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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 29, 2017 2:07am-3:51am EDT

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single most important step america has ever taken in the fight against global climate change. >> reporter: when president obama created the plan mr. trump is reversing, mr. obama emphasized the need to tackle rising global temperatures. >> no challenge poses a greater threat to our future and future generations. >> reporter: but president trump once called climate change a hoax, and scott pruitt recently denied a direct link between carbon dioxide and global warming. >> i would not agree it's a contributor to the global warming we see. >> reporter: in 2016, more than 20 states complained it exceeded federal law. mr. trump urges all federal agency to suspend or revise any rule believed to limit production. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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a after the president's announcements today, the governors of california and new york said they would continue to impose state loss limiting carbon in the atmosphere. 20% of americans live in one of those states. and john blackstone met one of them, a climate scientist who sent mr. trump a warning. >> reporter: ben santor has believed that temperatures rising and glaciers melting, climate change denial would melt away. he's faced with a new president, raising old doubts. >> a lot of it's a hoax. >> imagine you spend your entire life trying to do one thing. and someone comes along and says everything you've done is a hoax
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what do you do with at? >> reporter: in the 1990s, santor became one of the first scientists to analyze all the climate data and reach what at the time was a startling conclusion. >> the balance suggests a discernible human influence on global climate, and like it or mott, not, i was the guy who carried the can carrying that finding. >> reporter: he says scientists have proven again and again that arguments made by climate change deniers are wrong. >> the zombie arguments take on a life of their own once they're out there. they keep on coming back, and you can't slay them. that's frustration, it's not a hoax. this matters to every american. >> reporter: now climate change funding is on the federal chopping block. what happens to those scientists? ha happens to you? >> if the funding goes away, it will be difficult for me to
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my job. >> reporter: difficult, he says but not impossible.since much o covered by grants. what worries him more, he says is a new climate of intimidation. >> there's been a statement, get with the program or get out. if the program is to advance ignorance, then i'm out with the >> he has been speaking up as other scientists are now doing. scott, on april 22nd, not so coincidentally which is earth day. >> john blackstone by the way. thank you. this mosh irning, the presi tweeted and then crowed by a decision by ford to invest in michigan. car companies coming back to the u.s., mr. trump wrote. but who deserves the credit? dean reynolds found out. >> reporter: the white house
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big announcement by ford today, read a tweet by the president. car companies coming back to the u.s. jobs, jobs, jobs. it happened three weeks after mr. trump met with auto industry executives, as press secretary sean spicer was quick to point out. >> this is jobs news under the president. >> reporter: but the automaker says the billion-dollar investment is about plant modernization. and new production jobs come to agent 130. the new investment was actually agreed to during the 2015 labor negotiations, when barack obama was president. so, is this announcement by ford big news? >> they're big investment. but they're big dollars that we have known about by and large. >> reporter: she is for the automotive research. >> we've seen finalizing
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previously made. >> reporter: after seven years of solid growth, production jobs in the u.s. auto industry have reached a peak. news of any growth is liable to get a warm welcome. >> clearly, we know there's a microscope around auto investments and manufacturing jobs. and we're proud of the fact we make more vehicles in the u.s. than anybody else. >> reporter: ford says further expansion will depend on how successful the white house and congress are in passing tax perform and a new infrastructure bill. ford will be watching both efforts closely. >> dean reynolds, thanks. and late today, the house led by republicans, voted to peel back internet privacy protections. this would allow internet providers to collect and sell customers' personal information to marketers, including health data and web browsing histories. the senate p
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week and the president is expected to sign it. risk?l put lives at and later tsa defends this pat-down of a teenage boy.
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highway guardrails are supposed to save lives. but one type is suspected of contributing to
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her. van cleave is following ie >> nearly four months after steven's 17-year-old daughter, hannah, died in a violent car crash, tennessee sent a near $3,000 bill for the repairs for the guardrail hannah's car collided with. >> it's one of the most emoti emotionally tone-deaf acts i have ever witnessed. it was not made out to me. it was made out to hannah. i was furious. >> reporter: last november, her car veered off i-75. instead of collapsing on to itself, the guardrail penetrated the driver's car, hitting hannah in the chest and head. she was killed instantly. tennessee announced they would no longer use the guardrails. >> i don't understand how you can leave a dangerous product on the road, after you've acknowledged
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that's russian roulette. the state of tennessee chose to play russian roulette with people's lives. and my daughter is dead. >> reporter: at least four deaths in tennessee have been linked to the guardrails, prompting concerns about how those rails respond to crashes over 25 miles per hour. >> this is a an unprecedented situation. it was one that needed to be removed from the network because they could potentially pierce the vehicle. >> reporter: paul is from the department of transportation. he admits that sending that bill was a horrible mistake. >> we apologize for the family for that. >> reporter: the company that makes the guardrail, says it has passed all federal crash and safety tests. it's widely known that no guardrail can protect against all crashes. >> thanks. we'll be right back.
