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©2001 


Badger State 



For Radio Amateurs •-By Radio Amateurs 


Published Monthly Since 1969 • Our 31st Year 

Single Copy: $1.25 


Return Address: 
Kenneth A. Ebneter 
822 Wauona Trail 
Portage, Wl 53901 


ADDRESS SERVICE 
REQUESTED 


PRESORT STANDARD 
U.S. Postage 
PAID 

Permit #265 
Portage Wl 53901 


Vol. 31 No. 7 • 375th Consecutive Monthly Issue • Baraboo, Wisconsin • July 2001 





The WOP: He’s Number One! 


It’s 75 ARRL years for W9BZU 


By Don Michalski, W9IXG, 
Wisconsin Section Manager, ARRL 


The competition on the air was pretty stiff in the 2001 Wisconsin QSO Party. But 
this fellow made the rest of look like, well, amateurs, with a total score of 
133,951.5! He's Fred Helmstetter, N9FH, Mequon, Wl. His log shows 60 
counties, 39 states, and 4 Canadian provinces worked. CW QSOs tallied were 
306, and he worked 225 on SSB. He's a member of LEFROG. The results of the 
2001 WQP are available at http://www/WARAC/orq; the WQP sponsor is the 
West Allis Radio Amateur Club. The party is always the second Sunday in March 
from noon to 7 p.m. CST. 

Photo via Lynn Tamblyn, K9KR 


Chuck Scholten, W9BZU, center, is the "man of the hour" as he accepts his 75 
year membership plaque from the ARRL, At left is Wisconsin SM Don Michalski 
W9IXG, and at right is the "legend of the Cobia", Fred Neuenfeldt, W6BSF. 


Photo courtesy Don Michalski, W9IXG 


and new hams, alike, and I look forward to 
giving him his next award! 

W9BZU was born July 17, 1907 in 
Manitowoc. He's a 1926 graduate of Lincoln 
High School. He served as president of De 
Forest Radio Club and joined the ARRL. He 
received his first operating license in 1928; 
his first official call sign was W9FVL. 

During WWII, the military sought 
through the ARRL communications equip¬ 
ment for the war effort. Chuck offered his 
station, which was used in Alaska during the 
war. 

W9BZU is well known for "Elmering” 
eager new hams and for generously donating 
his time and equipment to the community. 
And, he has never lost interest in ham radio. 
DXing on 80 and 40, satellite communica¬ 
tions, and local ragchewing on 2 meters, 222 
MHz, and 440 MHz are all part of ham radio 
for him. 

He’s been a long-time, active supporter 
of the American Red Cross and the Boy 
Scouts of America. 

- Fred Neuenfeldt, W6BSF 


I t was a great pleasure for me to attend the 
award ceremony for W9BZU, Chuck 
Scholten. on his 75th anniversary on 
being an ARRL member. I was joined by 
good friends Roy, K9FH1, and Beryl, KA9- 
BAC and about 20 members of the Man- 
CoRad club at Chuck's home. Chuck re¬ 
ceived his 75 year emblem from the ARRL 
to put on his membership award plaque and 
a very nice framed letter of appreciation 
from ARRL Executive V'.P., Dave Sumner, 
K1ZZ. To add to his collection of awards, I 
presented him an ARRL Certificate of Merit 
for his outstanding contributions to the ama¬ 
teur community over the years. 

Following the formal presentations, I 
had a chance to talk with Chuck about his 
past amateur experiences. No surprise that 
he had many stories to tell! He appreciates 
everything ARRL has done for our hobby 
and looks forward to continued support. I 
found him very sharp and witty at 94 (going 
on 64)! 

Chuck remains very active in the club 
and checks regularly into the nets with his 2 
meter equipment. He is an inspiration to old 


Hams assist US Navy flight 


Participants on the 20-meter Maritime Mobile Net June 13 were a bit surprised when a 
ham aboard a US Navy plane checked in for assistance. John Pierce, KC4YWP, informed 
the Net that the Navy aircraft-using the military call sign "Copperhead 5"-had lost 
communication with its base. "He asked us to place a telephone call to his base to inform 
them he was returning due to loss of communications," said Bob Puharic ol 
Pennsylvania—one of the net controllers. Puharic said that retired US Air Force Col Bob 
Botik, K5S1V, placed the call and informed Copperhead 5 that it had been delivered. "The 
US Navy thanked the net and secured," Puharic said. 

The ARRL Letter 


What's Happening: Edited by K9EN and K9ZZ . 

From the ARRL Section Manager - Don Michalski, W9IXG. 

Susan Helms, KC7NHZ, first Field Day from space! . 

Editorial .......... .. 

Digital Television - an Overview - Tom Weeden. WJ9H. 

The Computer Corner: No. 91 - How to avoid Clogged Computer Syndrome - WB9RQR 

West Allis Radio Amateur Club Field Day photos - WA9POV. 

Wisconsin Nets Association. 

Lakeshore Repeater Association. . 

Quarter Century Wireless Association/Southeastern Wisconsin Chap ’ 2 . 

ManCoRad Radio Club . 

Yellow Thunder Amateur Radio Club Field Day photos - K9ZZ . 

Scholarship Winners announced by Foundation for Amateur Radio. 

Sheboygan County Amateur Radio Club . 

The Wisconsin Packeteer . 

Yellow Thunder Amateur Radio Club . 


Field Day fun Photos 


West Allis Radio Amateur Club ■ Page 6 
Yellow Thunder Amateur Radio Club ■ Page 8 
























2 JULY 2001 ■ BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS 




Swapfests and Other Social Events — Club Meetings 
Amateur Radio Exam Schedules 

Edited by Kenneth A. Ebneter, K9EN, 822 Wauona Trail, Portage, WI 53901 • kebneter@palacenet.net 


Swapfests 

And Other Social Events 


630.628.1501 Web: http:7ywww.chicagofmclub.org 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2002 30th Annual 
Mid-Winter Swapfest Sponsored by West Allis Radio 
Amateur Club Waukesha County Expo Center Forum 8 
a.ni. to 2 p.m. Info: Phil Gural, W9NAW, 
414.425.3649 Web: http://www.WARAC.org 

SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 2002. Eau Claire Ama- 


months listing.. 

FOND DU LAC AMATEUR RADIO CLUB 

Fond du Lac, WI 

Meetings: Second Monday at Moraine Park Techni¬ 
cal College, Fond du Lac, WI. Time: 7 p.m. Sunday net 
7:30pm CDT K9IA repeater 145.430- 107.2 Informa¬ 
tion: Jack Heil, KG9IN, (920)922-1413 
kg9in@fdlhams.org Web: http://www.fdlhams.org 


SATURDAY, JULY 7, 2001 Swapfest 01 South 
Milwaukee Amateur Radio Club American Legion Park, 
Oak Creek Info: Verne at (414) 762-3235 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 2001 Circus City 


teur Radio Club Hamfest Eau Claire County Expo Cen¬ 
ter (Same location as last five years). Information: Jim 
StaatZ, KG9RA. 1-715-838-9108. ECARC, P.O. Box 
1867, Eau Claire, WI 54702-1867. Web page: www. 
ecarc.org Email: w9ehu@ecarc.org 


The Test Point 


Swapfest Sauk County Fairgrounds, Baraboo, WI 7 a.m. 
until noon Into: Steve, N9UDO, 608.356.2313 or 
mailto:n9udo@arrl.net or Bill, N9KXX, 608.643.6908 
days or 608.643.6453 evenings. Web: http://www.qsl. 
net/ytarc 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2001, Bollingbrook 
ARS, Joliet, IL. Contact: Bolingbrook ARS, PO Box 
1009 Bolingbrook, IL 60440. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2001, Decatur, IL. 
Contact: Spence Carter, N9LVW (21) 423-2095. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2001, Davenport, IA. 
C6htact:fitfp://Www.gwlta.com/harnfest: 

SATURDAY and SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 22 and 
23 Radio Expo 2001 Sponsored by Chicago FM Club 


As a service to our readers, this section is available 
without charge to list your upcoming swapfest, hamfest, 
dinner, picnic, party or other event of interest to Radio 
Amateurs in Wisconsin and nearby areas. Send informa¬ 
tion on your event to kebneter@palacenet.net. 




|» CLUB MEETINGS 



Due to space limitations, we cannot 'carry the full 
listing of clubs every issue of fiSSS. Please see last 
months issue for a complete listing of area club meet- 



Amateur Radio Examination Locations and 
Schedules in the Wisconsin Area 


July 07, 2001 
July 07, 2001 
July 12, 2001 
July 14, 2001 
July 14, 2001 
July 17, 2001 
July 17, 2001 
July 21. 2001 
July 21, 2001 


St. Paul, MN 
Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
Apple Valley, MN 
Blaine, MN 
Madison, WI 
Eden Prairie, MN 
Sheboygan, WI 
Cottage Grove, MN 
Loves Park, IL 


Lake County Fairgrounds, Grayslake, IL Info: r 


ings. Thq following qre pjianges apd ojj^tions to last 


Badger State 
Smoke Signals 

Amateur Radio 
Education and Information 

CHAIRMAN: Kenneth A. Ebneter, K9EN, 822 
Wauona Trail, Portage, WI 53901. Telephone (6081 
742-3560. kebneter@palacenet.net 

EDITOR: Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ, 412 ’A Ash Street, 
Baraboo, WI 53913. Telephone (608) 356-4031. 
smokesigs@baraboo.com 

TREASURER: Kenneth A. Ebneter, K9EN, 822 
Wauona Trail, Portage WI 53901. 

EDITORIAL BOARD: Ken Ebneter, K9EN; Don Even- 
son, K9JYX; Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ. 


Subscription Rate 

1 year (12 issues) $13.95 

Subscription form is on page 5. Special club pack¬ 
age reduced rates are available. For information, 
contact Ken Ebneter, K9EN. 

When to Send It 


The closing date for each issue is the first of the 
month for the next month's issue. For example, the 
closing date for the June issue is May 1. The only 
exception is for participating clubs' minutes. Par¬ 
ticipating clubs are requested to send their material 
no later than FIVE DAYS after the club's meeting. 
For example, if a club meets on the 4th of the 
month, the material should be sent no later than 
the 9th of that month. This material is to be sent to 
the Editor. 


Where to Send It 

Address changes and corrections, and ex¬ 
change papers should be sent to Ken Ebneter. 

Editorial material, photographs, and feature arti¬ 
cles should be sent to Jim Romelfanger. 

Inquiries about advertising should be directed to 
Ken Ebneter. 1 

Club, swapfest, and Test Point information - 
should be sent to Ken Ebneter. 

Swapfest ADS should be sent to Jim Romel¬ 
fanger NO LATER THAN EIGHT WEEKS BEFORE THE 
EVENT'S DATE. 

Subscriptions should be sent, with check or 
money order, to Ken Ebneter. 

Conditions for Reprinting or BBS Post* 
ing Material from Badger State Smoke 
Signals 

Permission is hereby granted to reprint articles or 
posting articles on radio or telephone bulletin boards 
from Badger State Smoke Signals, providing credit is 
given to the original author, publication in which the 
article first appeared, and to Badger State Smoke 
Signals. THIS CREDIT IS MANDATORY. AND NO 
MATERIAL MAY BE PRINTED OR POSTED UNLESS 
IT IS GIVEN. 

This newspaper is produced by volunteer radio ama¬ 
teurs, and is non-profit. This newspaper is mailed 
from Portage, WI 53901. 

Badger State Smoke Signals is incorporated as a 
Wisconsin non-stock, non-for-profit organization. 


Editorial Disclaimer 

The opinions expressed in editorials, guest editorials, 
columns, articles, and letters from readers are the 
opinions of the authors only, and do not, unless oth¬ 
erwise stated, express or imply endorsement by 
Badger State Smoke Signals, or by any other in¬ 
dividual or organization. 


