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tv   News4 Today  NBC  August 30, 2015 6:00am-8:01am EDT

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volkswagen reward card on select 2015 jetta models. or lease a 2015 jetta s for $139 a month after a $1000 volkswagen bonus. now at 6:00 a.m., d.c. police program all hands on deck comes to an end as does a violent weekend in the district. angie, we're keeping a close eye on the d.c. police union as they tally up a vote surrounding chief cathy lanier. what we could learn in a matter of hours. summer break winds down. we are getting you ready as a huge chunk of students get ready to head back to school tomorrow. >> "news4 today" starts now. on this sunday morning, good morning. welcome to "news4 today." i'm david culver. >> i'm angie goff. it's sunday fun day. >> it is, yeah. starting off nice out there. >> yeah. >> we have had a few days of no
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humidity. relatively low at that. but that could change. >> yeah, we have enjoyed it a lot. but amelia segal is in. amelia, you sere saying we -- you're saying we could see more clouds today. >> you got it. and more humidity as well. you'll be noticing the mugginess. temperatures right now though nice for that early morning run or bicycle ride. most locations coming in at the 60s. gaithersburg at 66. manassas at 64 as the sun comes up. we're looking at mainly clear skies right now. here's how temperatures will warm up into the early afternoon hours. by 10:00 a.m., we're flirting with the noon mark. and we're near 90 degrees. so today, just a little bit warmer than yesterday. but more muggy than yesterday. at the bus stop tomorrow morning as many students have their first day of school, 7:00 a.m., a mild 70 degrees. plenty of clouds, by 9:00 a.m., humid 76.
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coming up in ten minutes i'm going to have what students can expect as they're coming home from school and when you could be dealing with a few thunderstorms tomorrow. >> all right, amelia. in the day ahead, the police union is going to announce the results of a vote on chief cathy lanier. this weekend the union surveyed its officers for a possible no confidence vote on lanier. the homicide rate is 43% higher this year than with last. the chief and the union have been at odds just over how to solve the problem. today when the vote comes out, we'll send you a push notification. you can get that as long as you have the nbc washington app. d.c. police is all hands on deck initiative just ended as we came on the air this morning. that program flooded every part of the district with extra police to serve as a visual crime deterrent. the program also gives officers a chance to interact with community members. despite the extra officers there were more than half a dozen shootings and two men died.
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with the rise in homicides in the district, the police department is now facing a lot of pressure to close cases. news4's darcy spencer takes a closer look at the families impacted. >> i still hurt. i still hurt. >> reporter: in the shaw neighborhood of northwest washington stands a memorial to one of d.c.'s unsolved murder victims. tamara gliss was killed when she was hit by stray gun fire not far from the convention center on memorial day. her mom is angry, no arrests have been made. three months after her death. >> not only are we feeling bad, you know, she has a son. she has brothers. it just hurts. >> reporter: there have been more than 100 lives lost on the streets of the nation's capital this year. a double digit increase over last year. gliss is just one of the grieving mothers who can't rest knowing a killer is on the loose. >> american university student
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got shot. then we see all of the police presence in everything. but just like i said, my daughter's case is still unsolved and you hear less about it. >> reporter: at the place where gliss lost her life, right across from the kennedy rec center, the recent violence prompted police to set up a temporary post. her mom says police have a person of interest in her daughter's murder, but that's not enough. >> if they don't have that person -- that one person can say that this person did it, it doesn't mean anything. it's just another unsolved murder. >> darcy spencer reporting there. 6:04, developing this morning, safety at the ballpark. again in focus after a man died at turner field in atlanta. they say the man fell from the upper stands into the area where players' families sit last night. >> to my left, he just came down like a thud.
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on to the concrete steps. >> the workers came and they were mopping up and all that stuff. but i asked the concession people -- they asked what was going on, they didn't give us no details. >> boy, that is horrible. well, the man we know a little bit more was in his 60s. he fell 40 feet. they do not know and they do not believe we should add there's any foul play there. metro is now part of a major lawsuit. the transit agency is suing over the silver spring transit center. according to the washington county, they're suing the people who designed and built the center. it put it millions of dollars over budget and five years behind schedule. the post says it's worth $166 million. the center opens on september 20th, less than a month away. a teenager should be okay after he wedged his foot in the escalator at the wheaton metro
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station. this is a picture of the sneaker. rescue crews were able to pull the boy out safely yesterday and took him to the hospital. it's the last day of summer vacation for lots of students in our area. back to school tomorrow morning for a number of school districts in the dmv. in maryland, charles and harford counties they'll welcome in the students. you will see buses in loudoun and prince william counties and a number of charter schools begin tomorrow. well, before the first day, kids can get a nice hair cut for free. this in fairfax county. it's the third year of back to school free hair cut program. it begins at 8:30 this morning at the deparis salon. they have to be between 5 and 18 to qualify. if you have tickets to the redskins first game this year there's a chance you will see
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cousins calling play, not rg3. the quarterback suffered a possible concussion last week and he was originally cleared to play last night and then he wasn't. and then cousins went on to lead the team to a win. now the doctors are saying that rg3 might not be able to start the team's first game. >> we're all as confused as you are. people have to understand this has nothing to do with the redskins. i know people want to make it out we're incompetent. it was by the doctor, we follow everything by the book. >> that was redskins coach gruden. the first game is at september 18th, exactly two weeks from today. and before the game yesterday, you could see rg3 warming up about an hour before hand trying to warm up the arm. meanwhile, kirk cousins having a strong showing. looking sharp in his preseason appearan
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appearances. well, a terrifying moment for one surfer after a shark chomped into her board. how she says she managed to get away unharmed. let's take you live outside right now this morning. might not be able to see it. but you migh
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you're watching "news4 today." >> thousands of fish are washing up dead near olympic park in rio de janeiro. the summer olympics will be there next year and a brazilian environmentalist said raw sewage is killing the fish. a study on the water quality found dangerously high levels of viruses and bacteria in the
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water there. los angeles could become the official u.s. choice for the 2024 olympics this week. the l.a. city council has to approve the plan at the meeting on tuesday. well, we told you boston was the u.s. olympic committees pick for the games but the city could not generate enough support. d.c. and san francisco were also on the short list for the games. the committee chose l.a. because it agreed to cover millions in cost overruns, plus it's hosted the games once before. this morning there's a 14 inch wide chunk missing from a woman's surfboard. officials in california closed this beach after a shark bit the board and talked the 54-year-old surfer yesterday. she is okay. she pushed the board towards the shark. look at that chunk right there and she was able to jump off it and started to swim away. experts are going to spend the day looking at that board, analyzing the bite, looking at the marks and trying to determine the size of that shark. i think just by looking at the board we can -- without an
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expert analysis say it was a big bite. >> maybe they all migrated somewhere else, but evidence, still some danger. >> it was a perfect -- >> massive. >> big. >> what a close call. so we're getting ready to enter september. can you believe it? >> i cannot. a couple days away from it. >> we're dealing with summer like temperatures. they're going up, right, amelia? >> you got it, angie. temperatures in the mid 90s as we work our way to the middle part of the week. nice at the bus stop tomorrow morning. there will be plenty of clouds but it will be mild. hot and humid the entire week. there's some storm chances but no widespread soaking rains in the forecast. so you might need to water your garden this week if you haven't started doing so already. currently we're at 69 degrees as the sun comes up. we're looking at mainly clear skies. dew point temperature keeping a
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close eye on this today. when it's above 65, we say it's humid. we're very close to that. definitely noticing the mugginess more so today than yesterday. today through tuesday, it's starting to feel sticky outside. wednesday and thursday, feeling oppressive when you factor in the humidity. the humidity is still here. still feeling a little bit sticky. so we don't have any pleasant fall-like weather in the near term forecast. highs today around 90. 90 in washington. 87 in winchester, back around the mountains and evening. there could be some scattered showers east of i eo95. most of us a dry sunday. more cloudiness today than yesterday. throughout the day tomorrow, we're looking at mostly to partly cloudy skies. 8:00 a.m., a mild 75. a chance of a shower or a thunderstorm throughout the day tomorrow. one of the days you might want to keep the small umbrella handy. most likely you won't need to use it. 4:00, humid 90 degrees.
