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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 5, 2016 2:00am-2:55am EDT

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where is heine headed next? theeadly storm gains strength. leaving a path of destruction along the coast. also tonight, voters weigh in on hillary clinton's honestier use. and whether donald trump's minority outreach is minds? cold case solved in central, minnesota. what led police to the remains of a buy whooy missing for deca. >> a powerful earthe felt in seven states, rattles t oil and gas industry. >> and, pope francis celebrates mother teresa to sainthood. >> mother theresa, called the saint of the gutters. before becoming pope, fncis refeed t athbish of
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welcome t the "cbs overnight news," i'm elaine quijano. hermine gaining strength and threatening ecome hurricane. the slow-moving system already killed at least two people including a homeless man hit by a falling tree in florida and a truck driver blown off rd in north carolina. storm warnings and watches are posted along the atlantic coast from north carolina to our correspondent is on the eporter: after mowing through florida as a hurrice, tropical storm hermine chewed the coast of georgia and carolina saturday bringg heavy rains and punishing wind. rough seas rocked this royal caribbean cruise ship en route from new jery to bermuda. now, hermine may crash a 5-foot wall of water into the mid-atlantic. menacing picturesque cline from maryland to massachusetts much newly rebuilt after
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voss, the mayor of seaside heights new jersey. >> how bad was the dam an when sandy came through? >> devastating. devastating. all built over the last four years. the icon, the memories, the rolloaster in the ocean. devastatg. >> reporter: sandy devastated thousa ofcounty. residents aren't taking chances th rme. emergency coordinator, bill >> whole sta o sure the water is on the other side of the boardwalk. when thed shifts. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie put hermine in context. >> i want to make this clear. this is certainly not sandy, nowhere near that. >> reporter: he warned against complacency. >> the biggest thing, people not to be lulleby the nice weather that nothing is going to happen. >> reporter: the storm was washing out holiday weekend plans. >> we didn't thing it would be this bad with the waves being this, you know, tall.
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i could understand their concern. >> instead of one last weekend of summer fun. beaches for hundreds of miles along the atlantic coast are closed and swimming is forbidden. farther south, storm clean-up continued as officials tried to restore power to thousands of homes from florida to rg. so f mid-atlantic impac is economic. >> i see empty tables the owner of seaside's thorry on the boardwalk in seaside heights, new jersey. >> today we were expecting a lot more people. scare, a lot of people turned out, they had a lot of cancellations what i ar. the motel people. >> reporter: as hermine continues to churn up the coast, officials are war residents to secure loose items so they don't become projectile. elaine, in seaside heights, many homewe elevated after sandy. for those that weren't, the fire department handed out 500 sandbags. >> thanks. meteorologist pamela gardner tracking hermine at wbz in
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to turn up rough seas and strong winds. max wind 70 miles an hour, moving east/northeast, 6 mil an hour. soon to take a turn toward the mid-atlantic states. ere we have warnings and watches in place, also across southeastern new england. the storm will continue to push slowly north, northwest, and linger to our south and west here. tuesy morning, 75 mile per hour winds, that's equal to hurricane strength, tuesday into thursday. st but, prior to this, we could pick up some beneficial rain in southeastern masshusetts. one to two inches of rainfall, with the heaviest rains staying offshore. and those max wind gusts, 50 miles per hour from time to time right during labor day. we are also dealing with some intense wind gustsf 35 to 60 miles an hour along the coast. primarily through tuesday morning. with major emotion likely across the beaches. elaine. >> pamela gardner, pamela,
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a saint by pope francis in a ceremony that drew an estimated 120,000 people to the vatican. our seth doan was there. ? >> reporter: the faithful packed st. peter's square beneath a portrait of now saint teres s a of calcutta. >> i think we will have difficulty calling her saint teresa. because of her tenderness, we wi c teresa. >> i think people recognized her as a living saint. when she was alive. they knew it. >> reporter: rick farrell and mary balo camemro anchorage, alaska. to help the poor. >> reporter: pope ancis praised that dedication as nuns from her order listened on. the pope noted mother ter redefended human life, the unborn and the abandoned.
