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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 13, 2016 2:37am-4:00am EST

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and go to work and have a job. i go to work and, "it's somebody's life is going to be changed today." it's just -- it's cool. it's -- it's neat. >> the setup here at clearchoice is all intentional. in fact, all of our locations across the country are set up and designed in a fashion so that patients don't feel like they're in a dental office. we recognize it takes a tremendous amount of courage for our patients to pick up the phone, schedule an appointment, and actually walk through the door. and it could be because of a past bad experience. and so our goal is for patients to come in, feel like they're welcome, not feel like it's a sterile environment. we take all of our patients on a tour. and many patients leave feeling like -- you know, they're hugging us. and they tell us that was the last thing that they thought would ever happen when they came through the door. our process is all intentional for patients to feel comfortable. >> the number-one thing that people tell me, when they get their dental implants, is, "i don't think about my teeth anymore.
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>> the first step with clearchoice is the free consultation at the center. so, what can i expect when i get there? >> well, you can expect, first of all, to meet with one of our patient-education consultants. please look at them as a partner in this process of helping you change your life. that's what they're going to do. and the first thing they're going to do is they're just going to talk with you. they're going to talk to you about what's most important for you, what your vision is, what problems have you had in the past, and how we can help you, going forward, to take care of those problems. when you feel comfortable, they're going to give you a tour of our center. we're very proud of our center. and you're going to be able to meet some of our team members and see the passion we have for helping people change their life. we're going to take a 3-d c.a.t. scan of your jaws so that one of our doctors can then sit down and actually put together a customized plan for you to be able to answer your questions
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you'll then meet with that doctor so that you can have any of the questions about what we propose having done answered, as well, including how long it will take and what the costs are. >> and this initial consultation takes about how long? >> well, it's free and it takes about an hour. we want to make sure there's plenty of time to answer all of your questions and make sure you walk away knowing not just what we can do for you but also how long it will take and what kind of costs are involved. >> clearchoice gives hundreds of consultations every day. here are some patients, doctors, and patient-education consultants to tell you more. >> i came to clearchoice for my consultation, and i met with dr. adams. and i felt a great confidence in him right away. and i was in pretty bad shape. i had run out of teeth to eat with and had to do something. >> announcer: from the second you walk into clearchoice for your free consultation until you leave with your new smile, we do
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ease, at home, and comfortable to ask questions until you can't think of any more to ask. >> one of the benefits of clearchoice, obviously, is that we are set up in a way where we can spend that hour, hour and a half it's going to take to really educate the patient and really discuss what this is going to do for you, how this is going to change your life, what the pros and cons are, what the other options are. >> we want to show them the center. we want them to meet the doctors. we want to show them, you know, our lab and how the teeth are being made. >> we actually involve the patient a lot. "hey, what do you want? bring us photos. show us your best smile." the c.t. scan tells us how much bone is there. it tells us if there's infections. it tells us a lot of things. and so, when we look at that, we're already cutting to the chase. >> announcer: so, at the end of the day, what can you expect at your consultation? you'll meet your doctors and their team, you'll get your treatment plan and free 3-d imaging c.t. scan that tells us how your mouth looks from the inside out, and you'll find out how much it's going to cost and how we can help with financing.
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i feel fabulous about the way they look and the way they feel. >> we'll be back with dr. adams right after this. >> i couldn't smile anymore. my daughter got married. i stood in the background for the wedding pictures. i would laugh and put my hand over my teeth. i had no self-confidence. and i thought, "i don't want dentures. i don't want my teeth on a nightstand." it was like a nightmare. and now i go to weddings, i get in their pictures because i look good. i feel good. in one day, they can give you all the self-confidence that you didn't have before. when you walk out of here, you have it. >> announcer: join the thousands who have already set their smiles free at clearchoice. call or click to schedule your free consultation with our team of experts.
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in and come out the same day with a beautiful smile. clearchoice just gave us a way out. >> announcer: don't wait another day. call clearchoice now. >> i can't imagine going the rest of my life without a smile. it was like a dream come true. >> running is -- it's a constant reminder of no limits. ever since i've had my surgery, i've done three half-marathons. well, this is my third one. i had a really extreme case of periodontal disease. i felt gorgeous and great inside, but it didn't look that way with the teeth that i had. i'm 36 years old, and someone is telling me, "you need to get full dentures." i'm thinking clicking, clacky teeth, i'm thinking i have to soak them at night. i thought, "you know, there has to be another choice." and my husband actually was the one who saw a commercial on tv. and i went ahead and made the
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after my surgery, i was handed a mirror. it was unbelievable. i cried. they cried with me. it was -- it was an unbelievable moment. when i'm out running, i feel amazing. [ sighs ] it's just a reminder of how my life has changed in these past two years. good morning. they're a blessing. they're a huge blessing in my life. i will never forget the loving care that they gave me. and that's from the heart. >> we're back to wrap up this episode of "smile healthy america." dr. adams, we've heard it from your patients and we've seen it in your doctors. clearchoice is truly making a profound difference in the lives of thousands of people all over the country. and it all comes back to your unique all-in-one approach to dental implants.