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the tsa is now resorting to more aggressive screening of passengers who fail an initial check at airports. one of these new pat-downs was recorded at dfw airport. and we asked omar to get the story behind it. >> reporter: jennifer williamson started recording, as the tsa pulled aside her 13-year-old son, aaron, for additional screening, after he left his laptop in his bag. then, for two minutes, performed the new pat-down procedure on the boy. >> i do think as a young child, that posed no threat, that had already passed an x-ray screening, it was completely unnecessary. williamson said she performed the agents
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processing disorder, that makes him sensitive to touch. >> we were told we could submit to the pat-down or be escorted out of the airport. >> reporter: the tsa says all of the approved procedures for followed. the tsa implemented the pat-down procedure after a 2015 audit showed that agents had failed to connect handguns and other weapons at security checkpoints. travelers don't mind the extra scrutiny. >> for me, it's okay to make sure everyone stays safe. they're having incidents at the airports recently. >> reporter: williamson says she understands the need for safety. but is upset her son wasn't given any other screening options. >> a child in that situation should be handled more delicately. >> reporter: williamson has filed a formal complaint with the
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happened here at dfw airport. >> omar, thanks. former first lady gets a marriage proposal. her answer, next.
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newly discovered letters to and from a former first lady go up for auctions tomorrow. here's mark phillips. >> reporter: an old, battered briefcase that carries the secrets of two battered lives. a case of letters between a former british ambassador to washington and a widowed woman he knew well. a woman named jackie kennedy. >> the minute we cracked open the boxes, i saw her loopy handwriting and her loopy "js." and i knew it was jackie kennedy. >> reporter: he found the letters locked away when the house contents were put up for sale. to unction them, you have to roll back the clock to the camelot years when
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british ambassador to washingto. then, fate took over. a few years after jfk was killed, ormsby-gore's wife, silvia, died, too. maybe it was the common trtrage their friendship. but in the following years, jackie and david became an item, vacations together. the sexualati salations on the level. dear david. >> particularly the way she signs off. with all my love. i think there is a real warmth there. >> reporter: the letters contain no marriage proposal. but there's a clear sign one was made and rejected. when jackie besides to marry aristotle onassis instead, ormsby-gore writes as a bitter, heartbroken man. as for your photograph, he
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touch of finality. and it must be said, cruelty. >> she is writing from aristotle onassis' yacht. >> reporter: writes to him from the yacht. >> with a greek stamp and the stationery of his yacht. >> reporter: that was that. when david ormsby-gore died 17 years later, jackie went to his funeral. mark phillips, cbs news, london. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news. and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is "the cbs overnight news." welcome to overnight news. i'm don dahler. president trump is taking action on another campaign promise. this one aimed at erasing former president obama's legacy on climate change. president trump signed an executive order reversing obama-era regulations on coal and oil industries. as a candidate, mr. trump called climate change a hoax. the white house says the president believes it's real. but the new policy is about jobs and boosting energy production. here's major garriett. >> reporter: time taking steps to lift the restriction on government energy and to
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job-killing regu >> reporter: president trump made historic of the obama regulations to curb greenhouse gas gases. mr. trump took the first step of erasing rules from coal-fired power plants and easing restrictions on new coal mines. >> my administration is putting an end to the war on coal. >> reporter: industry workers joined mr. trump for the event. >> that means you're going back to work. >> reporter: coal mining accounts for roughly 50,000 jobs in america. down from its peak in 180,000 in 1985. automation and the ability of hydraulic gas has made coal production less competitive. >> we're here to announce the single-most important step america has ever taken in the fight against global climate change. >> reporter: when president obama created the clean power plan, mr. trump is
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reversing, mr. obama cited the need to challenge rising global challengers. >> no challenge poses a better threat to our future and future generations. >> reporter: president trump called the climate change a hoax. and scott pruitt denied a direct link between carbon monoxide and global warming. >> it is not a contributor to the global warming we see. >> reporter: a cloud of suspicion over the russian interference in the 2016 election. the white house committee chairman cannot longer be trusted to look into ties of the trump team. >> reporter: house speaker ryan says he has full confidence that congressman nunes can conduct a fair and credible investigation. but pressure is building on the congressman to explain his actions and reveal his source. >> there was no sneaking around. i
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did not go to the west wing. did not talk to the president. >> reporter: the chairman of the house intelligence committee, devin nunes, said it was not a secret he visited the white house tuesday to review class y classified documents. >> i needed a place to review the information. >> reporter: the congressman wouldn't reveal his source. but says there is evidence that agencies under the obama administration had intercepted communications involving members of the transition team. but he dismissed allegations that president obama wiretapped trump tower. nearly a week after nunes briefed the president, adam schiff says the congressman has yet to share the intelligence with other members of the house committee he leads. >> it's not just an unwillingness to share with democrats. none of the committee members have seen what the chairman is referring to. >> reporter: schiff thinks the chairman should recuse himself from the
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>> certainly, this is a decision that i don't reach lightly. and i'm very unhappy, rafrankly to have gotten to this point. >> reporter: democrats are accusing nunes to shield the president, whether his campaign team coordinated with russian operatives. >> chairman nunes is falling down on the job, and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. >> reporter: in another surprise move, late last week, congressman nunes announced he was bringing back fbi director comey and nsa director rogers to testify in a closed hearing. that was supposed to happen today. but that hearing has been canceled. a mother in texas is outraged over how the tsa handled the security screening of her young son. she says agents went way too far at dallas-ft. worth international airport. she posted a video of the pat-down on facebook. omar has that.
