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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 13, 2017 2:35am-4:00am EDT

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things. >> what is wrong with this bill? >> it's basically obamacare light. it keeps the subsidies, keeps the taxes for a year, keeps the individual mandate, interestingly. republicans have complained for years, saying we didn't like that government was going to make you pay a penalty. now instead of paying a penalty to the government, you pay it to the insurance industry. there's also bailouts for the insurance industries. the one thing that's wrong with obamacare that's most visible to everybody is premiums are soaring in the individual market. that will happen under the ryan plan, as well. because they do nothing to fix the fundamental problem. it's the ryan plan or the status quo. what he has ran through the committee is his without any amendments. that's the question, if we get what we got from ryan, he will not have the votes and we have to get to that point before true negotiations begin. right now there's a charm offensive going on. everybody is being nice to everybody becausey
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to vote for this, but we're not going to vote for it. >> this has to do with a massive shift of wealth from working people to the richest people in this country. it is a $275 billion tax break for the top 2%. millionaires will get about $50,000 a year in tax breaks, while at the same time, some 5 million to 10 million people are going to lose their health insurance. premiums are going to soar. the aart says if you're 64 years of age and making $25,000 a year, you'll pay up to $7,000 more for your health insurance. they're going the defund planned parenthood, deny over 2 million women the right to choose the health care that they need. they're going to decimate medicaid, which is why the american medical association, the ama, and the american hospital association oppose it, in addition to the aarp. this is a
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>> what speaker ryan says it's an unfair comparison, because the people who have coverage now have coverage in a rick etty system that is getting worse, insurance companies are dropping out of the system. so it's unfair to compare the people that have it now because the system is falling apart. >> oh, really? 5 million to 10 million are going to have no health insurance at all. nobody has ever suggested that the affordable care act, obamacare, was perfect. but it did put 20 million people into the ranks of the insured. in my view, and what the american people want, is an improvement on obamacare, not the decimation of obamacare and throwing so many people off of health insurance and raising premiums substantially. it is very hard for ryan or anybody else not to deny that what they are bringing forth is far, far, far worse
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in iraq, islamic state militants are making their last stand as allied forces tighten the noose around isis held neighborhoods in mosul. the jihadists are outnumbered 10-1. and while many are determined to fight to the death, others are trying to escape. a holly williams has two reports from the front lines. >> reporter: isis fighters snipe at iraqi forces who are pushing into mosul's old city. one of the extremist's last strongholds. [ explosions ] 350 yards from the front line this week, we were with general al jeburi, as he called in helipt
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targeting an isis position where they were burning tires to try to hide their location. >> we are going to move a lot. we are going to fight isis house to house to liberate the city. but we put a safe sector for the civilians if they want to come to us. >> reporter: bearing a victorious move on the front line, and it's easy to understand why. nearly three years ago, isis swept triumphantly across northern iraq, as many iraqi soldiers ran away, rather than putting up a fight. the extremists captured mosul with ease. a gang of violent fanatics who claim to have established a new islamic state. now iraqi forces have regrouped and isis have been beaten back. some iraqi commanders told us
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they already have isis surrounded in mosul and they're pummeling the extremists. [ explosions ] but this is the cost of liberation. >> down the street the main government building. >> reporter: a city smashed beyond recognition, its people frightened and exhausted. they survived more than two years under isis, only to see their neighborhoods turned into battlefields. god bless you, said this woman to the troops. it's been a horrible week. on this street, they've defused a roadside bomb. a parting gift from the extremists. mosul will soon be free of isis, but they have left the city and its people with deep scars.