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clearchoice approach, how you're able to restore full smiles in one day, using the full-arch treatment. we've seen how you're helping people deal with their natural fears of having this procedure done, walking them through the entire process, and giving them finance options so that they can afford dental implants. it's all about taking control of your dental health and joining the smile-freedom movement, isn't it? >> shari, i couldn't agree with you more. it really is. you mentioned fear. many of our patients are very fearful. they've had the fear of having a bad smile, the fear of not being able to really show their teeth in public. they don't feel like they've had any control over what their smile looks like, any control over what all these expenses have cost them and their family, both in time and money. and while we do help these patients regain their dental health, and we do have to talk about implants and we have to talk about teeth, really, at the end of the day, it's not about
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it's about freedom -- freedom from dentures, freedom from worrying about your smile again, the freedom to walk into a restaurant, order anything that you want, the freedom of getting off this merry-go-round of continued failed "denturations." it's really about freedom, and we're very proud to set these smiles free. >> well, thank you, dr. adams, for being here and giving us your perspective. and thank you all for joining us for this episode of
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>> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk
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isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life. it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage as long as you pay your premiums, guaranteed. and because full benefits are not paid in the first two years your acceptance is guaranteed, you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself.
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with great information both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait,
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so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicker. and when i know she's feeling like that, it makes me feel like we're both... when she enjoys it, we enjoy it even more. and i enjoy it. feel the difference with k-y ultragel. we were below
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we had traveled for over 850 miles. my men driven nearly mad from starvation and frostbite. today we make history. >>bienvenidos! welcome to the south pole! if you're dora the explorer, you explore. it's what you do. >>what took you so long? if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. >>you did it, yay! education in america at a crossroads. support for common core is fading fast. student college debt is through the roof. the new acting secretary of education, john king, sat down with nora o'donnell to discuss the hurdles he faces and the challenges he has overcome. they did it as secretary king's
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>> are you a president? >> i work for the president. >> reporter: john king can already speak softly. putting his new role as acting secretary of education, he may also need to carry a big stick. in 2010, king scored new york state a $700 million federal grant, which made him controversy followed when new york's education commissioner he rolled out common core standards. parents and teachers shouted him off the stage at a pta meeting in 2013. you ended up canceling further meetings like that? >> we restructured them. that meeting got to a place where it wasn't productive. folks were screaming, yelling. >> reporter: why were people screaming and yelling? >> some of it was the politics of the moment. some of it was misunderstandings that folks have. >> reporter: you know what the
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standards in my state? >> yeah, it's important that folks realize that -- the standards are a matter of state policymaking. what we have said is that states need to have standards that push towards college and career readiness. >> reporter: at first, 46 states adopted common core standards. three states have since dropped them. and 19 more have put them under review. king will half to continue the fight for uniform standards without overstepping the bounds of his federal role. you went from this school to becoming the first african-american education commissioner, the first puerto rican education commissioner of new york. what does that mean to you? >> i think it is a testament to what is possible if students have the right opportunities. teachers could have looked at me and said, you know here is an african latino student, difficult family situation, what chance does he have? they could have given up on me. but they didn't.
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classroom? wow. >> reporter: the teachers king called life saving taught here in brooklyn. >> my mom worked here and was a guidance counselor here. so it felt like home. and then, my mom passed away when i was in 4th grade. and school took on a different role in my life. >> reporter: he was just 8 years old when heap lost his mother. 12 when he lost his father. once the highest ranking african-american educator in the country and later suffered from undiagnosed alzheimers disease. >> i can recall one night he the morning. said it was time to go to school. i can remember holding on to the banister in the house, saying, daddy, daddy, it is not time to go to school. not time to go to school. it's middle of the night. he didn't understand. i didn't know what was wrong. so that was a very, very difficult period.
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even that much more important. because school was the place where i could get beyond that. >> reporter: king went on to earn four ivy league degrees and co-found one of boston's best charter schools. he married and had two children. and now 41 years old, will become one of the youngest cabinet secretaries in history. is there a crisis in education in this country? >> it is hard to look at the fact that we have fall in from 1st and to 13th and not see a crisis. good news i do think there are lots of signs asing prore. as the the country goes through the election every candidate should talk about what are they going to do to raise graduation rates and make sure more kids graduate from college. >> raise your hand if you love school. >> king will be in office just over a year, a year that will be defined by a presidential race where the republican candidates have condemned common core. >> the term common core is so darn poisonous.