Ju|x #-S£* — 

July 28, 2obl 
July 28, 2001 
August 04, 2001 
AiigOst 04, '2001 
August 09, 2001 
August 10, 2001 
August 11, 2001 
August 11, 2001 
August 18, 2001 
August 18, 2001 
August 18, 2001 
August 21, 2001 
August 25, 2001 
August 25, 2001 
August 25, 2001 
September 01, 2001 
September 01, 2001 
September 01, 2001 
September 01, 2001 
September 08, 2001 
September 08, 2001 
September 13, 2001 
September 15, 2001 
September 15, 2001 
September 15, 2001 
September 15, 2001 
September 15, 2001 
September 18, 2001 
September 22, 2001 
September 29, 2001 
September 29, 2001 
October 06, 2001 
October 06, 2001 
October 06, 2001 
October 11, 2001 
October 12, 2001 
October 13, 2001 
October 13, 2001 
October 16, 2001 
October 20, 2001 
October 20, 2001 
October 20, 2001 
October 27, 2001. 
October 27, 2001 
October 27, 2001 


Tomahawk, WI 
Bloomington, MN 
Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
St. Paul, MN 
Apple Valley, MN 
Sioux City, IA 
Madison, WI 
Blaine, MN 
Loves Park, IL 
Cottage Grove, MN 
Appleton. WI 
Eden Prairie, MN 
Bloomington, MN 
Milwaukee, WI (MRAC) 
Tomahawk, WI 
Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
St. Paul, MN 
Adams 
Racine, WI 
Madison, WI 
Blame, MN 
Apple Valley, MN 
Milwaukee, WI (BE) 
Loves Park, IL 
Cottage Grove, MN 
La Crosse, WI 
Sheboygan, WI 
Eden Prairie, MN 
Bloomington, MN 
Milwaukee, WI (MRAC) 
Tomahawk, WI 
Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
St. Paul, MN 
Racine, WI 
Apple Valley, MN 
Sioux City, IA 
Madison, WI 
Blaine, MN 
Eden Prairie, MN 
Milwaukee. WI (BE) 
Loves Park, IL 
Cottage Grove, MN 
Bloomington, MN 
Milwaukee, WI (MRAC) 
Tomahawk, WI 






BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS ■ JULY 2001 3 


November 03, 2001 Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
November 03, 2001 St. Paul, MN 
November 03, 2001 Menomonie, WI 
November 04, 2001 Kaukauna, WI 
November 08, 2001 Apple Valley, MN 
November 10, 2001 Madison, WI 
November 10, 2001 Blaine, MN 
November 13, 2001 Eden Prairie, MN 
November 17, 2001 Milwaukee, WI (BE) 
November 17, 2001 Loves Park, IL 
November 17, 2001 Cottage Grove, MN 
November 20, 2001 Sheboygan, WI 
November 24, 2001 Bloomington, MN 
November 24, 2001. Milwaukee, WI (MRAC) 
December 01, 2001 Oshkosh (Omro), WI 


December 01, 2001 St. Paul, MN 
December 01, 2001 Adams, WI 
December 01, 2001 Racine, WI 
December 07, 2001 Sioux City, IA 
December 08, 2001 Madison, WI 
December 08, 2001 Blaine, MN 
December 13, 2001 Apple Valley, MN 
December 15, 2001 Milwaukee, WI (BE) 
December 15, 2001 Loves Park, IL 
December 15, 2001 Cottage Grove, MN 
December 15, 2001 La Crosse, WI 
December 18, 2001 Eden Prairie, MN 
December 22, 2001 Bloomington, MN 
January 26, 2002 Appleton, WI 
Monthly, 1st Sat. Oshkosh (Omro), WI 
Monthly, 1st Sat. St. Paul, MN 

Monthly, 2nd Thu. Apple Valley, MN 

Monthly, 2nd Sat. Madison, WI 

Monthly, 2nd Sat. Blaine, MN 

Monthly, 3rdTue. Eden Prairie, MN 
Monthly, 3rd Sat. Milwaukee, WI (BE) 
(September through April) 

Monthly, 3rd Sat. Loves Park, IL 

Monthly, 3rd Sat. Cottage Grove, MN 

Monthly, 4th Sat. Bloomington, MN 

Monthly, Last Sat. Milwaukee, WI (MRAC) 
(except December) 

Monthly. Last Sat. Tomahawk, WI 
(January thru October only) 


GENERAL RULES FOR MOST EXAMINA¬ 
TIONS Be sure to check with'sponsors before going to 
an examination session. There may be changes and/or 
errors in the dates or information given. Some exami¬ 
nations require filing an FCC or NCVEC Form 605 
and advance registration at least 30 days before the 
exam date. Some VE teams permit walkins. Check 
with the sponsor. 


Many hamfests and swapfests offer examina¬ 
tions. A hamfest entrance fee should not be charged if 
you come only to attend the examination. To register 
in advance, you must get a copy of the current FCC 
Form 605, and fill it out completely and correctly. 
Got your form from the FCC as instructed below, or 
from the American Radio Relay League, 225 Main 
Street, Newington, CT 06111. Please send an SASE if 
you request a form from the League. FCC Field Of¬ 
fices seldom stock forms. You can also get a form 
from 

http://www.fcc.gov/formpage.html or ftp://ftp. 
fcc.gov/pub/Forms/Form605. 

A form by FAX is available at (202) 418-0177 
(request Form 000605). The FCC Forms Distribution 
Center will accept orders at (800) 418-3676. Form 605 
has a main form, plus a Schedule D with two parts 
(for Vanity and Physician's Certifications). Forms 
can also be obtained from the sponsoring group. 

See QST, W1AW bulletins, or The ARRL Letter 
regarding any annual exam fee changes. ARRL/VEC 
no longer gives a free code test or Element 2., Test 
fees: The ARRL/VEC has set its 2001 test fee at 
$10.00. FCC requires applicants to show their origi¬ 
nal amateur license or CSCE to the VE team. You 
must also have a good copy of your license or CSCE. 
A copy of your license or CSCE must be attached to 
your FCC form 605 and most VE teams need a copy 
for their records. One good CSCE copy is sufficient. 
You are also be required to have a photo ID, or two 
other forms of ID. Contact the VE team for details. 

Technician class, licensees must show proof of 
testing before March 21, 198f, in order to upgrade to 


General with a code test only. Proof must be either in 
the form of a pre-3/21/87 license document or a 
"Letter of Verification of Technician License Held 
Prior to 1987" as requested in writing from the FCC, 
1270 Fairfield Road, Gettysburg, PA 17325-7245. For 
those with internet access, a listing of exam sessions is 
available from: 

http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec/examsearch.phtml 

By checking this page, you can find registered 
VE sessions anywhere in the US and some overseas. 
You can search by country, state or zip code. The list¬ 
ing is not specific to any particular VEC. It is a mas¬ 
ter database. Thanks to Bart Jahnke, W9JJ, ARRL/ 
VEC 

MILWAUKEE RADIO AMATEURS CLUB 
(MRAC/VEC) MILWAUKEE 

Last Saturday, except June, July, and August, 

9 JO a.m. to noon at 

Amateur Electronic Supply (AES), 5710 W. 
Good Hope Road (the door you enter Is actually num¬ 
bered 5730), Milwaukee. For additional information, 
call (262) 797- MRAC. Bring along your original li¬ 
cense, CSCE (if any), and one (1) good quality photo¬ 
copy of each, plus two forms of identification, such a 
driver's license, etc. Also required is $6.65 for the 
exam fee. Walkins are welcome. To register in ad¬ 
vance, use a post card. Print the grade of license you 
are applying for, your name, address, and telephone 
number, and send the card to MRAC/VEC, Milwau¬ 
kee Radio Amateurs Club, PO Box 25707, Milwau¬ 
kee, WI 53225. 

BADGER EXAMINERS (BE) • MILWAUKEE 

September thru April, every third Saturday 
morning, 9:30 a.m. to noon. Badger Examiners group , 
tests at AES (Amateur Electronic Supply) at 60th and 
Good Hope, Milwaukee (use the entrance numbered 
5730). Exams are given at the old Sternum Printing 
shop, just 300 feet west of the AES store. Novice to 
Extra are offered, and all test materials are provided. 
Fee is $6.35, and bring your original license, or 
CSCE if needed. Also available are Commercial li¬ 
cense exams GROL (General Radiotelephone license), 
GMDSS, Telegraph, Etc.Tee Is $35.00. For more in- 

0237. 

EAU CLAIRE, WI 

EAU CLAIRE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB 

October 6, 2001. 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. South 
Middle School, North East Side Door 7, 2115 
Mitscher Ave., Eau Claire. Walk-ins welcome. 

, January 19, 2002. 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. South 
Middle School, North East Side Door 7, 2115 
Mitscher Ave., Eau Claire. Walk-ins welcome. 

Saturday, April 20, 2002 9a.m. to 11:30.a.m., 
Eau Claire Hamfest. Held at Eau Claire Exposition 
Center, Lorch Avenue, Eau Claire. Walk-ins wel¬ 
come. " 

Examination Session Coordinator: Steve Bluem, 
KA90MY, ka9omy@arrl.net. Telephone: 
715.839.6509. Sponsored by the Eau Chore Amateur s 
Radio Club. Web page: http://www.ecarc.org Email: 
w9eau@ecar c. or g 

* FRIENDSHIP, WI 

March 3, June 2, September 1, and December 1, 
2001. Exams given from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Adams 
County Electric Cooperative, Community Room, 401 
E. Lake St. (CTH J), Friendship, WI. Exam fee: 
$ 10 . 00 . 

All candidates should bring appropriate identifi¬ 
cation which bears a photo and signature. Candidates 
must present the original document of any current 
Amateur Radio license or CSCEs. A photocopy of the 
original documents must be s^dt along with the ses¬ 
sion paperwork. Walkins are' permitted, but advance 
registration is appreciated. A candidate, wishing to 
retest for the same element will be allowed to do so, 
provided the VE team has appropriate time and an 
additional exam fee is paid. There are no free exam 
elements. 

Note that beginning June 1, 2001, multiple 
choice format Morse code tests will not be allowed. 
Code tests will be "fill in the blank" format only. 
Solid copy conditions will remain the same. Candidate 
registration may be submitted to Wayne Hemrbook, 
KB9NLQ,, at^dM^S^.dld^.^^QjiQiyojps .may. di¬ 


rected to Karl Simonson, KS9E, at 847.244.0802 or 
847.778.0247. Karl Simonson, KS9E 

MADISON, WI 

First Saturday monthly: 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Space 
Place, 1605 South Park Street, Madison. Please bring 
a picture ID, your original license, a copy of your li¬ 
cense, and the original and a copy of any relevant 
CSCEs, and a check for $10.00 made out to the 
ARRL/VEC. No appointments are necessary to take 
exams. Exams start promptly at 8 a.m. 2001 dates: 
April 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, August 4, September 
1, October 6, November 3, and December 1. Ques¬ 
tions may be directed to Tim Czerwonka, W09U, at 
(608) 233-9829 (home phone) or sent to wo9u@arrl. 
net. 

MENOMONIE, WI 

Saturday, March 31, 2001, and Saturday, No¬ 
vember 3, 2001. The location will be the U.W.-Stout's 
Mill ennium Hall 9 (the new Communications Budd¬ 
ing), at the corner of Broadway and 10th Avenue on 
the U-W Stout Campus in Menomonie, Wisconsin. 
Walkins only. Arrive between 9 and 11 a.m. For in¬ 
formation, contact Jim Ley, NX9F, (715) 235-3998 
(H), or (715) 232-1397 (W). 

RACINE, WISCONSIN - ARRL/VEC 
Monthly - first Saturday, except January, July, 
and August. Monthly exams are given 9 to 11 a.m. at 
the Faith United Methodist Church, 1013 Harmony 
Drive, Racine. Walkins are permitted. Talk in on 
147.87/.27. Inquiries and registrations should be di¬ 
rected to Robert N. Jensen, W0WLN, 5616 Cam¬ 
bridge lane #6, Racine, WI. Telephone (262) 886- 
8551. 

TOMAHAWK, WI 

Last Saturday of every month, January thru Oc¬ 
tober. Tomahawk Volunteer Examiners (ARRL/ 
VEC), Tomahawk, WI. No advance registration re¬ 
quired, but appointment would be appreciated. Regis¬ 
tration at 8:30 a.m. and testing starts at 9:00 a.m. 
For location or other information, inquire on 145.43 
MHz. repeater or contact: Terry Collins, KB9AUP, 
W6564 Highway 8, Tomahawk, WI 54487. Telephone 
(715) 453-4633. 

APfLETON, WI - ARRL/VEC * 
KAUKAUNA, WI (HAMFEST) 

Conducted by the Fox Cities ARC VE team. All 
regular test sessions are held at the American Red 
Cross Budding in Appleton. Testing starting at 8 a.m. 
For information, contact George R. Croy, W9MDP, 
2113 Twin Widows Drive, Appleton, WI 54914. (920) 
730-0967. Email: W9MDP@arrl.net. 

OSHKOSH (OMRO) 

The Oshkosh VE Team will administer Amateur 
Radio exams monthly on the first Saturday. Registra¬ 
tion begins at 8:30 a.m. and exams will be given from 
9 a.m. until noon at the Omro Community Center, 
130 W. Larrabee, Omro, WI. Walkins welcomed. 
Bring a good quality photocopy of your original li¬ 
cense and any other necessary documents such as a 
CSCE, etc. The first session will be through W5YI/ 
VEC, and then sessions will alternate between ARRL/ 
VEC and W5YI/VEC. The exam fee is $6.65. For 
more information, please cad Dick Lemme, K9FA, at 
(920) 235-0987, e-mail lemme@vbe.com, or write 
Dick at 826 Jefferson Street, Oshkosh, WI 54901. 

SHEBOYGAN, WI 
Saturdays, 9 a.m.: September 15 
Tuesdays, 7 p.m.: July 17, November 20 
Sessions will be held in the Red Cross budding, 
2023 Erie Avenue, Sheboygan, WI 53081, main floor. 
This testing site is handicapped accessible. Signs will 
direct applicants to the proper area of the building. 
Registration begins 30 minutes prior to each testing 
session. Pre-registration is appreciated, but walkins 
are welcome. Contact: Art Pahr, K9XJ, N8029 Wil¬ 
low Road, Plymouth, WI 53073-2929. (920) 876-2370. 
K9XJ e-mail: < k9xj@excel.net > 

ON ALASKA, WI (ARRL/VEC) 

February 21, May 19, September 15, and De¬ 
cember 15, 2001. Tests will be given at the Onalaska 
Public Library at 9 a.m. Contact: Roger Reader, 
KA9BKK. readers@centurytel.net 

(continued on page 11) „ ... 





BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS ■ July 2001 


From the 

MM 

Section 

Kr|irS 

Manager 

mm 

Don Michalski, W9IXG 


It is with deep regret that I inform you 
that Art Smith. 90, K9LWZ, is a Silent Key. 
Art was very active in Army MARS. Don 
Schumacher, 77, K9CPY is a S.K. Don was 
active in Sturgeon Bay and Manitowoc clubs. 
W0RHP, Phillip Muth, 69, and Frederick 
Kohn, WA90MC, are Silent Keys. 

W9BZU, Chuck Scholten, received his 
75 year ARRL award on May 15 at a cere¬ 
mony given by members of MANCORAD, 
K9FHI. KA9BAC and I. Chuck has been an 
inspiration to many hams and we wish him 
many more years of amateur activity. 

Our congratulations to the crew of the 
Dream Flight Wausau Shuttle. The mobile 
science education program is celebrating its 
10th anniversary this year! The Dream Flight 
Shuttle is a refurbished school bus that’s 
been outfitted to look like a NASA space 
shuttle. 


0S 


Our thanks to all the amateurs who have 
supported the State Assembly PRB-1 bill. 
SGL, AD9X and PIC, K9ZZ, et al, have 
taken the lead on this important project and 
we greatly appreciate their efforts. 

If your club is looking for an interesting 
project to demonstrate at a club meeting, 
consider building a copper cactus J-pole. It 
is and easy, fun and useful antenna! 

73, Don, W9IXG 
wwvv. w9ixg. eboard. com 


QSL card postage 
jumped a penny 
on July 1 

It costs another penny to mail a QSL 
card (postcard) after July 1. The US 
Postal Service announced in January that 
it would raise the postcard rate by one 
cent-to 21 cents. The complete postal 
rate schedule is available on the USPS 
Web site, http://www.usps.com/ . 

The ARRL Letter 


Fifth Annual! 


Susan Helms, KC7NHZ, thrills 
Field Day OPS from ISS 


Astronaut Susan Helms, KC7NHZ, took 
time out aboard the International Space Sta¬ 
tion to join in the ARRL Field Day fray last 
weekend. The operation was believed to mark 
the first time anyone participated in Field Day 
from space. 

Helms worked several dozen sta- 
tions—most of them Field Day operations~as 
the ISS passed over the US. ARRL Contest 
Branch Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, says 
the NA1SS contacts will count for Field Day 
credit, but they will not count for satellite 
bonus points. 

Helms sounded like a veteran contester 
during Field Day, although not without some 
confusion as to what exchange she should 
transmit. Initially acting on incorrect informa¬ 
tion, Helms was giving out "one alpha mari¬ 
time mobile-Russia" for a Field Day report. 
Later, she resorted to "1 alpha battery on the 
space station." 

The NA1SS Field Day operation infused 
a lot of enthusiasm into the occasion. "This 
Field Day is the one I'll remember the most, 
even after doing FD for 40 years," said ARRL 
Wisconsin Public Information Coordinator 
Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ. Romelfanger work- 


CITY 


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ed NA1SS as part of the WB9FDZ Yellow 
Thunder Amateur Radio Club Field Day crew. 
"Susan was having a ball up there!" he said. 

Dave Swartz, KC7RRH, said his club's 
Field Day operation was another lucky 
enough to snag a contact with NA1SS. It 
happened almost by accident. Swartz, who 
operated with the Federal Way Amateur 
Radio Club's WA7FW setup in Washington, 
said the group was set up for a packet contact 
via the ISS when he heard Helms' voice com¬ 
ing over the speaker. Although he was on 20 
meters at the time, he grabbed the mike at the 
packet setup next to him and made the QSO. 
Swartz said he was "very psyched" about 
working Helms but disappointed not to get the 
bonus points. 

Henderson said that ISS contacts will not 
count for bonus points because the ISS is not 
an "Amateur Radio satellite," as rule 7.3.7 
specifies 

<http://www.arrl.org/contests/announcement 
s/rules-fd.html>. Henderson said that, because 
of their nature, bonus points "need to be 
readily available to everybody," and the ISS 
offers only a limited window of opportunity. 

As for the correct Field Day operating 
class for NA1SS, Henderson said there is 
more than one possible choice, but the ques¬ 
tion is largely academic. "Whatever exchange 
she sent out, count it as a valid contact for 
Field Day and enjoy the experience," he said. 
Field Day entries require a list of call signs 
worked by band and mode. 

Henderson said Helms' ISS Field Day 
entry will end up "in a class by itself." 

US stations working NA1SS aboard the 
International Space Station QSL to Margie 
Bourgoin, KB1DCO, ARRL, 225 Main St, 
Newington, CT 06111. Canadian stations 
QSL to Radio Amateurs of Canada, 720 
Belfast Rd-Suite 217, Ottawa, ON K1G 0Z5. 
A self-addressed, Stamped' envefdpe Ts^TtT 
quired to get a QSL in return. 

' - The ARRL Letter 


From the editor ... 

Thanks to everyone who responded to 
my editorial in our June issue. There wasn’t 
one negative comment, and there was a lot of 
encouragement. It’s appreciated - it’s all the 
pay we get. 

The reason for that editorial had its roots 
in a number of complaints about late deliv¬ 
ery, so I thought you should have some 
facts. But the primary impetus for the edito¬ 
rial was a remark from a former Wisconsin 
ham about six weeks ago that we “should get 
into the 21 s1 century and put up a web site.” 
Well, it’s been there for a year and half, so 
we appreciate the “constructive criticism”, 
even though it is wrong. 

The site is hard to maintain, I have to 
say that. I literally do two versions of BSSS 
a month (and K9EN does four pages month¬ 
ly, of course). But the site gets at least 
15,000 hits a month. Not a Megasite, but 
good readership - and usually at least 25 
different countries show up on the web 
analyzer at our host site. 

So, each month brings more stress. And 
with a major anxiety disorder (didn’t I tell 
you last month there were more problems?), 
it really gets rough. 

Then, there is getting it to the printer, 
picking up the printed papers, labeling them, 
and lugging a bunch of big heavy bags to the 
Portage post office. They must be ZIP sorted 
is specific ways. Thank heaven for Ken, 
K9EN, he does that part. Gee, a staff of two! 

All of which brings me to repeat the 
thanks I gave above, and our gratitude to all 
our faithful readers. We like you all ! 

- Jim, K9ZZ 














July 2001 • BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS 5 


Digital Television: 


An Overview 


By Tom Weeden, WJ9H 

In the last few years we have seen many 
changes in the consumer electronics field. 
For example, you can now watch movies on 
DVD (digital versatile disk), record TV 
shows on disk-based PVRs (personal video 
recorders), connect to the internet using 
cable modems, and get hundreds of channels 
of satellite-delivered TV on an 18" dish. 
Something you may not have heard about 
yet, but will soon, is digital television, or 
DTV. 

Does anyone out there remember free, 
over-the-air, plain old television? The kind 
which doesn't need a cable hookup or 
satellite antenna? It's still there, but if the 
FCC has its way, will be phased out in the 
not-too-distant future. This article will 
briefly explain the technical side of the 
new-style broadcast digital television (DTV), 
and a bit of its history. 

The current type of analog television we 
can all watch was approved in 1953 by the 
National Television Systems Committee 
(NTSC). The NTSC developed a system of 
transmitting color TV on existing TV 
channels without obsoleting the 
black-and-white TV sets already in place. 
The beauty of this system was that 
monochrome sets could watch color TV 
programs (in black-and-white), and the 
newer color sets could tune in 
black-and-white programs. The NTSC 
standard has undergone several minor 
improvements in the last 50 years, along 
with technological advancements in the sets 
themselves, which give us very good pictures 
and sound. 

In analog TV transmission, video is 
basically an analog voltage which 
corresponds to the instantaneous, brightness 
value of a scene being scanned, line-by-line, 
by a camera. There are 525 scan lines in 
NTSC video (486 active lines), each of 
which are scanned in about 63 microseconds. 
A single complete "frame" of video is 
scanned in 1 /30th of a second. The complex 
video voltage has synchronization pulses 
added to it so that the receiving set will scan 
the same line that the camera scans. This 
video is simply amplitude-modulated onto a 
VHF or UHF carrier and transmitted. Audio 
is modulated FM on a carrier that is 4.5 
MHz above the video carrier. (A TV station 
can be thought of as having two separate 
transmitters, one for visual information and 
one for aural.) 

In the 1980s, the Japanese came up with 
a new TV system offering a wider screen, 
improved resolution, and better color. It was 
known as "high-definition television" but 
was still an analog system. It never really 
caught on. Meanwhile, in this country, 
several manufacturers attempted to come up 
with a high-definition (HDTV) system. 
Eventually, these manufacturers took 
advantage of new digital technologies and 
combined forces in what was called "The 
Grand Alliance” to develop digitally-based 
TV. 

Digital video is based on discrete pixels 
(picture elements) rather than on an electron 
beam that scans an image continuously. A 
picture may have 640 by 480 pixels, with 
each pixel having different brightness values 
for red, green and blue. If you assume that 
each of these three primary colors can be 
represented by one of 256 brightness levels 
(in 8 binary bits), you will need 24 bits of 
information to describe the color of just one 
pixel. Multiply 24 by 640 horizontal pixels 
by 480 lines, and you need a lot of bits to 
draw one frame of video. Now do this 30 
times a second! Well, the math has been 
) done by someone else, and the result is a 
/ data stream of 270 megabits per second 
■ when you include overhead. And this is for 
tyhat is known as "standard-definition" 


video, which produces quality slightly better 
than its analog counterpart. Once you get 
into "high-definition" video, with 1,980 
pixels per line by 1,080 lines, the data rate is 
around a billion and a half bits per second! 

Did I mention the audio is digital too? 
The analog audio is sampled at a 48 kHz rate 
and assigned an instantaneous digital value 
which is represented by 16 bits. For ' 
two-channel stereo, and the necessary 
overhead, digital audio runs about 1.5 
megabits per second. 

These digital audio and video bitstreams 
are what is known as "baseband signals." 
These high bit rates can't be delivered to the 
home in their baseband form. They have to 
be "compressed" to fit in the limited 
bandwidth transmission routes available. 
(You dial-up internet users may get up near 
50,000 bits per second on your modem, 
which is nowhere near 270,000,000 bits per 
second for ordinary digital video.) What can 
be done? 

DTV uses methods similar to "zipping" 
computer files to make them smaller. A 
frame of video can be considered a 
spreadsheet of data. Computer algorithms 
look for duplicate data, and use mathematical 
transforms which are beyond the scope of 
this article to squeeze the amount of data to 
the bare minimum for transmission. The 
state of the art today can get the original 270 
megabit/sec data down to 6-8 Mb/sec with 
no noticeable artifacts. What is even more 
amazing is that the 1.5 gigabit/sec HDTV 
data can be compressed down to 12-15 
Mb/sec with very few visual "impairments." 
While this is still too high a data rate for 
internet transmission, it can be done over the 
air! 

The Advanced Television Systems 
Committee (ATSC) approved a transmission 
system which takes a standard 6 MHz-wide 
RF television channel using 8-level 
amplitude modulation, and can send 19.4 
Mb/sec of data (better than 3 bits per Hertz) 
in it. The FCC adopted the ATSC system, 
and it will be coming soon to a TV near you. 

A few years ago, the FCC assigned each 
full-power TV station in the US a second 
channel for the purpose of broadcasting 
digital TV. Commercial stations are required 
to be on the air in DTV by May 1, 2002, 
and non-commercial stations (such as PBS 
affiliates) by May 1, 2003. After a period of 
simulcasting, the FCC will require the 
analog TV stations to sign off and vacate 
their original TV channel. 

As of today, there are more than 200 
DTV stations on the air in the US. In 
Madison, WISC, WKOW and WMTV have 
activated their digital channels. (WISC-DT is 
on channel 50, WKOW-DT is on channel 26, 
and WMTV-DT is on channel 19.) If you 
tune in a DTV channel on your analog TV 
set, you will just see digital "snow," as the 
new ATSC system is not backward 
compatible (like color TV was to 
black-and-white). 

Now I can hear some of you saying, 
"Wait a minute! Are you telling me I have to 
buy a new TV set?” In a word, yes. At least 
you will have to buy a DTV receiver, which 
can tune in digital TV and output analog 
video to your existing set. (Anyone 
remember FM converters for your car's 
AM-only radio?) 

The FCC's original drop-dead date for 
the cessation of all regular analog television 
broadcasting in the US was to be May 1, 
2006 (less than five years away). Since that 
ruling, a loophole was added saying that 
analog television can't be shut down until 
85% of viewers in a market can receive 
digital signals. How long will that take? If 
history is a guide, from the time color 
television was introduced in 1953, it took 
until 1978 for 50% of viewers to have color 
TV sets in their homes. That was 25 years. 


So you won't need to drop this newspaper 
and rush out to buy a DTV set today. 

Even though the cost of HDTV sets is 
dropping, it's still a few thousand dollars. 
But some of the new receiver-only units have 
a VGA connector on the back that can feed 
a computer monitor. The quality of the 
4 »cture using this set-up is outstanding, 
©onnect the audio outputs of the receiver to 
your stereo system, and you're ready. (Note 
to those who are in the market for a new 
HDTV set: make sure the set has a 
tuner/receivdr! Otherwise, you're just buying 
a really nice video monitor.) RCA's 
DTC-100 receiver with analog and VGA 
outputs is $549 last I checked. 