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8:00, balmy 84. here's future weather showing you that chance at 6:00 a.m. even a few sprinkles around. the clouds start to thing out, looking at a mix of clouds and sun across the area. notice at 3:00 some showers. the trend tomorrow is really going to be north of washington. 6:00, most of us are dry and noticing plenty of sunshine from your way home from work. 9:00 p.m., looking at mainly clear skies across the area so the school day forecast for tomorrow, mild at the bus stop. recess, most of us will be dry. dismissal is humid. 93 on tuesday with mostly sunny skies. there's the chance of some late-day thunderstorms on wednesday. especially west of washington. 94 for a high on wednesday. 92 on thursday. again, the chance of some showers and thunderstorms. 89 on friday.
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next saturday, still humid but cooler. >> thanks so much. that week does not look comfortable. >> no, getting warm. >> we have "reporter's notebook" up for you. >> we'll be back in 15 minutes. >> welcome to "reporter's notebook," i'm joe madison. let's get right to it. this has been a difficult week for reporters and with the killing of two reporters here in the state of virginia. so i'm talking to two journalists. your first reaction when you heard about this story. >> well, of course, it's scary. and in that kind of situation, especially the situation where those two -- the photographer and the reporter were in. oftentimes you're doing interviews and in this case it was television reporters and a camera person focused on the interview. you can't see what's going on around you. number one, to protect yourself. but also, in this particular case, joe, even though as a news person, you know, we have a certain affinity for this situation that the reporter and
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photographer were in, this was really a workplace issue. >> let me ask you, bremante, where you are, have you ever seen anything similar to that? people lose their tempers all the time. it's a high pressure business. >> oh, sure, i have worked in a lot of newsroom and you have issues with editors and reporters and photographers that go back and forth. what's stunning in this case is that this person had sort of filed a complaint, had been fired. you see the laundry list of complaints that the alleged shooter had. and so the station knew about it. they told the employee at the station, if you saw this person back in the area, back around the station, to make sure you call the police. every workplace you have someone that you don't necessarily get along with. i think here in this particular case because there is a paper trail on his activities and his actions at the television
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station which causes concern and i'm not sure how much they really could have done especially since this happened outside of the station. >> and two years ago. his concern two years ago. michael pope of wamu f.m., the governor of virginia didn't waste time making an issue out of this as it relates to gun control. >> a lot of people actually right after this happened started talking about this issue of gun control and the governor went on the radio and, you know, talked about background checks. the interesting -- this is a very familiar discussion. across the united states, but especially in virginia. if you think back to earlier this year, back in january, the governor issued his state of the commonwealth address. as a centerpiece of that he wanted to accomplish in this general assembly session was gun control. he had a list that he spent a significant amount of time on that speech talking about this issue of background checks for gun shows, like the one handgun a month limit not allowing
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people who have protective orders against them to buy guns. not allowing deadbeat parents to get guns. none of that passed. gun control advocates in the general assembly were able to stop all of those reforms. >> well, do you think that maybe this incident might now create a different political climate? >> history tells us no. i mean, the president's spokesperson said this is another case of violence in the united states due to guns. and we know where the president stands on this and we know that the president has not been able to build enough coalition to get legislation passed. i said this before, i'll say it again. after sandy hook, if he could not get gun control legislation pushed through i don't know how he could do it. >> that was a salient point. you would imagine that sandy hook, that did not happen. this shooting that happened here
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in virginia, the shooter passed the background check, right? so all the reforms that the governor is talking about would not have had much effect on this particular incident. that doesn't mean you shouldn't try to attempt gun control. >> before i move on to the old dominion issue which is a whole different ball game, should this be declared a hate crime, michael? >> i'm with bremante. this is a workplace violence issue. despite the fact that it did not happen in the office, these people were working when they were assaulted by a former colleague, you know, who was embittered about what had happened in the workplace. if i were going to classify this, i would think workplace violence. >> i would agree. we know that the young man had some issues, allegedly he had
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some issues with the photographer when the alleged shooter was walked out of the station, the photographer was almost videotaping him being walked out of the station when he was dismissed. so there's a personal problem issue to that. so i definitely think it's more of a workplace issue. obviously, the young man had some mental issues too. >> what's going on with fraternities at old dominion university in norfolk, virginia? you would think after the incident with the united states of virginia that fraternities particularly would know better. let's explain to people. the signs, like leave your mother here. >> or we'll take -- >> yeah, drop your mother off here. did they respond the way do you think they should have? >> the fraternity was suspended. the national chapter of the fraternity suspended the local chapter. this is old behavior. if you think of the stuff going on for college campuses for
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many, many years. signs like this are nothing new. i'll tell you what is new is the social media culture that we live in now. you know, what happened with the signs is they were posted on facebook. they made the rounds and people reacted to them and so the fraternity was sort of forced to take action. the university was forced to take action. and so that is sort of a changing point here. >> i don't remember that when i was in college. i mean, that type of open misogynistic mentality. >> yeah. i think fraternities sort of have that reputation, but in this day and age that's really ridiculous. i have a young daughter, if my daughter was going to college and those signs were hanging over a fraternity, i think they were -- they were so overt that i think the university couldn't do anything but what they did. in this particular climate, not even in this particular climate, there's a right or wrong and i think the fraternity was wrong
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no matter what the political climate is right now. >> what should the suspension entail? >> well, that's hard to say. you know, you could suspend activities on the campus for a year, but if they did not do anything that was direct to any of the young ladies and it was just a sign, you know, it's hard to say if you should suspend the fraternity for a year. maybe what might need to happen is their national office has to do something and let them handle it. >> would you agree? i think that's the issue, where are the adults in the fraternity, michael. less than a minute. >> it's a thorny issue, because we're at a time right now in history where there's this growing concern about sexual violence on college campuses. and that's sort of the atmosphere that these signs -- you have to put them in context. it's the atmosphere that the signs are in. so, you know, it's really important to send a message that this behavior is unacceptable.
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>> all right. so we're going to continue with more here on "reporter's notebook." muriel bowser has talked about how she's going to deal with this crime spree. so we'll continue with more right here, "reporter's notebook."