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the so-called islamic state is crumbling. iraqi forces are now on the edge of mosul's historic old town. one of the extremist's last strongholds. isis fighters are being killed and rounded up as prisoners. but even as they lose on the battlefield, they are still waging an online propaganda war painting themselves as a band of holy warriors. this isis defector, who we met in turkey, shows just how powerful that propaganda can be. he told us he served in the military in jordan, and then joined isis in late 2014, believing they had created a just islamic state. but said he quickly realized he made a mistake. "they kill anyone who argues with them," he told us. he was surprised to discover their brutality. yet joined the extremis
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vicious execution videos, including the beheadings of two american journalists. why would you still join when you had seen them committing atrocities like that? "they said they were cia agents, not journalists, and they slipped a verse from the koran to justify the killings. no muslim could object or say this was wrong." he told us he paid a smuggler to get him out of isis territory last year. he's far from alone to succumbing to the extremist propaganda. "there are many people that came to isis like me, tens of thousands. if they had known the truth they wouldn't have joined." isis is losing the fight in iraq and syria. but that they not be enough to loosen its grip on the minds of many of its followers. holly williams, cbs
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northern iraq. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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sheryl crow has a new album dropping next month called "be myself. "and these days part of being herself is making women aware of the importance of early cancer detection. she's a survivor and discussed it all with rita braver. >> reporter: this is where we're used to seeing sheryl crow. ♪ on stage, with a guitar in her hands. ♪ but she says she's equally at home here. >> some right this way. i'm going to bring you into the
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she gets an annual mammogram or breast x-ray. >> we're going to do a top to bottom review, then a side view. >> reporter: a subject those women have teenage girls now. >> reporter: crow has reason to understand the importance of early detection. in 2006, you discovered that you haea
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it? >> i had a routine mammogram. it was a very inopportune time. it was right before the grammys. my personal life was in turmoil, the last thing i wanted to do was a mammogram. and i did. the result was come back in six months, and my gynecologist said you don't wait. let's go and get a second opinion. let's get a biopsy and it turned out it was innovative. >> do you remember your emotions? you're young and they're telling you that you have breast cancer. >> yeah. it's one of those scenes in a movie where everything is swirling. she said, you're not going to die. this is very early and you'll get on with your life. >> reporter: it was a life that sheryl crow had worked hard to build. raised in missouri, she worked as a grade school music teacher after college. but
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singing commercial jingles. ♪ ♪ in and out, in and out, that's what a hamburger is all about ♪ >> all the greats. >> reporter: but in 1986, she decided to try her luck in l.a. it took you a while. nobody was beating down your door and saying please, honey, make us some music. >> every label said we don't know what to do with a blue eyed country soul singer. i was pretty much turned down by everybody. ♪ i'm going to soak up the sun >> reporter: in 1993, she finally broke through. ♪ all i want to do is have some fun ♪ ♪ until the sun comes up over santa monica ♪ >> reporter: she had a string of hits. eventually racking up nine grammy
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♪ and in 2006, at age 44, a double whammy. not only cancer, but the end of her engagement to cyclist lance armstrong. the whole saga unfolding publicly. >> you can work so long and have selling records, but when your life falls apart, you become like an a-celebrity. so there was a convergence of people being interested in my private life. >> reporter: she had 33 radiation treatments. >> every morning i would lay there with my arm over my head and reassess my life. >> reporter: and when she got a clean bill of health, she decided to not wait for marriage to have children. >> she just said, adopt, get a surrogate. your life doesn't have to look like the life you were born into. and that's what i did. i just thought you know what? life's so short.
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>> reporter: she dotes on 6-year-old levi and his big brother, 9-year-old wyatt. >> and action. >> reporter: but she's also found time to launch a new line of clothing. which she'll soon peddle on hsn. working from her converted barn in nashville, she's developing pieces based on her all-american style. >> it's a great way to get clothes out to people who can't afford the $350 jeans, which, you know, i go back to my hometown all the time and that is basically middle america. those are the people who are more economically strapped. >> that's who you want these clothes to appeal to? >> i think that's kind of who buys my records. >> reporter: and yes, she has a new record coming next month, called "be myself." the first single, which she recently performed at l.a.'s famed troubadour, is
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"halfway there." ♪ she says the song is about urging people to listen to each other in today's vitriolic political climate. >> it doesn't matter if you're this person and i'm that person, don't we all want the same thing at the end of the day? >> reporter: along with the songs she sings, crow says she'll continue to talk, urging women to get an annual mammogram. >> i was healthy. i didn't have any family history. the technology is getting better and better. so at a certain age, take it into your own hands to make sure you're your advocate. i look at the opportunity as a gift. it's worth being sad. ♪
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what's the opposite of bullying in school? how about buddying. steve hartman found the story "on the road." >> reporter: when the lunch bell rings at boca high in boca raton, florida, 3400 kids fill into the courtyard and split into their social groups. but not everyone gets included. here at boca high and schools across the country, someone always sits alone. >> sometimes you feel like you're by yourself, and that's something i don't want anybody to go through. >> reporter: dennis esteman is a haitian immigrant. he says when he first came here, he felt isolated. now he's a senior and popular. >> to me it's like if we don't make that change, who is going to do