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ended it is a disaster. >> imagine repealing every word of common core. >> reporter: he isn't exactly fazeed. >> hard ambitious things come with contentious politics. are we moving toward the goal of all students having access to quality education, moving to the goal of all students having the kind of life saving experiences
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even after his death, rock star, trendsetter, david bowie continues to have a major impact on the music business. his album, "black star" released friday two days before he passed away is now number one on itunes. five of ten albums are bowie classics. 60 minutes did a series of bowie in 2003. the man who fell to earth describes how he never liked
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of his music deals with lonliness. >> searching for music is like searching for god. they're very similar. there is an effort to reclaim the unmentionable, the unseeable, then speakable, all those things comes into being, composer, writing music and searching for notes and pieces of musical information that don't exist. somebody asked me the dumbest question, my god it was hard to answer. they said why do you do what you do? i thought, boy that is, that is such an awful question to answer. i really had to think about that. i guess taking away all of the theatrics or costuming and all the kind of outer layers of what it is. i am a writer, what i do, i write. i started examining the subject matter that i write about. it boils down to a few songs. based around, lonliness, to a certain extent.
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and some kind of spiritual search. and, looking for a way into communicating with other people. that's about it. that's about all i have ever written about in 40 years. let's do a harmony line on those two that we just did. the forever sections, yeah. i was never particularly fond of my voice. i never thought of myself as a singer, you know. and i thought that i wrote songs and music. and i thought what i was best at doing. and because nobody else is doing my songs. i felt i had to go out and do them. it is only over the last few years, that i actually felt more comfortable interpreting the songs myself and being a singer, you know? i don't mind doing, being that now. but for many years, i really wasn't comfortable with being a singer. i would have much preferred other people to have done my songs. then i wouldn't have had to put all that makeup on. and that hair. oh.
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but, ha-ha. the way of the world. >> and that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning" from the broadcast here in new york city, i'm michelle miller. oh changes are changing changes turn and face >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." president obama went before a joint session of congress to deliver the final state of the union address of his presidency. he didn't outline any new bold proposals, instead, he gave an upbeat assessment of his seven years in office and his hopes for america's future. it was likely mr. obama's final primetime opportunity to speak to the nation before the party
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and it comes at a time when seven out of ten americans say the country is headed in the wrong direction. here's some of what the president had to say. >> we're in the middle of the longest streak of private sector job creation in history. [ applause ] more than 14 million jobs, strongest two years of job growth since the 90s. an unemployment rate cut in half. our auto industry just had its best year ever. [ applause ] that's just part of a manufacturing surge that created nearly 900,000 new jobs in the past six years. and we have done all this while
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almost 3/4. [ applause ] anyone claiming that america's economy is in decline is peddling fiction. i told you earlier all the talk of america's economic decline is political hot air. well so is all of the rhetoric you hear about our enemies getting stronger and america getting weaker. i mean, let me tell you something. the united states of america is the most powerful nation on earth. period. [ applause ] period. it's not even close. it's not even close. it's not even close.
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than the next eight nations combined. our troops are the finest fighting force in the history of the world. [ applause ] but as we focus on destroying isil over the top claims that this is world war iii, just play into their hands. masses of fighters on the back of pickup trucks, twisted souls plotting in apartments or garages, they pose an enormous danger to civilians. they have to be stopped. but they do not threaten our national existence. the future we want, all of us
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standard of living, a sustainable peaceful planet or our kids. all of that is within our reach. but it will only happen if we work together. it will only happen if we can have rational constructive debates. it will only happen if we fix our politics. >> a new cbs news/"the new york times" poll out moments ago shows the democratic race tightening. have a look. last month hillary clinton had a 20-point lead nationally over bernie sanders. tonight, sanders has cut clinton's lead to 7. the senator from vermont talked to our nancy cordes. >> i think so. >> reporter: for senator sanders was better than the last. a new hampshire poll showed him widening his lead over clinton, 53 to 39.
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ahead by five points. a 16-point swing in one month. do you now kid yourself the front-runner, at least in the two states? >> i am feeling better and better that we can win both states. when we began in iowa, i think the first poll had us at 2%. 2%. >> reporter: his reversal of fortune forced clinton to step up her attacks in ames, iowa where she called his medicare for all plan impractical. even risky. >> if that is the kind of revolution he is talking about, i am worried, folks. >> her daughter chelsea carried the message to new hampshire. >> senator sanders wants to dismantle obama care. >> indication that the clinton campaign is getting very, very nervous. >> reporter: if you win in iowa, and new hampshire, how do you compete in south carolina, florida, states where hillary clinton has a huge organization and a huge head start in the polls. >> gee, nancy, that's the question that was asked of me eight and a half month as go about iowa and new hampshire. well things have changed.
