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'HE CBSH BOH 


THE / 

CONFIDENTIAL WEEKLY 
OF THE ^ 
COIN MACHINE INDUS 




Yol. 9. No. 14 
JAN, 3. 1948 




...when you operate the WuRLlIZER 



1100 


^ The day you install a Wurlitzer Model 1 100 — down go your 
operating costs — up goes your income. 

The Zenith Cobra Tone Arm gives you up to 2000 plays on 
a record. Your record and needle costs are drastically reduced. 

New, sensational engineering improvements mean minimum 
service, but when needed Wurlitzer’s "Quick-As-A-Flash” 
Replacement Units make parts removal and replacement from 
2 to 100 times faster. Down go your service costs. 

At the same time, up goes your take. No phonograph ever 
packed the play appeal of this one. The public can’t resist it. 
They play it over and over again. To admire its beauty and 
action! To hear its sensational tone. 

Start now. Install Wurlitzer 1100s in your top spots for top 
profits and watch the cash box prove our claims. The Rudolph 
Wurlitzer Company, North Tonawanda, New Y>rk. 


can save up to 

its original cost 
^3 in 4 years'^ play 










when I want the best in musk 


• NO OTHER PHONOGRAPH HAS ALL THESE FEATURES 


# Aluminum Cabinet 


# Adjustable Tone Arm 


Mills Industries, Incorporated, 4100 Fullerton Avenue, Chicago 39, lllino 





^^THE CONFIDENTIAL WEEKLY OF THE COIN MACHINE INDUSTRY’’ 

THE CASH BOX IS THE OPERATOR’S MAGAZINE— IT IS NOT SOLD ON NEWSSTANDS 


DILL CERSn, Publisher 

JOE ORLECK, Editorial and Advertising Director 

ROBERT E, AUSTIN, General Manager, Music Department JOEL FRIEDMAN, Music Editor 

G. BRUNER, Business Manager G. BLOOM Circulation A. JOFFE, Production Manager 

L. MILAZZO, Classified Advertising HERB OLSOW, General Mgr., Automatic Merchandising O. S. SIBLEY, Art Director 

MARSHALL MICON, General Manager, Chicago Office STEVE MASON, General Manager, Los Angeles Office 

BERT MERRILL, St. Louis, Mo. 

CORRESPONDENTS iN LEADING CITIES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES 


IN THIS ISSUE 

January 3, 1948 Vol. 9, ISo. 14 


HAPPY NEW YEAR Page 4 

MORE OPS SWING OVER TO GAMES TO LEVEL OFF TAKE Page 5 

OPS FACED WITH TELE SETS AS COMPETITORS CLAIM 2-MINUTE 

RECORDS ARE VITAL NEED Page 6 

OPS CLAIM BIG TAX BOOSTS ARE ON THE WAY Page 7 

JUKE BOX LEADERS URGE NAT’L COMMITTEE BE FORMED Page 18 

2-MINUTE DISKS WILL HELP STOP CHISELERS Page 20 

ELMER F. PIERSON NEW PRESIDENT OF NAMA Page 30 

GREENE PREDICTS 2 BILLION DOLLAR MDSE. MACH. B12 

WITHIN NEXT FIVE YEARS Page 31 

“JIGGLING” PIN BALL GAMES IN PRESS Page 38 

THE TRUE AMUSEMENT MACHINE SITUATION IN NEW YORK CITY— 

AN ARTICLE BY THEODORE BLATT Page 40 

JUKE BOX OP’S ACCOUNTANT’S STATEMENT 

SHOWS LOSS OF $6.38 ON EVERY $100 Page 45 

RUDY GREENBAUM HOLDS NEW YORK MEETING Page 46 

JOE HANNA NAMED “MOST OUTSTANDING YOUNG MAN OF 1947”. .Page 47 

PINGAME LICENSE REDUCED 80% Page 48 

LACK OF COIN DEMAND PUZZLES U.S. MINT Page 48 

CHICAGO CHATTER Page 49 

EASTERN FLASHES Page 50 

CALIFORNIA CLIPPINGS Page 51 

ST. LOUIS, MO. — NEW ORLEANS, LA Page 52 


ADVERTISER’S INDEX Page 48 


PUBLISHED WEEKLY by The Cash Box 
Publishing Co., Inc., 381 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 16, N. Y., Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 4-7797. Branch Offices: 32 West Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago i, Illinois, Telephone: 
DEArborn 0045 and 422 West lltli Street, 
Los Angeles 15, California, Telephone: 
PRospect 2687. 

CONTENTS COMPLETELY COPY- 
RIGHTED 1947. All rights reserved. 
No publication of any material contained 
herein is allowed without written permis- 
sion from the publisher. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. All 
advertising closes Fridays at 5 P.M. pre- 
ceding week of issue. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATE $15 per year any- 


where in the U.S.A. and Canada. Special 
subscription allowing free classified adver- 
tisement each week, not to exceed three 
full lines, $48 per year. Subscription rates 
for all foreign countries on request. 

THE CASH BOX exclusively covers the 
coin machine industry, including oper- 
ators, johhers, distributors and manufac- 
turers, and all those allied to automatic 
coin operated music equipment; automatic 
coin operated vending machines and serv- 
ice machines as well as all coin operated 
amusement equipment; the music and 
record business, recording artists and pub- 
lishers of music; and all others in any 
fashion identified or allied to the coin 


operated machines industry as well as 
all finance firms, banks and other finan- 
cial institutions expressly interested in the 
financing of coin operated equipment of 
all types. 

THE CASH BOX has been recogmzed by 
various associations of coin machine oper- 
ators thruout the United States as their 
official weekly magazine. 

The C.M.I. BLUE BOOK division of The 
Cash Box is an entirely separate medium, 
giving all prices of new and used machines 
of all kinds, continually reporting all 
market changes. The C.M.I. BLUE BOOK 
is officially recognized by many States as 
the “official price book of the coin ma- 
cliine industry.” 





The Cash Box 


January 3, 1948 


Page 4 



Leaders Look Ahead to 1 948 With Great 
Optimism. Foresee Better Biz Methods 
and Cioser Cooperation. More intense 
Saies Coverage Predicted. Controiied 
Production Wiii Be Feature. New Type 

Machines Seen. 


NEW YORK — Happy New Year. 
1948, is the year many in the indus- 
try have looked forward to for the 
realization of their plans. A year of 
change. A year of harder work than 
ever before known to the field. A 
year where many will advance with 
great and rapid strides and when ev- 
eryone will find themselves on a 
more stabilized base, whether ope- 
rating, distributing or manufactur- 
ing. 

1948 will be the year when closer 
cooperation will become the pass- 
word of almost everyone in the field. 
This is the year many have pointed 
to, for they all realize that the trade 
has come to better understand just 
what its possibilities are, and just 
what new equipment and better per- 
centages can mean to it. 


From all indications, therefore, the 
year 1948 promises a great deal to 
every energetic, hard working coin- 
man in the nation. It is a year when 
there will be a closer understanding 
and alliance between the producer 
and the consumer. Already many 
producers are planning to get out in- 
to the field to better understand the 
men who are on the firing line, to 
offer them their closest cooperation 
and sincerest aid and, because of 
this, bring about a closer alliance. 

This is the year that will see this 
field advance faster and further than 
at any other time in history — at 


least from the standpoint of a better 
and closer understanding among its 
many components. 

The operators are coming closer to 
the wholesalers and the manufac- 
turers. These latter now realize that 
they must have his closer under- 
standing to assure them greater pro- 
duction success. 

Therefore, from every standpoint, 
the trade can feel more optimistic 
over 1948. This is the year when the 
industry will settle a great many of 
the problems which have irked it for 
so long a period of time. 