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>> reporter: so with some friends he started a club called we dine together. >> we tindine. >> together! >> reporter: their mission is to go into the courtyard at lunchtime to make sure no one is starving for company. for new kids especially, the club is a god send. >> it's gabriel. >> reporter: since it started last fall, hundreds of friendships have formed. some very unlikely. >> you're probably meeting kids you would meet on the football team. >> ever. >> reporter: gene max quit the football team just so he could spend more time with this club. >> i don't mind not getting a football scholarship. this is what i want to do. >> reporter: just imagine how different your teenage years would have been if the coolest kids in school decided that you mattered. it obviously takes a lot of empathy to devote your lunch period into thi
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experience. >> i went from coming from a school that i always had friends to coming to where i had nobody. >> reporter: club member ally seeley transferred two years ago. she said lunch can be the most excruciating part of the day. >> it seemed really unfair. it's honestly an issue. meeting someone who cares and listens to what you have to say makes a difference. and that can happen at lunch, that can happen at our club. it's going to make a difference. >> reporter: and not just here at boca high. >> i'll be around tomorrow if you want to eat lunch. >> reporter: dennis and his team are trying to open chapters of "we dine together" at schools across the country. and maybe they can teach us adults, too. steve hartman, on the road, in boca raton, florida. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and "c
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york city, i'm elaine quijano. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com burdf en oproof. a top republican says president trump should either drop his wiretapping claim against president obama or provide evidence. also tonight, new details about thn e maseaccu hd ofngoppi the white house fence looking for a midnight meeting with the president. an avalanche buries a road, blocking a group of students froiom gng home. >> we're trapped. and across the u.s., a day to "meet a muslim" and build acceptance. >> he'retoere gr proess together. this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. if the justice department has any proof of wiretapping at trump tower, a congressional
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turned over today. the deadline looms as pressure mounts on president trump to drop his wiretapping claim against president obama or prove it. here's errol barnett. >> the president has one of two choices, either retract or to provide the information that the american people deserve. >> reporter: republican senator john mccain today said he has no reason to believe president trump's claim of being wiretapped. >> i hope we get to the bottom of all these matters. >> reporter: republican senate intelligence committee member, tom cotton said he has seen no supporting evidence, neither has the ranking democrat on the house intelligence committee. >> either the president quite deliberately for some reason made up this charge or perhaps more disturbing the president really believes this. >> reporter: last weekend, president trump tweeted that president obama ordered surveillance of trump tower during the election. he offered no evidence or further explanation. >> no, i said i'm not aware and i'm not aware. >> reporter: press secretary
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if the surveillance occurred because mr. trump was already part of investigations into russia. >> that's why we want the house and senate to do what the president has asked of them to look into this. >> reporter: house members are asking the justice department to turn over any evidence of wiretapping by monday. president obama's director of national intelligence has disputed the president's claim. >> there was no such wiretap activity mounted against the president-elect. >> reporter: president trump has asked congress to investigate his wiretapping accusations against president obama, while congress is still waiting for any supporting evidence from the white house. meanwhile, fbi director james comey is scheduled to testify before the house committee on this matter one week from tomorrow. >> errol barnett, thanks. tomorrow, the "congressional budget office" - a non-partisan agency of economists - is expected to release its report t
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repeal and replace obamacare. the report will outline the cost and impact of the bill. the re-ignited health care debate was a hot topic on the sunday morning programs. house speaker paul ryan weighed in on "face the nation" with john dickerson. >> the one thing i'm certain will happen is cbo will say, "well, gosh, not as many people will get coverage." you know why? because this isn't a government mandate. this is not the government makes you buy what we say you should buy and therefore the government thinks you're all going to buy it. so there's no way you can compete with on paper a government mandate with coverage. what we are trying to achieve here is bringing down the cost of care, bringing down the cost of care, bringing down the cost of insurance, thought through government mandates and monopolies but by having more choice and competition. >> john dickerson is with us now from washington. so john, the congressional budget office's assessment of the plan, as you know, is expected on monday. now if it predicts that millions will lose coverage what are the arguments that we will likely hear from those republicans who
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backed this bill? >> well, here's why that's such a problem. president trump said more people will be covered than are currently covered. white house adviser kellyanne conway said everybody who is covered by the affordable care act will be covered. this has been the consistent message from the president. leaving aside the promises the president also made about quality and choice which are quite robust promises. so that's why this is a big hurdle if cbo comes out and makes this judgment. >> if this legislation fails what is the potential political fallout for the white house as well as congressional republicans? >> well, if it fails completely and there is no replacement for the affordable care act, the president has said that would be a bloodbath. and paul ryan on the broadcast today affirmed that. so that would be the big disaster. the interim situation would be -- what happens often in legislation -- which is it fails, and then people cobble together a solution and try to
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run up the hill one more time. the challenge here is that the republicans are operating within their own space and are not picking up any democrats and not appealing to them. >> john dickerson in washington, john thank you. the california man who hopped the white house fence and tried to pay a midnight visit to president trump over the weekend is due in federal court tomorrow. demarco morgan has the latest. >> reporter: family members told reporters jonathan tran was troubled after being laid off from a job at an engineering company. he had been stressed out, living is in his car, eating junk food. the 26-year-old from milpitas, california, graduated from san jose state university in 2015. in u.s. district court saturday afternoon, tran was charged with entering restricted grounds while carrying a dangerous weapon. according to the criminal complaint, just before midnight friday, a secret service agent intercepted tran as he was approaching the south portico entrance to the white house mansion.