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pat-down that went into effect earlier this month. that touched a nerve with a mother who went through security through dfw here on sunday, with her son. >> we were treated with utter disrespect, as if we were criminals. >> reporter: jennifer williamson turned her anger into action, sunday, recording a tsa officer patting down her 13-year-old son at dallas international airport and posted it on face book. >> they went over his sensitive areas a little more than necessary, given he wasn't wearing bulky clothing or anything like that. >> reporter: williamson said the whole thing started when agents found a laptop in his book bag as it went through the scanning machine. they said her son would have to submit to a pat-down, even though he did not set off the body scanner. they suggested
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in otherso processing disorder. the agent explains the procedure, and pats down his backside, front and legs. the supervisor then instructs the man to complete the final step. as per policy, the tsa uses the back of his hands for pat-downs over sensitive areas of his body. the tsa says the boy cooperated during the screening process. and all approved procedures were followed. as for a wait time, in a statement, the agency says the passengers were at the checkpoint for approximately 45 minutes, which included the time it took to discuss screening procedures with the mother, and to screen three carry-on items that prior required further inspection. >> he said i don't know why they did this. i don't know what i did wrong. and to me, that was a sign of trauma for him to think he had done anything wrong. >> reporter: the new procedures were put
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audit found there were serious security lapses. williamson has filed a complaint with the tsa but has not heard back. "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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president trump's proposed budget calls for deep cuts in the education department. supporters applaud the $9 billion rollback. but what does it mean for students who rely on federal funds? michelle miller visited a successful after-school program in new jersey that could be eliminated. >> reporter: proposed budget cuts would determine nate a nationwide after-school program known as 21st century community learni learnings. there's 2,500 of these centers across the country. and they can be found in every state. we went to new jersey, where administrators said it's not only working, but there's a waiting list to enroll. as the school day ends in plainfield, new jersey, most students head home.
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but about 350 of them take to g for a federally-funded after-school program known as 21st century community learning centers. >> we align what we do to the school day to support schoolteachers. but with after-school and summer learning opportunities, we can really hone in on our instructional craft and be more innovative. >> reporter: zelda spence is the director of the program in plainfield. >> almost 100% of our after-school students graduate high school or obtain a vocation and go on to college and graduate. >> reporter: and they wouldn't have if they didn't have this program? >> it would be highly difficult. our children here struggle. many of our families are economically compromised. and we're able to provide opportunities that their parents just don't have the money to be able to do. >> reporter: if you lose this funding,t
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>> it would be devastating for us. >> reporter: brothers jose and joelle spend afternoons here when the parents are at work. >> reporter: her mom met us on the lunch hour to boast about their accomplishments. >> i see a lot of change in my kids. >> i got all-as. i said, i got all-as and i spent you a picture. >> reporter: did she believe you? >> i sent her a picture of the grades. and it was all-as. >> reporter: for all of the success here in plainfield, national centers has been less encouraging. evaluation of the program in 2013, just one-third of students participating saw improvement in math and english grades. that falls short of the target
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half of the students who participate. >> it's a program that's failed to meet its stated mission. >> reporter: lindsay burke is the director of education policy for the heritage foundation. a conservative thinktank based in washington, d.c. >> on the evidence of the program or the lack of evidence, about its effectiveness, we have to ask whether this is appropriately housed at the federal level. and is it really appropriate for the federal government to be funding after-school programs? and i think that the answer to that question is no. >> reporter: 21st century community learning centers were created in 1994, under president bill clinton. then, expanded in 2001 under president george w. bush. it serves more than 2 million people on an annual budget of $1.2 billion. $550,000 of that goes to the plainfield new jersey district. federal funding that props to
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zero in president trump's current budget proposal. is there any way the district could fund this program without the federal dollars? >> it would be challenging. of course, we can look to, wright and obtain grant funding opportunities. but that is not a guarantee. and sacrificing the healthy and very important learning experiences for children, it just doesn't seem worth it to me. the new wall street statue of a girl staring down the iconic charging bull will stand its ground for a year. the statue has become a major tourist attraction. but the artist behind the bull is seeing red. saying it changes his work. >> reporter: for decades, this 7,000-pound bull has dominated lower manhattan by
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but since march 8th, it had to tays right here, staring down the bull forever. the fearless girl began as a temporary installation, an ad campaign for a company hoping to highlight the lack of women on corporate boards. but after weeks of adoring crowds, she has a permit to stay put through february 2018. >> she spoke to the moment. that sense, that women were not going to live in fear. >> reporter: the artist built the statue. >> the bottom line is, she says women are strong. women are here. >> reporter: but the fearless girl's symbolic staredown with wall street's charging bull, is a standoff. >> they are transforming the message of the bull. >> reporter: arthur is a spokesperson for the italian sculptor who made the bull as a symbol of hope. >> now, this girl is confronting, a monstrous figure. that's an oue.