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south carolina. >> they are going to have to change in a few weeks. >> well we have pretty good ground organizations as well. >> reporter: clinton supporters argue this is just the natural tightening you see at the end of any race. but even sanders admitted to us, scott, that he is resonating even more than he ever expected. >> nancy cordes with the key interview tonight. nancy, thank you. on the republican side, our national poll finds donald trump leading his closest rival, ted cruz, nearly 2 to 1. marco rubio is the only other candidate in double digits. here's major garrett. >> did he not get the memo live free or die? >> reporter: ted cruz deadlocked with donald trump for first in iowa returned to new hampshire for the first time in two months and again tried to dispel trump planted questions about his birth in canada and legal status for the white house. >> the legal question is quite straight forward which is the children of u.s. citizens born abroad are natural born citizens or by birth.
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professors at harvard, democrat lawrence tribe, wrote the constitutional definition of a natural born citizen is unsettled. john mccain confronted similar questions as gop nominee in 2008. mccain was born on a u.s. military base in panama. >> i am very confident that ted cruz is legitimately qualified to run for president. but it need, it needs to be looked into. >> reporter: what do you think trump and to a lesser extent ted cruz have tapped into within the republican conversation? >> anger, frustration. >> does donald trump represent the party of abraham lincoln and ronald reagan? >> i think he wants to. i disagree with him on a number of the statements and positions that he has taken, obviously. but if that's the verdict of the
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majority of americans, then i will do everything i can to help that president. >> mccain supported lindsay graham and told us now is not the time to endorse any other republican. scott, mccain said he will endorse the party's nominee no matter who it is, because party loyalty will not allow him to walk away. >> major garrett, thank you. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through
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to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life. it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage that can never be cancelled as long as you pay your premiums, guaranteed. and because full benefits are not paid in the first two years your acceptance is guaranteed, you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself. you'll also get a free gift with great information both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait,
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president obama interrupted preparations for tonight's state of the union address to deal with the breaking development in the persian gulf. iran seized two small u.s. navy boats and took 10 crew members into custody. cbs news national security correspondent david martin is following this story at the pentagon.
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were en route from kuwait to bahrain ended up on iran's farsi island in the persian gulf. u.s. officials believe the boats and ten soilors were picked up after they had suffered a mechanical breakdown and drifted into iranian territory waters. officials do not know if shots were fired but say iran's foreign minister personally assured secretary of state kerry sailors will be allowed to continue their journey. it would seem a harmness incident, except two weeks ago iranian revolutionary guard ships fired off rockets within a mile of the aircraft carrier truman. the rockets were aimed the other way, but firing munitions in crowded shipping lanes drew a strong protest from the u.s. scott, u.s. officials expect the sailors will be allowed to continue their journey as soon as it is day light in the persian gulf. >> david martin, reporting at the pentagon, thank you. tonight cbs news has confirmed that 10 yemenis, held at
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transferred to middle eastern countries now willing to take them. with that, the population at the u.s. detention camp for terror suspects will fall below 100 for the first time. president obama vowed to close guantanamo in his first address to congress in 2009, but congress so far has blocked him. >> in turkey today, a suicide bomber blew himself up in a section of istanbul that is most often packed with foreign tourists. at least ten people were killed. 15 wounded. turkey's government blames isis, but not everyone is convinced. holly williams is there. >> reporter: the deadly explosion targeted istanbul's historic heart, just yard from monuments dating back 2,000 years. at least 8 of those who lost their lives were german tourists. this image captures the moment of the blast.
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hit by shranel from the bomb. we were splattered said his wife magna, our clothes my jacket was splattered with burned human remains. the turkish government blamed a syrian suicide bomber and said he was a member of isis. but so far the terrorist group, which normally celebrates its atrocities, has not taken responsibility. this attack comes just three months after two suicide bombers targeted a peace rally in the turkish capital ankara. more than 100 people were killed in the deadliest terror attack in turkey's modern history. turkey's a member of the u.s.-led coalition against isis, and has tightened its border security to try to stop the flow of militants to syria. turkey is also engaged in a violent conflict with militants from the country's kurdish
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after a cease-fire collapse last year. some here in turkey believe this spate of deadly attacks shows syria's civil war is spilling across the border. but, scott, others blame the turkish government, because of its ongoing clashes with the country's kurdish militants. >> holly williams in istanbul, thank you. >> today, mexican authorities released a new video of the capture of the drug kingpin known as el chapo. he was caught friday, six months after escaping from prison. the video shows how he nearly got away again. manuel bojorquez is in mexico. [ gunfire ] when mexican marines first raided the house there was no sign of the notorious drug lord el chapo. instead inside a maze of dark
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the marines found cartel members who pleaded for their lives guns on the floor. upstairs a stack of dvds, featured kate del castillo, the actress who arranged the "rolling stone" interview for sean penn. then they found this. a light chain inside a closet that unlocked an unusual panel behind this mirror revealing a hidden door and el chapo's escape route. and he almost managed to get away, fleeing through wood panelled tunnels, el chapo made it several blocks to the city storm sewers before he was finally arrested. the government said it had been watching the house for weeks after a cartel member known for his tunnel making expertise was spotted going inside. today, el chapo is locked up here at the same prison he escaped from six months ago awaiting possible extradition to the u.s. but former mexican foreign minister jorge castaneda cautioned capturing el chapo won't make a dent in the drug business.