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friend of the president. i have an appointment." but he admitted, "i jumped the fence." tran was carrying two cans of mace, a united states passport, a book written by president trump, and a letter to president trump that mentioned russian hackers. on saturday, president trump praised the secet service. >> the secret service did a fantastic job. it was a troubled person. it was very sad. >> reporter: during the obama administration several white house intruders prompted plans for the perimeter fence to be strengthened and raised. sharp spikes were installed as an interim solution. he's due in court on monday. he could be facing a sentence of ten years in prison. we should also mention that the former secret service head joseph clancy retired earlier this month and has yet to be replaced. >> demarco, thanks. for millions of americans, the last week of winter will get off to a snowy start. storms are expected from the northern plains to the ohio valley monday.
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bracing for possible blizzard conditions monday, and tuesday expect travel delays. across the country, in washington state, an avalanche left a group of students on a school trip snowed in. mireya villarreal has the story. >> reporter: this pile of snow, at least 30 feet high and 150 feet wide, is blocking the only way in or out of the north cascades institute's environmental learning center. >> we're trapped! >> reporter: korrena standley is one of the 42 students on a field trip from henry jackson high school trapped. after reassuring their parents that they're okay, her classmates took to social media, describing their unexpected adventure, like only high schoolers can. >> we're just trying to have fun and make light of it. >> reporter: teacher meghan emery says the inconvenience turned into an important lesson on the environment. they were supposed to go home on friday, but this road block will keep them here at least until monday. for now, they're making the best of their ual
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a promise that hit the beaches of normandy. a covenant that split the skies over berlin. a vow that captured iwo jima. a promise was made. a solemn oath that liberated seoul. a sacred trust that defended khe sanh. a pact that dug in in da nang. a contract that weathered tet. a promise was made. a pledge that stormed the desert in iraq. a bond that patrolled door-to-door in fallujah. an iou that braved ieds in kandahar. a promise was made. to america's veterans. a promise we all must keep. dav fights for all veterans and their families so they get the health care, financial benefits and support they earned. if your'e a veteran who needs help, or you'd like to help us keep the promise,
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iraqi troops, backed by the u.s. military, are tightening the noose around isis in the city of mosul. holly williams is covering the battle . >> reporter: isis fighters snipe at iraqi forces pushing into mosul's old city. one of the extremist's last strongholds. [ explosions ] 350 yards from the frontline this week, we were with general al jaberi, as he called in helicopter gunships. targeting an isis position where they were burning tires to try to hide their location. >> we are going to move a lot. we are going to fight isis house to house.
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but we put a safe sector for the civilians if they want to come to us. >> reporter: bearing a victorious mood on the frontline, and it's easy to understand why. nearly three years ago, isis swept triumphantly across northern iraq, as many iraqi soldiers ran away, rather than putting up a fight. the extremists captured mosul with ease. a gang of violent fanatics who claim to have established a new islamic state. now iraqi forces have regrouped and isis have been beaten back. some iraqi commanders told us they'll retake the entire city within weeks. they already have isis surrounded in mosul and they're pummeling the extremists. [ explosions ]
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but this is the cost of liberation. >> down the street the main government building. >> reporter: a city smashed beyond recognition, its people frightened and exhausted. they survived more than two years under isis, only to see their neighborhoods turned into battlefields. "god bless you," said this woman to the troops. it's been a horrible week. on this street, they've defused a roadside bomb. a parting gift from the extremists. mosul will soon be free of iity its people with deep scars. holly williams, cbs news mosul. the recent murders of three transgender women in louisiana are not linked but their deaths are part of a disturbing trend. don champion looked into this. >> reporter: the fear is real in
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ammani dupree. >> i've been frightened but not like this before. >> reporter: last month, her close friend, chyna gibson and sierra michelvy were murdered within a week of each other. a week earlier, jaquarrius holland was killed in another louisiana town. all of the victims, trans women of color. >> what scares me the most is that people will feel like they can get away with these things and nothing will be done about it. >> reporter: while the three murders here in louisiana aren't connected, they highlight an alarming trend. seven trans women have been killed already this year. last year a record 23 were killed, the majority black and latino women. beverly tillery at the new york city anti-violence project tracks these cases and feels the political climate including bathroom bills, are making the trans community less safe. >> when you can't be valued for simply who you are then that sets up a situation where people
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>> reporter: tillery says discrimination often leaves trans women of color without jobs and living in dangerous neighborhoods. many states, including louisiana, don't even protect trans people under hate crime laws. dupree, who works as a professional makeup artist, mentors young people in a community trying to find its voice. >> how many more people have to be killed before something is done about it? >> reporter: she says they are tired. but wont give up their right to live as who they are. don champion, cbs news, new orleans. up next, after a steel plant spewed contaminants on this farmer's land, he decided to try an unusual experiment.