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referred to as the bishop of the slums. both put the poor at the center of their ministry. and today, pope francis called poverty a crime. in rome, indian flags were flown with pride. while in calcutta formerly where mother teresa focused missionary work half a century oers watched the canonization on a large telesieen. erin and paul traveled to rome from da. mother teresa's appeal is universal. >> great humanitari great compassion for the, the, the less fortunate. so, she means something to many people. regardless of faith. >> reporter: the albanian born nobel peace prize winner who dedicated her life to those in the shadows, was honored today in the bright nlight less than two decades after her death. seth doan, cbs news, ro.
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of dabney montgomery, a tuskegee airman in world wari and civil rights activist in selma, alabama. he served as a bodyguard f dr. martin lr king jr. in 2007, montgomery was issued a congressional medal of honor remained active in his final wes talking to schoolkid about his experience. he was 93 years old. coming up weekend's powerful earthquake in oklahoma shakes up the oil and
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my name's hillary. i was born on september 11, 2001. i know a lot of people who go to my school and lost their parents or other family members in 9/11. i would hope people can realize how much the world h grown. doing something good makes me realize i have the power to change things.
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the u.s. its not rushing into a deal with russia to try to end syria's long and brutal civil war. o officials spent the weekend trying to reach an agreement. margaret brennan is traveling with president obama at the g-20 summit in china. >> reporter: u.s. officials thought they would be announcing russia to kwopd coordinate air s in syria. but there was a hitch. >> there still remains a couple of tough issues. >> reporter: russia pulled back from their initial agreement from the u.s. it would have ended the syrian regime air attacks on civilians and enabled aid to flow into besieged starving cities like aleppo. any alliance with russia would be extraordinary given their
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trying to overthrow him. mr. obama admitted america now needs russia if it has any chance of ending the war that killed 400,000 people and created 5 million refugees. >> if we do not get some buy-in from the russians on reducing the violence and easing the humanitarian crisis then it is difficult to see how we get to the next phase. >> reporter: russian president vladamir putin and president obama may try to revivehe the trip got off to awkward starred yet when just after landing a chinese official yelled at national security adviser susan rice. and tried to block her from joining the president's motorcade. prompting the secret service to intervene. president obama downplayed that incident saying he understands how much strain countries are under when they have to host the u.s. president given his sizable security entourage. elaine. >> margaret brennan, thank you.
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beginning of the homestretch for the presidential campaigns with nine weeks until the election and new cbs news battleground tracker poll shows hillary clinton leading donald trump by 8 points in pennsylvania. in north carolina, our poll shows clinton four points ahead. for more on this bring in errol barnett and cbs news election director, anthony salvanto in washington. >> your numbers show clinton in a winning position. but weaknesses >> she has the the lead nationally. she has the leaden enough states. battleground states if the election were held today sunny would be in a commanding position. but, for a front-runner she has remarkably high unfavorable numbers, and she also has issues with the trust question. what is part of that its skepticism over answers to the e-mail server question. where many more people say that her answers are becoming less believable. and this is why her vice
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is doing damage control on that front. let's listen to him on abc. >> slow did make a mistake. she made it by deciding she wanted to use one device rather than multiple devices. apologiz. said it was a mistake and learned for tip. >> for republicans what are people saying about donald trump perceived immigration policy shifts. >> mr. people think he has been steady than think h has switch. become easier on people who are in the count illegally. but this he is trying to apapeal to broader base of voters who don't like his current policies but also trying to keep his base happy. >> his number two, governor mike pence, defending the policy. let's listen to what he said sunday. >> we are going to build a wall. we are going to enforce the laws. going to end catch and release. do all the things that politicians in both political party have been talking about more than a generation. >> we should explain all of this
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overall minority outreach. any proof that is working? >> he is not polling well. we might not expect polls to move overnight or over the course of a week. >> let's listen to donald trump speaking at a black church in detroit. >> i am here today to listen to your message. i hope my presence will also help your voice to reach new audiences in our country. >> i notice he said new audiences there. might those be moderate you have got some moderate republicans who heretofore said they dent non't necessarily lik rhetoric out of his campaign. watching him try to reach out to a broader base could bring some of them back into the fold. >> it is all fascinating stuff. cbs elections director, anthony salvanto. thank you for your time. elaine. >> errol barnett. thank you. a break this weekend in a cold case shocked the nation.