Happy New Year. 


"TH| CASH BOX" IS'THE dPERATOR'S MAGAZINE 
IT IS NOT SOLD ON WEWSSTANDS. 





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The Cash Box Bage 5 January 5 , 1948 

MORE OPS SWING 
OVER TO GAMES TO 
LE VEL OFF TA KE 

Fast Action Equipment Moving to Ops 
Who Want to Level Off Poor Take on Other 
Machines. Look to Bigger Sales of Bells, 
Consoles and One-Balls. 


CHICAGO — This center of coin machine 
activity is suddenly awakening to the 
fact that more and still more operators 
are swinging over to faster action 
amusement equipment to level off their 
collections. 

There is no longer any doubt that the 
progressive operator must be engaged in 
a variety of divisions of this industry to 
enjoy financial success. 

He must not only have on specialized 
piece of equipment on a location, he 
must, instead, actually “control” that lo- 
cation, if he wants to get the maximum 
take from it. 

This is happening everywhere in the 
nation. It isn’t new. It was done for 
years and years. Intelligent operators 
who had the best paying piece of equip- 
ment in a location never allowed any- 
thing else, especially any competitor, 
into the spot, for they purchased what- 
ever else was needed. 

The operators are, therefore, swinging 
over to faster action games. They believe 
that the time has at long last arrived 
when they must obtain the maximum 
share of the take from each and every- 
one of their locations. 

Where, during the war period, they 
continued along lackadaisically because 
they were enjoying a marvelous average 
on their equipment and didn’t care whe- 
ther they did, or did not (in most cases), 
install more equipment, they are, today, 
hustling in every type of machine they 


can, to capture the greatest possible por- 
tion of the income in the location. 

And, what’s more', the location owners 
are working very closely with them. As 
the taverns are taxed and over-taxed 
on top of more taxes, they call for more 
and still more equipment to level off 
their tax problem. This causes the loca- 
tion owner to be happy with installations 
of new machines and, most certainly, the 
operator is happy, too, for he is going 
ahead progressively and enjoying more 
financial supremacy. 

What is more surprising, then, to 
many engaged in the manufacture and 
distribution of coin operated machines in 
this center of the industry is the fact 
that more and still more of their cus- 
tomers are slowly, but surely, starting to 
call for “fast action machines”. There is 
a revival under way for bells, consoles 
and one-balls, and this means better 
profits all around. 

One noted distributor here stated, 
“This past week I’ve actually been 
stunned by the sudden orders we have 
been receiving for consoles and one-balls 
and bells. I just didn’t expect it. Now I 
realize, after talking long distance with 
some of our customers, that they are 
placing these on spots where they could 
have always run them, but, held back 


and continued to specialize in one type 
of equipment while that equipment was 
bringing them good profits. It isn’t 
bringing in the profits today and they 
are now going out to fill their spots 
with equipment which they know will 
bring them the maximum returns and 
boost their entire route average.” 

There is the answer, “boost their en- 
tire route average” and, what’s more, 
allow them to pay off other equipment 
which isn’t averaging what it should, 
but, equipment that the operator know^ 
will come back strong and must be car- 
ried thru this present period to the time 
when it gets going again. 

Many factors are involved in this sud- 
den switch over to faster action equip- 
ment. The main one, of course, is the 
desperate need which faces the majority 
of operators to increase their averages 
to assure themselves financial stability. 

Therefore all point to a definite boom 
for the faster action amusement games 
field and believe, as happened during the 
’30’s, that this field will be the one which 
will lead the way for purchases of what- 
ever new products may appear during 
this new year because it will bring the 
operator back to a better financial posi- 
tion. 


THE CASH BOX" IS THE OPERATOR'S: MA'GAZIN 
IT IS NOT SOLD ON NEWSSTANDS. 








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The Cash Box 


Page 6 


January 3, 1948 


OPS FACED WITH 
TELEVISION SETS AS 
COMPETITORS CLAIM 
2 MIN. RECORDS ARE 
VITAL NEED 


Urge Record Mfrs. to Press 2 Minute 
Disks Now. Point Out Faster Records 
Can Equaiize Their Coiiections Against 
Shorter Piaying Period Due to Teievision. 


NEW YORK — The juke box operators 
in this metropolis, which features the 
largest number of television receivers in 
the country, are urging the record manu- 
factur.,rs to start pressing two minute 
disks, ‘ For”, these men claim, “this v/ill 
give us the extra play required to offset 
the loss of time we are now enduring 
because of television.” 

Where, at first, television cut deeply 
into the profits of the juke box operators 
here, it has, of late, especially, levelled 
off, and the juke box operators just don’t 
give it the competitive attention they 
formerly did for they find, in most in- 
stances, that their collections have re- 
turned to a near-normal mark. 

But, with two minute records, as these 
men realize, they will be able to not only 
reach, but even surpass, former collec- 
tion marks." 

As one noted New York operator stat- 
ed, “The two minute record is the an- 
swer to every juke box operator who is 
faced with any competition whatsoever 
from television. The faster play on good 
recordings like ‘Peg O’ My Heai't’ is go- 
ing to boost collections right back to 
normal and give many an operator a 
chance to come out far ahead of what 


he is now getting from his spots. The 
very fact that ‘Peg O’ My Heart’ is still 
being featured in all the juke bexes here 
is the answer to any record manufactur- 
er who wants to know whether we need 
two minute recordings.” 

The juke box operators in every city 
where television has started broadcasting 
operations, are for the two minute record 
wholeheartedly. In New Jersey areas the 
operators are just as adamant that the 
two minute disc is the answer to their 
take problems. The same is true in other 
centers where television cuts into the 
regular playing time of the juke box. 

As the one op pointed out, “The av- 
erage tacoem owner today doesn’t even 
care to turn on his television receiver. 
But, he’s stuck. He had to buy it because 
of competition and now he realizes that 
when he has it in action, he’s losing 
money or else he’s depending on the 
crowd to stick around after the broad- 
cast so that he can even himself up. 
Therefore, with two minute records, 
whatever part of the crowd remains and 


whatever other playing time there is, the 
operator sees some real profit and so does 
the location. Both are happy. The record 
manufacturers should start pressing two 
minute recordings immediately.” 

One very well known New Jersey op- 
erator v/ho has 78 tavern locations and 
finds 65 of them feature television stated, 
“Tho we have somewhat licked the tele- 
vision sets, we know that the two minute 
record will win out for us completely. 
The location owner needs the income 
from his juke box more than he ever 
did. As we went about these past weeks 
we questioned these people regarding 
two minute records and played ‘Peg O’ 
My Heart’ for them by The Hanrmonicats 
and times it for them. Not only were 
they impressed, but, they told us not to 
even buy any other type records but two 
minute disks. That's how the storekeep- 
ers feel. I thought this might help you 
in your campaign and I believe that 
when the record }>roducers read it, they 
will get some idea why we juke box 
operators are anxious to see them start 
pressing two minute recordings.” 


if 

Tl 

4E CASH 

4SJTHE OPERATOR’S MAGAZIN 


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The Cash Box 


Page 7 


January 3 , l948 


OPS CLAIM BIG 
TAX BOOSTS ARE 
ON THE WAY 


Report Many Cities and States Plan 
to Hike Coin Machine License Fees. 
Prepare to Fight Further Boosts. 


NEW YORK — Just as the newspapers 
are now beginning to feature the cry for 
more and still more revenue for their 
cities, counties, states as well as for the 
Federal Government, and the law makers 
of the land begin to seek ways and 
means to raise this greater revenue, the 
coin machine operators, everywhere in 
the nation, are now realizing that they 
will be faced with new demands for 
higher license fees and taxes from their 
villages, towns, cities and states and 
possibly, even from the Federal Govern- 
ment. 