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so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things. >> important message for residents age 50 to 85. write down this number now. right now, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you are on a fixed income, learn about affordable whole life insurance that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, call this number now. your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. stand by to learn more. >> i'm alex trebek, here to tell you about a popular life insurance plan
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farmers in a region of italy once known for cheeses have turned to cultivating a type of cannabis -- not to smoke or sell -- but to decontaminate polluted soil. the hemp they're growing contains very little thc -- the compound that makes people high. seth doane checked out the crop. >> reporter: vincenzo fornara showed us his now-empty farm, once packed with more than 600 sheep. for generations, our family produced ricotta and meat he recalled. until 2008, when italy's government discovered the toxic chemical dioxin in his sheep and slaughtered the entire herd. the culprit -- just a mile away. contaminants spewing from this massive steel plant, europe's larg
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never have grazing animals again. to clean up his land, he decided to try a rather unusual experiment. he's growing marijuana. fornaro planted industrial hemp to try to leech contaminants from the soil. the science is called phyto-remediation. contaminants are absorbed by the fast-growing roots of the cannabis plant which stores or transforms toxins into a harmless substance. you think this marijuana is the future of your farm? "yes, absolutely," he said. this crop is past harvest and doesn't look like much now. but it's proven to pull heavy metals from soil and was used following the nuclear disaster at chernobyl to remove radioactive cesium. you have hemp oil, hemp beer. >> claudio sells some of the thousands of products made from indust
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"we want to eliminate the prejudice against cannabis," he said. he took us to an apartment complex built from hemp composite materials. so passers-by don't miss the point the grass out front is cannabis. we must innovate, fornaro told us, and develop in a way that's ecologically sound. in the shadow of the steel factory, this farmer is pegging his future to a very different type of plant. seth doane, cbs news, taranto, italy. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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swells from radio ♪ [howling continues] is thno, it's, uh, breyers gelato indulgences. you really wouldn't like it. it's got caramel and crunchy stuff. i like caramel and crunchy stuff. breyers gelato indulgences. it's way beyond ice cream. we have another report now from holly williams in iraq. here, she meets up with a shadow platoon of gamers who are using drones to fight isis.
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>> reporter: it looks like a toy plane. >> it's just a really big slingshot. >> reporter: and sounds like a lawnmower. but the rq7bv2 is a $1.5 million drone. the u.s. military calls it "the shadow." in the skies above mosul, it allows the american coalition to do this, call in air strikes targeting isis positions. sergeant joe pinchott is a drone pilot with the 82nd airborne division in northern iraq, surveilling the battlefield in incredible detail from the back of a humvee. >> by the vehicle they're driving, and what they're wearing it's pretty easy to tell. >> you can see what people are wearing? >> enough to make out whether they're american or not. i can't read somebody's name tag or anything. but i can tell what they're wearing. >> rporter: the average age of the drone pilots in shadow
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keen video gamers, but these screens are too secret for us to show you. how is it different to a video game? >> it's much slower paced, graphics aren't quite as good, the controls aren't quite the same. it's sort of like a video game, but nobody would buy to play this video game. >> reporter: isis has its own drones, which it uses to guide its suicide bombers, and which they've even adapted to drop explosives. for the most part though the extremists rely on low-tech weapons like rifles and explosives. but america's military technology is gradually beating back the enemy. holly williams, cbs news, iraq. when we return, around the country saturday was a day to meet a muslim. the goal -- to build acceptance.
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finally tonight, in 85 cities across the country saturday was "meet a muslim day" a little more than 1% of the u.s. population is muslim, and many americans have never met a person of the muslim faith.
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tony dokoupil shows us how the meet-and-greet went. >> reporter: it's been a bruising time in american politics and you might expect american muslims to feel bruised more than most. >> there's no better time to be a muslim in america than now. although there is a lot of islamophobia happening out there there's a lot of curiosity. >> reporter: but on saturday, muslims across the country tried to fight fear of islam with friendly conversation and facts. >> as a muslim in america, what do you find is the most common question or misconception that people have? >> probably the most common one is that jihad is a violent war against the non-muslims. there's nothing in islam that allows for radicalism. >> reporter: that exchange and hundreds like it were part of the first national "meet a muslim day," a project of the ahmadiyya muslim youth association. spokesperson salaam bhatti met people in new york's times square.