Another method of receiving DTV is to 
buy a DTV card for your computer. 
Hauppauge and other manufacturers have 
gotten the demodulator and digital processing 
down to a single card, at a price of about 
$300. You can watch the DTV station on 
your computer screen, or use the S-video 
output on the card to drive a large TV set. 

When you see high-definition TV for the 
first time, you will be amazed! Regular 
analog TV will seem almost out of focus, 
since HDTV detail is so good. If you get a 
chance, go to your favorite electronics 
retailer and ask him to tune in your local 
digital TV stations on one of his new sets. 
You might BOTH be amazed! 


Want to learn more 
about DTV? 

There is a wealth of information 
about Digital TV at the following Web 

sites: 

h ttp: //www .hdDictures.com/stations.htm 

http ://www.sbe24. or g/techdocs/dtv/dtv 
handout.htm 

http://www.digitaltelevision.com 

Tom Weeden, WJ9H 
Chief Engineer,WMTV/ 
WMTV-DT digital 


About the author.. 

Tom Weeden (WJ9H) is a native of 
Beloit, Wisconsin, and earned a degree in 
Broadcast Engineering and Production from 
the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in 
1979. He was an Operations Engineer at 
WTVO/Rockford IL from 1979-1980, then 
moved on to become Chief Engineer at 
WSWW AM-FM/Platteville from 1980-83. 
Tom left Wisconsin in 1983 and served as a 
Master Control Operator at Austin (TX) 
CableVision until 1986. In 1985 he also 
began to work part-time as Chief Engineer at 
KIXL/Austin TX. In 1986 he and his wife 
returned to Wisconsin, where he began work 
at WMTV/Madison as a Maintenance 
Engineer. In 1991 he was promoted to Chief 
Engineer. 

Tom held an FCC First Class 
Radiotelephone Operator permit from 1976 
<mltil it was discontinued in 1985. In April 
1986 he joined the Society of Broadcast 
Engineers. Tom holds a Certified 
Professional Broadcast Engineer (CPBE) 
certification and is SBE Chapter 24's 
secretary. 

WJ9H has been an amateur radio 
operator for 30 years, first licensed as 
WN9HME in 1971, and earning Extra Class 
in 1985. Tom's radio interests include 
non-voice modes such asAPRS, ATV, 
PSK31 and SSTV, as well as occasional net 
control duty for South-Central Wisconsin 
SKYWARN. 

Tom, his wife and two children live in 
-- Madison and are active at Lake City .Church. 


Why Digital Television? 

The demand for spectrum for new wire¬ 
less services is huge. That demand and the 
relatively recent concept that the radio spec¬ 
trum can be sold are the main forces driving 
the transition from analog to digital TV, in 
my opinion. 

The FCC's allocation of UHF TV chan¬ 
nels many years ago was based on poor 
selectivity in receivers. To avoid image 
interference and for other reasons, UHF 
stations in a particular city were spaced 6 
channels apart. That's 30 MHz of unused 
space between stations! Notice the original 
6-channel layout of UHF stations in the 
larger Wisconsin markets: 

Milwaukee: 18 -24-30- 36 

La Crosse: 19-25-31 

Madison: 21 - 27 - 33 (WMTV was later 

reallocated from 33 to 15, still 

6-channel spacing) 

Green Bay/Appleton: 26 - 32- 38-44 

With today's improved receiver technol¬ 
ogy, TV stations can be more tightly packed 
together. The original UHF TV band was 
channels 14-83 (470-890 MHz). About 20 
years ago TV stations were moved off the 
channels above 69 (806 MHz) to make room 
for cellular phone and other services. Now 
there's a new opportunity to shuffle the TV 
spectrum again with a conversion to digital 
TV. Here's a quote from a recent FCC 
Notice of Proposed Rule Making (concerning 
wireless microphones on unused TV chan¬ 
nels): "We note that the Balanced Budget Act 
of 1997 directed the Commission to auction 
recaptured television broadcast spectrum and 
to allocate spectrum in the 746-806 MHz 
band (UHF TV channels 60-69) for public 
safety services and for commercial use. The 
Commission has already implemented the 
reallocation of the 746-806 MHz band 
(emphasis mine) and intends to reallocate the 
698-746 MHz band (UHF-TV channels 
52-59) in the future." 108 MHz of'UHF 
spectrum is for sale, even though many TV 
stations still occupy those channels, provid¬ 
ing a free service to the public. 

DTV does have many advantages over 
analog. However, several problems compli¬ 
cate the transition. 

• There are enormous equipment costs 
to each TV station for a second antenna, 
transmitter, and analog-to-digital conversion 
gear. Small stations may not be able to 
afford these costs and could be forced off the 
air. 

• Approximately 80% of Americans 
don’t rely primarily on over-the-air TV. 
They have cable or satellite service. 

• Cable TV companies are not required 
to carry the digital signals of the local TV 
station. If they do carry the digital signal, 
they are not required to furnish any set-top 
converter to the subscriber, despite incom¬ 
patible signal formats between digital TV and 
digital cable. If a station offers high-defini¬ 
tion programming, the cable company can 
choose to deliver it in a low-resolution for¬ 
mat. 

• Most viewers are perfectly happy with 
the quality of analog TV and don’t want to 
pay for a new, expensive HDTV receiver. 

• As noted above, the auction of UHF 
spectrum is written into law. There is great 
pressure to get analog TV off the air quickly 
so auctioned spectrum can help "balance the 
budget." 

Digital television offers improved pic¬ 
tures, sound, and even datacasting possibili¬ 
ties. DTVs quality is better than DVD. But 
to those of us who work in the broadcasting 
industry, it is a frustrating time of transition 
- -a government-mandated transition that 
most TV viewers are unaware of!. The atti¬ 
tude of "spectrum for sale" also shows how 
we amateurs must be diligent in occr ing 
and protecting our bands from the highest 
bidder. 

; . : -.. . -WJ9H 



6 BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS ■ July 2001 


The Computer 
Comer 


By Man Uaplan, "VyBVKQR *105 Martin Drive 
Port Washington, Wl 53074-9654 
(262) 284-9346 
skaplan@mcw.edu 



No. 91. How to Avoid Clogged Computer Syndrome 


Lei's lace it, we aJJ don’t clean out our garages , basements or closets as often as we 
should. Then, one day, when rummaging among the shoeboxes and boots, the whole 
thing comes crashing down, sometimes along with the closet pole and all the clothes 
hanging on it! Field repairs are necessary right immediately, and we often give in to the 
necessity of finally cleaning out the junk and organizing the remainder. Well, a disorga¬ 
nized, junk-ridden buildup can develop in a computer’s hard drive, too. So here are some 
tips to fix that. It will not only prevent buildup of files leading to the dreaded “Disk Full” 
message, it will also reorganize and defragment those files and programs you wish to 
keep. Moreover, it is quite an easy task. 

However, it takes just a little preparation. Assuming you are working with Windows 
98 (you should be) double-click My Computer, then click View, then Folder Options, 
then select the View tab. The list shown there will display a number of option boxes. 

Select (by clicking the box to put a black dot in it) Show all Files. Similarly, deselect (so 
no black dot is in the box) Hide File Extensions ... You have just instructed your 
computer not to hide any files from your view, and not to hide any file extensions. You 
are the human boss of your computer, and nothing should be hidden from you! Now you 
can clean things up. 

If you are a bit worried about deleting files, remember that any file you delete while 
in Windows still resides in the Recycle Bin until the bin is emptied. It can be restored 
from there should things stop working properly. If you are really skittish, instead of 
deleting the files you can move them to a new folder you create for that purpose. Call the 
new tolder JUNK, and delete its contents after a few days when you are sure that all is 
well. If a program complains that it cannot find a file that you moved to JUNK, simply 
move it back to where the program expects to find it (write down any error messages so 
you know where that is). 

1 Erase temporary files. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the C:\Windows\Temp 
folder. Open it and look at the files inside. Highlight any file with the .tmp file 
extension that has a date/time stamp earlier than the last time you started your 
computer. Then right-click it and delete it. Repeat as necessary until they are all 
gone. These are temporary files, used by installation programs or by open application 
programs. They are supposed to be deleted automatically, but were not, sometimes 
because a programmer was sloppy or lazy and did not provide for proper cleanup. 
They are no longer useful for anything at all once the intended activity is over. 


2 Erase Mscreate.dir. Click Start, then Find, then Files or Folders and type in 

*.DIR. Make sure the Include Subfolders box is selected, and then click Find Now. 
If any Mscreate.dir files turn up, right click them and delete them. There may well 
be hundreds of these files on your drive. They were created during execution of any 
of Microsoft’s installation programs and are completely, totally useless. While they 
are zero-byte files that take no data space, they do take directory space. Delete every 
last one. 

3. Repeat the Start, Find, Files or Folders bit and type in *.old. Erase any files with 
that extension. 


Amateur Morse Testing 
Changes Effective July 1 


New Morse code exam standards took 
etfent. luJ.v, t. fox Vobw/ftfir. Examiner. 
Coordinators. The new standards call for 
Farnsworth character speed in the 13-to-15 
WPM range and the end of multiple-choice 
questions for routine Morse code exams. 

In the wake of restructuring and the 
establishment of 5 WPM as the sole amateur 
Morse requirement, the National Conference 
of Volunteer Examiner Coordinators voted 
last July to set up the revised standards for 
the administration of Morse code examina¬ 
tions in the US. 

ARRL VEC Manager Bart Jahnke, 
W9JJ, points out the required change to the 
Farnsworth protocol replaces the 18-WPM 
character speed ARRL VEC has used since 
1989. “Standard 5 WPM messages with 5 
WPM characters are available as an accom¬ 
modation,” he said. “Standard (non-Farns¬ 
worth) speed messages are available upon 
special request from the ARRL VEC for 
ARRL VE teams.” 

In addition, the Morse exam audio 
frequency range should be between 700 and 
1000 Hz for routine exams. Consistent with 
the revised standards, Jahnke said, ARRL 
VEC has set 15-WPM characters as its 
Farnsworth setting and 750 Hz as its au¬ 
dio-frequency standard. 


Code practice transmissions from 
MAx.'ro.M/ujJiir.'aJ.Statjfin.W 'w, 1 , 1 , YtE/ecv 

the new Farnsworth standard. W1AW Sta¬ 
tion Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, said trans¬ 
missions using the new protocolwere to 
begin Monday, July 2. Code transmissions at 
speeds below 18 WPM will drop from 18 
WPM to 15 WPM character speed. W1AW 
Web code practice files, at 
http://www.arrl.org/wlaw/morse.htmL will 
mirror the new standards too. 

The new Morse examination standards 
also affect test administration. After July 1, 
Morse examinees will have to supply 
fill-in-the-blank answers for the 10-question 
Element 1 quiz. Multiple-choice type exami¬ 
nations no longer will be acceptable. Under 
the new testing regime, Morse code examin¬ 
ees must either correctly answer seven of the 
ten fill-in-the-blanks questions or correctly 
copy 25 consecutive characters. 

Changes are on the horizon for the 
written examinations as well. Revised Ama¬ 
teur Extra question pool will go into effect 
July 1, 2002. Reworked Technician and 
General question pools will become effective 
on July 1 2003 and 2004 respectively. 

ARRL Bulletin 024 


West Allis Amateur Radio Club 
does Field Day 2001 



4. Do it again for *.bak. 

5. If you are ruthlessly seeking more disk space, do it again for *.log and *.txt. If you 
prefer to use a safety measure, open each file first (double click it to open it with 
Notepad - they are simple text files) to view the contents before deleting. If expend¬ 
able. right click to delete. 

6 If your browser is Internet Explorer, open it,‘click Tools, then Internet Options. 
Under the Temporary Internet Files click Delete Files. While you are at it, under 
History click Clear History. 

7. If you use Netscape, open it and click Edit, then Preferences. Click Advanced to 
expand it. By the way, this screen under Advanced is where you can turn off cookies 
if you choose, which is my recommendation. Click Cache and then click both Clear 
Memory Cache and Clear Disk Cache. Return to the desktop. 

8. Now is a decisive moment. If you feel confident, delete the contents of your Recycle 
Bin. If not, double-click the bin to open it, right click the file(s) you are worried 
about and select Save To. You can save the files to floppies, or to some folder you 
have created for that purpose. 

9. Next is perhaps the most important step of all. Click Start, then Programs, then 
Accessories and select System Tools, Disk Defragmenter. In the pull-down slider 
bar, select All Hard Drives if you have more than one partition. Click Start and 
Show Details if you would like to watch the process. The “defrag” process will put 
the files in proper order on the disk, and will consolidate all scattered file fragments 
into contiguous blocks, as they should be. It is much like making certain that 
matching pairs of shoes are together in all the shoe boxes in your closet, and neatly 
slacking the boxes in the order in which you use them. It can significantly increase 
the overall speed and efficiency of your computer, so do it! Try to remember to do it 
once a month or more often if you use the machine heavily. 

That is it for this month. Happy Computing! 