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disappeared on a rural road near his home in central minnesota. jamie yuckas is there. >> my favorite food is steak. favorite color is blue. >> jack on wetterling's face etched in the mind of parents since october 22nd, 1989 when he his brother and a friend biked to a convenience store to rent a movie. 11-year-old jacob would never come home. for more than 26 years, jacob's mother, patty forward. >> we will hope and pray one day we will have the answer to the one question we have asked forever. where is jacob? >> saturday, stearns county sheriffs deputies confirmed jacob's remains were located after long time suspect, danny heinrich led the fbi to a farm in central minnesota not far from the abduction site. sources say he gave the location as part of an ongoing plea deal. according to court documents.
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connection to the case in 1990 but never charged. neighbors say they always knew he was a suspect. >> everyone just got to talking. everyone heard about it. he is a suspect back in '89. they booked him. took his mug shot. took hair samples. >> reporter: the case changes the lives of parents and children in minnesot >> went everywhere. had to be homego for dinner and bedtime. you could room anywhere. >> life changed after that very much. publicly. patty wetterling did tweet out. our famisrawing strength from a your love and support. we are struggling with words at this time. thank you for your hope. #jacob'shope. >> the ce had implications in 1994, congress pass aid law after jacob wetterling that required states to set up sex offender ridge trees. elaine. thank you. e "c overnig news"ill be right back. to begin visibly
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only mucinex has a unique bi-layer tablet. mucinex is absorbed 60 percent while the blue extended release layer lasts a full 12 hours. relieve chest congestion with mucinex, and enjoy living well. a powerfurthqua rattled central oklahoma saturday. the 5.6 quake centered near the city ofpawnee tied a state record felt in seven states. and renewed crns about the disposal of was water from oil angas productionhichas en linked to the recent outbreaks of quakes i oklahoma res mireya villarreal.
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from historical buildings in pawnee, oklahomaover the sidewalks. the small city the lat epicenter of concern over oklahoma's oil and gas industry. >> it was bad. whole thing was going like th. it was bad. >> reporter:n 2015, oklahoma averaged 2.5 earthquakes a day with magnitude of 3. or?j highe. a total of 907 last year compared to 2 in 2008. oklahomagica connected increase in ques to dispoe sau disposal ofastero hydraulic fracturing or fracking. it prompted the state to shut down wasteat hls in state history. 37 scheduled to be closed. if stopped all the activity tomorrow. not li the earthquakes would stop morrow. >>he seismologist of u.s. geologic survey says induc
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ul chae if ates where fracking is bming don't ta no. >> i there a chance things could get worse? >> we expect the regulatory steps areoi to help overall. the rates are going to go down.% and the hazard will go down. don't have an exact crystal ball. so there is the potential certainly r more earthquakes. there is potential for bigger earthquakes than what we have seen. >> the 37 waste water wells fraction of the 4,200 currently permitteby the ste. elaine, oklahoma governor derg th affected area.arre still ahead, the story of af
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in new jersey, a little girl battling cancer is starting third grade this week. she couldn't go to school last year. marly hall tells us how she recently discovered the healing wer of horses. had this much fun in >> awesome. so much fun. >> reporter: the 8-year-old has a rare form of leukemia. last year h has been a blur of doctors, hospitals, a chemotherapy. >> this week i felt good. i wasn't really nauseous. and i wasn't in any pain, really. >> kaya and 19 other young patients took part in pony power therapy in new jersey's