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comfort zones, and have our neighbors meet us. so that we can let them know that islam is a peaceful religion, muslims are loyal to this country. this is our country of residence, and we're here to progress together. >> reporter: almost two-thirds of americans don't know a muslim in their everyday lives, according to pew research. >> people tell us islam is cancer, it needs to be eradicated. >> reporter: and according to the fbi, anti-muslim hate crimes have surged 67% since 2002, reaching a level not seen since the 9/11 attacks. volunteer assad banguwa hopes this weekend of conversation will help bring those numbers down. >> but it's all about a lack of knowledge. if they're a little more educated about the topic, that's why we're here. >> reporter: and many were grateful to learn something new. tony dokoupil, cbs news, new york. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. if the justice department has any proof of wiretapping at trump tower, a congressional committee wants that evidence turned over today. the deadline looms as pressure mounts on president trump to drop his wiretapping claim against president obama or prove it. here's errol barnett. >> the president has one of two choices, either retract or to provide the information that the american people deserve. >> reporter: republican senator john mccain today said he has no reason to believe president trump's claim of being wiretapped. >> i hope we get to the bottom of all these matters. >> reporter: republican senate intelligence committee member
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supporting intelligence. >> either the president quite deliberately for some reason made up this charge or perhaps more disturbing the president really believes this. >> reporter: last weekend, president trump tweeted that president obama ordered surveillance of trump tower during the election. he offered no evidence or further explanation. >> no, i said i'm not aware and i'm not aware. >> reporter: press secretary sean spicer struggled to clarify if the surveillance occurred because mr. trump was already part of investigations into russia. >> that's why we want the house and senate to do what the president has asked of them to look into this. >> reporter: house members are asking the department of justice to turn over any evidence of wiretapping by monday. president obama's director of national intelligence has disputed the president's claim. >> there was no such wiretap activity mounted against the president-elect. >> reporter: president trump has asked congress to investigate his wiretapping accusations
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congress is still waiting for any supporting evidence from the white house. meanwhile, fbi director james comey is scheduled to testify before the house committee on this matter one week from tomorrow. >> errol barnett, thanks. the next round in the fight over health care reform comes today. the congressional budget office will release its analysis of the gop plan to repeal and replace the affordable care act. the two biggest numbers, how many people will likely lose their health insurance and how much it will cost. republicans in the house have been pushing the bill through without that information. john dickerson spoke to some of principals on "face the nation." >> reporter: you have conservative governors, members of the house, aarp, medical hospital association, the health insurance lobby, all coming out against this. you're pleased with the reaction, but the reaction has been awful. >> i wouldn't say it's been awful. i think the reaction is -- everybody wants to compare this to obamacare as if they can keep these gu
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as if we're going to have obamacare plans and we're going to finance it a different way. this is repealing and replacing obamacare. so this first part is very, very important. it repeals the entire fiscal pieces of the law and replaces it with a patient centered system. the point is, a lot of people who you just mentioned, they would like to see us make americans buy what they say we should buy. >> these are critics on the conservative side. >> when you're a governing party, getting consensus among your wide, big-tent party, everybody doesn't get what they want. but we're getting much better policy here. let me put it this way. obamacare is collapsing. if we just did nothing, washed our hands of the situation, we would see a further collapse of the health insurance markets. so we feel an obligation to step in front of that collapse and replace this law with one that works, that has more freedom. some people would like it to be done a little bit differently. the point here, though, is we have an obligation. we made a
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who elected us that we would repeal and replace this law, and we basically said this is what we would replace it with, and now we're keeping our word. >> there are so many people that have issues with it. on your wide, on the other side. tom cotton, senator from arkansas, lindsay graham, have both said, let's slow down. why go so fast? >> that's puzzling me to me? why go so fast? let me see -- we ran on repeal and replace in 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016. and oh, by the way, we spent six months last year developing a replacement plan. we ran on that plan. >> these senators know that. >> this has been a long and deliberate process. suggesting that this is going fast, going through this four committees, going through regular order. saying we were going to do this for seven years and now come to the point where we're on the cusp of keeping our word, i hardly think we're rushing
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>> it's basically obamacare light. it keeps the subsidies, keeps the taxes for a year, keeps the cadillac tax forever. it keeps the individual mandate interestingly. republicans have complained for years, saying we didn't like that government was going to make you pay a penalty. now instead of paying a penalty to the government, you pay it to the insurance industry. there's also bailouts for the insurance industries. the one thing that's wrong with obamacare that's most visible to everybody is premiums are rising through the roof, soring in the individual market. that will happen under the ryan plan, as well. because they d nothing to fix the fundamental problem. it's the ryan plan or the status quo. what he has ran through the committee is his without any amendments. that's the question, if we get what we got from ryan, he will not have the votes and we have to get to that point before true negotiations begin. right now there's a charm offensive going on. everybody is being nice to everybody because they want us to vote for this, but we're not going to vote for it.