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that less drugs in in all are entering the united states from mexico than before. >> reporter: so el chapo being in prison doesn't change any of the operation? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: here at the prison federal police beefed up security. guzman's oldest son is believed to be filling his father's role in the cartel now. scott, a twitter message claiming to be from ivan guzman vowed revenge for his father's arrest. >> manuel, thank you. >> well, winter was awfully slow to arrive in the northeast. now it has come in with a vengeance. driving was nearly impossible south of buffalo, new york. 2 feet of snow since yesterday. in eastern indiana, have a look, mangled trucks scattered all over i-70. they crashed in blizzard conditions. but no serious injuries. >> it's not just cold, descending from the north. canadians are streaming over the
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today, the jackpot for tomorrow night's drawing grew to at least $1.5 billion. more than 19 million dollars worth of tickets are being sold every hour. well you can't put a price on clean water in one city where the supplies are tainted with lead. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. there's moving... and there's moving with move free ultra. it has triple-action support for your joints, cartilage and bones. and unlike the big osteo-bi flex pills, it's all in one tiny pill. move free ultra. get your move on. it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at her. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicker.
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common smart phone apps for helping the terrorists. families in flint, michigan, finally saw clean water delivered door to door today. their tap water has been tainted with lead for nearly two years after the city began drawing from the flint river to save money. the number of children with high lead levels in their blood has doubled. adriana diaz is in flint. >> reporter: flint residents have been waiting a long time for this. >> water and this is replacement filter. >> reporter: volunteers and state troopers handled out bottled water and filters a week after governor rick snyder declared a state of emergency for the city.
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you got to go pay your water bills. then go and buy water too. >> reporter: back in october that drinking water in flint was declared unsafe. recently unearthed e-mails suggest state officials knew about the lead problem as far back as july when an internal health study found high lead levels in flint children after the 2014 water switch. residents weren't told there was a problem two months later and continued to drink contaminated water. governor snyder came to flint yesterday. >> i have apologized for what is going on with the state i am responsible for state government. >> reporter: the flint resident said that the governor's words ring hollow. >> we are the walking dead. we just haven't had the dirt thrown upon us yet. >> reporter: she worries about her kids. their pediatrician told her contaminated drinking watt r may be what's behind their skin rashes and mouth sores. known indicators of lead
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>> it's frustrating and irritating because nobody cares. >> reporter: why do you think people don't care? >> because it's -- it's a high crime rate here. and there is more, poor african-americans. you know? snyder don't care. he don't stay here. >> reporter: today the governor's office told us state experts originally concluded higher lead levels were simply seasonal. it wasn't until october 1, the governor learned there was confirmed lead in the water. still, scott, the federal justice department is launching an investigation. >> joe biden reveals a secret offer from the president when we
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david bowie never had a number one album, but that is about to change.
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headed to the top with 130,000 albums expected to sell this week. the album debuted friday. bowie died of cancer on sunday. in an interview with cnn, vice president joe biden has revealed a touching moment with president obama. the subject was biden's son beau, delaware's attorney general, who was battling cancer. >> i said, you know, my concern is, i said, if beau resigns, he had no, there, there's no -- nothing to fall back on. his salary, i said but i worked it out. i said, joe ill and i will sell the house. he got up. don't sell the house. promise me you won't sell the house. he will be mad at me saying this. he said whfr atever you need. i will give you the money. i said i don't think we will have to. he said promise me.
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and we'll be right back. >> important message for women and men ages 50 to 85. please write down this toll-free number now. right now, in areas like yours, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you're on a fixed income or concerned about rising prices, learn about affordable whole life insurance with a lifetime rate lock that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, or if you misplaced it,
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>> first lady michelle obama invited more than a dozen people to sit with her in the house chamber tonight for the state of the union address. including one young boy from bear, delaware. chip reid has his story. >> welcome, tom vilsack, nice to meet you. >> nice to meet you too.
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braeden manering, and his mother in tow, had meetings with the secretary of agriculture and home state senator, tom carper of delaware. you may be wondering what a 12-year-old did to earn such special treatment. well it started when he was just 9 and entered a recipe in the first lady's healthy eating contest. he won and was invited to the kids state dinner at the white house where mrs. obama challenged him to make a difference in his community. two days later when he saw a homeless man on the street in the rain inspiration struck. >> i couldn't stop thinking about him and how he could be cold, hungry, tired. >> reporter: so he put together a bag of food and asked his mother to help him find the man. >> i got out of the car gave him the bag and umbrella. he said, thank you, son. then i knew what to do. >> reporter: he knew he had to feed the hungry. he created brae's brown bag
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4,600 bags of healthy food. how does it make you feel? >> it makes me feel happy. and but at the same time not very happy. because i know they're all out there. but -- as long as, as long as i'm there, he'll be good. >> reporter: his mother christie is so proud she can hardly believe this is her son. >> people often say, you are doing a great job raising him. and i say, he's raising me too. so -- >> reporter: he says the key is to change how people see the homeless. >> i treat them as if they were my family. >> reporter: he hopes his seat of honor tonight in washington will inspire others to feel that way too. chip reid, cbs news, washington. >> that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and of course, "cbs this morning." from the nation's capital, i'm
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welcome to the "overnight news" i'm michelle miller. president obama went before joint session of congress to deliver the final state of the union address of his presidency. he didn't outline any bold new proposals, instead giving his upbeat assessment of his seven years in office and his hopes for the future.