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transform it. ep1989, the bull was considered the outrage, dropped illegally on a public street downtown. piccolo led the campaign to get the bull its home now. >> it was in front of the new york stock exchange. the new york stock exchange, represents most of the companies that have a problem with equality. >> she has clearly struck a nerve. she has become an overnight sensation. >> reporter: new york congressman carolyn maloney and thousands are pushing to make the fearless girl's message last trevo forever, possibly in this very location. what would you say to the people that said the bull was fine on its own and the girl changes the meaning. >> the world changes. and women are here. we're an intergral part of the business xhaummunity and we're even more important tomorrow. >> reporter: the financial firm that commissioned the
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declined to comment on the controversy or their hopes for the future of the girl. the represents of the bull are reviewing their legal options. "cbs overnight news" will be right back. to remem. what! she washed this like a month ago the long lasting scent of gain flings makewith instant moisture utes from k-y ultragel.
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martial arts. but lee also did something else with his hands that he hoped would have a lasting impact without actually hitting anyone. here's ben tracy. >> reporter: it was a few years ago that bruce lee's family regained control of his licensing rights and his likeness. his wife, linda, has stepped out of the spotlight. but now, his only child, shannon, wants to know her dad was as deep thinking poet as hard-hitting warrior. bruce lee is recognized all over the world for this -- he made fight scenes look like some sort of brutal ballet. he popularized martial arts in the person world, and changed the way asians were portrayed on the big screen. this is the bruce lee archive? >> the pressure trove, yes. >> reporter: shannon lee was 4 years old in 1973, when her father
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>> what i remember most about him is the feeling of him. his energy, how it felt to be in his presence. >> reporter: and now, we're learning bruce lee the fighter was also bruce lee the philosophical writer. >> i don't think a lot of people understand the depth of his character. his knowledge, and what was really foundational about the man, which was his philosophy. >> reporter: these are some of your feat's writings. >> yes. >> reporter: and in the mid-20s, shannon found essays her father left behind, including one that he rewrote during the last year of his live. >> above all, actual wising myself to be an artist of life.
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>> reporter: what do you make of the fact he has nine drafts? >> he's in t he's working it out on the page. he has crossed out things and written in other words, in different pen colors. it was a moment in time for him to very intentionally try to communicate who is bruce lee? what is he really about. >> reporter: it was a difficult moment in his life. he was achieving a goal of making a mainstream hollywood film. the 1973 classic, "enter the dragon." but shannon says the studio wanted to take out all of the philosophical elements he insisted on adding to the script. >> and he fought. he fought with the writers. he fought with the producers. he said, no. i am not coming on to set until you guarantee me that this is going to be in the film. >> reporter: he got his way. >> he got his way. >> it is like a finger pointing away to
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don't concentrate on the finger or you will miss all that heavenly glory. >> reporter: what a gift this must be for you, as a daughter, who lost your father, to have all of this. >> reporter: finding this gift came with a great loss. >> right before my 24th birthday, my brother was killed. and that plummeted me into quite a depression for many years. >> this way, you'll always remember. >> reporter: 28-year-old brandon lee died in 1993, after being shot on the set of the movie "the crow." shannon felt comfort in her father's words. >> i came across this quote that started with, the medicine for my suffering, i had within me. a and i remember it hitting me so clearly in the chest. you have the ability to shift out of
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you just have to look for the path and find the way. and so, i did. hi, everyone. this is shannon lee. >> reporter: she is now share herring father's philosophy with the world, through her podcast. >> he had his quote, you know, under the sky, under the heavens, we're all one family. >> reporter: they've been downloaded more than 1.3 million times. >> mostly millennials. it's mostly young people. it thrills me that people are grabbing on to the philosophy. they're getting the message. they're getting to know who he is, beyond the movies. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
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the raiders to leave oakland and start playing in sin city. >> reporter: the image of this city has changed over the decades. and apparently, that's part of the reason why the nfl approved the move. the city's formerly seedy reputation has shifted. and now, the city is known as a big-league entertainment capital, hopefully ready for a big-league football team. it's been a long time coming for these las vegas sports fans. the city is finally home to an nfl franchise. >> raid deers the. >> va caegas is the best thing ra
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roge t oakland, vegas offered $750ba o $650 million loan. but the biggest incentive, a new 65,000-seat domed stadium. raiders owner, mark davis, said the decision wasn't easy. >> i love the fans in oakland. there's going to be disappointment and some anger. >> this is a royal slap in the face. >> reporter: these oakland raider fans will have the loyalties tested over the next two years. the team will be playing in northern california, while the new las vegas stadium is being built. >> there are fans who oakland who will relish the opportunity to continue to support the team in its last years in oakland. there will be fans who say no thank you. >> reporter: but the phrase no thank you is familiar to vegas sports fans. both the utah jazz and oakla
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athletics had reportedly n of that was, perhaps, there was something untowa or unseemly about it. >> i think theed a version to vegas was ant vegas antiquated. that's the news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler.