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all right. let's get right to this, the mayor of washington, d.c., under a lot of pressure to do something about the crime spree that's taking place in washington, d.c. so she held a news conference. had a little opposition from black lives matter. so let's talk about this outline. who wants to start? michael? well, michael, what do you think? >> so the mayor's effort here is really going to fall under some harsh criticism. >> why? >> because it targets people o who, you know, are in the parole system, the probation system. and it has some actions on them
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that are going to be questioned by a lot of people. for example, if you're in the parole program or probation program, you could be detained for 72 hours, that you can be searched without a warrant. these are things that are going to concern the liberal members of the council. some of the people in the black lives movement. so i think we'll see kind of a fight in terms of whether or not these are efforts that people really are going to agree with. >> do you think her response is appropriate? do you think that the laws -- the suggestions are draconian? >> well, i think her response she feels is necessary. now, here's the interesting part. i think the aclu will get into this. if you're on probation or parole, who's to say that police don't stop and check on you
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because they're suspicious of you. what i find interesting here, phil mendelson is behind this. he supports muriel bowser. she's trying to get more police out on the street. you mentioned black lives matter. she had some pushback even at her press conference from black lives matter. they were saying, great. we don't need more police on the street. we need more jobs. so they're pushing economics saying thiss saying this is an economic issue, not just those who committed crimes prior to who you're looking at. they're trying to zero in on folks that half of the homicides are happening from folks who have either been on parole or have been charged with -- >> that's why they're being targeted. >> correct. >> but let me jump to a story that i think all three of us found very interesting. southeast ward 8. this involved the united medical center southern avenue, we saw the channel 4 broadcast of people dodging cars. i was amazed that this was the
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only hospital in the city that didn't have a crosswalk so that people could get back and forth across a major thoroughfare. >> i think what the video did and what the unfortunate story of two people being killed trying to cross that street does too, it sort of isolates and maybe supports those in ward 8 who say, listen, we're not getting is the services or the protection or the attention that the other wards are getting. i know that muriel bowser one of her big issues when she was running for mayor was, listen, i'm going to have a representative in ward 8. i'm going to know about the issues going on there. channel 4 had to press her about getting a light there. it will happen. still, how quickly can it happen? it doesn't sound any time immediate. >> you know what i like about this story is what we saw on channel 4, the legendary pat collins doing performance art as
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journalism. showing this was a problem, putting a spotlight on it and then making the mayor do something about it. >> we have a couple of minutes left and we've got a problem that needs to be dealt with in prince george's county. here you have the prince george's county public school ceo, kevin maxwell, saying, i don't have enough money. i want to do something about pre-k, especially in poverty stricken areas. we can't do anything. what's the politics of this? >> well, the first day -- first week of school, kevin maxwell is letting the folks know if we have some issues or complaint here, it's not really about what we're trying to do. myself and the chief executive, executive county executive rushern baker, we put a proposal to put $133 million to go towards the school district and the county council gave us only $33 million. it goes towards teacher pension. so he's basically saying we want to do things but we can't. i'm not sure if that -- he need
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today take that tack that early. you know, you would think that he might -- would wait to see if there were complaints before he started that. but he might be trying to get out ahead of that. that wasn't his only conversation. he was talking about the good things going on with the school district, two new international schools. it was interesting that came into the conversation. >> i have less than a minute, michael. so what do you think the politics are? >> well, the politics are you get what you pay for, right? so baker and kevin maxwell had a very detailed plan on what they wanted to do. they weren't able to sell it to the council members. you know, the argument they could have made and they probably -- tried to make is that, you know, we are talking about a school system that needs help. >> well, let me help you. i think we got to all three areas, virginia, washington, d.c. and maryland. thank you for joining us on "reporter's notebook."
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"news4 today" starts now. >> hello, everybody. good morning. welcome to "news4 today." i'm angie goff. >> i'm david culver. the last weekend of august. feels like summer is going to continue that way. amelia segal is tracking out how this day is looking for you. what do you think? >> well, david, we'll be muggy pretty much this entire week evin on into next week. i can't believe we're starting september on tuesday. today going to be noticeably more humid than yesterday. a bit more cloud cover as well. temperatures across the area right now generally in the mid to upper 60s. 69 degrees in washington. 66 at college park. and annapolis at 70 degrees right now. for the most part, we're looking at a nice morning. walking the dog this morning. just taking a nice walk outside. 8:00 a.m., temperature around 82. and by noon, we're at a mild 85.
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for most of us, dry. but the there's the chance of some late day thunderstorms. become around the i-81 corridor. probably the best time to exercise is right now. great pool day. if you're headed to the nationals game, seats in the sun it will be hot. angie, i'll let you know exactly what you can expect if you're headed to the nats game later today. a look ahead to the first day of school forecast or the many kids. >> thank you. a memorial service today for the american university graduate who was killed on a metro train. d.c. police say jasper spires killed kevin sutherland on the train at the noma station last month. sutherland graduated two years ago. he worked at a new blue interactive which is a democratic digital firm. a.u. students will gather today to remember him and that service begins at 3:00 p.m. a coward and cold blooded killer. that's what sheriff's deputies in texas are calling the man accused of murdering one of
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their own. the sheriff says just because he was in a uniform. 30-year-old shannon miles should have his first court appearance tomorrow. he faces capital murder charges. harris county deputies say he shot and killed darren goforth around 8:30 friday night at a gas station firing even after the deputy collapsed. >> we heard black lives matter, well, cops lives matter too. why don't we drop the qualifier and say all lives matter and take that too the bank. >> a memorial is growing at the scene outside of houston. a lot of people lighting candles, praying together at the vig till. he was married and leaves behind two children. there are questions about martin o'malley's purchase of furniture for the governor's mansion. he paid close to $10,000 for items that originally cost
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taxpayers $62,000. agency rules prohibit sales of state property to government officials. representatives for o'malley said he followed proper procedures. in the week ahead, president obama will visit alaska. he'll be there to talk about climate change. the president will land in anchorage tomorrow and wednesday he'll become the first sitting president to visit the arctic. when he travels to the far northwest part of the state. severe storms happening today in washington state. two people lost their lives near seattle when storms toppled several trees. and the tree limb also fell on a 10-year-old girl. the storm also cut power for more than 500,000 folks in that area. from now on, there's going to be more identity checks and baggage controls when it comes to going on trains throughout europe.
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transit officials from e.u. member states made that decision in an emergency meeting held yesterday. they called that meeting after an attack on a train that was headed for paris. you recall three americans helped to take down that suspect. the man was flagged but the suspect was able to still buy his ticket using cash. didn't have to show i.d. in decision 2016 vice president joe biden dodged questions about a possible presidential run during his surprise visit in delaware. he showed up at the sussex democratic jamboree yesterday. he choked up, thanking the crowd for their support following the death of his son beau biden. beau biden used to attend this event as the state's attorney general. it is pretty much quiet around the capitol, but do not be surprised if you see helicopters and emergency crews here tomorrow and on tuesday. u.s. park police, capitol police and officers with the district are all plans medical evacuation
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drills. there may be street closures between 6:30 and 8:30 in the morning and at the same time in the evening. all new this morning we're told a protest at a church is cancelled. teachers from jericho christian academy in landover had planned to protest at that church which operates a private school. now, the school is closed right now after a legal battle over who's in charge. students haven't been able to go to class. teachers say they're out of a job. those teachers plan to protest outside the church today. but they say the principal asked them to hold off for now. tomorrow begins a new school year in prince william county and a brand-new school will open up its doors. teachers at chris yung elementary will welcome the students for the first time ever tomorrow morning. many will start at the in school. it's named for office chris yung from the prince william county police. he died on duty nearly three years ago. >> he cared about people.
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he cared about children. he had a passion for helping others. and when you have that kind of passion for helping others and helping children, just helping people in general, that's what we are all about. >> the school will run a new program that focuses on science, technology and engineering, arts and math. it also is known as s.t.e.a.m. the principal says it's the school's way of teaching 21st century skills at the elementary level. a new school with a focus on language is up and running in prince george's county. the school gives english as a second language students an opportunity to learn at their own pace. tracee wilkins explains this new program that's really a first of its kind in our area. >> hi. how are you? >> reporter: this is where the principal can get to know the name of every student. this is one of 100 students here at the international high school at largo. they're here in hopes of vastly improving their english. >> i speak spanish at home and i
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grew up speaking spanish at home. >> reporter: even though she drew up in america. that made it tough in the school setting. >> rock, paper, scissors. >> reporter: this international school inside of largo high school, students will focus on group learning opportunity. >> we're trying to create a space and a place that's different and a place of belonging. >> reporter: it's a model that the county borrows. >> we're looking at the students from the perspective of skills and how -- what are their strengths and how to build on the strengths. >> reporter: the students speak up to 12 different languages and they have varied learning needs. today was just orientation, but many are already optimistic. >> because it's really important when i grow up i have a better future. >> tracee wilkins reporting there. 6:38. well, if it's sunday, you know what that means. >> yeah, it's "meet the press."