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primetime opportunity to speak to the nation before the party primaries begin next month. it comes at a time when seven in ten americans say the country is headed in the wrong direction. here is some of what the president had to say. >> tonight marks the eighth year that i have come here to report on the state of the union. and for this final one i'm going to try to make it a little shorter. [ applause ] and i know some of you are antsy to get back to iowa. but for my final address to this chamber, i don't want to just talk about next year. i want to focus on the next five years, the next ten years, and beyond. we're in the middle of the longest streak of private sector job creation in history.
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more than 14 million new jobs, the strongest two years of job growth since the 1990s, an unemployment rate cut in half. our auto industry just had its best year ever. [ applause ] that's just part of a manufacturing surge that created nearly 900,000 new jobs in the past six years. and we have done all of this while cutting our deficits by almost 3/4. any one claiming that america's economy is in decline is peddling fiction. i believe a thriving private sector is the lifeblood of our economy. i think there are outdated regulations that need to be changed.
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be cut. but after years now of record corporate profits, working families won't get more opportunity or bigger pay checks, just by letting big make their own rules and everybody else's expense. [ applause ] and middle-class families are not going to feel more secure because we allowed a tax on collective bargaining to go unanswered. food stamp recipients did not cause the financial crisis. recklessness on wall street did.
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dispute the science around climate change. have at it. you will be pretty lonely. because you will be debating our military, most of america's business leaders, the majority of the american people, almost the entire scientific community, and 200 nations around the world who agree it is a problem and intend to solve it. but, i told you earlier, all the talk of america's economic decline is, political hot air. well so is all of the rhetoric you hear about our enemies getting stronger, and america getting weaker. i mean, let me tell you something. the united states of america is the most powerful nation on earth. period. [ applause ] period! it's not even close. it's not even close. we spend more on our military than the next eight nations
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fighting force in the history of the world. [ applause ] but as we focus on destroying isil, over the top claims that this is world war iii, just play into their hands. masses of fighters on the back of pickup trucks, twisted souls plotting in apartments or garages, they pose an enormous danger to civilians. they have to be stopped. but they do not threaten our national existence. the future we want, all of us want, opportunity and security for our families, a rising standard of living, a sustainable peaceful planet for our kids. all of that is within our reach. but it will only happen if we work together.
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have rational constructive debates. it will only happen if we fix our politics. >> the republican response was delivered by south carolina governor niki haley. >> barack obama's election as president broke historic barriers and inspired millions of americans. as he did when he first ran for office, tonight, president obama spoke eloquently about grand things. he is at his best when he does that. unfortunately, the president's record has often fallen far short of his soaring words. as he enters his final year in office, many americans are still feeling the squeeze of an economy too weak to raise income
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we're feeling a crushing national debt. a health care plan that made insurance less affordable and doctors less available. and chaotic unrest in many of our cities. even worse, we are facing the most dangerous terrorist threat our nation has seen since september 11th. and this president appears unwilling or unable to deal with it. soon the obama presidency will end, and america will have the chance to turn in a new direction. that direction is what i want to talk about tonight. at the outset, i'll say this. you have paid attention to what has been happening in washington. and you're not naive. neither am i. i see what you see. and many of your frustrations are my frustrations. a frustration with a government that has grown day after day, year after year, yet doesn't serve us any better. a frustration with the same endless conversations we hear over and over again. a frustration with promises made, and never kept. we need to be honest with each other and with ourselves. while democrats in washington
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problems facing america today, they do not bear it alone. there is more than enough blame to go around. we as republicans need to own that truth. we need to recognize our contributions to the erosion of the public trust in america's leadership. we need to accept that we have played a role in how and why our government is broken. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. (cell phone rings) where are you? well the squirrels are back in the attic. mom? your dad won't call an exterminator... can i call you back, mom? he says it's personal this time... if you're a mom, you call at the worst time. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. r it's what you do. where are you?r it's very loud there. are you taking at
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your heart loves omega-3s. but there's a difference
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and those in megared krill oil. unlike fish oil, megared is easily absorbed by your body... ...which makes your heart, well, mega-happy. happier still, megared is proven to increase omega-3 levels in 30 days. megared. the difference is easy to absorb. the biggest lottery prize in history continues to groechlt the powerball jackpot stands at more than $1.5 billion, that's right billion. excitement is growing internationally. thousands of canadians are pouring across the border to try their luck. demarco morgan is in niagara falls at the new york border with canada.