The West Allis Radio Amateur Club operated Field Day at the Crystal Ridge Ski 
Hill in Franklin. Here, Tim Schumann, KB9HJN, cranks the knobs and rolls out the 
QSOs. 



Good antennas never hurt! Here's a 20-meter beam used by WARAC on Field 
Day. 


Photos and info courtesy Dave Knaus, N9QA 


Read us on the Web! 

http://www.bsss.org 











July 2001 ■ BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS 7 


P ARTICIPATING 

_ .. fe 


Clubs and Organizations 


Wisconsin Nets Association Ltd. 

Dean R. Herriges, KB9R0B, Secretary 
W370 S9590 Highway 67 • Eagle, Wl 53119 


Wisconsin Nets 


Net 

WNA 

Freq. 

UTC 

CDT 

Manager 

BWN 

Yes 

3985 

1100 

0600 

W9RCW 

BEN 

Yes 

3985 

1700 

1200 

KE9VU 

WSBN 

Yes 

3985 

2230 

1730 

K9FHI 

WNN 

Yes 

3723 

2300 

1800 

KB9ROB 

WSSN 

Yes 

3645 

2330 

1830 

N9BDL 

WIN/E 

Yes 

3662 

0000 

1900 

WB9ICH 

WIN/L 

Yes 

3662 

0300 

2200 

W9UW 

RCRA 

No 

01/61 

0030 

1930 

KA90MC 



(Mondays CDT) (Menomonie Area) 


Gr. Bay 

No 

72/12 

0245 

2145 

WB9NRK 




(Green Bay Area) 



ARES 

No 

4.65/5.25 

0200 

2100 



(South East/South Central Wisconsin) 


Wisconsin STM Report 
May 2001 

It's All in the Translation 


We need to keep our faith in the hobby 
and in our practiced skills. We need to 
maintain our hope that we can serve through 
our hobby. And we need to be very clear 
about who we are and what we offer. Faith, 


We have all kinds of codes in our hobby hope, and, perhaps the greatest of these, 
- the Morse code, of* course, a code of clarity, 
ethics,, the "Q" * - 

code one gets from putting up antennas in 75 - K9LGU / STM 


mid-winter. Oh, sorry, an observant reader 
has just pointed out that a head code is only 
how it sounds in voice. In CW, it's still a 
cold. Especially if noses run in your family. 
So what about all those other codes? 

It's our job to translate. Whether we are 
explaining the hobby to a non-ham, 
describing our activities to a public official, 
or delivering traffic with ARL numbers in 
the text, we need to convert the idea into 
plain, understandable words. 

Sure, it's fun to have the jargon among 
us. We enjoy swapping acronyms - QTH, 
BC610, EME, PSK-31, etc. - but when 
we're in the company of non-hams, we need 


MONTHLY NET ACTIVITY SUMMARY 
MAY 2001 


NET 

QNI 

QTC 

QTR 

SSNS 

NM 

BWN 

1302 

1599 

2325 

31 

W9IHW for 






W9RCW 

BEN 

478 

73 

790 

30 

KE9VU 

WSBN 

591 

62 

834 

31 

K9FHI 

WNN 

140 

13 

319 

31 

KB9R0B 

WSSN 

201 

29 

326 

31 

N9BDL 

WIN/E 

204 

81 ' 

339 

31 

WB9ICH 

WIN/L 

196 

66 

322 

31 

W9UW 

TOTALS 

3112 

1923 

5255 

216 



to do what we do best - communicate. 


It doesn’t hurt to draw parallels to the 
Internet when explaining Ham Radio. It's 
important to show the differences, just as it 
is when Ham Radio is contrasted with CB. 
The fun in the hobby is the diversity it offers 
in ways to communicate with interesting 
people. 

When delivering a radiogram to a 
non-ham, of course, we read the entire text 
of the message - not the ARL numbers. In 
fact, even when delivering to a ham, it's a 
good idea to ask if the recipient has the 
ARRL's list of radiograms. (Need one? 
They're free from HQ, from me, or from the 
ARRL website, 

http: //www. arrl. org/FandES/field/forms/.) 

When we explain the use of the National 
Traffic System to public officials, we need to 
be clear. Quite simply, the NTS is a way of 
getting messages across the city, state, or 
country in an accurate and orderly way. It is 
a method of supporting communications 
when the cell phones don't work and the 
other systems are overloaded. It may help to 
"«*|how a sample radiogram. There's no need 
to explain net protocol or the workings of the 
^NTS unle« someone asks. What's important 
i\ to let peo f i e j cnow what is availably to 
them in times oi . ee( j. 


SJATI0N ACTIVITY SUMMARY 
Wisconsin Section 
May 2001 


STATION 

0RIG 

RCVD 

SENT 

DLVD 

TOTAL 

W9RCW 

0 

391 

50 

386 

827 ■ BPL 

K9JPS 

2 

341 

45 

338 

718 ■ BPL 

W9IHW 

0 

314 

34 

280 

628 ■ BPL 

N9VE 

0 

239 

33 

242 

514 ■ BPL 

W09GNK 

0 

238 

30 

288 

506 • BPL 

N9TVT 

0 

122 

341 

4 

467 

W9YPY 

0 

155 

204 

0 

359 

W9CBE 

0 

159 

148 

6 

313 

K9LGU 

5 

80 

47 

1 

133 

K9GU 

0 

54 

11 

54 

119 

K9FHI 

0 

41 

81 

0 

102 

N9CK 

0 

48 

46 

2 

96 

N9BDL 

0 

23 

65 

1 

89 

A09X 

0 

32 

42 

11 

85 

N9KHD 

0 

39 

45 

0 

84 

W9YCV 

1 

32 

41 

6 

80 

wqw 

1 “v- 

40 

26 

1 

68 

AG9G 

0 

9 

54 

0 

- 63 

KG3B 

0 

9 

41 

0 

50 

KE9VU 

0 

18 

32 

0 

50 

KB9R0B 

0 

32 

5 

0 

37 

KA9FVX 

0 

1 

32 

1 

34 

K9H0F 

0 

0 

30 

0 

30 

W9BHL 

0 

0 

29 

0 

29 

N9J1Y 

1 

8 

11 

8 

28 

AA9BB 

0 

0 

26 

0 

26 

WB9ICH 

0 

23 

2 

1 

’ ~ 26 

W09FLJ 

5 

6 

5 

6 

22 

KA9BHK 

0 

0 

10 

0 

10 

KN9P 

0 

4 

4 

0 

8 

K9UTQ 

0 

1 

2 

1 

4 

W9PVD 

0 

0 

1 

0 

1 


lakeshore Repeater Association 


147.270 MHz • Racine, Wisconsin 


lam Mctam. WMJMt • 5400 six Mile mail 
Racing. Wl 53402-9741 • wa9lms@wl.net 


Our quarterly Repeater meeting will be 
held at7:30p.m. on Tuesday, July 31, 2001 
in the lo wer meeting room of the Racine Red 
Cross Building, 4521 Taylor Avenue in 
Racine. Park in the back and enter the glass 
doors next to the white overhead garage 
door. Our 70cm repeater should be opera¬ 
tional on 447.000/442.000 prior to this date. 
We will be “buming-it-in” for a couple 
weeks, testing all circuits and hardware prior 
to installing it at our new site. Final arrange¬ 
ments are being made with a commercial 
tower climber and the last of the needed 
installation hardware is being gathered. 
There is a very slight chance that the re¬ 
peater will be moved to, and operational 
from the new tower. But after all the delays 
we have had, 1 expect that a more realistic 
date would be in August. 

Prior to the Repeater meeting, ARES 
will host their own meeting beginning at 
6:30 p.m. in the same classroom. Please try 
to attend both gatherings. 

Dan Miller, KA90IL, is our nomina¬ 
tion’s chair for the selection of Lakeshore’s 
slate of 2002 candidates for office. We are 


looking for candidates for President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer. If you 
are interested in one of these positions or 
know of someone who is, please give Dan a 
call. Nominations will also be accepted at 
our election meeting, Tuesday, October 23, 
2001 . 

We have had some interference on our 
two-meter machine. One of our members 
living very close to one of our receive site 
runs high power to work a two-meter re¬ 
peater in Northern Illinois. When third 
station/party/repeater activates their transmit¬ 
ter while our member is working (he Illinois 
repeater, we get a duel transmission our 
147.870/270 machine. We are working to 
identify the third party to this problem so a 
permanent fix can be addressed. If you have 
the time and inclination, please give a listen; 
see if you can identify the source. Please 
share your ideas with your board of direc¬ 
tors. 

75, 

Larry McCalvy, WA9JMO 
President, Lakeshore Repeater Association 


Quarter Century Wireless Association 
Southeastern Wisconsin Chapter 162 

Larry McCalvy, WA9JM0 
5400 Six Mile Road 
Racine, Wl 53402 



At this writing, Chapter members are 
busy gathering equipment and ideas as they 
anticipate Field Day 2001. The gang, operat¬ 
ing QRP battery, is hoping for pleasant 
weather conditions and great contacts as this 
.event kicks-off at 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 
23 rd . The various committees associated with 
this annual event have their areas of respon- 
sibilitiesfcovered and everyone is looking for 
a grand time and a big score. 

Cruise Convention 2001 sailing on the 
Holland America Westerdam out of Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida has 108 cabins con¬ 
firmed with 217 Hams/relatives/guests pre¬ 
paring to enjoy all the Caribbean has to 
offer. The 27 October to 4 November outing 
will explore the conditions on 15 and 20 

■ j i ■ ** • 

PSHRSUMMARY 
May 2001 


CALL 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

T 

W9RCW 

34 

0 

0 

386 0 

30 

3 

3 

450 

K9JPS 

46 

24 

24 

328 2 

10 

0 

0 

434 

N9VE 

60 

0 

6 

242 0 

20 

40 

0 

378 

K9FHI 

60 

24 

24 

1 

0 

30 

20 

30 

188 

K9LGU 

60 

24 

24 

1 

5 

20 

10 

0 

144 

N9B0L 

60 

24 

24 

1 

0 

30 

0 

0 

T39 

W9YCV 

60 

24 

24 

6 

1 

20 

0 

0 

135 

W9CBE 

60 

24 

24 

6 

0 

20 

0 

0 

134 

W09FLJ 

60 

0 

12 

6 

5 

20 

0 

30 

133 

N9TVT 

60 

24 

24 

4 

0 

10 

0 

0 

122 

AG9G 

60 

24 

18 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

112 

KG9B 

33 

12 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

30 

75 

KA9FVX 

60 

0 

0 

1 

0 

10 

0 

0 

71 


meters during the day and the 40 to 75 me¬ 
ters opportunities at night. We will have a 
speciafevent station in operation during most 
of our cruise. We are still looking at options 
for our sailing Hams onboard the Westerdam 
and in our ports of call. If you are interested 
in the cruise give me a call at (262) 639- 
7327, and/or email me at 

wa9imo@wi.net . 

This is an Amateur Radio opportunity 
that is not limited to QCWA members. I will 
be happy to send additional information and 
our price list to interested parties. 

Mark your calendars for 1 p.m, on 
Sunday, 19 August and note it is time for our 
annual picnic. Our site is again Decision 
Farm, 5400 Six Mile Road, Racine, Vi mile 
west of Highway 31 on the north side of 
Highway “G” (Six Mile Road). The Chapter 
will provide two gas grills and one charcoal 
- the latter for roasting our world famous 
com-on-the-cob; the Chapter will also pro¬ 
vide beverages. Each attendee is asked to 
bring a dish to pass and their own meat to 
grill. Swimming and fishing should be great 
and there is a canoe and paddleboat avail¬ 
able. I have ordered all the mosquitoes to 
depart the area from noon until dark for our 
picnic 

73, 

Larry McCalvy, WA9JMO, President, 
Chapter 162 


















8 BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS ■ July 2001 




Mancorad Radio Club 

Theresa Hartlaub, KB9KXE, 
Secretary 

P.O. Box 204 • Manitowoc, Wl 
54221-0204 




ERVICE <R 


June Meeting Minutes 

The Mancorad June meeting was held 
June 13th at our new club shack at 1105 
Fleetwood Drive, just off of Waldo Blvd. 
President Fred (W6BSF) started the meeting 
at 7:34 p.m. The May minutes were read 
and approved by motions made and seconded 
by Ken (K9HAG) and Travis (KB9YRC). 
Our treasurer, Roger, read the treasurer's 
report which also was approved with motions 
by Mary (KB9GOY) and Rahlf (N9AWG). 

Fred thanked all the members who 
helped with the move of club equipment 
from the downtown location to our new 
shack. He also reminded everyone that there 
is still alot to do, so anyone interested in 
helping should talk to Red or Fred. 

All members were reminded that after 
July 1st the ARRL membership dues are 
going up. 

Thank you letter was read from the 
Salvation Army for our bell ringing efforts at 
Christmas. This was organized by John 
(NZ9Z) with other members helping. 
$284.00 was brought in through their efforts. 
A job well done. Thank you to all who 
participated. 

The club will buy a refrigerator for the 
shack. After a discussion, it was decided by 
unanimous vote to purchase a GE 4.3 cu.ft. 
model. Fred will stock it for the next meet¬ 
ing. 