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chuck todd joining us next with a look at what some are calling the trump effect and explains why he has exceeded those expectations over a lot of people. the last day of summer for a
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you're watching "news4 today." >> donald trump surging in one of the latest iowa polls, creating some distance between himself and other republican presidential hopefuls. >> seems like we have been talking about this for a while now. trump becoming a serious contend for the white house, all the way getting into the heads of the other gop candidates. we have chuck todd with us, moderator of "meet the press." he's once again on the show talking about at least -- still talking about him. it hasn't gone away this trump effect. >> no, not only that, what you're seeing is the other candidates, whether they realize it or not, they're almost subliminally finding themselves reiterating the things that he
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say, clearly reacting to him. trying to channel, trying to get some of this energy. that said, i thought the most interesting part of the new polls, yes, trump is at the top, but it was the surging candidacy of ben carson. ben carson was a very close second. and in fact, it's sort of trump and carson and then a huge gap between those two and everyone else. and when you ask about first and second choice, they're tied. ben carson is the other big story of the summer. that has not gotten the same amount of attention. >> it's funny you say that because i got back from south carolina. a big state with a primary. that's what i heard over and over again. my grandfather who was a veteran, they were talking about trump and carson and pairing them up together. that's interesting. speaking of south carolina, we also heard yesterday from donald trump talking about how he plans to announce whether or not he'd run for the third party bid. which he'd have to do by september 30th.
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>> right. for the south carolina ballot, you know, they're -- about three or four different state files if you file as a republican you have to sign a pledge you'll stay in the party, not run as an independent. absolutely. when he was in south carolina, he was asked specifically about that pledge. he basically but all is hinting, yes, i'm going to sign that pledge when i have to. but he's clearly dragging it out. he's enjoying dragging this out. it's pretty clear he'll stick to the pledge. >> you mentioned trump and carson and they're pushing past governor scott walker. >> i had an interview with him yesterday. look, he himself is -- has admitted that yes, all of a sudden, trump has surpassed him and a lot of the other candidates. he takes comfort in this fact that he brought up. he said in august of 2007, people were wondering what was wrong with barack obama's
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campaign, it wasn't catching fire, and he's trying to ask for patience among his supporters that's for sure. >> we know you're revisiting hurricane katrina. >> some people may oscar from freak anomics and outliers and he had a provocative piece in the new yorker. he looked at studies that you could make the case the studies essentially say how katrina saved new orleans. nobody wants to talk about it that way. and a lot of people suffered, but new orleans may be -- is it better today than it was before katrina and there are a lot of metrics that say yes. there are some people who were pushed out of new orleans better off today than they were when they lived in new orleans. that's also a ton of evidence that points in that direction as well. >> wow. that's interesting. >> fascinating. >> just the media coverage alone, victims and people who have relocated who said it's sad to say, but it was a blessing in disguise. >> you don't want to say it. you don't like to admit it, but
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the numbers bear it out. malcolm glad well is a numbers guy. fascinating guy. >> you can catch that discussion and "meet the press" will be right here at 10:30. got a few hours to go. >> you've got it. the federal reserve says it could still raise interest rates at its next meeting which is coming up next month. fed vice chairman stanley fisher believes inflation will go above a 2% threshold that will justify the increase. thoughts of a race increase were put on hold, but it seems it could happen in a few weeks. a hiker who was stranded for nine days in the wilderness, now recovering at the hospital. the hiker is on a day trip in california when she was stranded from her group. she broke several bones and crawled to a creek, just to survive. rescuers say fires made everything more dangerous.
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>> what made this search and rescue extremely difficult from the very beginning was the rough fire that's burning south of this location. the smoky conditions made the search and rescue extremely difficult. >> rescuers say the woman used a filtered water bottle to drink creek water for day, then used a whistle so as to alert search teams where exactly she was. today the maryland department of agriculture is spraying for mosquitos in laurel. it will beg after sundown. you can empty the kiddie pools and changing out the pet water every day. earlier this month, a person in the baltimore area contracted west nile virus. >> we're talking mosquito. we were outside and i said how much i hate mosquitos. they bite me, but also if you don't want to use the chemical, the fan is effective at keeping them away and it dilutes the
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carbon dioxide that we exhale. like a regular house fan, plug them outside. window fan, anything like that. because the wind keeps them circulating. that's -- >> they have been horrible this year. >> i know. >> you know, since mosquitos like heat and humidity we'll have plenty around this week. summer hanging on strong. today, the weather had a low impact on your day. it will be hot and humid. we're looking at a mix of clouds and sun, but for most of us it's dry today. there's the chance of mountain thunderstorms this afternoon and this evening. i think the metro area east of 95 is dry. a slight chance of a thunderstorm, a bit of a better chance in martinsburg or winchester. only at 30%. 69 in washington. 61 in martinsburg as well as luray. as the sun comes up, mostly sunny skies. skycast 4, 9:00, you can see that cloud/sun mix.
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temperatures in the mid 70s across the area. as we get into the midday hour, temperatures in the mid to upper 80s. high temperatures around 90 degrees. 3:00 this afternoon, you're definitely noticing the heat and humidity. but it's nice this evening as the sun goes down. as long as the mosquitos aren't too bad. about 86 in washington and 85 in the suburbs. today at the nats game, it is going to feel very hot there at the ballpark if they're in the shade, not so bad. first pitch at 1:35 as the nationals taken to marlins. 88 degrees at that point. it's hot and humid, about 91 degrees there. lows tonight will only dip to around 70 degrees. widespread lows around 70. that's because we're looking at mostly cloudy skies. maybe an isolated shower or two. overnight tonight. 72 for a low in washington. 70 in manassas. that's a mild start tomorrow morning. more comfortable this morning. as we get into the afternoon
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hours, for tomorrow, on monday, highs tomorrow generally in the upper 80s. 89 in washington. 85 in annapolis. looks like tomorrow we'll start off with plenty of clouds, by recess warm. 82. i'll give recess an a-minus. by dismissal, 88 degrees. then on tuesday, hazy, hot and humid. high of 93. there's chance of a shower or thunderstorm tomorrow. keep the small umbrella handy. might not need to use it. some late day thunderstorms are possible on wednesday. a high of 94. it's muggy with a chance is of some scattered showers and thunderstorms. friday and saturday, keeping it dry for now. high temperatures in the mid to upper 80s. >> thanks, amelia. all right.
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some questions can't wait until morning. so i'm one of many nurses at cigna with answers, anytime, day or night. i'm lauren, and i've got your back.
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oh my gosh, it's the guy from last night. what?! can i jump on your wi-fi? yeah, you can try it. hey! i had a really good time last night. yeah, me too. the only thing is that... the only thing is what? what's the only thing? oh my gosh he's married. he's a kleptomaniac. he's a pyromaniac. he's a total maniac. hey! hey! go back to your wife you sociopath! leave slow internet behind. the 100% fiber optics network is here. get out of the past. get fios. tea? now $79.99 a month. go online or call now. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities at 800.974.6006 tty/v
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health news, thousands of
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off children -- of our children get ready to go back to school, nutritional options in the lunch line are up dramatically. well, keep in mind the study touting the success came from feds. the cdc, it says most schools have multiple fruit and vegetable options at every meal, but did not say anything about whether or not the children actually ate those more nutritious options. street sense, the local newspaper written and sold by the homeless has expanded into the filmmaking world. some are getting to show their own documentary. >> wendy rieger has more on why it's giving more homeless people hope for a better life. >> my life started here. >> reporter: in some ways, d.c. general represents the beginning and the end of sasha williams' life. she was born there in 1985 when it was a hospital. 29 years later, it's a homeless shelter. she found herself back there with a 2-year-old child. her life at a dead end.