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story that first gained national attention after an investigation by "60 minutes." the sexual abuse of american female gymnasts. tuesday, victims told congress the stories they had kept secret for years out of fear. legislation is in the works to protect future victims. we have the new developments from capitol hill. >> i want the women who testified to know how very proud i am of you for standing up. i know how hard it is. >> reporter: senators called today's testimony an act of bravery. elite
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by some in the gymnastics community for disturbing issue to light. now, i know i'm not alone. >> reporter: jessica howard says she was 15 when the doctor abused her. >> my postgymnastics life has been fraught with the abuse i experienced as a teenager. >> reporter: the national governing body for the sport has been embroiled. allegations against gymnastic coaches that prompted more than 100 young women, including howard and dancher, to come forward about nasser. usa gymnastics was a no-show at today's hearing. that
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supreme court. it would mandate immediate reporting to authorities of any sexual abuse. and ban coaches from continuing to work with children until it's them.mined there's no risk to former usa gymnastics president steve penny resigned this month. usa gymnastics supports the bill. >> my own view is that the board should change. and people be put on that board that have this number one in their mind. >> reporter: nasser is being held without bail. he pleaded not guilty to child pornography and sexual assault not related to dancher of howard. the representative didn't appear in person because of pending litigati litigation. >> thank you. president trump is calling the story of his campaign's ties to russia a hoax, even though
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house, senate and fbi are were looking into russian meddling in the election. and today, the republican chairman of the house committee will not take himself off of the investigations. democrats and one republican are demanding devin nunes recuse himself because he has appeared to be coordinating with the white house. jeff pegues has the latest. >> are you going to stay as chairman and run this investigation? >> why would i not? >> reporter: house intelligence committee chairman devin nunes dismissed accusations he's been intentionally delaying his committee's investigation. the committee has held one public hearing on russia and was supposed to have a second today. but after nunes said he had been shown intercepted communications involving trump transition team,
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it was supposed to featurecuri . in january, yates informed the white house that flynn had misled the vice president about his contacts with the russian ambassador. he obtained this letter warning there was a limit of what she could reveal in her testimony and she needs to consult with the white house. yates followed up with a white house lawyers on friday. they never responded. and the same day nunes canceled the hearing. >> the white house did not respond and took no action that prevented ms. yates from testifying. >> the american people should be hearing from sally yates. >> reporter: derek swalwell is a member of t
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>> this is what cover-up behavior looks like. >> that'sinalling for nunes to step aside. today i newsroom. thanks. today, president trump made good on a campaign promise and nullified a series of obama administration rules that limit greenhouse gases. his order would allow coal mining on federal lands, permit the oil tree industry to release metha methane. methane and carbon are leading to climate warming. all this is intended to put mineac
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and major garrett is at the government intrusion and to cancel job-killing f the obama administration's efforts to curb greenhouse gases t. mr. trump took the first step towards erasing rules to limit carbon monoxide emissions. coal mining accounts for 50,000 jobs in america. down from its peak of nearly 180,000 in 1985. automation and the ability of hydraulic gas has made coal production less competitive.
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single-most important step li >> reporter: when president obama created the clean power plan, mr. trump is now reversing, mr. obama cited the need to tackle rising global temperatures. >> no challenge poses a better threat to our future and future generations. >> reporter: president trump called the climate change a hoax. and his e.p.a. administrator, scott pruitt denied a direct link between carbon monoxide and gloal warming. >> it is not a contributor to the global warming we see. >> reporter: in 2016, the supreme court blocked mr mr. obama's clean power plan after 20 states complained it exceeded federal law. the trump order urges all agencies to suspend or revise any rule he believes burdens domestic energy production. "the cbs overnight news" will be right back
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democratic governors of california and new york said they would continue to impose state laws limiting carbon in the atmosphere. 20% of americans live in one of those states. and john blackstone met one of them, a climate scientist who sent mr. trump a warning. >> reporter: climate scientists ben sandter has believed with temperatures rising and glaciers melting, climbed change denial would melt away. >> boy, how naive were we? >> reporter: now, he's faced with a new president raising old doubts. >> a lot of it's a hoax. >> reporte >> imagine you spend your entire life trying to do one thing. and someone comes along saying
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hoax orte data and reach a startling conclusion. he balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate. and i'm the guy that carried the can for that finding. >> reporter: sant eer wrote an open letter to president-elect trump, saying not to listen to ignorant voices. he says scientists have proven that the deniers are wrong. >> the zombie arguments keep on coming back. and you can't slay them. that's the frustration. the alternative facts, it's not a hoax. this matters to every american. >> reporter: now, climate change funding is on the federal chopping block. what happens to those scientists? what happens to you? >> if the funding goes away, it will be difficult for me to do
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>> reporter: difficult, he says, but not impossible.sais a new c intimidation. >> there's been a statement, get with the program or get out. if the program is to advance ignorance, then i'm not with the program. >> reporter: santer would prefer to let the science speak for itself. but he's been speaking up as other scientists are now doing. scott, on april 2 22nd, which i earth day, thousands of scientists are expected to join a march on washington. >> john blackstone, by the bay. thank you. this morning, the president dweeted and then crowed about a decision by ford to invest in michigan. car companies coming back to the u.s., mr. trump wrote. but who deserves the credit? dean reynolds found out. >> reporter: the white house
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drumroll began early. big announcement by ford today, read a tweet from theen it happened three weeks after president trump met with auto industry executives. >> this is jobs news under the president. >> reporter: its automaker says the billion-dollar investment at three facilities is more about plant modernization. and new production jobs come to about 130. the new investment was actually agreed to during the 2015 labor negotiations when barack obama was president. is this announcement by ford today big news? >> well, big investment dollars. but dollars that we've known about since 2015 by and large. >> reporter: kristen is with the center for automotive research. >> what we've seen so far is this year is reannouncements or finalizing announcements that had been previously
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of solid growth, productionache news of any growth is liable to get a warm welcome. >> we know there's a microscope around auto investments and manufacturing jobs. and we're proud of the fact we make more vehicles in the u.s. than anybody else. >> reporter: ford says further expansion will depend on how successful the white house and congress are in passing tax reform and a big, new infrastructure bill. an executive told us ford will be watching both efforts closely. >> dean reynolds, thanks. and late today, the white house, led by republicans, voted to peel back internet privacy protecti protections. this would allow internet providers to collect and sell customers' personal information, to marketers. including health data and web browsing histories. the senate passed the bill
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highway guardrails are supposed to save lives. but one type is suspected of contributing to
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chris is following this. er dd in a violent car old crash, tennessee sent a nearly $3,000 bill for repairs for the guardrail hannah's car collided with. >> it is one of the most emotionally tone deaf acts i think i have ever witnessed. it was not made out to me. it was made out to hannah. i was furious. >> reporter: last november, her car veered off i-75. instead of collapsing on to itself, the guardrail penetrated the driver's car, hitting hannah in the chest and head. she was killed instantly. hannah's death came days after tennessee announced they would no longer use the guardrails. >> i don't understand how you can leave a dangerous product on the road, after you've acknowledged it.