A request from Jim Romelfanger (K9 
ZZ) was read for a donation to expenses he 
incurs while running a special event on the 
Circus Train. The train travels from Baraboo 
to Milwaukee. It was decided to send him 
50.00 towards his expenses. 

Once again a nuclear drill will be run 
from the Kewaunee plant. Volunteers are 
asked to help again. It will be held July 31st. 
Fred ran down the procedures for the day. 
More participation is wanted from the Madi¬ 
son office. A meeting for those involved will 
be held July lO" 1 at the Holiday Inn, includ¬ 
ing a lunch. If interested please contact Fred. 

Any one interested in a club badge will 
have an opportunity to order one next 
month. Roger (W9NPX) will have more 
information next meeting. 

Also jackets and shirts are also still 
available. 

Jim (KB9GOX) reported on the Smelt-a- 
thon held May 19th and 20th. He thanked 
everyone who had helped out the 2 days. 
There were 248 racers from 5 states. He also 
had a thank you from the race committee. 
Next year the dates are May 17- 18th. 

Members were asked to help at another 
race being held in Kewaunee op Just 14th at 
9:30. Two races will be held at the same 
time. Anyone who can help should contact 
James (KB9GOY). This would be country 
roads mostly. 

Fred also reminded us of the Leukemia 
ride coming up. As in the past, riders will be 
coming up from Milwaukee and staying 
overnight at the UW campus. Then starting 
out early Sunday morning on their way to 
Door County. It will be held Just 21st and 


22nd. Steve (N9PBL) is coordinating this. 
Please contact him if you can help. 

Travis (KB9YRC) was applauded for the 
fine job he did running the weather net a few 
days earlier. Thank you Travis for all your 
efforts. 

The committee for the Hamfest is work¬ 
ing on next years event. Places are being 
contacted for possible use. More on this in 
coming meetings. One possibility is the Club 
BilMar. 

The Lighthouse Event which was to be 
held later in the summer is looking like a no 
show. Ron (WS9X) is trying to contact the 
people in charge for a final answer. Hope¬ 
fully we should know soon either way. 

The club has been trying to get more 
exposure for the club. One way would be to 
have a small display at the local county fair. 
Theresa (KB9KXE) checked with fair offi¬ 
cials about putting up a small display outside 
in their equipment booth. Permission was 
given. So think about helping out manning 
the display at the fair. Some discussion was 
held about which days would work out the 
best for all involved. 

Fred reported that 4 members of the 
club will have keys for the club shack. If you 
would need to get in, you can contact one of 
the following: Fred (W6BSF), Red (N9- 
GHE), Roger (W9NPX), or Dick (N9QFY). 

A small party was given for Chuck 
(W9BZU) on the 75th anniversary of his 
being a ham operator. He was given a 
placque for his many years of service. All 
those who attended were treated to a pizza 
party. Thank you to all who took time from 
their busy day to honor Chuck. 

Congratulations to Chuck from the 
entire club on your accomplishment. Mary 
(KB9GOY) brought some pictures of the 
party which will be put into our club scrap¬ 
book. 

The attendance drawing was held; Steve 
(KB9GPN) was drawn but not in attendance. 
The pot goes to 17.00. 

Our next monthly meeting will be held 
on July 11th at the club shack off Waldo 
Blvd. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:41 with 
motions made by Mary (KB9GOY) and Red 
(N9GHE). 

Submitted for approval, 

Theresa Hartlaub (KB9KXE) 
Secretary 

Member Attendance 

Roger W9NPX Rahlf N9AWG 

Travis KB9YRC Jeff N9XEV 

Fred W6BSF Bob KB9INK 

Ken K9HAG Red N9GHE 

Clancy K9WIX Dan N9FVZ 

Lyle WB9VTM Gene WB9DQD 

Oran N9VIA Don KB9NTL 

Gene KB9KXF Chris KB9VLS 

Mary KB9GOY John NZ9Z 

Dick N9QFY James KB9GOX 

Chuck N9WUN Julie N9PZX 

Vic WB9VYO Theresa KB9KXE 


Astronaut Susan Helms, KC7NHZ, is shown here aboard a space shuttle during 
a mission. She operated Field Day from earth orbit, 170 miles up, from the 
International Space Station, using the call sign NA1SS. 


Just before heading to Owen Park for 
the club’s FD outing, I noted a pass of the 
International Space Station (ISS) would 
occur about five minutes into the communi¬ 
cations exercise, with two more to follow. 
We would be in the station’s “footprint” all 
three times. 

I parked my butt at the two meter rig. 
Steve. N9UDO. has his eggbeater antenna 
lashed to a fence post, about eight feet off 
the ground. We checked the frequencies to 
be sure they were correct. And then we 
wailed. 

It was lime. We heard a packet burst, 
and someone commented that might be all 
we’d get. Not so, as right after that, there 
was Susan Helms on voice using the ARISS 
station and signing the call NA1SS. 

The DXing competitiveness within me 
turned itself on. Tail-ending. Timing. 

And. sure enough. Three minutes or so 
into the pass, WB9FDZ became a part of an 
historic Field Day. the first time someone in 
earth orbit operated Field Day. We worked 
her with excellent signals both ways. 


So, about seven minutes into FD, we 
had the ARISS contact, and it seemed any¬ 
thing after that would be anti-climactic. 

We then listened with interest as she 
worked a youngster and a station with a 
Scout troop. It was interesting to hear her 
slow the pace just a little and take the time to 
encourage them. She asked either the young¬ 
ster or the Scouts, “What do you think of 
ham radio now? ” We could not hear the 
earth station, of course, but let your imagina¬ 
tion provide the answer. 

Two or three dozen stations had FD 
QSOs with NA1SS. The members of 
YTARC are proud and happy to be a part of 
something new in that annual bug-swatting, 
wire tripping, and all-around enjoyable event 
we call Field Day. 

And we all thank everyone who made 
ARISS possible in the first place, and thanks 
to Susan Helms and her superiors who gave 
her Field Day time from 170 miles above us. 

- Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ 


Steve Schulze, N9UDO, does an equipment shuffle as son Rich looks on at the 
YTARC Field Day site, Owen Park in western Columbia County in Caledonia 
Township. Two things made th ; s outing more interesting than other Field Days 
may have ever been. One was about 100 Harley-Davidsons rolling in for a 
wedding They used the west end of the park, and YTARC was on the east side. 
We had lots of fun talking with quite a fe\ f the bikers, and they enjoyed 
watching the Field Day fun. The other was working NA1SS in earth orbit. 

Photos by Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ 


Something interesting happening? 


Maybe our readers would like to read about it. 
Write it up and send to the editor. The address is 

on page 2. 


2-Meter Repeater: 146.01 Input/146.61 Output 


Yellow Thunder Amateur Radio 
Club - Field Day 2001 - WB9FDZ 













July 2001 ■ BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS 9 


Scholarship winners 
announced by Foundation 
for Amateur Radio 


The Foundation for Amateur Radio, a 
non-profit 501(c)(3) organization has an¬ 
nounced the winners of the 65 scholarships it 
administers. These awards are for the aca¬ 
demic year 2001-2002. Three Wisconsin 
clubs are among the many who provide 
scholarships. 

WARAC Memorial 
Scholarships 

Sponsored by the West Allis Radio 
Amateur Club 

Two at $1000 each 

Andrew A. Knitt, KB9JOZ 
Rhinelander, WI 

Andrew J. Wagner, KB9TAC 
Menomonie, WI 

South Milwaukee Amateur 
Radio Club Scholarships 

Two at $1000 each 

Michael R. Placek, KB9SCH 


Oak Creek, WI 

Michael M. Imrick, AA9ZT 
Mason, WI 

Ozaukee Radio Club 
Scholarship 

One at $1000 

Jeffrey D. Koch, N9XMN 
Wisconsin Rapids, WI 

In addition, Phillip A. Bogacki, KB9- 
KEE, Milwaukee, WI, won one of two Rose 
Ellen Bills Memorial Scholarships. Those are 
$2000 each. 

The 65 total scholarships were open to 
all licensed radio amateurs meeting the 
qualification and residence requirements of 
the various sponsors. 

The Foundation is a non-profit organiza¬ 
tion incorporated in the District of Columbia, 
and is devoted exclusively to the scientific, 
literary and educational pursuits that advance 
the purposes of the Amateur Radio Service. 

The announcement of the year 2002 
awards will appear in the January or Febru¬ 
ary issues of the major Amateur Radio publi¬ 
cations and selected radio club newsletters. 


Securing the antennas 




Don Evenson, 
K9JYX, helps 
secure the VHF 
and UHF anten¬ 
nas to a post at 
the Yellow Thun¬ 
der Amateur Ra¬ 
dio Club's FD 
site. The second 
antenna from the 
left is the two- 
meter eggbeater 
which was used 
to work NA1SS 
on the Interna¬ 
tional Space Sta¬ 
tion. 


K9ZZ photo 








Sheboygan 

County Amateur Radio Club 

★ 


Sky Borgenhagen, N9XRU, Secretary 
N6466 Plank Circle • Glenbeulah WI 53023 


2-Meter Repeater: 147.06 Output 


The June meeting was called to order by 
club President Steve, N9TRK, at 7:00 p.m. 
There were seven members present. The 
SCARC meetings are held every second 
Tuesday of the month in the Red Cross 
building at 2032 Erie Ave. in Sheboygan. 

Field Day agenda was finalized. We will 
be operating 5A with the new club call sign, 
KB9ZUO. A big thank you to Steve, AA9SJ 
for doing all the leg work on the club call 
sign! 

Club officer elections were held and the 
results were as follows: 


President: 
Secretary: 
Treasurer: 
Board Member: 
Board Member: 
Board Member: 


Mike - K9SJ 
Sky - N9XRU 
Steve - N9TRK 
Steve - AA9SJ 
Larry - WB9FXQ 
Jeff - KB9VSA 


Finishing touches were done on the 
radio room wall. 

The meeting adjourned at 9 p.m. 

Net Schedule 


2nd Saturday - Family Restaurant in 
Cleveland 

3rd Saturday - Plymouth Family 
Restaurant, Mill Street in Plymouth 

4th Saturday - Park View Restaurant, 
County PP Sheboygan Falls 

5th Saturday - Hill Farm Restaurant, Cty V 
and OK 

Hams, spouses, hangers on and such are 
welcome. 

Email List 

If you use e-mail, consider signing up 
on the Sheboygan Hams mailing list. Simply 
submit your e-mail address to: 
<julian@bongo.tele.com>. All e-mail sent 
to < shebham@tele.com > will be forwarded 
to all listed subscribers. Thanks again, 
N6ARE, for providing this wonderful mail 
server for SCARC 
use. 


The SCARC 2 Meter net meets Monday 
nights at 8:00 p.m. on 147.060, PL107.2 +. 
This is a fun net and all are welcome to join 
us. Any members willing to take net control 
for one or more nights should contact Steve, 
N9TRK. 

Saturday Morning Breakfasts 

The Saturday morning Sheboygan hams 
breakfasts are held in the following venues at 
8 a.m.: 

1st Saturday - Jumes in Sheboygan 


Club Postal Mailing Address 

SCARC, PO Box 1282, Sheboygan, WI 
53081-1282 

Respectfully Submitted: 

Sky Borgenhagen, N9XRU 


Hbxafi you fan teaditty 

SaeUyen State S*m6c Stytalef 


Colorado students interview 
astronaut via ham radio 


Eight students from several schools in 
the Boulder, Colorado, area used ham radio 
to ask US astronaut Jim Voss about his 
experiences and activities aboard the Interna¬ 
tional Space Station. The June 21 contact 
was arranged through the Amateur Radio on 
the International Space Station (ARISS) 
program. 

Participants ranged from elementary 
school age through college, including one 
questioner who attends the University of 
Colorado in Boulder, Voss' alma mater. The 
students gathered at the home station of Bill 
McCaa, K0RZ, in Boulder for the linkup, 
which lasted just over 10 minutes. 

Students' curiosity ran the gamut from 
scientific to spiritual. One high schooler 
asked about how the lack of gravity affected 
Voss' sensation of balance. 

"Actually, the fluids of your inner ear 
do change a little bit,'but after a day or so, 
you’re used to it — your eyes take over and 
you don't really feel like you're off balance 
or anything like that,” Voss replied. Voss 
said the body adapts very quickly to space, 
"and you feel like you're right at home, 
whether you're upside down or right side 
up." 

Another youngster asked Voss if being 
aboard the International Space Station made 
him "feel any closer to any heavenly body.” 

' 'Mister Guitar,'' Chet 

Guitar picker, music legend and Ama¬ 
teur Radio operator Chester B. "Chet" 
Atkins, W4CGP, of Nashville, Tennessee, 
died June 30. He was 77. 

Known as "Mister Guitar," Atkins 
hailed from East Tennessee and began his 
musical career playing fiddle, but later earn¬ 
ed his reputation as a guitarist. He went on 
to become the most-recorded solo instrumen¬ 
tal musician in history. 

Formerly WA4CZD, Atkins, a General 
licensee, obtained the vanity call sign 


Voss pointed out that the ISS was only a 
couple of hundred miles or so above Earth 
and that the view of the heavens wasn't that 
much different than from the ground. "I just 
feel further away from Earth," he said. 