Thruout the past year, city after city 
and state after state, attempted to boost 
the taxes of coin machines and a great 
many succeeded. The average city rea- 
lizes that it must have more revenue to 
meet its budget. It also knows that with 
increased wages for municipal employ- 
ees, with greater costs of materials to 
repair roads, schools, libraries, civic in- 
stitutions, care for the needy and un- 
employed, etc., that the one and only 
way it can obtain money for these needs 
is to tax all business and real estate at 
a higher rate than ever before. And, as 
usual, the coin machine industry' comes 
in for its share of this boost. 

Usually, too, the first industry which 
I is set up for a tax rise, is the coin 
machine business. There is little, or no, 
understanding of \he field, and the av- 
erage publican believes that the mem- 
bers of this trade are enjoying huge pro- 
fits, just as the local press claims. This 
latter, of course, is a job for a public 
relations bureau. Such a campaign has 


been urged on this industry time and 
again by The Cash Box. But, since it 
isn’t there to be had because of the 
many, many thousands of dollars which 
this involves, the next best bet is to see 
what coinmen can do to possibly over- 
come excessive and inequitable taxation. 

There is no doubt that the average 
coin machine man wants to pay his share 
of his city’s tax requirements. Not only 
from the standpoint of civic pride, but, 
also from the standpoint of good citi- 
zenship. But, he does not want to be 
excessively and inequitably taxed, espe- 
cially as he has been in former years. 
There are no other businesses which 
have been taxed to pay 10% or 20%, or 
even a high share, of their “gross re- 
ceipts”. Then why the coin machine in- 
dustry? Why should this business bear 
the brunt of taxation up and above what 
other business men in any community 
do? 

Since operators are already informing 
The Cash Box that they expect to be 
taxed at a higher rate than ever before 
in their history, this is the time when 
the leaders of the field must come to- 
gether and arrange for some method and 
means of helping the operator for this 
industry cannot withstand any further 
encroachments upon its present income. 

The creation of a Tax Legal Depart- 


ment by CMI (Coin Machine Industries, 
Inc.) was a very progressive • move. No 
one Avill question this. But, there is 
needed much more than such a depart- 
ment to offset the tax problems which 
are going to arise. 

There is needed an intelligent and in- 
tensive campaign to educate the public 
to the fact that this industry is not the 
tremendous financially powerful business 
which the average publican believes it is. 
This campaign will pave the way for the 
Tax & Legal Oept. And will help it to 
overcome the increased license fees and 
occupational taxes which are now in the 
making, and which will be presented at 
the next sessions of city and state legis- 
latures. 

The industry must realize that it can- 
not pay excessive taxes at this time. It 
is already paying over 200% above what- 
ever high prices it paid at any other 
time in its history for supplies and parts 
and, especially, for new machines. The 
men in the field simply cannot take on a 
financial burden of such size that it will 
halt them dead in their tracks and kill 
many of them off. 

Here, then, is the problem which faces 
the best minds in the field — what to do 
about the forthcoming tax demands? 

WHAT DO YOU THINK SHOULD 
BE DONE? 


'THE CASH BOX" IS THE pPERATOR'S MAOAZIN 
IT IS NOT S0L6 ON NEWSSTAND 


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=- "»gg 9 January 3, 1948 

THE CASH BOX 


AMERICA'S ONLY WEEKLY MAGAZINE EXCLUSIVELY DEVOTED TO THE COIN MACHINE INDUSTRY 


BIfi 3 CONVENTION ISSUES.. 


No. 1 

PRE-CONVENTION ISSUE 

• The issue that tells your story a full week before the Big Show 
opens in Chicago's Sherman Hotel and also appears in The Cash Box 
booth the very first day of the show to be distributed to all coin 
machine men as they enter the exhibition floor. Be sure that your 
ads and news stories appear in this issue to gain complete attention 
to your firm right before and at the show. An all-important out- 
standing issue in which you can tell your story a week before the 
Big Show (January 19-22) and pull them in to see you right at 
the show. 

DATED — JANUARY 17, 1948 

CLOSING DAY FOR ALL ADS 
JANUARY 9, 1948 


No. 2 

CONVENTION ISSUE 

• This is the issue that will be distributed RIGHT AT THE BIG SHOW 
in the Sherman Hotel, Chicago, January 19, 20, 21 and 22, 1948. 
This is the issue that was the outstanding sensation of the '47 con- 
vention — it will prove an even greater sensation in 1948. And, 
this is the issue which appears on the second day of the show to once 
again pull more and bigger interest to you, your firm and your 
products. This is the issue used by operators, operators' associations, 
jobbers, distributors, manufacturers, all the music industry and all 
the allied fields. Rush your ad for this issue quick. 

DATED — JANUARY 24. 1948 

CLOSING DAY FOR ALL ADS 
JANUARY 15, 1948 


No. 3 

POST-CONVENTION ISSUE 

• Last year The Cash Box "Post-Convention Issue" proved to be the 
most attractive issue of all time. Not only were there hundreds of 
pictures of booths and personalities as taken by The Cash Box candid 
cameramen right at the show and in all the convention rooms, but, 
it carried the messages which brought real business interest to every 
advertiser. This is a VERY IMPORTANT ISSUE TO USE. Don't pass 
this one up — even if you have to go out of your way to MAKE SURE 
that your ad appears in it. Many a coinman in '47 regretted not 
using the "Post-Convention Issue". Don't be one of those who will 
regret it in '48 — SET YOUR AD UP NOW FOR THIS ISSUEII 

DATED — JANUARY 31, 1948 

CLOSING DAY FOR ALL ADS 
JANUARY 23, 1948 


WRITE - WIRE - PHONE - CALL 

THE CASH BOX 

381 FOURTH AVE., NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 

(All Phoiies: MUrray Hill 4-7797) 
BRANCH OFFICES 

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USE THIS SPACE GUIDE FOR YOUR RESERVATION 


FULL PAGE ( 71 / 2 " Wide by 13" High) $273.00 

TWO-THIRDS PAGE (4%“ Wide by 13" High) 182.00 

HALF PAGE ( 71 / 2 " Wide by 6Y2’ High) 136.50 

ONE-THIRD (23/8" Wide by 13" High) 

(4%'' Wide by 6'/2" High). 91.00 

QUARTER PAGE ( 71 / 2 " Wide by 31 / 4 " High) 

(4%" Wide by 43^" High) 68.25 

COLUMN INCH (23/8" Wide by I" High) 7.00 


EXTRA COLORS $35.00 Each (Except Gold, Silver. Copper, Bronze) 

ADVISE SIZE SPACE YOU WANT TO APPEAR IN THE 

BIG 3 CONVENTION ISSUES 










m 



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'■'[ ■ 

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3SS 




When music operators think ot "Hillbilly" music, they think of 
Eddy Arnold, Eddy's RCA-Victor recording of "It's A Sin" garnered 
The Cash Box "Oscar" as the "Best Hillbilly Recording of 1947" in 
the Second Annual Music Poll of the Automatic Music Industry. Mis 
current "I'll Hold You In My Heart", "To My Sorrow", "You Must 
Walk The Line" and "What Is Life Without Love" are virtual musts 
in juke boxes throughout the nation. Featured artist on the WSM 
"Grand Ole Opry" air show, Saturdays, NBC. Personal Manager; 
Thomas A. Parker. 