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se vetly shoot -- secretly shooting with an iphone camera, she takes us on a quest to free herself from the relentless pull. >> it was like just go ahead and lay it out there. don't hold nothing back. >> the stories do matter, that their lives matter, that we are interested in -- >> reporter: this is the brain child of brian bellow. he started the co-op after he made a documentary about a homeless guy and he wondered what if his subject had the camera? >> he can make any film he wants, but most of our filmma r filmmakers tell the story from their life. >> reporter: the process of filmmaking can be therapeutic to the homeless as it takes shape outside of them. >> for the filmmakers it is helpful to see some structure around what oftentimes has been
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a series of chaotic events. and through the process of making a tight narrative, there's a level of control that's instilled. >> these things happen, but this is not me. you know? i have to step out of that. >> reporter: for sasha williams, filmmaking has been transformational. >> i'm a director. i have that title now. and this is not the end for me, you know? this is the beginning. >> reporter: and she's working with other street filmmakers to improve the skill, shooting, editing and even animation. best of all, she and ebony now have their open home. >> it's like got it girl. >> reporter: sasha and ebony walking down the street look quite different from the mother and child in her film. and williams says she's feeling it. >> i haven't got to that moment of overjoyment. but i know it will come. i think i'll get that at the premiere. i'm just excited.
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>> wendy rieger with that report right there. >> real authentic stories are happening around the corner. we in this business are very fortunate we have the chance to tell so many stories but we know there are so many more out there. >> yeah. >> go unnoticed. this is a great way. >> an outlet for creativity, clearly she has ideas. now she's able to express those in a unique way and let others tune in on it. 6:57. much more ahead on "news4 today.." >> that's right. it's the last weekend of august. can you believe it? it looks nice, but looks can be deceiving. we'll break down that forecast with storm team 4 meteorol
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now at 7:00, d.c. police's program all hands on deck comes to the end. and angie, we're keeping a close eye on the d.c. police union as they tally up a vote on chief cathy lanier. what we could learn in just a matter of hours. summer break winds down. we are getting you ready as a huge chunk of students get ready to head back to school tomorrow. "news4 today" starts now. >> back to school going in waves. >> i know. they're probably so busy right now, getting the backpack stuff, getting it ready to go. go to bed early tonight. >> the last weekend of august if
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you can believe that. i'm david culver. >> i'm angie goff. you mentioned the last weekend of the month, which means we're headed into september. but it seems like, amelia segal, summer doesn't want to give it up. >> you got it. high temperatures this weekendly around 90 degrees. even some mid 90s on the seven day. but first, the sun is coming up over reston this morning. a nice start for today. temperatures currently in the 60s. about 64 in reston. currently 69 here in washington. 65 degrees in hunting town. as we work our way toward noon, temperatures will warm into the mid 8 0s. yesterday, not so humid but today noticing the humidity. tomorrow, it will be mild at 7:00 a.m., around 70 degrees. i think we will have men the i of clouds -- plenty of clouds tomorrow morning. there's the chance of a shower or a storm today.
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but that threat is pretty small. only 30%. coming up the humidity forecast throughout the week. when it will feel the muggiest. something to look forward to there. >> thanks. in the day ahead the d.c. police union will announce the results of a vote on cathy lanier. the union surveyed the officers for the possible no confidence vote on her. the homicide rate is 43% higher this year than last. the chief and the union they have been at odds over how to solve theb pro. today when that vote comes out we'll send you a push notification. you can get that if you have the nbc washington app on your smartphone. we are working to learn the overall effect of this weekend's all hands on deck program within the district. it flooded every part of d.c. with extra officers to be an extra vigilance on crime.
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despite the extra police occurrence, there were more than half a dozen shootings and two men died. and darcy spencer is looking at the families impacted. >> i still hurt. i still hurt. >> reporter: at 7th and "o" streets in northwest washington stands a memorial to one of d.c.'s unsolved murder victims. tamara gliss was killed when she was hit by stray gun fire outside her home not far from the convention center on memorial day. her mom is angry, no arrests have been made. three months after her death. >> not only are we feeling bad, you know, she has a son. she has brothers. and, you know, it just hurts. >> reporter: there have been more than 100 lives lost on the streets of the nation's capital so far this year. a double digit increase over last year. many of the cases are still unsolved. gliss is just one of the grieving mothers who can't rest knowing a killer is on the loose. >> american university student got shot.
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then we see all of the police presence and everything. but just like i said, my daughter's case is still unsolved and you hear less about it. >> reporter: at the place where gliss lost her life right across from the kennedy rec center, the recent violence prompted police to set up a temporary post. her mom said police have a person of interest in daughter's murder, but that's not enough. >> if they don't have that person -- that one person that can come out and is say that this person did it. it doesn't mean anything. it's just another unsolved murder. >> darcy spencer with the report. safety at the ballpark once again coming into focus after a man died at turner field in atlanta. police say the man fell from the upper stands into the area where the players' family sit. >> he came down like a thud on to the concrete steps. >> the workers came and they were mopping up and all that
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stuff. yeah, i asked the concession people asked what was going on and they said they didn't know what was going on. >> tough to hear. police say he fell 40 feet. police believe this was a horrific accident. metro is now part of a major lawsuit. they're suing the people who designed and built and inspected the silver spring transit center. that is according to "the washington post." "the post" said they're accusing three companies of collective failure that put the center millions of dollars over budget and five years behind schedule. the center opens up on september 20th. a teenager will be okay after he got his foot stuck in an escalator at the wheaton metro station. you're looking at a picture of the sneaker there. montgomery county rescue crews were able to pull him out safely and took him to the hospital. it's the last day of summer vacation for many in our area. that means back to school for
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many in maryland, montgomery, carroll, charles and harford counties will welcome back students and you will see school buses rolling out in loudoun and prince william counties in the commonwealth. a number of charter schools begin tomorrow. and kids can get a nice free hair kit in fairfax county. this is the third year of the back to school free hair cut program. it begins at the alexandre de paris salon not too far from fair oaks mall. kids have to be between 5 and 18 in order to get that free cut. well, if you have tickets to the redskins first game this year, there is a chance you will see kirk cousins calling plays, not rg3. the quarterback suffered a possible concussion last week. he was originally cleared to play last night and then he wasn't. and cousins led the team to the win. now a league doctor is saying that rg3 might not be able to start the first game.
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>> we're all as confused as you are, and people have to understand this has nothing to do with the redskins. i know people want to make it out we're incompetent, but this had nothing to do with us. it was a totally independent doctor. we followed everything by the book. >> well, that was redskins coach jay gruden on the decision to bench rg3. the first regular season game, september 13th, exactly two weeks from today. the people that were at the game yesterday did see rg3 out on the field. about an hour before game time doing a real vigorous workout. warming up. seems like he's a little frustrated earlier in the week. he wants to play. >> i think a lot of folks are frustrated too. they heard at first he was going to and then that independent review by a neurologist saying better safe than sorry there. >> but mccoy and cousins impressive in the preseason already. well, moving on to terrifying moments for one surfer after a shark chomped on to her board.
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how she says she managed to get away unharmed. >> pretty incredible. looking live outside this morning you might not see it, but you're certainly going to start feeling it today.