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and an attraction that draws americans and canadians. now it seems as if canadians are using this hoping the crossing will transfer them to a destination where all their dreams will come true. while millions of americans think they're lucky enough to beat the odds, so too do canadians. >> i'm going to take my chances just like everyone else. >> reporter: she drove nearly two hours from her ontario home for a chance to become the world's next billionaire. >> we come here and drop a lot of money, we shop in the u.s. a lot. so we give to you. it's time you give back. >> reporter: our neighbors to the north have been traveling from vancouver, toronto, montreal. >> the canadians coming like crazy here for the lotto. >> thank you. >> reporter: which they are legally allowed to do. >> you do not have to be a u.s. citizen to buy a powerball ticket. as long as you're buying at an
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that's fine with us. winners outside the u.s. can expect more taxes. the federal government can withhold 30% of gambling winnings paid to a foreigner. that's 5% more than for a u.s. resident. there could also be state taxes depending on where the ticket was purchased. new york has one of the highest state lottery taxes, more than 8%. we are steps from the border where canadians enter the u.s. for those not willing to make the trip there are online retailers willing to do it for them. the lotter.com. says it became unavailable after experiencing high demand. >> we don't endorse them. we tell everyone to, to, be careful. >> reporter: no matter which side of the border you are on, there is no escaping the one in nearly 300 million chance of winning. >> you know the odds are totally against winning. somebody has to win. so we can dream. >> reporter: jackpot is $1.9 billion in canadian dollars, long way from the jackpot of
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million. >> the son of mexican drug lord, joaquin "el chapo" guzman, grows by the day. "rolling stone" released the 17 minute in the view with el chapo. outside the mexican prison where el chapo is being held. >> reporter: newly released mug shot of joaquin "el chapo" guzman shows the drug lord with his head and mustache shaved. authorities here at the prison where he is held indicated they're moving him from cell to cell to make it difficult for him to escape. and we're now getting a look at the violent shootout that led to his arrest. dramatic video taken by helmet camera and released by the mexican government shows the deadly gunfight that took place shortly before el chapo's capture. cbs news has learned when 17 mexican marines stormed the home
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concealed by a mirror. he hid in a tunnel until rain water forced him out. an armed guzman stole a car before being arrested. now tanks surround the maximum security prison where guzman is being held. is there a chance we will see el chapo escape again? >> there is more than all of the eyes of the world put on him. therefore, i don't think so. >> reporter: guzman's attorney says he hasn't been able to communicate with his client. which he claims violates the drug lord's rights. over the weekend, it was revealed that guzman's secret visit with sean penn and mexican actress kate del castillo helped authorities narrow down the fugitive location. new photos show the academy award winner arriving at a mexican airport for the october meeting. del castillo, was photographed in the country on several different dates. in one of the images a lawyer
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handing her a cell phone. "rolling stone" magazine has come under fire for publishing the article in which penn details the encounter. penn says guzman reviewed the article before it was published but did not ask for any changes. monday, penn told associated press, he has nothing to hide. in an interview, "rolling stone" publisher, defended the magazine's decision to give el chapo what he calls story approval saying it was a small price to pay. >> reporter: the u.s. is seeking to extradite guzman to face charges there. one mexican official said that process could take a year or more. >> the federal government's dietary guidelines have touched off a firestorm of controversy. the guidelines are updated about every five years. and critics say that gives food industry lobbyists plenty of time to sway the final results. anna warner has the story.
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from usda and department of health and human services are to tell you what to eat. critics say they're muddled and confusing and not by accident. more fruit and vegetables. less sugar. limited saturated fat. the key dietary recommendations from the government. >> even a small shift can make a big difference. >> reporter: new york university professor of nutrition maryann nestle says there is something missing in the message. you say the junk food industry should kid the guidelines a win, why? >> because there is no direct messaging in the dietary guidelines that says don't eat junk food, don't eat processed food, don't eat meat, don't drink sodas. >> reporter: dietary guidelines affect food labelling to national school lunch program that serves more than 30 million kids each day. but instead of simply saying don't drink soda, she points out, the guidelines say, less than 10% of calories should come from added sugars.