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the state of tennessee chose to play russianle and my daughter is dead. >> reporter: at least four deaths in tennessee have been linked to the guardrails, prompting concerns about how those rails respond to crashes above 45 miles per hour. >> this is an unprecedented situation. it was one that we felt pretty strongly that we needed to removed from the network because they could potentially pierce the vehicle. >> reporter: paul is from the department of transportation. he admits that sending that bill was a horrible mistake. >> we apologize for the family for that. >> reporter: the company that makes the guardrail, says it has passed all federal crash and safety tests. scott, the company adds, it's widely known that no guardrail can protect against all crashes. >> thanks. we'll be right back.
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passengers who fail an initial check at airports. one of these new pat-downs was recorded at dfw airport. and we asked omar to get the story behind it. >> reporter: jennifer williamson started recording, as the tsa pulled aside her 13-year-old son, aaron, for additional screening, after he left his laptop in his bag. then, for two minutes, performed the new pat-down procedure on the boy. >> i do think as a young child, that posed no threat, that had already passed an x-ray screening, it was completely unnecessary. williamson said she performed the agents her son has a sensory processing disorder, that makes him sensitive to touch.
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>> we were told we could submit >> reporter: in a statement to cbs news, the tsa says, all of the approved procedures for followed. the tsa implemented the pat-down procedure after a 2015 audit showed that agents had failed to detect handguns and other weapons at security checkpoints. travelers don't mind the extra scrutiny. >> for me, it's okay to make sure everyone stays safe. they're having incidents at the airports recently. >> reporter: williamson says she understands the need for safety. but is upset her son wasn't given any other screening options. >> a child in that situation should be handled more delicately. >> reporter: williamson has filed a formal complaint with the tsa about the pat-down that happened here at dfw airport.
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heard back from the agency. >> omar, thanks.
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newly discovered letters to and from a former first lady go up for auction tomorrow. here's mark phillips. >> reporter: an old, battered briefcase containing the secrets of two battered lives. a case full of letters, from a former british ambassador to washington and a widow eed woma he knew well. a woman named jackie kennedy. >> the minute we cracked open the boxes, i saw her loopy handwriting and her loopy "js." and i knew it was jackie kennedy. >> reporter: matthew haley found the letters locked away in a british country home when the house contents were put up for sale. to understand them, you have to roll back the clock to the
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british ambassador to washington anth a few years after jfk was killed, ormsby-gore's wife, silvia, died, too. maybe it was their common tragedies or their friendship. or the mutual affection. but in the following years, jackie and david became an item, vacations together. here, in cambodia. the salutations on the letters, dear david. dearest david. >> particularly the way she signs off. with all my love. i think there is a real warmth there. >> reporter: the letters contain no marriage proposal. but there's a clear sign one was made and rejected. when jackie decides to marry aristotle onassis instead, ormsby-gore writes as a bitter, heartbroken man. as for your photograph, he says,
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her last letter to him has a >> with a greek stamp and the stationery of his yacht. >> reporter: that was that. or was it? when david ormsby-gore died 17 years later, jackie went to his funeral. mark phillips, cbs news, london. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news. and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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news." welcome to overnight news. i'm don dahler. president trump is taking action on another campaign promise. this one aimed at erasing former president obama's legacy on climate change. president trump signed an executive order reversing obama-era regulations on coal and oil industries. as a candidate, mr. trump called climate change a hoax. the white house says the president believes it's real. but the new policy is about jobs and boosting energy production. here's major garrett. >> i am taking steps to lift the restriction on government energy and to cancel job-killing regulations.