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horses. hackensack university medical center sponsors the four day program. >> lots of joy on the farm.is e. getting dirty. >> reporter: despite their size and strength. horses tend to be very calm. studies have shown children who spend time with them experience lower levels of pediatrician, steven percy says it develops muscle and coordination. >> children, issues with walking to get them on the animals and moving limbs in a different way really helped them. >> reporter: kaya regained something her parents long to get back. >> this has brought so much happiness to her. she looked forward to this so long. it's just really nice to know that these opportunities are there for them. to make them feel special. >> marley hall, cbs news, new
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finally tonight. when florida state opens its college football season tomorrow night against ole miss. a boy from tallahassee will be watching and rooting for his lunch buddy. mark strassmann has the story. >> reporter: monford cafeteria served up something special. football players were visiting. travis rudolph, the team's star wide receiver, noticed one 6th grader in particular. >> i saw him by himself. i was like, yo can i have a seat and eat with you. he was like, sure why not. we started off having a good conversation. >> that kid was 11-year-old, bo passkey. you looked up, there he was. what did he say? >> he said, what's up, dude.
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travis having lunch. everyone else in the picture is sitting far away. you see, bo has autism and often eats lunch by himself. >> on the days he is sitting alone. those are the days it bothers me more than it bothers him. >> leah passkey is bo's mother. she posted to facebook saying this is one day i didn't have to worry if my sweet boy ate lunch alone because he sat across from some one who is a hero in many eyes. her post went viral. emotion at his generosity and his kindness. i don't know what made him pick bo. but i am so grateful he did. >> rudolph. >> travis rudolph could score a million touchdowns this season, and never come close to making one family so happy. >> i haven't gone through bullying. but i have seen it. i don't like it. i don't approve of bullying. i feel like it is wrong. honestly, a cool person. i will hang out with him any
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lunch wednesday. every kid wanted to sit with him. >> i am a superstar. everybody recognizes me. >> mark strassmann, cbs news, tallahassee. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. standing-room-only in st. peter's square where pope poen elevated mother teresa to sainthood. saint poor on the streets of calcutta, indiana. 120,000 faithful filled the square in the front row where sisters of saint teresa's order missionaries of charity. beside them, 1,500 homeless people and 13 head of state and government. and at least one royal. queen sophia of spain. cbs's seth doane reports. >> reporter: the faithful packed
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of calcutta. pope francis acknowledged maybe we will have difficulty calling her saint teresa. because of her tenderness, he added we will continue to call her motr teresa. >> i think people recognized her as a living saint. when she was alive. they knew. >> rick farrell and mary basaloni came from anchorage, alaska all. she gave of herself and her life to helphe praised the dedication as nuns from her order listened on. the pope noted, mother teresa defended human life, unborn and abandoned. mother teresa was called the saint of the gutters and before becoming pope, francis was referred to as the bishop of the slums. both put the poor at the center of their ministry. today, pope francis called poverty a crime. in rome, indian flags were flown with pride.