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meat, they say, less than 10% of your diet should come from saturated fats. >> the meat industry does not want the american government saying, eat less meat. that is unamerican. >> these are multibillion dollar industries that put a huge amount of effort not just in advertising but in changing policy. >> reporter: the doctor is president of the nonprofit physicians committee for responsible medicine which is suing the government. claiming the egg industry used its influence to try to weaken warnings about cholesterol. the new guidelines dropped recommended limits but advise people to eat little as possible. >> the egg industry is paying universities where the people are then put on the committee to decide whether eggs are safe or not. that's a conflict of interest. >> now the usda told cbs this morning its process is robust and transparent. and the new guidelines reflect advancements in scientific understanding about healthy eating choices and health outcomes over a lifetime. >> the cbs "overnight news" will
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education in america at a crossroads. support for common core is fading fast. student college debt is through the new acting secretary of education, john king, sat down the hurdles he faces and the challenges he has overcome. they did it as secretary king's
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>> i work for the president. >> reporter: john king can already speak softly. putting his new role as acting secretary of education, he may also need to carry a big stick. in 2010, king scored new york state a $700 million federal grant, which made him controversy followed when new york's education commissioner he rolled out common core standards. parents and teachers shouted him off the stage at a pta meeting in 2013. you ended up canceling further meetings like that? >> we restructured them. that meeting got to a place where it wasn't productive. folks were screaming, yelling. >> reporter: why were people screaming and yelling? >> some of it was the politics of the moment. some of it was misunderstandings that folks have. >> reporter: you know what the critics say, i don't need the
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standards in my state? >> yeah, it's important that folks realize that -- the standards are a matter of state policymaking. what we have said is that states need to have standards that push towards college and career readiness. >> reporter: at first, 46 states adopted common core standards. three states have since dropped them. and 19 more have put them under review. king will half to continue the fight for uniform standards without overstepping the bounds of his federal role. you went from this school to becoming the first african-american education commissioner, the first puerto rican education commissioner of new york. what does that mean to you? >> i think it is a testament to what is possible if students have the right opportunities. teachers could have looked at me and said, you know here is an
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difficult family situation, what chance does he have? they could have given up on me. but they didn't. >> so, this is your old classroom? wow. >> reporter: the teachers king called life saving taught here in brooklyn. >> my mom worked here and was a guidance counselor here. so it felt like home. and then, my mom passed away when i was in 4th grade. and school took on a different role in my life. >> reporter: he was just 8 years old when he lost his mother. 12 when he lost his father. once the highest ranking african-american educator in the country and later suffered from undiagnosed alzheimers disease. >> i can recall one night he woke me up at like 2:00 clock in the morning. said it was time to go to school. i can remember holding on to the banister in the house, saying, daddy, daddy, it is not time to go to school. not time to go to school. it's middle of the night. he didn't understand. i didn't know what was wrong. so that was a very, very
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and, you know, it made school even that much more important. because school was the place where i could get beyond that. >> reporter: king went on to earn four ivy league degrees and co-found one of boston's best charter schools. he married and had two children. and now 41 years old, will become one of the youngest cabinet secretaries in history. is there a crisis in education in this country? >> it is hard to look at the fact that we have fall in from 1st and to 13th and not see a crisis. good news i do think there are lots of signs of progress. as the the country goes through the election every candidate should talk about what are they going to do to raise graduation rates and make sure more kids graduate from college. >> raise your hand if you love school. >> king will be in office just over a year, a year that will be defined by a presidential race where the republican candidates have condemned common core. >> the term common core is so
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ended it is a disaster. >> imagine repealing every word of common core. >> reporter: he isn't exactly fazed. >> hard ambitious things come with contentious politics. are we moving toward the goal of all students having access to quality education, moving to the goal of all students having the kind of life saving experiences
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even after his death, rock star, trendsetter, david bowie continues to have a major impact on the music business. his album, "black star" released friday two days before he passed away is now number one on itunes. five of ten albums are bowie classics. 60 minutes did a series of bowie in 2003. none of the footage was ever aired. the man who fell to earth describes how he never liked hearing himself sing and so much
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lonliness. >> searching for music is like searching for god. they're very similar. there is an effort to reclaim the unmentionable, the unseeable, then speakable, all those things comes into being, composer, writing music and searching for notes and pieces of musical information that don't exist. somebody asked me the dumbest question, my god it was hard to answer. they said why do you do what you do? i thought, boy that is, that is such an awful question to answer. i really had to think about that. i guess taking away all of the theatrics or costuming and all the kind of outer layers of what it is. i am a writer, what i do, i write. i started examining the subject matter that i write about. it boils down to a few songs.
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and a couple with isolation. and some kind of spiritual search. and, looking for a way into communicating with other people. that's about it. that's about all i have ever written about in 40 years. let's do a harmony line on those two that we just did. the forever sections, yeah. i was never particularly fond of my voice. i never thought of myself as a singer, you know. and i thought that i wrote songs and music. and i thought what i was best at doing. and because nobody else is doing my songs. i felt i had to go out and do them. it is only over the last few years, that i actually felt more comfortable interpreting the songs myself and being a singer, you know? i don't mind doing, being that now. but for many years, i really wasn't comfortable with being a singer. i would have much preferred other people to have done my songs. then i wouldn't have had to put all that makeup on. and that hair. oh. you know?
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