EDDY ARNOLD 



T he Cash Box^ A utomatic Music Section 


Page 1 1 


January 3, 1948 









The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play In 
The Nation's Juke Boxes, Compiled From 
Reports Submitted Weekly To The Cash Box 
By Leading Music Operators Throughout The 
Country. 


CODE 


AL-AladdIn 
AP— Apollo 
AR— Aristocrat 
BU-Bullet 
BW-Black & White 
CA— Capitol 
CM— Continental 
CO — Columbia 

EX-Exclusive 
JB— Juke Box 
Kl— King 
LI— Lissen 
MA— Majestic 
ME— Mercury 

mg-m-g-m 

MH— Manor 

RE — Regent 
SA— Savoy 
SI— Signature 
SP— Specialty 
ST— Sterling 
TO-Top 
TR-Triloii 

CR— Crown 

MO— Modern 

UA— United Artist 

CS"^0B$t 

MU— Musicraft 

UN— Universal 

DE— Dacca 

NA— Rational 

Vl-Victor 

DEL— Deluxe 

RA— Rainbow 

VT— Vitacoustic 


© BALLERINA 

In the third spot last <u;eek and 
right on top of the heap here. Really 
racking the coin in. 


CO-38381— 6uddy Clark 
DE-24265 — Enric Madreguera 
ME-5075 — Jerry Shelton Trio 


MG- 1 0035 — Jimmy Dorsey O. 
MU-15116 — Mel Torme 
Vl-20-2433 — Vaughn Monroe O 



CIVILIZATION 

In fifth place last ’week, this plug 
tune moves up to garner the second 
spot this 'Week. 


AP-1059 — The Murphy Sisters 
CA-465 — Jack Smith 
CO-37885 — Woody Herman 
DE-23940 — Danny Kaye — 
Andrews Sisters 


MA-7274— Ray McKinley O. 
ME-5067 — Dick Baker O. 

MG- 10083 — Sy Oliver O. 
VI-20-2400— Louis Prima O. 



TOO FAT POLKA 

Continues to grab a load of coin, 
’with this ditty grabbing this feat- 
ured spot in the charmed circle this 
’week. 


CA-480 — The Starlighters 
CO-37921 — Arthur Godfrey 
DE-24268 — Andrews Sisters 
MA-6022 — Slim Bryant 


ME-5079 — Dick Baker O, 
MG-I0I06 — Blue Barron 
VI-20-2609 — Louis Prima O. 



NEAR YOU 

In first place for ’well over t’wo 
months this sensational recording 
drops this ’week to take over fourth 
place. 


BU-IOOl — Francis Craig DE-24I7I — Andrews Sisters 

CA-452 — Alvino Rey O. MA-7263 — Victor Lombardo O. 

CO-37838— Elliot Lawrence O. ME-5066— Two Ton Baker O. 


RA-10025 — The Auditones 
SA-657 — Four Bars & A Melody 
ST-3001 — Dolores Brown 
VI-20-2421 — Larry Green O. 



HOW SOON 

In sixth place last ’week — into the 
fifth spot here. Every disk a coin 
culler. 


CO-37952 — Dinah Shore 
DE-24I0I — Bing Crosby — 
Cavallero O. 

CON- 1 1 004 — Jimmy Atkins 


M A- 1 1 79 — Dick Farney 
ME-5069 — John Laurenz 
TO-1258 — Jack Owens 
VI-20-2523 — Vaughn Monroe O. 



GOLDEN EARRINGS 

On the bottom this <week, the sen- 
sational demand for this recording 
boosts this tune ’way up and into 
sixth place. 


CA- 1 5009 — Peggy Lee 
CO-37932 — Dinah Shore 
DE-24270 — Guy Lombardo O. 


© YOU DO 

Retains its hold in the seventh spot 
’With ops continuing to reorder. 


CA-438 — Margaret Whiting 
CO-38597 — Dinah Shore 
D E-24 1 0 1 — Crosby-Ca va Nero 
MA-120II — Georgia Gibbs 


ME-3072 — Anita Ellis 
MG- 1 0085— Jack Fina O. 
VI-20-2585— Charlie Spivak O. 


ME-5056 — Jerry Gray O. 

MG- 1 0050 — Helen Forrest 
SI-15144 — Larry Douglas 
VI-20-2361 — Vaughn Monroe O. 



AN APPLE BLOSSOM WEDDING 

In eighth place last <week and into 
the same spot again, ’with a load of 
coin pouring in. 


CA-430 — Hal Derwin O. 

CN-IIOI Joe Dosh 

CO-37488— Buddy Clark 
DE-24II7 — Kenny Baker 


DI-2081 — Jerry Cooper 
MA-II56 — Eddy Howard 
MU-15112— Phil Brito 
SO-3044— Ginny Simms 


VI-20-2330 — Sammy Kaye 



MICKEY 

Still running hot as an attractive 
disking in the nation’s phonos. Ops 
report heavy play. 


AR-501 — The Two Tones 
CO-37987— Tiny Hill O. 
DE-24267— The Brooks Bros. 


DEL-1119 — Air Lane Trio 
ME'5062 — Ted Weems O. 
MG- 10 1 06 — Blue Barron O, 
VI-20-2551— Dennis Day 


( 0 ) 


TWO LOVES HAVE I 

Breaks into the big time, ’with music 
ops begging this one for the top in 
no time ai alL 


CO-38026 — Ray Noble O. ME-5064 — Frankie Lair.o 

DE-24263 — Guy Lombardo O. MG- 1 0097 — Billy Eckstine 


VI-20-2543 — Perry Como 











a:,,; 




"Three Little Words" (2:35) 

"I Can't Give You Anything But 
Love Baby" (2:56) 

MEL TORME 
(Musicraff 528) 

• More hush-hush warbling by Mel 
Torme of Velvet Fog fame. Mel shows 
with a pair of standards with the wax 
message of “Three Little Words”, and 
“I Can’t Give You Anything But Love. 
Baby” echoing in sweet, light tones of 
simple musical charm. Both sides will be 
remembered for their tremendous pop- 
ularity many moons ago, and seem right 
for those quiet spots today. Where they 
go for Torme, they’ll go for this. 

"Gin Rummy Polka" (2:50) 

"Pin Up Polka" (2:42) 

AL STUART 
(Embassy 1004) 

O Pair of polka sides, with loads of 
laughs and merriment behind them spill 
here by A1 Stuart and his lads. Labeled 
“Gin Rummy Polka” and “Pin Up Pol- 
ka”, A1 and his boys combine to knock 
out a pair the folks in the mid-west are 
sure to go for. Titles give oif the bill 
of fare on the pair, with Al’s pipes 
vocalizing in effective mood throughout. 
If you have the spots — get next to this 
duo. 

"They're Mine, They're Mine, 
They're Mine" (3:04) 

"Two Loves Have I" (3:00) 

GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 

(Decca 24263) 

• The wide and established popularity 
of maestro Guy Lombardo should prove 
this hunk of wax as phono material for 
a slew of ops. With balladeer Kenny 
Gardner to the fore to wail the light 
phrases of “'They’re Mine”, the deck 
shows as one ops will want to get next 
to. Natch the music offered is in typical 
Lombardo styling, with the reeds echo- 
ing brilliantly behind Kenny’s pipes. On 
the flip for a comer, Kenny bows again 
with “Two Loves Have I.” You can bet 
your boots that this one will be way up 
there pronto. Kenny’s tonsils show in top 
notch fashion once again here, with 
maestro Guy backing the lad all the way. 