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as calcutta where mother teresa focused missionary work for half a century. others watched canonization on a large television screen. the two traveled from rome from dallas they're not catholic but said mother teresa's appeal is universal. >> great humanitarian. great compassion for the less fortunate. so, she means something to many people. regardless of faith. >> reporter: the albanian-born, dedicated her life to those in the shadows, was honored today in the bright sun light. less than two decades after her death. seth doane, cbs news, rome. the zika virus continues to spread around the word. latest hot spot, singapore. health officials there confirm 27 new cases of locally transmitted zika. in all, doctors have confirmed nearly 250 cases nationwide. here in the u.s., the storm
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to fight the virus in florida. the heavy rain kept mosquito fighters indoors nearly a week. and the high wind could spread insects around the state. for the first time in the u.s. researchers have trapped mosquitoes carrying the virus. all were found inside the miami beach zika zone. michelle miller has more. >> reporter: the discovery of zika inside mosquitoes confirms insects are spreading the virus here in the united states. and as hurricane hermine hit been infected by local transmission, the state's governor is bracing for the impact. >> we have got to get rid of standing water. most important now. >> reporter: in the leadup to hurricane hermine, officials have been removing smallest traces of water to stop the spread of zika. >> i think all expected there would be mosquitoes. >> reporter: after inspecting 2500 samples, florida officials identified the virus in three
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a first in the continental united states. >> if there are traps, we know when, we know where, we can identify where this transmission is occurring. >> one positive trap at the miami beach botanical garden, temporarily closed while crews remove the featured plants. the flowers collect waters where mosquitoes can breed. while hurricane hermine could drop more than a foot of rain in parts of the state. mosquito is a double edged sword. >> good news about hurricanes. they can wash away, mosquito population. the downside is that the hurricane will interrupt any ongoing efforts at control. and then as the the floodwaters recede, we could see the reappearance of mosquitoes. >> another problem, florida is facing is fighting zika is the cost. director of the cdc said this
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the house will consider a 1.1 billion zika bill when it returns from vacation next week. >> u.s. airlines are gearing up for what they expect to be a bonanza after the obama administration loosened travel restrictions to cuba. on wednesday, jetblue sent the first commercial flight into cuba in more than half a century. but by december, there will be nearly aozen airlines flying about 300 dect flights a week. kris van cleave on the first >> reporter: an unlikely spot for the first flight. 250,000 call cuba's fifth largest city home. no more as a crossroads, it is burial site of a cuban revolutionary and not much else. soon, ten flights a day from the u.s. will land here. as many as 110 daily at airports across the island. that could be a tall order. in santa clara. many taxis are drawn by horses
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hotel rooms. walking out of the airport wednesday, this woman was on the first flight. isoment she ter her aunt she m one time .
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finally tonight. en florida state opens its college football season tomorrow night against ole miss. a boy from tallahassee will be watching and rooting for h lunch buddy. rk sassmann has the story. >> reporter: monford cafeteria served up something special. a handful of florida state football players were viting and walked in for lunch. one of tm, travis rudol, am'sthe tetar wide receiver, noticed one 6th grader in paicular. >> i saw him by msel i was ke, yo can i have a at and eat with you. he was like, sure why not. we started off having a good >> that kid was 11-year-old, bo passkey. you looked up, there he was. what did he say?
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you see, bo has autism and often eats lunch by hielf. >> on the days he is sitting alone. those the days it boers me more than it bothers him. >> leah passkey is bo's mother. she postedo facebook saying this is one day i didn't have to worry if my sweet boy ate lunch alone because he sat across from some one who is a hero in many her post went viral. >> i'm any just -- moved with emotion at his geny and his kindness. i don't know what made him pick bo. but i am so grateful he did. >> rudolph. >> travis rudolph could score a million touchdowns this season, and never come close to making one family so happy. >> i haven't gone through
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i feel like it is wrong. honestly, a cool person. i will hang out with him any >> bo. >> right here. >> reporter: when bo walked into lunch wednesday. every kid wanted to sit with r some of you ws h s, news ands isorning from the broadcast center in new
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welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. standing-room-only in st. heter's conveyor, when pope inered for her poorthets calcuttest of the square in the t row ere sisters of saiera's order ionar. be govele and 1f e and and lst one royal.qun sophain. cbs's seth doa reports. ?
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st. peter's s beneath a giant portrait of sainteresa of calcu poperancis acknowledged maybe we will have diffiy callheer te. >> i think people recognizeder as a living saint. when she was alive. they kne >> rick ell bae fr ancho?rage,
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