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the first step of erasing rules from coal-fired power plants and easing restrictions on new coal mines. >> my administration is putting an end to the war on coal. >> reporter: industry workers joined mr. trump for the event. >> that means you're going back to work. >> reporter: coal mining accounts for roughly 50,000 jobs in america. down from its peak of 180,000 in 1985. automation and the ability of natural gas from fracturing has made coal production less competitive. >> we're here to announce the single-most important step america has ever taken in the fight against global climate change. >> reporter: when president
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plan mr. trump is now reversing, mr. obama cited the need to s a threat to our future and future generations. >> reporter: president trump called the climate change a hoax. and his e.p.s. administrator scott pruitt denied a direct link between carbon monoxide and global warming. >> i would not agree that it's a primary contributor to the global warming we see. a cloud of suspicion over the russian interference in the 2016 election. some say that the white house committee chairman cannot longer be trusted to look into ties of the trump team. here's jeff pegues. >> reporter: house speaker ryan says he has full confidence that congressman nunes can conduct a fair and credible investigation. but pressure is building on the congressman to explain his actions and reveal his source. >> there was no sneaking aro
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i walked on to the grounds, said hi to peop tuesday to review classified documents. >> i needed a place to go and find this information and review it. >> reporter: the congressman wouldn't reveal his source. but says there is evidence that agencies under the obama administration had intercepted communications involving members of the trump transition team. but he dismissed allegations that president obama wiretapped trump tower. >> that never happened. >> reporter: nearly a week after nunes briefed the president, ranking member adam schiff says the congressman has yet to share the intelligence with other members of the house committee he leads. >> it's not just an unwillingness to share with democrats. none of the committee members, democrats or republicans, have seen what the chairman is referring to. >> reporter: schiff thinks the chairman should recuse himself from the investigation. >> cin
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that i don't reach lightly. ave tten to this point. >> reporter: democrats are accusing nunes of trying to shield the president in the investigation and whether his campaign team coordinated with russian operatives. >> chairman nunes is falling down on the job and seems to be more interested in protecting the president than in seeking the truth. >> reporter: in another surprise move, late last week, congressman nunes announced he was bringing back fbi director comey and nsa director rogers to steph, this time in a closed hearing. that was supposed to happen today. but that hearing has been canceled. a mother in texas is outraged over how the tsa handled the security screening of her young son. she says agents went way too far at dallas-ft. worth international airport. she posted a video of the pat-down on facebook. omar has that. >> reporter: the tsa says that
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the procedure performed by that agent on video was part of the standard pat-down that went into effect earlier this month. in stead of variations, there's just one full-body pat-down. that touched a nerve with a mother who went through security through dfw here on sunday, with her son. >> we were treated with utter disrespect, as if we were criminals. >> reporter: jennifer williamson turned her anger into action, sunday, recording a tsa officer patting down her 13-year-old son at dallas international airport and posted it on facebook. >> i believe he was patted down excessively. they went over his sensitive areas a little more than necessary, given he wasn't wearing bulky clothing or anything like that. >> reporter: williamson said the whole thing started when agents found a laptop in his book bag as it went through the scanning machine. they said her son would have to submit to a pat-down, even though he did not set off the body scanner.
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she requested they screen him in other ways because he suffers from sensory processing disorder. the agent explains the procedure, and pats down his backside, front and legs. the supervisor then instructs the man to complete the final step. as per policy, the tsa uses the back of his hands for pat-downs over sensitive areas of his body. the tsa says the boy cooperated during the screening process. and all approved procedures were followed. as for a wait time, in a statement, the agency says the passengers were at the checkpoint for approximately 45 minutes, which included the time it took to discuss screening procedures with the mother, and to screen three carry-on items that required further inspection. >> his first question to me was, i don't know why they did this. i don't know what i did wrong. and to me, hat was a sign of trauma for him to think he had done anything wrong. >> reporter: the new procedures were put in ac
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audit found there were serious security lapses. williamson has filed a complaint with the tsa but has not heard back. "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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president trump's proposed budget calls for deep cuts in the education department. supporters applaud the $9 billion rollback. but what does it mean for students who rely on federal funds? michelle miller visited a successful after-school program in new jersey that could be eliminated. >> reporter: proposed budget cuts would terminate a nationwide after-school program known as 21st century community learning centers. there's currently 9,500 of these centers across the country and they can be found in every state. we went to new jersey, where administrators said it's not only working, but there's a waiting list to enroll. as the school day ends in plainfield, new jersey, most students head home.
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for a federally-funded after-school program known as 21st century community learning centers. >> we align what we do to the school day to support school day teachers. but with after-school and summer learning opportunities, we can really hone in on our instructional craft and be more innovative. >> reporter: zelda spence is the director of the program in plainfield. >> almost 100% of our after-school students graduate high school or obtain a vocation and go on to college and graduate. >> reporter: and they wouldn't have if they didn't have this program? >> it would be highly difficult. our children here struggle. many of our families are economically compromised. and we're able to provide opportunities that their parents just don't have the money to be able to do. >> reporter: if you lose this funding, what would that mean to this district? >> it would be devastating for
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joelle spend afternoons here when the parents are at work. these are your boys. their mom met us on the lunch hour to boast about their accomplishments. >> i see a lot of change in my kids. >> i got all-as. i said, i got all-as and i sent her a picture. >> reporter: did she believe you? >> i sent her a picture of the grades. and it was all-as. >> reporter: for all of the success here in plainfield, national results of the centers has been less encouraging. evaluation of the program in 2014, just one-third of students participating saw improvement in math and english grades. f
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>> it's a program that's failed to meet its stated mission. >> reporter: lindsay burke is the director of education policy for the heritage foundation. a conservative thinktank based in washington, d.c. >> beyond the evidence of the program or the lack of evidence, about its effectiveness, we have to ask whether this is appropriately housed at the federal level. and is it really appropriate for the federal government to be funding after-school programs? and i think that the answer to that question is no. >> reporter: 21st century community learning centers were created in 1994, under president bill clinton. then, expanded in 2001 under president george w. bush. it serves more than 2 million people on an annual budget of $1.2 billion. $550,000 of that goes to the plainfield new jersey district.