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you're watching "news4 today." >> thousands of fish are washing up dead in a lagoon near olympic park in rio de janeiro. the summer olympics will be held there next year. and a brazilian environmentalist says raw sewage is killing the fish. it's a problem we told you about before. a study on the water quality found dangerously high levels of viruses and bacteria in the water there. los angeles could become the official u.s. choice for the 2024 olympics this week. the l.a. city council has to approve the plan at its meeting on tuesday. we told how boston is the
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original pick for the games. but the city couldn't generate enough support. d.c. and san francisco were also on the short list for the game, but the committee chose l.a. because it agreed to cover millions in cost overruns. there's a 14-inch wide chunk missing from a woman's surfboard this morning. officials in california closed this beach after a shark bit the board and attacked the 54-year-old surfer yesterday. she's okay, but she had to push it toward the shark and swim away. first they'll analyze the bite mark and teeth pattern to determine how big that shark was. wow. >> she said she's sitting on the board. she sees it two feet underneath her. she thought it was a dolphin, and then realized that's not a dolphin. dolphins don't bite like that. but they did close the beach down for 72 hours. okay. so what will the weather be like
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tomorrow as kids -- lots of kids gear up for first day of class? >> that's right. it
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you're watching "news4 today." >> financial aid many wouldn't make it through college without it. >> but the ways that students access the money could come with a cost. consumer reporter erika gonzalez
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reports on an issue creating a heated debate on campuses nationwide. >> reporter: it's back to school for college students, for many financial aid is a life line to education. and it pays for more than tuition. >> the books, transportation. maybe lunch. because that's expensive here. >> reporter: after tuition is paid, students can choose how to get the rest of their money. some colleges like prince george's counties pay to make sure that they get more. students can ask for a check, have the money deposited into the account or have the moe knew put on the higher one debit card. >> it's more convenient to keep it on the higher one debit card so you won't get your personal money confused with the school money. >> reporter: plus students can use higher one atms for free, but we found some students like jada didn't know that the debit card can come at a cost. >> you enter your p.i.n. number.
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they charge you 50 cents every time you use i. i saw it on the statement. and it seems like a little bit but it adds up. >> reporter: this fee has surprised students on college campuses across the country. including this girl who attends a private school in michigan. >> every time i use my p.i.n. number with the debit card, they take out 50 cents. they have been doing this for years. >> reporter: we interviewed her via skype. she has been using her debit card since 2009. that's right. she's been charged 50 cents every time she made a purchase with her higher one debit card for the last six years. >> they didn't bring it to my attention. >> reporter: higher one says it serves 1,900 college campuses and more than half of the schools it partners with are communi community colleges. in our area they partner with
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salisbury and baltimore county. prince george's county community college said, quote, it has been our practice to send the pamphlet to all credit students once admitted to the college, but there were signs some students aren't getting the message. either from their college or higher one. signs higher one hasn't always been transparent about fees. last year the federal reserve took enforcement action against higher one and a bank partner for deceptive practices. in 2012, the fdic settled with higher one and they agreed to pay money back to the students. and there was a class action setment will against higher one. >> the problem is that banks and colleges have teamed up to market bank accounts and prepaid cards to students in a way that may not really give students free choice of accounts.
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>> reporter: we asked higher one about the allegations of decepti deceptive practices and they said that they have always been transparent. on average, the customers pay $4 a month in fees. but students we talked to don't think there should be any fees at all. >> as a student, you should haven't to be required a fee. to use your money that you're receiving for school. without it, i wouldn't be in school. >> reporter: erika gonzalez, news4. >> it's tricky and you pointed it out, angie, you're not reviewing every little statement. >> 50 cents, you wouldn't notice it like that. >> over time it adds up. especially that girl who had been using her card for so long. so important to try to monitor those things on the other side. okay. so mix of sun and clouds that's what we'll get today. >> yes, partly sunny skies, a
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hazy start this morning. and mild and muggy. here are your weather headlines. not just humid and hot today, but for the most part this entire week on into next weekend. nice at the bus stop tomorrow morning. we're looking at plenty of cloud, dry. the temperature is comfortable. some storm chances on the seven day and they come from the heat and humidity. those kind of scattered shower and thunderstorm chances that we often see in the summertime. right now at 69 degrees. the dew point at 64. keeping a close eye on the dew point today, it will get above 65 or kind of hang out right around 65. and when you have a temperature -- a dew point temperature that starts to indicate that it's feeling humid. today, tomorrow, tuesday, feeling sticky. dew point temperature up into the low 70s on wednesday and thursday. that means it will start to feel oppressive outside. and then toward the end of the week into next saturday, dew
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points drop a little bit. so the mugginess is here this week, the air conditioner working in full force. highs today in the upper 80s, low 90s. 90 for a high in washington. 88 in la plata. for most of us, dry back around the mountains today, there could be some scattered thunderstorms this afternoon and evening. tomorrow, your hour by hour forecast, 8:00 a.m., mild 75 degrees. there's the chance of a shower tomorrow, mainly north and west of town. maybe a thunderstorm or two. have a small umbrella handy. you might not need to use it. temperature around 90ing thes at 4:00 p.m. and so future weather showing you this slight shower and thunderstorm chance. 6:00 a.m., notice sprinkles around. plenty of clouds in place as we work to the lunch time hours. still partly sunny, maybe an isolated shower around west of town. notice trend at 3:00, north and west of washington. some wildly -- widely scattered shower chances. 6:00 going home from work for
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the most part looking just fine there. so the school day forecast, at the bus stop, mild, recess mostly dry. dismissal it will be humid. you're headed back to school tomorrow, best of luck. on tuesday, a high temperature of 93 degrees. it's hazy, sun throughout the day on tuesday. wednesday, some late day thunderstorms are possible. a high temperature on wednesday of 94 degrees. thursday, a high of 92 with a chance of some showers and thunderstorms. friday, partly sunny skies. high temperatures in the upper 80s. saturday, partly sunny skies and although our temperatures drop next saturday, it is looking like we'll keep that mugginess around. fall officially starts on september 23rd so we're definitely feeling like summer as we start september. >> just hanging around. >> i know. >> all right, thanks, amelia. well, they run in with everybody else when they run out. >> how firefighters in our area learn the skills that keep them
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learn the skills that keep them
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oh my gosh, it's the guy from last night. what?! can i jump on your wi-fi? yeah, you can try it. hey! i had a really good time last night. yeah, me too. the only thing is that... the only thing is what? what's the only thing? oh my gosh he's married. he's a kleptomaniac. he's a pyromaniac.
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he's a total maniac. hey! hey! go back to your wife you sociopath! leave slow internet behind. the 100% fiber optics network is here. get out of the past. get fios. tea? now $79.99 a month. go online or call now. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities at 800.974.6006 tty/v you're watching "news4 today." >> falling through dark tunnels, burning building, part of what goes into the firefighter training in prince george's county. >> a tough job to do. first responders showed their skills to congress this week. they helped convince washington to find and staff the department. but one firefighter says the
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same kind of drills saved his life. news4's mark segraves has the details. >> reporter: that's why local fire departments offer this unique experience. >> i mean, look at a couple of minutes in there. you're already sweating. you're already a little disoriented. so we've got to give these guys everything they need to do the job. after all, they're doing it for us. >> reporter: while the heat and the stress of the simulation was intense, it was nothing like the real thing. >> you're going into one of the buildings, you have no idea whether there's a hole in the floor, a burning body you have to drag out. >> reporter: that's what happened to donald fletcher a few weeks ago. the floor gave out beneath him and he began to fall. >> i was able to grab a metal railing on my way down. and hang on so i could call for safety. >> reporter: while he credits his training for saving his life, that metal rail was about 800 degrees and burned through
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his gloves. he was in rehab for weeks. >> without a doubt my instincts kicked in. same instinct i was taught in the program. >> reporter: two other firefighters had much more serious injuries in separate fires. >> third degree burns to the hands, first and second degree to the head and to the arms. the other had a chimney drop on him, hit him square on the head. >> reporter: both are out of the hospital, but it's a while before they can return to duty. thanks in part to training like this, they'll be all right. in college park, mark segraves, news4. a developing story this morning. surrounding former maryland governor martin o'malley. why he could soon be under investigation for a major purchase. and a first for president obama and any sitting president at that. why an upcoming trip will put him in the history books. all right, a live look this morning. amelia segal will join
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in today's top stories, today the d.c. police union will announce the results of a possible no confidence vote on chief cathy lanier. once those results are out, we will send a notification to your phone using the nbc washington app. and police are investigating how a man fell 40 feet at the baseball game. a man in his 60s fell from the second deck at the game last night. he passed away.