"You Made Me Love You" (2:53) 
"Will You Still Be Mine" (2:58) 

CONNIE HAINES 
(Signature 15168) 

• The tricky pipes of chirp Connie 
Haines echo with a pair of oldies that 
should fit your machine like a glove. 
Warbling the pleasing wordage to “You 
-Made Me Love You” and “Will You Still 
Be Mine”, Connie shows her wares in 
grade A fashion, with exceptional back- 
ing by maestro Ray Bloch filling in 
for the accompaniment. Both sides, al- 
ways popular, should be a rousing send- 
off — once music ops get next to them. 
Lend your ears in this direction — you’ll 
be pleased with what you hear. 


PISKO’THE WEEK 


"Manana" (2:48) 

"All Dressed Up With A 
Broken Heart" (2:52) 
PEGGY LEE 


(Capitol 15022) 



PEGGY LEE 


9 There’s no stopping this gal! 
Peggy Lee comes up with another 
clickeroo on this cute bundle of 
wax labeled “Manana” and “All 
Dressed Up With A Broken 
Heart”. Top deck shows Peggy’s 
versatile style, as she wails in cute 
Latin tones to the hep samba beat 
of Dave Barbour his boys. You’ll 
laugh your sides silly with this 
wax adventure as Peg and the boys 
mimic “tomorrow”. Especially suit- 
ed for the crowd that loves to go 
wild over Latin stuff this waxing is 
easily suitable for any spot looking 
for a boost. The flip shows just as 
well, with Peg lifting the beat of 
this powerful ballad to turn it into 
an item for the jump crowd. The 
gal’s pipes pitch pretty through- 
out, with the first-rate musical 
styling of Dave Barbour and his 
gang highlighting the cookie. The 
pair stands for a merry ride on the 
phonos — get next to them today 
— not “manana.” 


"At The Candlelight Cafe" (2:50) 
"The Secretary Song" (2:54) 
TED WEEMS ORCH. 

(Mercury 5081) 

• Pair of sides by the capable Ted 
Weems crew spill here with the odor of 
coin play all around. Top deck, bound to 
be a featured item in your machines in 
the near future features piper Bill Usher 
wailing the strong sugar coated wmrdage 
to “At The Candlelight Cafe.” Bill’s 
pipes ring flowers and showers of top 
notch vocal treatment around this plain- 
tive gypsy ballad. On the flip with a cute 
novelty ditty, chirp Shirley Richards to 
the fore for the message “'The Secretary 
Song” brings us. Wax weaves in jolly 
tempo with the ork blending mellow 
tones. Both sides definitely deserve that 
spot in your machine — latch on. 


FIGURES 

SHOWN FOLLOWING 

SONG TITLES, INDICATE PLAYING 

TIME OF 

RECORD. 


"Gloomy Sunday" (2:51) 
"Night & Day" (2:50) 

BILLIE HOLLIDAY 
(Columbia 38044) 

• The smooth fashioned tones of thrush 
Billie Holliday spill on this tender pair, 
with the hypo phrases showing as stuff 
her wide following is bound to latch on 
to. You’ll go for “Gloomy Sunday” in a 
big way, with Billie’s pipes pitching way 
up there. Metro is slow and meaningful, 
while the orchestral accompaniment 
backs the lass splendidly. On the flip 
with the ever-lovin’ “Night and Day”, 
Billie once again shows her brilliant 
pipes on this featured spot. 


"To Be Continued" (2:40) 
"That's The Kind O Gal I Dream 
Of" (2:37) 

THE SOFT WINDS 
(Majestic 1182) 

• The soft dulcet tones of harmony that 
this crew spill with are sure to clinch 
with those phono fans that go for the 
light treatment. Wailing the cute word- 
age to the top deck, “To Be Continued”, 
the combo display an easy free style, 
smooth as a whistle. Wax message 
weaves around our entertainment cut 
short with the title coming in to fill. 
On the flip with “That’s The Kind Of 
Gal I Dream Of”, the crew show in hap- 
py tones once again to sparkle for a 
happy waxing. Both s’des for the crowd 
that really love good music. 

"Bubbles" (2:52) 
"Swingin' For Pappy" (2:43) 

BILL MOORE ORCH. 

(Savoy 662) 

® Pair of hep instrumental sides for 
the crowd that loves to let loose are of- 
fered here on this duo by the Bill Moore 
ork. Top deck features a slow winding 
sax, with a heavy bounce beat that 
makes for mellow listening time. On the 
flip with ‘“Swingin’ For Pappy”, the 
combo come thru again with the beat 
offered picked up. The crew show with 
loads of riff spots that add up to a merry 
chain of coin play. 

"If You Care For Me" (2:40) 
"Roses of Picardy" (2:37) 
JIMMY SAUNDERS 
(Rainbow 10044) 

0 More teeming tones by Jimmy Saun- 
ders spill here with the music resounding 
with the magic sound of coin play. Jim- 
my grabs the lead on the top deck titled 
“If You Care For Me”, to come thru 
with some beautiful rhythmic splendor. 
The pipers pleasing tones bounce along 
behind some wonderful instrumental, ac- 
companiment by Joe Sgro and his man- 
dolin ork. On the flip with the ever- 
lovin’ “Roses of Picardy”, Jimmy shows 
his tonsils in top notch styling once 
again. Both sides are suitable for the 
dance and listener crowds — whirl ’em. 


"Easy Does It" (2:30) 
"Jungle Fantasy" (2:42) 

ESY MORALES 
(Rainbow 10058) 

0 Lots and lots of gay music for the 
hip swivelers echo here by Esy Morale.* 
and his boys. Top deck labeled “Easy 
Does It” offers loads of kicks, while the 
tempo swings in gay rhumba tones. On 
the flip with some top notch instrumen- 
tal flavoring, Esy and his boys offer 
“Jungle Fantasy”. Wax spins at terrific 
tempo, bound to make the dance crowd 
step lively. Both sides show as effective 
material. If you have the spots, this pair 
will do it. 


Only Rmcords Considered Best Suited To The Requiremeufs Of The Trade Are Reviewed On These Pages, 







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T h^ Cash BoXf Automatic Music Section 

m CASH BOS 


Page 14 


January 3, 1948 



"Is It Too Late" (2:43) 
"Mickey" (2:50) 

THE BROOKS BROTHERS 
(Decca 24267) 

® Currently riding the boxes in a big 
way, “Is It Too Late” gets a dose of 
sugar and spic6 with this r6ndition by 
the Brooks Brothers. Wax spills in slow, 
torrid tones with the combo’s pitch way 
down low and in just the right mood. 
The stuff makes for mellow listening 
moments; we’re sure you’ll like it. On 
the flip with another current favorite, 
the combo display their first rate tones 
on “Mickey”. Add this one to the long 
list of charm platters already out on this 
deck. 


"Loaded Pistols & Loaded Dice" 
(2:59) 

"In A Little Book Shop" (3:00) 

FRANKIE MASTERS ORCH. 

(MGM 10115) 

# The whizz bang phono fans will get 
from this piece should put orkster Fran- 
kie Masters back into the limelight as 
a featured artist in the juke boxes of the 
nation. “Loaded Pistols & Loaded Dice”, 
with orchestral backing replete with the 
stuff to make this novelty niece a comer, 
shows as an item ops will want to get 
next to. On the flip with some slow 
stuff, Phil Gray tonsils the sugar coated 
lyrics to “In A Little Book Shop.” Vocal 
treatment is effective with Frankie’s 
work flavoring the cookie. The pair are 
there for the asking. 


"Two Loves Have I" (3:00) 
"Sierra Madre" (3:01) 

BUDDY CLARK wit)i RAY NOBLE ORCH. 