Voss told the students that he and his 
crewmates still can see the stars and planets, 
but they don't twinkle as they do on Earth 
because of the lack of atmosphere. More 
spectacular, he said, is the view of Earth 
from the ISS. "It is truly beautiful!" Voss 
exclaimed. Seeing Earth from space for the 
first time was "a very emotional experience." 
he said. 

He said the crew has been working to 
get the Canadian-built manipulator arm 
working properly and would be involved 
next month in the installation of a module 
that will serve as a launch platform for space 
walks. 

Voss used the NA1SS call sign for the 
contact. Each student got to ask two ques¬ 
tions. Questioners included at least two 
hams, 17-year-old Brian Bowman, KC0FSO, 
and 12-year-old Emily Arthur, KC0GIA. 
Voss said he hoped to make it back to Boul¬ 
der for an in-person visit after he returns to 
Earth. The Expedition 2 crew of Voss, Susan 
Helms, KC7NHZ, and Yuri Usachev, RW3- 
FU. is scheduled to leave the ISS in 
mid-August. 

The ARRL Letter 


Atkins, W4CGP, SK 

W4CGP in 1998-the suffix standing for 
"certified guitar picker." He was an ARRL 
member. He won 14 Grammy awards during 
his career and was elevated to the Country 
Music Hall of Fame in 1973. He was pre¬ 
sented with a Lifetime Achievement Award 
in 1993 by the National Aca^my of Record¬ 
ing Arts and Sciences m > recognize his 
guitar-picking technique as ell as his wide 
influence on music. Tie had more than 100 
albums to his credi, 


- ARRL 





10 JULY 2001 ■ BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS 




C Wisconsin i. 

( Amateur 

THE WISCONSIN PACKETEER 


N raCKc i 

| Radiof/Jgf 
) Association^ 

Wisconsin Amateur Packet Radio Association 

Larry Shields, WD9ESU, Treasurer, W8929 Highway K, Lodi, WI 53555 

Andy Nemec, KB9ALN, Editor • 453 Cottage Grove Avenue • Green Bay, WI54304 • e-mail: kb9aln@juno.com 


WAPR News -July, 2001 

by Andy Nemec, KB9ALN 

Hello and Happy July 4th to everyone. I hope you 
have a safe and happy holiday. 

As many of you may vividly remember, the middle 
of June was not kind to us here in Wisconsin, at least 
with regard to the weather. Severe thunderstorms with 
high winds, and even a tornado or two affected many 
people in Wisconsin. Many Amateurs found themselves 
assisting various emergency response organizations after 
taking part in weather reporting nets. For the most part, 
the Wisconsin packet network made it through OK. 
There were a couple of scattered outages that were di¬ 
rectly attributable to the storms, and nodestacks that had 
emergency power were using it in a few cases. 

Al, KB9BYQ in Appleton found himself with a wet 
basement and no power on the ni gh t, of the June 11th 
storms that turned Outagamie and Winnebago counties 
(among others) into declared disaster areas. His node 
stack kept tight on ticking, though. It wasi’t until the 
early morning hours of the 13th that his commercial 
power returned. His BBS was down for the duration, 
however. Folks in Waupaca were not so lucky - their 
node stack was without power for a day or two as well. 

We were lucky that there were no more problems 
than just power - high winds made this a particularly 
dangerous event. Packet is another ode of our many 
communications resources we use to support emergency 
management agencies. It can be especially valuable to us 
in maintnimng' contact with the State Department of 
Emergency Management when voice chanrnh may not 
be available, may be crowded with other disaster-related 
activity, or just not suitable far the information we’re 
trying to pass. 

In addition to the "regular" packet network, Wis¬ 
consin has it's own ARES node network specially pro¬ 
vided to carry out Emergency and Drill packet traffic. It 
is on the frequency of 145.610 MHz, 1200 bps (same 
speed as the regular VHF packet you probably normally 
use). This is a state-wide coordinated frequency that has 
long been designated as such. I recently received an E- 
Mail reminder concerning the use of this frequency, and 
this would be a good time to share it with you. It comes 
from Len Kryer, N9QIP who is the state ARES packet 
coordinator. Here’s the full text of his note: 

Just a heads up to all those who are running a 
packet staliori dn 145.610 Mhz. Each ’Nation that oper¬ 
ates on this frequency shall be for Emergency purposes 
only!' • ’’ ■ " *• ' 

1 am seeing many stations with mail boxes and in¬ 
vites to drop each other a line using this frequency. This 
emergency network relies on keeping the frequency clear 
of general BBS type traffic and personal mailbox traffic. 
If you have not done so, please limit your personal sta¬ 
tions to ID only with no other text following your ID 
beacon. Do NOT use a Digi to relay your station beacon 
anywhere on this network. In a real emergency, those 
beacons, digis, and IDs from any stations other than 
ARES/RACES tend to clog the network and take valu¬ 
able time away from emergency traffic. v 

If you wish to use your station for assisting the’ 
emergency network on a full time basis, please turn off 
the digi function and enable the node operation on your 
TNC instead. 

Failure to help keep traffic to a minimum will sim¬ 
ply render the network useless. ■ - 

Ldn KreyOr, N9QIP Wisconsin Emergency Packet 
Coordinator v ' : ' 

Len’s ndt Was forwarded to me by a cotrple of-dif¬ 
ferent people, .'liong with his note, I saw a request from 
ARRL Official Observer and Section Technical Special¬ 


ist Ridiard Polivka, N6NKO. Here’s his request: 

Along with the request to limit the traffic on 
145.610 MHz, I would like to m ake the following re¬ 
quest to all. 

Could you please email me the location, callsign 
and function of any equipment that anyone may have on 
145.610 MHz? I am trying to come up with a map of 
145.61 stations and nodes for Wisconsin. This map will 
be regularly updated and released. Having a map of die 
145.61 system will be of great use in getting messages 
through in a tim e of need. 

Thank you. 

73, Richard E. Polivka, N6NKO n6nko@execpc. 

com 

I hope that if you have any equipment on the state 
ARES frequuicy, you operate it in the spirit of it’s in¬ 
tended use, and let Rich know about it. After all, you 
never know if, when or where a disaster will strike. 
Having this frequency dear for emergency communica¬ 
tions may well help you if disaster ever affects your 
community. 

That’s all I have for this month. As always, feel 
free to send me your packet news at one of the addresses 
etthe top of this page. Until nest time, 73 from Andy. 


This is part 4 of a series designed to help node Sys¬ 
ops leam more about the popular TheNET X-U series of 
nodes. WeTl skip over the more common user com¬ 
mands and devote our discussion to commands used by 
the Sysop. This month, we look at ALIAS and ARP. 


ALIAS 

Most every node has an alias - a name other than 
it’s call-sign - that it is known by. TheNet X-U revision 
4 nodes can have the standard network node alias plus 3 
other aliases. These are BBSALIAS, DXCAIJAS, and 
HOST ALIAS. 

The BBSALIAS is simply another name that the 
node is known by for BBS purposes. If a station attempts 
to connect to the BBSALIAS, the node will respond and 
carry out the BBS connect command (automatically con¬ 
nect to a specified BBS). In the case of DXCALIAS, the 
node connects the user to a DX Cluster. HOSTALIAS 
will connect the use- to a local TCP/IP "Host" com¬ 
puter. You don’t have to set these other aliases if you 
don’t have these services in your area. Of course, you 
would want to set the network node alias. 

The command syntax is the sane for all commands 
involving an ALIAS. Naturally, you need to be con¬ 
nected to the node as a sysop in order to use these com¬ 
mands. Here’s a summary: 

ALIAS* 

Clears the alias entry. To enter a new abas, type: 

ALLAS your_alias_pameJiere 

Note that there are certain checks the node makes 
to see if your proposed abas is permitted under it’$ 
"rules". Changing abases without careful consideration 
of the problems it may cause others is discouraged. Most 
commonly, the abas is "burned" into the node’s EPROM 
so you probably would only re-enter a node abas if 
something really bad happened, or it was changed. 


WISCONSIN AMATEUR PACKET RADIO 
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 

PLEASE PRINT: 

NAME:_ ^ _CALL: __ HOME PHONE: (_)_ 

ADDRESS: CITY: . _ STATE: ZIP: _L_, _ 

HOME BBS:__JFREQ:_(Listing.your home BBS is important) 

MY PACKET STATION OPERATES: ' - D AY__ NIGHT 24HOURS 

I OPERATE A: ’ DIGIPEATER WITH AN ALIAS OF:___ 

_ FULL SERVICE BBS 

PRIMARY PACKET INTERST/EXPERTISE IS:_ ' _ 


‘ -L .. ___-i-i__:_ 

Si f . . t • ... ( ; 

_ YES - . I want to receive Badger State Smoke Signals and I understand that part of my dues will go to 

pay the subscription. Cost $20.00. 

_ NO: I do not wish to receive Badger State Smoke signals as part of WAPR membership. Cost 

. $15-00. ,. 

Complete and return this form with your check or money order — $15.00 for membership only or $20.00 for member¬ 
ship and Badger State Smoke Signals, made payable to W.A.P.R. to: 

Larry Shields, WD9ESJJ, Treasurer,. . ? 

W892(THighway K . ' /’ .v 

Lodi, W153555’ ' ' : " ‘' 


Net/Rom Node Infejo sitkii far the Sjnop - 
Part Four 

by Andy Nemec, KB9ALN 








BADGER STATE SMOKE SIGNALS ■ JULY 2001 11 




Yellow Thunder Amateur Radio Club 


WB9FDZ (Original Club Call) 

K90DK (Robert L. Prine Memorial Call) 

Club net: Sundays 8:00 p.m. on 147.315 

Raymond J. Matlosz, N9MLZ, Secretary 
450 W. 2nd St., Reedsburg, Wl 53959-1500 


/A 

#) 

w 


V 


ARP 

Arp is a command closely related to other TCP/IP 
commands for TheNet X-1J. One of the most recogniz¬ 
able feature of these nodes is the ability to act as a TCP/ 
IP router. That is, it can correctly and automatically 
route TCP/IP packets (called datagrams) to their in¬ 
tended destination. 

What is "ARP"? Arp means "Address Resolution 
Protocol". In the world of TCP/IP, computers are known 
by their names (called "hostnames") as well as a number 
(called an IP address). In the Amateur Radio World, 
Call-signs are used to differentiate stations. ARP bridges 
this gap by associating an IP address to a Call-Sign. 

ARP allows the node to properly direct TCP/IP 
connections toward a particular call-sign-equipped radio 
transmitter and TNC, eventually reaching the computet. 

The Node Sysop maintains a small database in the 
node (called an "ARP Table") that it uses to remember 
which call-sign goes with which IP address. ARP, when 
used as a node command, is used to manipulate this data¬ 
base. 

Sound contusing? It's really pretty simple when you 
take it step-by-step. For now, let's just assume that 
WX9APR has an IP address of 44.92.232.5. All we have 
to do is to tell this to the node. 

Let's put WX9APR into a node's ARP Table. We'd 
use the command form of: 

ARP 44.92.232.5 + P AX25 WX9APR DG 

The First number is the IP address belonging to 
WX9APR. The + indicates you want to add it to the list. 
The P indicates that you want the node to Publish this 
arp entry - tell it to other computers that are listening on 
the frequency. AX25 tells the node to use the AX.25 
protocol set (the Amateur Packet Standard) to talk to 
WX9APR, which is the call-sign used to connect. The 
Last entry, DG, means to use the "Datagram" mode. 
The Datagram mode uses end-to-end packet acknowl¬ 
edgement. 

There is one other choice, VC. This means that the 
connection is to be a "Virtual Circuit" type. These con¬ 
nections are hop-to-hop acknowledged. There are special 
uses for both. The general rule seems to be to use DG on 
reliable paths, and VC wh e n fee path is error-prone. • 

This isjBne*-w» have WX9APR on the* list. What 
IlppSis^ihen he decides to change call-signs, and we 
have to remove the old one from die list? That one is 
easy enough: 

ARP 44.92.232,5* AX25 

> From there, you can add that address on a differ¬ 
ent call-sign using the ARP + variant of the command. 

Any incorrect syntax using the ARP command can 
make things interesting. One common mistake is not en¬ 
tering enough information when-dropping a station from 
the list. Forgetting to enter the IP Address, for example, 
will turn ARP off entirely. Turning it back on is simple: 

ARP + 

Will do it. ARP - by itself, as you have probably 
guessed, totally disables ARP. 

That's all for this part. Two of the final install¬ 
ments in this series will summarize what it takes to get 
the TCP/IP functions operating on TheNet X-1JR4 
nodes. Next month, we’ 11 continue our alphabetical ex¬ 
ploration of the Sysop commands for these nodes. Until 
then, 73 from Andy. 

THE TEST POINT 

(continued from page 3) 

MEDFORD, WI (ARRL/VEQ-UPDATE 
NEEDED 

Take Ogden St. west off of Hwy. 13 to the court¬ 
house. Park on the street or in the parking lot on the 
south side of the courthouse. Use one of the two en¬ 
trances there. Watch for the signs when you get into 
the building. Talk-in on the 147.15 (+500 KHz, ^14.8 
PL) repeater. Walk-ins welcome, but if you know 
you'll be attending, please let us know. Contact: Tom 
Hrdina, N9GEN, 2373 Willow Ave., Medford, WI 
54451. (715) 748-4054. E-mail: Mike, N9GHZ, muzik- 
man0pcpros.net. 