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federal funding that drops to zero in president trump's current budget proposal. is there any way the district could fund this program without the federal dollars? >> it would be challenging. of course, we can look to, wright and obtain grant funding opportunities. but that is not a guarantee. and sacrificing the healthy and very important learning experiences for children, it just doesn't seem worth it to me. the new wall street statue of a fearless girl staring down the iconic charging bull will stand its ground for a year. the temporary statue has become a major tourist attraction. but the artist behind the bull is seeing red. saying it changes his work. >> reporter: for decades, this 7,000-pound bull has dominated lower manhattan by itself. but since march 8th, it to
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share this space with a little girl, who has a lot of friends who hopes she stays right here, staring down the bull forever. the fearless girl began as a temporary installation, an ad campaign for a company hoping to highlight the lack of women on corporate boards. but after weeks of adoring crowds, she has a permit to stay put through february 2018. >> she spoke to the moment. that sense, that women were not going to live in fear. >> reporter: the artist built the statue. >> the bottom line is, she says women are strong. women are here. >> reporter: but the fearless girl's symbolic staredown with wall street's charging bull, is a standoff. >> they are transforming the message of the bull. >> reporter: arthur is a spokesperson for the italian sculptor wad
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symbol of hope. >> it was in front of the new york stock exchange. the new york stock excha paesua. >> she has clearly struck a nerve. she has become an overnight sensation. >> reporter: new york congressman carolyn maloney and thousands are pushing to make the fearless girl's message last forever, possibly in this very location. what would you say to the people that said the bull was fine on its own and the girl changes the meaning. >> the world changes. and women are here. we're an intergral part of the business community and we're even more important tomorrow. >> reporter: the financial firm that commissioned the girl, state street global advisers,
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it was so gross.rigs one more way you've got what it takes to protect. bruce lee is world famous for his extraordinary skills in martial arts
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kung flerld ds that he hoped for this -- he made fight scenes look like some sort of b he popularized martial arts in the western world, and changed the way asians were portrayed on the big screen. this is the bruce lee archive? >> the treasure trove, yes. >> reporter: shannon lee was 4 years old in 1973, when her father died from a traumatic
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brain injury. he was just 32. >> what i remember most about him is the feeling of him. his energy, how it felt to be in his presence. >> reporter: and now, we're learning bruce lee the fighter was also bruce lee the philosophical writer. >> i don't think a lot of people understand the depth of his character. his knowledge, and what was really foundational about the man, which was his philosophy. >> reporter: these are some of your feat's writings. >> yes. >> reporter: and in the mid-20s, shannon found essays her father left behind, including one that he continuously rewrote during the last year of his life. >> i have on a martial artist by choice, and actor by profession.
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ab myself to be an artist of life. >> reporter: what do you make of the fact he has nine drafts? >> he's in the process. he's working it out on the page. he has crossed out things and written in other words, in ifferent pen colors. it was a moment in time for him to very intentionally try to communicate who is bruce lee? what is he really about. >> reporter: it was a difficult moment in his life. he was achieving a goal of making a mainstream hollywood film. the 1973 classic, "enter the dragon." but shannon says the studio wanted to take out all of the philosophical elements he insisted on adding to the script. >> and he fought. he fought with the writers. he fought with the producers. he said, no. i am not coming on to set until you guarantee me that this is going to be in the film. >> reporter: he got his way. >> he got his way. >> it is like a finger pointing
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don't concentrate on the finger or you will miss all that heavenly glory. >> reporter: what a gift this must be for you, as a daughter, who lost your father, to have all of this. >> reporter: finding this gift came with a great loss. >> right before my 24th birthday, my brother was killed. and that plummeted me into quite a depression for many years. re this way, you'll always member. >> reporter: 28-year-old brandon lee died in 1993, after being shot on the set of the movie "the crow." shannon felt comfort in her father's words. >> i came across this quote that started with, the medicine for my suffering, i had within me. and i remember it hitting me so clearly in the chest. you have the ability to shift out of this.
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you just have to look for the path and find the way. and so, i did. hi, everyone. this is shannon lee. >> reporter: she is now sharing her father's philosophy with the world, through her podcast. >> he had his quote, you know, under the sky, under the heavens, we're all one family. >> reporter: they've been downloaded more than 1.3 million times. >> mostly millennials. it's mostly young people. it thrills me that people are grabbing on to the philosophy. they're getting the message. they're getting to know who he is, beyond the movies. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back.
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tic..ta tan
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captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, march 29th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." the russian meddling investigation is on hold. >> same thing as always around this place. a lot of politics. >> more than dozen reported tornados in texasing and three storm chasers die in apparent pursuit of one twister. and silent no more. u.s. gymnasts go to capitol hill to share their stories of alleged sexual abuse in a push for change.

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