(Columbia 38076) 

# Vocal styling of Buddy Clark, teamed 
with orkster Ray Noble sets this platter 
as one for the boxes. Wailing the power- 
ful wordage to “Two Loves Have I” and 
“Sierra Madre”, Buddy comes thru for 
music ops in pleasing manner to set 
this cookie right from the start. You’ll 
go for “Sierra Madre”, with Buddy dis- 
playing his tonsils in grade A fashion 
while the Noble crew furnish the Span- 
ish beat. Both sides are there for the 
asking — you take it from here. 


"Why Does It Have To Rain On 
Sunday" (3:03) 

"Beginner's Boogie" (2:40) 

FREDDY MARTIN ORCH. 

(RCA-Victor 20-2557) 

O Music styled by maestro Freddy Mar- 
tin and his boys reeks here to the bounce 
metro of “Why Does It Have To Rain 
On Sunday” coming thru. With the Mar- 
tin Men to the mike to spill the cute 
lyrics, the deck stacks up as one — the 
many Martin fans should take a liking 
to. On the flip we find pianist Barclay 
.\llen of “Cumana” fame to give with 
his adaptation of “Chopsticks” set to 
music. Titled “Beginner’s Boogie”, Bar- 
clay trips the 88’s in brilliant manner 
throughout, with the Martin band back- 
ing all the way. Altho both sides won’t 
stop traffiic, they are nevertheless, items 
that may fill that extra spot. 


SLEEPER 

F THE W 


LI 


A 


"I Wish I Knew The Name" 
(3:06) 

"Passing Fancy" (2:59) 

RAY DOREY 
(Majestic 1186) 

• The top cupid tones which bal- 
ladeer Ray Dorey gives out with 
merits this featured spot this week 
on a ditty we believe you’ll go for 
pronto. Titled, “I Wish I Knew The 
Name”, Ray shows his potent pow- 
er blending to a beautiful high on 
this grade A hunk of wax. With 
the metro spinning in slow tender 
mood. Ray’s piping takes on an 
air of fragrant simplicity as maes- 
tro Paul Baron builds the musical 
accompaniment to a fever pitch. 
The kids who love to snuggle-up 
close are sure to want to get next 
to this. On the flip with more ro- 
mance music, Ray comes thru with 
“Passing Fancy”. The piper excells 
on this side, with the Paul Baron 
ork floating strings and sweet mu- 
sic to a full crescendo once again. 
Both sides for some heavy coin 
play in your phonos. 


"Pianissimo" (3:00) 

"I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling" 
(3:02) 

PERRY COMO 

(RCA-Victor 20-2593) 

9 The King of the balladeers to the fore 
with the fragrant tones of “Pianissimo” 
spilling on the blue ribbon package of 
wax. Perry Como, in soft and low tones 
to match the brilliance of this ballad, 
built to a wonderful pitch by the Russ 
Case ork. Perry s pitch gives the ditty 
that close-up touch and tags it phono 
material. On the flip with "i ve Lrot A 
Feeling I’m Falling”, the piper shows his 
splendid wares in equal manner to come 
thru again. Both sides for the phonos. 


"For Jumper's Only" (2:39) 
"Cat's Boogie" (2:46) 

CAT ANDERSON 
(Apollo 774) 

• Pair of instrumental sides for the 
gang that loves to jump are offered here 
by the Cat Anderson crew. Cat and his 
boys show with loads of brass on this 
fast deck labeled “For Jumper’s Only”. 
The flip, in boogie tempo matches the 
top quality off the top deck with the 
band giving out with loads of spots that 
add up to coin play. Especially suited 
for ops with race spots — this pair 
should make the phonos bounce. 


FIGURES SHOWN 

FOLLOWING 

SONG TITLES, INDICATE PLAYING 

TIME OF RECORD. 



"Little Small Town Girl" (2:30) 

"Ain't Gonna Worry 'Bout A Soul" 
(2:46) 

DELTA RHYTHM BOYS 
(RCA-Victor 2C-2588) 

More mellow tones of harmnnv, this 
time by Delta Rhythm Boys. The stuff 
they spiel with makes you want to set 
awhile — it’s that good. Labeled “Little 
Small Town Girl”, the group spill their 
wax message in first-rate tones of musi- 
cal snlendor to rate heavily. Title gives 
off the lead here with the background 
music blending ace high. On the flip 
with “Ain’t Gonna Worry ’Bout A Soul”, 
the crew come back again to turn in 
another grade A performance. Ops with 
spots that go for real clever work, are 
sure to want to get this duo. 


"I'll Make Up For Everything" 
(3:04) 

"My Cousin Louella" (2:59) 
ANDY RUSSELL 
(Capitol 15021) 

® Here’s a cookie that should have pho- 
no fans throughout the nation spilling 
with Andy Russell on their tongues all 
day long. The teeming tones of Andy on 
“I’ll Make Up For E . erything” and 
“My Cousin Louella” should have his 
“Besame Mucho” beat a yard wide. With 
the wordage of the top deck matching 
the balladeer’s soothing pipes, and some 
exceptional string backing by the Paul 
Weston ork, the wax shines for a bright 
future. On the flip with a bit of a nov- 
elty, Andy gives with “My Cousin 
Louella”. The wax moves along gayly, 
giving Andv plenty of room to move 
about in. You’ll go for the pair in a 
big — big way; hop to it! 

"But What Are These" (2:47) 

"I Need Ya Like I Need A Hole In 
The Head" (2:46) 

PEARL BAILEY 
(Columbia 38020 

♦ Always a name in every phono spot, 
chirp Pearl Bailey sends a pa>r here tint- 
ed with buffalo all the way. Top deck, in 
teasing tones that add up to coin play 
has Pearl asking “But What Are These’’. 
The stuff makes for musical charm and 
gaiety, with Pearl’s deep throated tones 
adding to the waxing. On the flip for 
some more kicks, our gal gives out with 
“I Need Ya Like 1 Need A Hole In The 
Head”, with the title acting very effi- 
ciently for the wax story. You know 
your spots better than we do — take it 
from here. 


"I'll Lose A Friend Tomorrow" 
(2:59) 

"When You Come To The End of 
the Day" (2:47) 

THE INK SPOTS 
(Decca 24261) 

♦ Popular combo of the day step up to 
the mike to offer a pair music ops will 
want to get next to. It’s the Ink Spots 
to wail “I'll Lose A Friend Tomorrow” 
and “When You Come To The End Of 
The Day”. Both sides spill in slow 
fashion, with Billy Kenny’s pipes float- 
ing up high for the hypo lyrics. It’s 
top notch harmony the crew give out 
with — add to that their strong follow- 
ing and you’ve got a platter your phono 
fans will want to hear. 


Only Records Considered Besf So/fed To The Reqnirenienfs Of The Trode Are Reviewed On These Roges- 






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The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section Page 15 


January 3, 1948 



New York 


Chicago 


Los Angeles 


1. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

2. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

3. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 

( Buddy Clark) 

i. CIVILIZATION (Louis Prima) 

3. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

6. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

7. I CAN’T GIVE YOU ANYTHING BUT LOVE 

(Rose Murphy) 

0. TWO LOVES HAVE I (Frankie Laine) 

<). SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Sammy Kaye) 
10. I STILL GET JEALOUS (The Three Suns) 


1. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

2. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 

(Buddy Clark) 

3. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

4. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

5. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

6. YOU DO (Vic Damone) 

7. CIVILIZATION (Louis Prima) 

8. DON’T YOU LOVE ME ANYMORE 

(Buddy Clark) 

9. TWO LOVE HAVE I (Perry Como) 

10. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 


1. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

2. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

3. TWO LOVE HAVE I (Frankie Laine) 

4. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Leo) 

5. AN APPLE BLOSSOM WEDDING 

(Eddy Howard) 

6. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

7. CIVILIZATION (Louis Prima) 

8. AND MIMI (Dick Jlaymes) 

9. YOU DO (Vaughn Monroe) 

19. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 


Indianapolis, Ind. 

1. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Sammy Kaye) 

2. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

3. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

4. NEAR Y'OU (Francis Craig) 

5. WHIFFENPOOF SONG (Bing Crosby) 

6. SO FAR (Frank Sinatra^ 

7. YOU DO (Vaughn Monroe) 

C. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 
(Dick liaymes) 

9. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

10. WHITE CHRISTMAS (Bing Crosby) 


Nashville, Tenn. 

1. NE.AR YOU (Francis Craig) 

2. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

3. YOU DO (Bing Crosby) 

4. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

3. THE WHIFFENPOOF SONG (Bing Crosby) 

6. YOUR RED WAGON (The Andrews Sisters) 

7. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

8. TWO LOVES HAVE I (Perry Como) 

9. BEG YOUR PARDON (Francis Craig) 

10. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 

(Peggy Lee) 


Reading, Pa. 

1. Cl VILIZ.ATION Danny Kayc-Andrews Sisters) 

2. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

3. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

4. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Guy Lombardo) 

5. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

6. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

7. YOU DO (Georgia Gibbs) 

8. MICKEY (Air Laine Trio) 

9. BEG YOUR PARDON (Francis Craig) 

10. DON’T YOU LOVE ME ANYMORE 

(Jose Mclis) 


Great Bend, Kansas 

1. CIVILIZATION (Louis Prima) 

2. WHITE CHRISTMAS (Bing Crosby) 

3. NAUGHTY ANGELINE (Art Lund) 

4. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Guy Lombardo) 
3, BALLERIN.-A (Vaughn Monroe) 

6. NE.AR YOU (Francis Craig) 

7. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

8. TO MY SORROW (Eddy Arnold) 

9. DEEP PURPLE (Larry Clinton) 

10. THE LITTLE OLD MILL ("Sammy Kaye) 


Detroit, Mich. 

1. B.ALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

2. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

3. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

4. AND MIMI (Dick liaymes) 

3. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

6. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WXDDING 

(Peggy Lee) 

7. CIVILIZ.ATION (Louis Prima) 

8. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

9. YOU DO (Vic Damone) 

10. I CAN’T GIVE YOU ANYTHING BUT LOVE 
(Rose Murphy) 


Washington, D. C. 

1. HOW" SOON (John Laurens) 

2. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 

(Ray Noble-Buddy Clark) 

3. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

4. CIVILIZATION (Louis Prima) 

5. MICKEY (Ted Weems) 

6. YOU DO (Helen Forrest) 

7. I HAVE BUT ONE HEART (Vic Damone) 

8. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

9. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Jo Stafford) 

10. DON’T YOU LOVE ME ANYMORE 

( Jose Melis) 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

1. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

2. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

3. CIVILIZATION (Danny Kaye~Andrews Sisters) 

4. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

5. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Sammy Kaye) 

6. HOW SOON (Vaughn Monroe) 

7. AND MIMI (Dick Haymes) 

8. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

9. YOU DO (Margaret Whiting) 

10. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 
(Buddy Clark) 


San Antonio, Texas 

1. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

2. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

3. YOU DO (Margaret Whiting) 

4. HOW SOON (Vaughn Monroe) 

3. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

6. CIVILIZATION (Ray McKinley) 

7. I HAVE BUT ONE HEART (Vic Damone) 

8. EARLY IN THE MORNING (Louis Jordan) 

9. OLD ROCKIN’ CHAIR (-Eddy Arnold) 

10. SIGNED, SEALED & DELIVERED 

(Copa Copas) 


Rochester, N. Y. 

1. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

2. HOW SOON (Bing Crosby) 

3. YOU DO (Vaughn Monroe) 

4. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

5. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

6. CIVILIZATION (Sy Oliver) 

7. AND MIMP (Art Lund) 

8. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

9. I HAVE BUT OiNE HEART (Vic Damone) 

10. I’LL DAN(X AT YOUR WXDDING 

(Peggy Lee) 


Miami, Fla. 

1. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

2. HOW SOON (Jack Oicens ) 

3. BEG YOUR PARDON (Francis Craig) 

4. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

5. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

6. I CAN’T GIVE YOU ANYTHING BUT LOVE 

(Rose Murphy) 

7. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

8. T OL DO (Vaughn Monroe) 

9. WHITE CHRISTMAS (Ding Crosby) 

10. THE CHRISTMAS SONG (King Cole Trio) 


Kingman, Ariz. 

1. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

2. CIVILIZATION (Jack Smith) 

3. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

4. TOO FAT POLKA (The Andrews Sisters) 

5. THE WHIFFENPOOF SONG (Tex Beneke) 

6. A FELLOW NEEDS A GIRL (Guy Lombardo) 

7. SO FAR (Guy Lombardo) 

8. THE LADY FROM 29 PALMS 

(The Andrews Sisters) 

9. SUGAR BLUES (Johnny Mercer) 

10. SERENADE OF THE BELLS (Guy Lombardo) 


Des Moines, la. 

1. WHITE CHRISTMAS (Bing Crosby) 

2. HERE COMES SANTA (Gene Autry) 

3. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

4. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

5. THE WHISTLERS SONG (Sam Donahue) 

6. SOUTH (Count Basie) 

7. PASS THAT PEACE PIPE (Frank Sinatra) 

8. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

9. YOU DO (Vaughn Monuroe) 

10. LITTLE OLD MILL (Sammy Kaye) 


Wilmington, N. C. 

1. KENTUCKY BABE (Montana Slim) 

2. KOKOMO, INDIANA (Dinah Shore) 

3. SO FAR (Martha Tilton) 

4. JEALOUS (Art Lund) 

3. I’LL BE THERE (Eddy Howard) 

6. BODY & SOUL (Billie Holliday) 

7. THE CHRISTMAS SONG (King Cole Trio) 

8. I HAVE BUT ONE HEART (Vic Damone) 

9. NEAR YOU (Francis Craig) 

10. PEC O’ MY HEART (The Harmonicats) 


Butte, Mont. 

1. GOLDEN EARRINGS (Peggy Lee) 

2. BALLERIN.A (Vaughn Monroe) 

.3. HOW SOON (Jack Owens) 

4. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 

3. I’LL HOLD YOU IN MY HEART 

(Eddy Arnold) 

6. I have but one HEART (Vic Damone) 

7. .AND MIMI (Dick liaymes) 

8. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WEDDING 

(Buddy Clark) 

9. ON SILVER WINGS (Rosalie Allen) 

10. CIVILIZATION (Danny Kaye-Andrews Sisters) 


Little Rock, Ark. 

1. I’LL HOLD YOU IN MY HEART 

(Eddy Arnold) 

2. NEVER TRUST A WOMAN (Red Foley) 

3. BALLERINA (Vaughn Monroe) 

4. BEG YOUR PARDON (Francis Craig) 

5. I HAVE BUT ONX HEART (Vie Damone) 

6. I’LL DANCE AT YOUR WXDDING 

(Buddy Clark) 

7. civilization (Danny Kaye-Andrews Sisters) 

8. THE CHRISTMAS SONG (King Cole Tru,, 

9. I WISH I DIDN’T LOVE YOU SO 

(Vaughn Monroe) 

10. TOO FAT POLKA (Arthur Godfrey) 






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The Cash Box^ Automatic Music Section 


January 3 , 1948 


Page if 



rhe Ten Top Tunes Netting 
Heaviest Play Compiled From 
Reports Submitted Weekly To 
The Cash Box By Leading Music 
Operators in New Yor-k City’s Harlem. 


o 


I LOVE YOU 
YES I DO 

Bull Moose Jackson 

(King 41811 

On top of the heap for the second 
straight week, with ops pegging this 
one for a long stay. 