The June 5, 2001 meeting of the Yellow Thunder 
Amateur Radio club was called to order at 7:42 p.m. by 
the club president Steve Schulze, N9UDO. 

Minutes for the May 1, 2001 meeting were ap¬ 
proved as published in BSSS. Bill Klinkner, N9KXX 
gave the treasurers report. Bill also reported two new 
members, Brian Smith KG90G Portage and Steven 
Hayes, KB9LMZ, Briggsville. Club now has thirty seven 
members. 

OLD BUSINESS: Bill Hommel, KA9QFJ and Tho¬ 
mas Harrison, N9PQJ participated in Circus Heritage 
Day held in May. The club received a blue ribbon from 
the Boy Scouts for the participation. It was reported that 
it was fire that got the attention of the scouts in the area 
though it was the adults who seemed most interested in 
ham radio. Next Zilch meeting will be September 23, 
2001. About a dozen people attended the presentation by 
Stan Kaplan, Ph.D. at the May 17th meeting of SCARES. 
Other old business discussed was a balloon flight and a 
memorial for silent key Bob King. 

NEW BUSINESS: Preparations were made for Field 
day June 23-24 in Owen Park (Columbia County). Bring 
own meat to grill (grills will be furnished). Club hamfest 
was approved by ARRL. * - x?: 

Steve Schulz's Eggbeater antenna was the center of 


HUDSON, WI (ARRL/VEC) 

Sponsor: St. Croix Valley AR TeStingCol.TIme: 
Call for time and walk-in info. Contact: Gregory 
Miller (715)386-9857 Location: St. Croix County 
Emergency, Government Center by jail, Carmichal 

ARRL Web site) 

HAMFEST EXAMS 
Cedarburg WI - ORC Hamfest 
Green Bay WI - ARES Hamfest 
Hayward WI - Hayward Hamfest 
Kaukauna WI - Swapfest 
Manitowoc WI - Lakeshore Hamfest 
Oak Creek WI - SMARC Hamfest 
Rhinelander Wl - NWARC Swapfest 
* Rockford IL - RARC Hamfest 
Rothschild WI - WVRA Hamfest 
South Milwaukee, WI • SMARC Hamfest 
Stevens Point, WI - CWRA Swapfest 
Waukesha WI - KMRA Swapfest 
Waukesha WI - Midwinter Swapfest 
Dubuque IA - Hamfest 

See the Swapfest page for additional information 
and contact persons. 

IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Dubuque Hamfest. Contact: Carl Clark, 
N0KAX, 2145 Deiicia Drive, Dubuque, IA 52001. 
(319) 557-9149. 

ROCKFORD/LOVES PARK, IL 
Third Saturday of every month. Northern Illi¬ 
nois Volunteer Examiners (W5YI VEC). Held at 
North Suburban District Library, 6340 North Second 
St. (Hwy. 251), Loves Park, IL. 9:00 a.m. to noon. 
No new applicants after 11:00 a.m. Walkins welcome. 
Contact: Rusty Cordell, WB9QYV, 1823 Hulin St., 
Rockford, IL 61102-2619. (815) 968-0080. e-mail 
WB9QYV0aol.com 

MINNESOTA TEST INFORMATION 
From The Ground Wave, Saint Paul Radio Club 

Saint Paul Radio Club (SPRC) 

TESTING: First Saturday of the month, 8:30 a. 
m. Contact: Ed VanCleave, W0VC, (612) 636-0108 
Test Site: St. Paul Technical College 235 Marshall 


attention during the meeting, although Patrick Klinkner 
thought a few modifications were indicated and made 
same. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:15 p.m. 

NEXT MEETING: There will be NO meeting July 
3, 2001. Instead a dub get together (picnic and antenna 
site tour) will be held July 7th. August meeting will be 
August 7, 2001 at 7:30 p.m. at the Baraboo Civic Center. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Raymond J Matlosz, N9MLZ, Club Secretary 


The following 

members and guests were present: 

Duane Grotophorst 

N9DG 

North Free- 

dom 



David Spearing 

KB9CSW 

Portage 

Raymond Matlosz 

N9MLZ 

Reedsburg 

Steve Schulze 

N9UDO 

Baraboo 

Tom Harrison 

N9PQJ 

Reedsburg 

Bob Dischler 

KB9UOJ 

Prairie du Sac 

Bill Hommel 

KA9QFJ 

Baraboo 

Bill Klinkner 

N9KXX 

Sauk City 

Patrick Klinkner 


Sauk City 

Peter Sweeney 

WD9JIB 

Reedsburg 

Leonard Wagner 

N9XJG 

Baraboo 


Ave. St Paul, MN. http://www.qsl.net/sprc/index. 
html 

Anoka Amateur Radio Club (AARC) 

TESTING: Second Saturday of the month, 9 a. 

Test Site: Paine City Hal) 9150 Central Aye, NE 
Blaine, MN Bloomington Office of Emergency Man¬ 
agement 

Bloomington Amateur Radio Club (BARQ 

TESTING: Fourth Saturday of the month, 9 a. 
m. Contact; Dan Royer, KEOOR (612) 888-9756 Test 
Site: Fire Station No. 1 94th St. & Nicollet Avenue S. 
Bloomington, MN 

Valley Amateur Radio Club (VARC) 

TESTING: Second Thursday of the month, 7 p. 
m. Contact: BUI Martin, AI0D (612) 432-0438 Test 
Site: Hayes Community Center 14601 Hayes Road 
Apple Valley, MN 

W5YI Group 

TESTING: Third Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p. 
m. Contact: Dave Ranney, N0AXL (612) 542-2553 
Test Site: Eden Prairie Library 479 Eden Prairie 
Drive Eden Prairie, MN 

SE Metro Area Radio Club (SEMARC) 

TESTING: Third Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. 
Contact: Dave HarreU, K0BTE (612) 459-8678 Test 
Site: Cottage Grove fire Station 8641 80th ST., S Cot¬ 
tage Grove, MN. 

The times and places listed above are the usual 
time and place for each VE team. Occasionally, ses¬ 
sions are canceled or changed. It is a good idea to call 
ahead to confirm the test time and place. 

This section of Badger State Smoke Signals is 
available to pubUcize your Volunteer Examiner Ama¬ 
teur Radio license examination schedules. Please send 
us your schedules of dates, times, and locations that 
you will be conducting examinations and we wiU in¬ 
clude the information here. Be sure to include contact 
address and any other necessary requirements. Infor¬ 
mation should be sent to kebneter0palacenet.net. 




Buy it! • Sell it! • Trade it! • Fix it! 


SWAPFESTS 


W A R A C. ITi 

Memorial I 

\ Scholarships j 


i'llillip A Bogatkt. KB 9 KFL 
Milwaukee Wl 
Michael K Place*. KWSCH 
Oak Oeck. Wt 


29th ANNUAL MIDWINTER 

SWAPFEST 

WAUKESHA EXPOSITION 
CENTER 

WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN 



HAM IT UP EVERY SPRING! 

MADISON SWAPFEST 

April 8, 2001 
Mandt Community Center 

400 Mandt Parkway • Stoughton, Wl 
Doors open at 8 a.m. 

Sponsored by MARA/W9HSY 
P. O. Box 8890 Madison, Wl 53708-8890 

Swapfest Information Line: (608) 245-8890 


The Chicago FM Club presents 

RADIO EXPO 2001 

September 22 and 23 
Lake County Fairgrounds, Rts. 45 and 120, 
Grayslake, Illinois 

Free parking • Amateur Exams • Talkin 14616(76 
Info • Voice mail an i FAX: (708) 457-0906 
http:llymw.chicagofinclub.org • P.0. Box 56784, Harwood 
Heights, IL 80656-0724 


Eau Claire Amateur Radio Club 

HAMFEST 2001 

Saturday, June 9,2001 

For Information Contact: 

Jim Staatz KG9RA at 715-838-9108 
P.O. Box 1867 Eau Claire, Wl 54702-1867 


e Radio ciub /box 1066 Highland Park, il/ 6003 s I http://www.ec8rc.org w9eau@ecarc.org 


Both sponsored by: 

THE WEST ALLIS RADIO AMATEUR CLUB, INC. 
P. O. BOX 1072 • MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN S3201 


SEWFARS SWAPFEST 

HAM RADIOS • COMPUTERS • ELECTRONICS 
AMATEUR LICENSE EXAMS 


Setup Starts at 6:00 A.M. 

For more information, call (414) 835-7035 


SOUTH MILWAUKEE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB 

SWAPFEST 01 

2001 ❖ July 7 

(Held every July) 

American Legion Park 
Shepard Avenue • Oak Creek, Wl 
(414) 762-3235 Extension: Ask for Verne 

P.O. Box 102 South Milwaukee, Wl 53172 


TRI-COUNTY ARC PRESENTS 


YOUR SPRING FAVORITE I 


tricounty arc@ globsktialog .com 
TCARC 213 Frederick St 
Fort Atkinson, Wl 53538 


920-563-6381 

Evenings 


ns Qrc 


formerly bimini as LAMARSfest 

Lake County Fairgrounds / Grayslake, Illinois 
Radio. Electronic, Computer Swapfest 


Ozaukee Radio Club 


COMPUTER SWAPFEST 

Saturday, May 5, 2001 

8 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Circle B Recreation Center 
Intersection of Highway 60 and County I 

Kxams by Badger Examiners, c/6 Gary Sharbuno, 
5119 W. Willow Rd., Brown Deer, Wl $3222 
Swapfest sponsored by the Ozaukee Radio Club 
WS5 NS65 Cedar Ridge Drive • Cedarburg, Wl 53012 


Circus City Swapfest 

Sponsored by The Yellow Thunder Amo tour Radio Club 

sankrdtfy Autjtflffll, 2001 • 7 am - Neon 
Souk County Fairgrounds • Baraboo, Wl 



Vandore * Concessions 
Camping • Free Parking 
Tail Gate Area 



44 - Advanced 
45 - At Gate 
8 Foot Tablea - 45 


Steve Schulze, N9UDO BUI Klinkner, N9KXX 

(608)356-2313 (608)643-6908/643-6453 

http://vwwv.qel.net/ytaro/hMTifeet.hlm 


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES 



.^UPPLY^ 

5710 W. Good Hope Rd . Miltvaukee*53223j / 
T*>ll Free I-ROO-SSfPMli*. 414-35^0333 Vj 

The World's largest Ham bealer,..„.. ; . ;v; ... 
is located in Wi' COnsilV 


1 $m thrmigtiom the world 


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Com plete Inventories 

Top Trades . ' 

f^InpetltlVe pricing 
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TECH INFO 5204J5-3JS9 
FAX UNE 920435-3920 


SCOTT. KB9AMM & JILL. K83P2F • EMAIL: PL 2S98JU80.COM 
P. 0. B0)( 12531 • GpEtK BAY. Wl 54307 2531 
f . *r (56O0)ISWPj» HUMS SINCE 1975 




Towert, Satellite; Prntin'Ctblinj)T.V. f C B^ 
Cellular^Construction; Home 'Theater/ Telephone; 
Law' EnforosnieritjAmateifr, &' Business' 2 Way.' 

•^NtNSSaOlL'eVNO XL'm'SCXVVX 

S‘/ren?s Web: i www.qo.to/atpius % 


VCR SERVICE 
9forth freedom Electronics 

Same day service by appointment 
VCR Cleaning: $19.95 
Computers • Musical Instruments 
Stereos • Auto Sound • CDs • CBs 
Sorry, no TVs or stacked stereo systems 
HOURS MAY VARY - CALL AHEAD - 

John Schmelzer (608) 522-4366 

201 E. Walnut, Box 18 North Freedom Wl 53951 


♦ ARRL 

Publications HOTLINE 

Call toll free! 888-277-5289 

e-mail: pubsales@arrl.org 

Check us out on the Web: 
http://www.arrl.org/ 

• Complete Publications Catalog 
• Membership application and services 


For all your portable potter requirements I 

www.battoriasamerica.com 

Batter* Racks for Address: 

Hem Radio (Inserts tool) 22114)PanrlewRoad 

R/C Hobby Middleton, Wl 53542 

Laptop/Notebook MnoseiM.9iim.ier) 

Digital Cameras Ph: 808-831-3443 

Cellular Phone Fax:808-431-1082 

Video Camcorder E-mail: ehyB a tOmldplelne.net 

New in stock: EBP-U NIMH tar Mnco; BP-1S0 MMH tar ICOU; BP-200 NIMH lor ICOM; 
FNB-Stu tor Yaeeu; PB-JS NiMH tor Kenwood; AM H T SI I H BBI . WW41 NIMH tar Ysesu: 
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& morel And...the UOQ-S000 Universal Oierpcr I Cat tar Into I peeing, or viw our weOsite I 

Nickel Cadmium / Nickel Metal Hydride I Uthlum km I Sealed Lead / Alkaline 


Books Clearance! 

50% off list price! 

NEW books by ARRL 
and others from the 
past hamfest season. 

i 

Computer books 20% off! 

Send an S.A.S.E. 

Brownsville Sales Co., Inc. 
Rich’s General Store and Surplus 

Route 2, Highway “H” North • Stanley, Wl 54768-9418 
Telephone (715) 644-2112