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metro and montgomery county have opened up a lawsuit over the silver spring center. it's millions of dollars overbudget and it opens up next month. she went for a hike and didn't return for more than a week later. updates on how she was saved. >> good morning, welcome back. i'm angie goff. >> i'm david culver. 7:30, starting off on this sunday morning. the last weekend in august. amelia segal saying don't say good-bye to summer just yet. >> i know. it's been a hazy start, right? >> you've got it. it will be noticeably more humid. we'll keep the mugginess around even on into next weekend. not so bad, temperatures in the 60s. fair skies across the area. 64 right now in leesburg. 72 degrees over in annapolis and 69 degrees here in washington. throughout the day today, expect
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a mix of clouds and sunshine. here's what you can expect as we work toward noon. skycast 4 showing a mix of clouds and sun. 8:00 a.m., about 72. 10:00 a.m., near 80 degrees. we're in the mid 80s by noon. a chance of a late day thunderstorm today, but that's mainly west of washington. looking good for exercise, headed to the pool. headed to the nationals game, who at in the sun. i'll have your hour by hour forecast for this afternoon coming up in about ten minutes. >> amelia, thank you. a memorial service today for the american university graduate who was killed on a metro train. d.c. police say jasper spires killed kevin sutherland on the train at the noma station last month. sutherland graduated two years ago and he worked at new blue interactive which is a democratic digital strategy firm. a.u. students and the staff will gather at the life center on campus today to remember him. that service begins at 3:00 p.m. a coward and a cold blooded killer that's what sheriffs deputies in texas are calling
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the man who is accused of murdering one of their own. the sheriff says just because he was in a uniform. 30-year-old shannon miles should have his first court appearance tomorrow. he faces capital murder charges. harris county deputies say he shot and killed darren goforth around 8:30 friday might at a fire station. firing even after he collapsed. >> i heard black lives matter, all lives matter and cop lives matter too. why don't we drop the qualifier and say all lives matter and take that to the bank. >> there's a growing memorial at the scene. a lot of people, they actually ended up lighting candles, praying together at a vigil. deputy goforth was married. he leaves behind two kids. a developing story right now. there are questions about former maryland governor martin o'malley's purchase of used furniture from the governor's mansion. "the baltimore sun" says that democratic presidential
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candidate has paid close to $10,000. ethics agency rules prohibit preferential sale of property, and there's a review being called for the sale. representatives say he followed proper procedures. president obama will visit alaska. he'll be there to talk about climate and he'll land in anchorage tomorrow. well, wednesday, he'll become the first sitting president to visit the alaska arctic when he visits the far northwest parts of the state. a lot of cleaning up going on this morning, following severe storms in washington state. two people died near seattle when one of those storms toppled several trees. a man died when the tree fell on his car. a storm cut power for more than 500,000 folks in the area. for now, more baggage checks on the trains in europe.
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that was made in an emergency meeting held yesterday. they called it after an attack on a train headed for paris. you'll recall, three americans helped to take down the suspect yesterday. the suspect was able to buy his ticket with cash and didn't have to show an i.d. in decision 2016, vice president joe biden dodged questions about a possible presidential run during a surprise visit in delaware. biden showed up at the sussex county democratic jamboree. he choked up thanking the crowd for their support following the death of his son, beau biden. beau biden used to attend as the state's attorney general. do not be surprised if you see some helicopters and emergency crews here tomorrow and on tuesday. u.s. park police, capitol police as well as officers in the district are planning medical evacuation drills. there may be street closures nearby between 6:30 and 8:30 in the morning and in the evening.
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all new this morning, we're told a protest that was supposed to be held at a church is called off. teachers at jericho had planned to protest at the church. students haven't been able to go to class and students are out of a job. these teachers planned to protest outside the church today, but they say the principal asked them to hold off. tomorrow begins a new school year in prince william county. and a brand-new school will open up its doors. teachers at chris yung elementary will welcome students for first time tomorrow morning. more than 600 first through sixth graders will start at the new school. it's named for officer chris yung and he died on duty nearly three years ago. >> he cared about people. he cared about children. he had a passion for helping others and when you have that
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kind of passion for helping others and helping children, just helping people in general, that's what we are all about. >> the school will run a new program that focuses on science, technology, engineering, arts and math. it is known as s.t.e.a.m. the principal says its way of teaching 21st century skills is part of the program. >> leaving quite a legacy behind. another new school with a focus on language is up and running in prince george's county. so the school gives english as a second language students a chance to learn at their own pace. tracee wilkins explains this new program that's a first of it kind in our area. >> reporter: this is an intimate learning experiment that the principal can learn the names of every student. and they're here in hopes of vastly improving their english.
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>> i grew up speaking spanish at home. >> reporter: even though she grew up in america. that made it tough for her in the traditional school setting. >> rock, paper, scissors. >> reporter: this international school inside of largo high school, students have focused on group learning opportunities. >> we are really trying to create a face and a place that's different and of belonging. >> reporter: it's a model that they borrowed from new york city, making it the first in the d.c. metropolitan area. >> we are looking at students from the skills and what are their strengths and how to build on their strengths. >> reporter: the students speak up to 12 different languages and they have varied learning needs. today was just orientation, but many are already optimistic. >> because when i grow up i have a better future. >> 7:37 now. she went for a hike, didn't return for more than a week. >> how one woman managed to surviv
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you're watching "news4 today." >> the federal reserve says it
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could still raise interest rates at its meeting next month. stanley fisher says he believes inflation will go above a 2% threshold and that will justify the increase. the recent ups and downs in markets and the world put thoughts on the rate increase on hold, but it can still happen weeks from now. a hiker stranded for nine days now recovering at the hospital. the hiker was on what was supposed on the a day trip in california. when she was stranded from her group. she broke several bones and crawled to a creek just to survive. rescuers say fires made things even more dangerous. >> what made this search and rescue extremely difficult from the very beginning was the rough fire that is burning just south of this location. the smoky conditions made the search and rescue extremely difficult. >> rescuers say the woman used a
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filtered water bottle to drink creek water for days and used a whistle to alert the search crews a toss whether she was. today, the department of agriculture will begin spraying for mosquitos in laurel. you can empty the kiddie pools and then changing pet water every day. earlier this month a person in the baltimore area contracted west nile virus. and also to get rid of the and also to get rid of the mosquitos, using a house fan is ♪
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know you can deposit checks right from your phone transfer money to someone quickly and easily speak to a financial professional when it's convenient and pay for things with the tap of your finger know that with pnc's convenient solutions, at least your finances will be easy to control.