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>> this has everything to do with is a massive shift of wealth from working people and middle income people to the very richest people in this country. it is a $275 billion tax break for the top 2%. millionaires will get about $50,000 a year in tax breaks, while at the same time, some 5 million to 10 million people are going to lose their health insurance. premiums are going to soar. the aarp says that if you are 64 years of age and making about $25,000 a year, you're going to pay up to $7,000 more foreyour health insurance. they're going the defund planned parenthood, deny over 2 million women the right to choose the health care that they need. they're going to decimate medicaid, which is why the american medical association, the ama, and the american hospital association oppose it, in addition to the aarp. this is a disgrace. >> wt
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an unfair comparison, because the people who have coverage now have coverage in a rickety system that is getting worse, insurance companies are dropping out of the system. so it's unfair to compare the people that have it now because the system is falling apart. >> oh, really? 5 million to 10 million are going to have no health insurance at all. nobody has ever suggested that the affordable care act, obamacare, was perfect. but it did put 20 million people into the ranks of the insured. in my view, and what the american people want, is an improvement on obamacare, not the decimation of obamacare and throwing so many people off of health insurance and raising premiums substantially. it is very hard for ryan or anybody else not to deny that what they are bringing forth is far, far, far worse than obamacare, and that its primary purpose is massive tax bre
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the wealthiest people in this country.
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can it fix this teen's skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne, not so much on other teen things.
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in iraq, islamic state militants are making their last stand as allied forces tighten the noose around isis held neighborhoods in mosul. the jihadists are outnumbered 10-1. and while many are determined to fight to the death, others are trying to escape the blood shed. up to 600,000 civilians are caught in the cross fire. holly williams has two reports from the front lines. >> reporter isis fighters snipe at iraqi forces who are pushing into mosul's old city. one of the extremist's last strongholds. [ explosions ] 350 yards from the frontline this week, we were with general al jeburi, as he called in helicopter gunships.
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targeting an isis position where they were burning tires to try to hide their location. >> we are going to move a lot. we are going to fight isis house to house to liberate the city. but we put a safe sector for the civilians if they want to come to us. >> reporter: bearing a victorious move on the frontline, and it's easy to understand why. nearly three years ago, isis swept triumphantly across northern iraq, as many iraqi soldiers ran away, rather than putting up a fight. the extremists captured mosul with ease. a gang of violent fanatics who claim to have established a new islamic state. now iraqi forces have regrouped and isis have been beaten back. some iraqi commanders told us they'll retake the entire city
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they already have isis surrounded in mosul and they're pummeling the extremists. [ explosions ] but this is the cost of liberation. >> down the street the main government building. >> reporter: a city smashed beyond recognition, its people frightened and exhausted. they survived more than two years under isis, only to see their neighborhoods turned into battlefields. god bless you, said this woman to the troops. it's been a horrible week. on this street, they've defused a roadside bomb. a parting gift from the extremists. mosul will soon be free of isis, but they have left the city and its people with deep scars.