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you're watching "news4 today." >> welcome back. the "today" show is next on nbc4. starts at 8:00. >> that's right. let's get a preview, head up to new york and see erica hill and carson daly. good morning, guys. >> good morning. just ahead on "today," we'll have more on the tragedy at the ballpark. the fatal fall at a yankees/braves game as onlookers watched in horror. and two close calls with sharks in california on saturday, beaches were shut down in la jolla after a hammerhead shark was there. and a surfer escaped a great white further north. plus a yacht race. we'll take you to london where groups of ordinary people are setting sail on an extraordinary adventure.
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and miley cyrus is promising a raw performance at the awards. i have been to a view vmas. >> so you will have some stories. >> i can't tell any of them. >> see how they can top that one. that last one was a talker. >> certainly was. >> thanks, guys. amelia segal with us. >> how do i follow miley cyrus? >> i don't know. we need a wrecking ball in the studio. >> you can wreck away all the humidity. going away with the wrecking ball, the humidity is coming back. >> yeah. the humidity is here today. we're noticing it this entire week. it's muggy. air conditioners are working in full force. we have had a string of comfortably cool nights and warm afternoons. say good-bye to that. it will be muggy and mild this week and hot during the afternoon. but today, the weather having a low impact on your day. partly sunny skies, hot and
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humid. for most of us it's dry. just the chance of some late day thunderstorms in washington. some spots in the 70s. that includes fredericksburg and winchester. washington at 69 degrees. manassas at 63. skycast 4 forecasts what the sky looks like throughout the day. you can see throughout the morning hours we have some hazy sunshine out there. much of the same around the midday hours as we get into the afternoon. kind of that mix of clouds and sun. more cloud cover today than we had yesterday. tonight, not a bad night out there. nice night for maybe having the dinner outdoors. then as kids get on the bus tomorrow morning, it's mild. if you head to the ballpark today, it will be hot. here's the planner for this afternoon. 1:30 first pitch against the marlins. 88 degrees by the last out. temperature around 91. if your seats are in the sun it will be hot today. lows tonight will only dip to around 70 degrees. the low in washington of 72. we're looking at mostly cloudy skies tonight. there's the chance of an
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isolated shower or two. and that's the chance of a shower or two throughout the day tomorrow. maybe a thunderstorm. but right now, tracking dry conditions across the area. here's high temperatures in your neighborhood. 86 in martinsburg, we'll start off with plenty of clouds tomorrow. but as we work our way toward the afternoon hours, we're looking at partly sunny skies. at the bus stop, a mild 72. recess tomorrow gets an "a." looking at warm conditions and the temperature of 82. most students having a dry recess tomorrow. if your heads are headed back to school, best of luck. by dismissal at a 88 degrees, partly sunny at that point. on tuesday, hazy, hot and humid, a high of 93. for wednesday, a high temperature of 94 degrees. thursday, it's still hot and still humid with partly sunny skies and the chance of some
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scattered showers and thunderstorms. chances of showers and storms wednesday and thursday, mainly west of town. a lot of the storms will be fueled by the heat and humidity, especially on thursday. friday, partly sunny skies. high temperature of 89. next weekend, saturday, labor day weekend. temperatures look like they'll start to cool off a little bit. looks like the mugginess sticks around. next saturday, still tracking pretty humid conditions across the area with a mix of clouds and sun. david? >> all right, thanks. drug agents call it russian roulette. hundreds of chemicals were lumped together under the name synthetic drugs. but what's really inside and why is it causing so much havoc in the region? tisha thompson and the i-team got exclusive access to a drug lab to find out. >> reporter: white ladies, sour d and plur. it's hard for some to take them seriously. but for jill head, these little
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packets may be the scariest thing she has seen come through her lab. >> i want people to know that there is no association with these drugs to marijuana. >> reporter: head and her team at the drug enforcement administration's special testing and research laboratory in virginia analyze and identify all of the elicit drugs seized by dea agents throughout the world. before 2002, they only saw half a dozen types of drugs like cocaine, heroin and meth. but since then, they have been flooded with more than 300 varieties of synthetic drugs. >> probably at the highest we have been seeing one to two new synthetic drugs per week. >> reporter: this is what synthetic drugs really look like. despite all of the fancy packaging, head say they start off as a white powder. manufactured in chinese laboratories that to the naked eye look identical to cocaine.
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>> fastball, spice, scooby snacks, molly, they all look like this. they're all powder. >> reporter: the dea groups them by what they look like under a microscope. one like molly stays in powder form or gets pushed into a pill. bath salts have a crystal like appearance. but most contain synthetic cannabino cannabinoids. >> what happens is the drug is added to the solvent and dissolved the way that you would dissolve sugar into iced tea, make a solution. then it's added to the plant material. there's various methods for mixing such as spraying or mixing in a bathtub or cement mixer. >> reporter: she said the mixing is uneven, meaning some batches are more concentrated and can lead to overdoses. head says the k-2 and spice
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packets are some of the earliest samples they have processed in the lab. >> we don't see a lot of those anymore. >> reporter: she say scooby snacks is still widely available, but warns the label on the outside has nothing to do with the chemicals she's found on the inside. >> we can find one that has one drug in it and even the same store, same seizure right next to it it could be another packet that had a completely different drug. >> reporter: the dea says do not be fooled by labels like fruit punch, promising it's lab certified or dea compliant. head says none of it is true. they're all illegal synthetic drugs. which is why head doesn't just analyze synthetic drugs but is one of the very few allowed to make them in the united states. trying to give the dea a jump start on what's coming next in this new drug war. >> the scariest thing to me is how much is unknown and how much
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people don't know. they're completely unknown. it's like roulette. >> tisha thompson with that report right there. the dea gave us a break down of what each of the new variations they have uncovered look like and how they keep evolving atom by atom. you can see it by going to the nbc washington app, click on investigations. >> fascinating stuff. do you like the passaaadd?
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street sense, a local newspaper written and sold by the homeless has expanded. >> and wendy rieger has more on why it's giving more homeless folks hope for a better life. >> my life started here. >> reporter: in some ways, d.c. general represents the beginning and the end of sasha williams' life. she was born there in 1985 when it was a hospital. 29 years later it's a homeless shelter. she found herself back there with a 2-year-old child. her life at a dead end. secretly shooting with an iphone camera, williams takes us on an intimate, soul searching quest to free herself from the undertow of misfortune's relentless pull. >> it was like display it out there. don't hold nothing back. >> their stories do matter, their lives matter.
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that we are interested in -- >> reporter: this is the brain child of filmmaker brian bellow. he started the homeless filmmaking co-op after he made a documentary about a homeless guy and he wondered what if his subject had the camera? >> you can make any film you want to be fiction, but most of them tell the story from their lives. >> reporter: bellow says it can be therapeutic for the homeless as their painful stories are allowed to exit and take shape outside of them. >> for the filmmakers it is helpful to see structure around a series of chaotic events and through the process of making that kind of tight narrative to a level of skill. >> this is not me, i have to step out of that. >> reporter: for sasha williams, filmmaking has been transformational. >> i'm a director, i have that title now. this is not the end for me. you know?
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this is the beginning. >> reporter: and she's working with other street filmmakers to improve those skills, shooting, editing, even animation. best of all, she and ebony now have their own home. >> it's like got it girl. >> reporter: the sasha and ebony walking down the street look quite different from the mother and child in her film. and williams says she's feeling it. >> i haven't gotten to the moment of overjoy. but i know it will come. i think i'll get that at the premiere. i'm just excited. >> love that story and for today, hot and
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good morning tragedy at the ballpark. >> someone just fell over the upper deck. oh, my gosh. a fan plummets to his death at the yankees braves game in atlanta as horrified fans, players, and coaches looked on. the latest in a string of major league accidents in ballparks this year. this morning more on the investigation. a texas man under arrest for charged with the execution style murder of a sheriff deputy who said the spotlight may be to blame.

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