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the so-called islamic state is crumbling. iraqi forces are now on the edge of mosul's historic old town. one of the extremist's last strongholds. isis fighters are being killed and rounded up as prisoners. but even as they lose on the battlefield, they are still waging an online propaganda war painting themselves as a band of holy warriors. this isis defector, who we met in turkey, shows just how powerful that propaganda can be. he told us he served in the military in jordan, and then joined isis in late 2014, believing they had created a just islamic state. but said he quickly realized he made a mistake. "they kill anyone who argues with them," he told us. he was surprised to discover their brutality. yet joined the extremists even after he watched some of their
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including the beheadings of two american journalists. why would you still join when you had seen them committing atrocities like that? "they said they were cia agents, not journalists, and they slipped a verse from the koran into the video to justify the killings. no muslim could object or say this was wrong." he told us he paid a smuggler to get him out of isis territory last year. he's far from alone to succumbing to the extremist propaganda. "there are many people that came to isis like me, tens of thousands. if they had known the truth they wouldn't have joined." isis is losing the fight in iraq and syria. but that may not be enough to loosen its grip on the minds of many of its followers. holly williams, cbs news, northern iraq. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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sheryl crow has a new album dropping next month called "be myself. "and these days part of being herself is making women aware of the importance of early cancer detection. she's a survivor and discussed it all with rita braver. ♪ >> reporter: this is where we're used to seeing sheryl crow. ♪ ♪ every day is a winding road >> reporter: on stage with a guitar in her hands. ♪ but she says she's equally at home here. >> come right this way. i'm going to bring you into the exam room. >> reporter: demonti
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breast x-ray. >> we're going to do a top to bottom view, then we'll be turning the machine and doing a side view. >> reporter: a subject that was only once whispered about. >> women just didn't speak about their breasts. it was so tabu. obviously we live in a different day and age. i feel like i'm in kind of a rarified position in that i have a very large fan base of women and those women have teenage girls now. that's just great to at least stay on top of your own health. >> reporter: and she makes no bones about being a paid spokesperson for hologic, which makes 3-d imaging machines for mammograms. >> it can be the difference between a real harsh treatment or something that's early and ultimately a cure. >> reporter: crow has reason to understand the importance of early detection. in 2006, you discovered that you had breast cancer. how did you even learn you had
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>> i had a routine mammogram. it was a very inopportune time. it was right before the grammys. my personal life was in turmoil, the last thing i wanted to do was have a mammogram. and i did. the result was come back in six months, that we seen something that's suspect, but let's keep an eye on it. and my gynecologist said there is no six months. you don't wait. let's go and get a second opinion. let's get a biopsy and it turned out it was invasive. >> do you remember your emotions? you're young and they're telling you that you have breast cancer. >> yeah. it's one of those scenes in a movie where everything is swirling. she said, you're not going to die. this is very early and you'll get on with your life. >> reporter: it was a life that sheryl crow had worked hard to build. raised in missouri, she worked as a grade school music teacher after college.
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♪ ♪ in and out, in and out, that's what a hamburger is all about ♪ >> all the greats. >> reporter: but in 1986, she decided to try her luck in l.a. it took you a while. nobody was beating down your door and saying please, honey, make us some music. >> every label said we don't know what to do with a blue eyed country soul singer. i was pretty much turned down by everybody. ♪ i'm going to soak up the sun >> reporter: in 1993, she finally broke through. ♪ all i want to do is have some fun ♪ ♪ until the sun comes up over santa monica ♪ >> reporter: she had a string of hits. eventually racking up nine grammy awards. ♪
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and in 2006, at age 44, a double whammy. not only cancer, but the end of her engagement to cyclist lance armstrong. the whole saga unfolding publicly. >> you can work so long and have selling records, but when your life falls apart, you become like an a-celebrity. so there was a convergence of people being interested in my private life. and this for me was such an intrusion. >> reporter: she had 33 radiation treatments. >> every morning i would lay there with my arm over my head and reassess my life. >> reporter: and when she got a clean bill of health, she decided to take her mom's advice and not wait for marriage to have children. >> she just said, adopt, get a surrogate. your life doesn't have to look like the life you were born into. and that's what i did. i just thought you know what? life's so short.
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6-year-old levi and his big brother, 9-year-old wyatt. >> and action. >> reporter: but she's also found time to launch a new line of clothing. which she'll soon peddle on hsn. working from her converted barn in nashville, she's developing pieces based on her all-american style. >> it's a great way to get clothes out to people who can't afford the $350 jeans, which, you know, i go back to my hometown all the time and that is basically middle america. those are the people who are more economically strapped. >> that's who you want these clothes to appeal to? >> i think that's kind of who buys my records. >> reporter: and yes, she has a new record coming next month, called "be myself." the first single, which she recently performed at l.a.'s famed troubadour, is called "halfway there." ♪
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she says the song is about urging people to listen to each other in today's vitriolic political climate. >> it doesn't matter if you're this person and i'm that person, don't we all want the same thing at the end of the day? >> reporter: along with the songs she sings, crow says she'll continue to talk, urging women to get an annual mammogram. >> i was healthy. i didn't have any family history. the technology is getting better and better. so at a certain age, take it into your own hands to make sure you're your advocate. i look at the opportunity as a gift than a responsibility. it's worth being sad. ♪
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, march 13th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." bracing for a blizzard. while millions of people in the northeast gear up for more than a foot of snow in some places, the midwest is digging out. a documentary director raises new questions about the final minutes of michael brown's life with newly released video from the ferguson convenience store near where he was killed. and prove it or drop it. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle call on president trump to prove his claim that president obama wiretapped trump tower.

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