© 


845 STOMP 

Earl Bostic 

(Gotham 1541 

In second place with reports indi- 
cating sensational play being re- 
ceived. 


© 


MAD LAD 

Sir Charles 

(jipoUo 7731 

In sixth place a week ago and into 
the third spot here. Really mad! 


o 


THE CHRISTMAS 
SONG 

King Cole Trio 

(Capitol 3111 

A saga in disk annals. They’ll play 
this fifty years from today. 


© 


WRITE ME A LETTER 

The Ravens 

(National 9038; 

More click disk material from The 
Ravens. Drops a few from the 
third spot, to take over fifth place. 


o 


EAST SIDE 
WEST SIDE 

Charley Barnet 

(Apollo 10841 

Continues to ride the board, with 
music ops approving. Steady play 
pours in the boxes. 


0 


IS IT TOO LATE 

Savannah Churchill 

(Manor 10931 

Operators boom this piece again, 
with play on the upswing. 


HASTINGS ST. 
BOUNCE 

Paul Williams Sextet 

I ^ (Savoy 659; 

1 ^^ Still receiving peak play in spots 
throughout the nation. Ops look for 
the IFilliams group for loads of 


© 


THE LORD'S PRAYER 

Sarah Vaughn 
I ■ (Musicraff 5251 

Remember this one! One of the 
better recordings of our time, 
snagging sensational play. 


© 


I CAN'T GIVE YOU 
ANYTHING BUT LOVE 

Rose Murphy 
(Majesfic 12041 

Oh is this one made. Ops boom 
this one for the top of the heap. 



Illinois Jacquet Pacts 
with RCA-Victor 


NEW YORK — Illinois Jacquet, often 
hailed the “youthful dynamo of the saxo- 
phone” signed a long term recording 
contract with RCA-Victor Records this 
past week, The Cash Box learned this 
past week. 

In addition, Jacquet is to team with 
Mercury chirp Ella Fitzgerald on a 
nationwide tour covering 23 cities. The 
tour, under the direction of Ernest 
Anderson is to get under way early in 
January. 

Jacquet skyrocketed to fame via his 
recording of “Jazz At The Philharmonic” 
and since has come up with several smash 
platters for the phono trade. The tour 
will mark the first concert appearance 
for Miss Fitzgerald. The pair are sched- 
uled to hit every major city in the nation, 
with advance box office figures reported 
to be phenomenal. 


More Power to 
Savannah Churchill 

NEW YORK — The sensational attraction 
and nickel-nabbing name of Savannah 
Churchill took on unusual proportions 
this past week, when The Cash Box 
learned of her many fans goipg as far 
as signing a petition to get her smash 
disking of “I Want To Be Loved” back 
into the juke boxes. 

Well over two hundred signatures 
appeared on a petition drawn by a loca- 
tion owner at the request of her patrons 
who vehemently demanded Miss Chur- 
chill’s record back into the boxes. 

Operators point out that very fre- 
quently, a location is neglected only as 
a means of stimulating play for a par- 
ticular recording. In this case it most 
certainly did. 

(Editors Note — Manor Records star 
Savannah Churchill copped The Cash 
Box “Oscar” for “I Want To Be Loved” 
as the Best Race Record of 1947.) 


lanannnnnnnnn nnnnnnnnnannmna 


8 

8 

J 

5 

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To All The Operators: 

Best Wishes for a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year. 


MALVERNE DISTRIBUTORS. Inc. 

424 W. 49th St.f New York City 
Tel: COlumbus 5-1872-3-4 
★ VISIT US AT OUR NEW HOME!! 


Distributors for . . . 

MERCURY • DELUXE • DISC • KEYNOTE 


3 


■*1 


nnt3Eae3EaE3Eaegaeatae3EagaEic«3EaEat«3nnnneana 



JIMMY LIGGINS 
"I CANT STOP IT" 

Backed by 

"TROUBLES GOODBYE" 





backed by 


Nati 


onal 


9038 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answerin g ads — U proves you^re a real coin machine manl 






The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 18 


January 3, 1948 


JUKE BOX LEADERS URGE 
NAn COMMITTEE BE NAMED 
TO DEFEND TRADE AGAINST 
ANY NEW CONGRESS BIILS 


“Let’s Not Get Caught Short This Time,” 
Leader’s Warn Nation’s Juke Box industry 


NEW YORK — After the seven hectic 
public hearings held in Washington in 
1947, and the further fact that certain 
leaders among the music protective as- 
socm^ions have already stated that uucy 
intend to present bills to the Congress 
of the United States at this session in an 
effort to revise certain clauses in the 
Copyright Act ox 1909, so that everyone 
of the nation’s 000,000 juke boxes will 
have to pay a license fee to these varied 
and many organizations, the time has ar- 
rived when the automatic music indus- 
try of America must arrange to protect 
itself from such Federal legislation. 

It is well known that the music pro- 
tective associations will not halt in their 
effort to make every juke box in the 
nation pay them tribute. And just as has 
happened in such countries as South 
Africa, Australia and New Zealand, 
where these organizations in agreement 
with the juke box operators started with 
a very nominal fee which they have 
since boosted to almost prohibitive fi- 
gures, they will do exactly the same 
here and attempt, at all costs (because 
they are driving for a revenue which 
may equal or exceed $50,000,000 per 
year from the juke box industry) to rail- 
road thru legislation in their favor 
against the juke boxes of America. 

Such legislation would, of a certainty, 
wipe out a great many operators. At 
the same time, such legislation would 
cause so much confusion that the av- 
erage location owner would almost be 
lorced to give up his juke box He could 
and would be sued trom a dozen diffe- 
rent directions all at once and tne same 
time Everyone who ever wrote a song, 
or who even intends to write a song and 
have it recorded, could sue and sue and 
sue. And, as is well known to the juke 
box industry, it takes only a tew such 
actions to xorce location owners to dodge 
any lurcner complications. 

Therefore, it is up to the juke box in- 
dustry to prepare to dexend itself. 

This is the time to prepare tor the 
bitter battle ahead. This is tne time to 
name the men wnom the members of the 
juke box business leel will capaoiy pro- 
tect it irom wnaiever legisianon is 
presented this year in Washington. 


NAME THE MEN IN THE JUKE BOX INDUSTRY 
YOU THINK SHOULD BE ON A NATIONAL 
COMMITTEE TO HELP DEFEND IT AGAINST 
FORTHCOMING FEDERAL LEGISLATION . . . 


Remarks 


Signed 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 

CITY ZONE STATE 

TEAR OFF AND MAIL TO: The Cash Box 
381 Fourth Ave New York 16, N. Y. TODAY! 


I 


The Cash Box, Autottiatic Music Section P(tgc 19 


January 3 , 1948 


Diskers Join For Action 
On Recording Ban 


TRADE PREDICTS COURT 
ACTION INEVITADLE 


NEW YORK — Recent meetings held in 
New York this past week pointed to a 
united front, with court action imminent, 
in the event that the impending recording 
ban becomes an actuality. 

The meetings, in which representatives 
of the many allied industry’s effected by 
the ban participated was called this past 
week, when it became fairly evident that 
the American Federation of Musicians 
would adhere to the ruling laid forth by 
James C. Petrillo, president of the union, 
this past summer. 

While Mr. Petrillo this past week 
stated that the disk manufacturers would 
continue to pay tribute and royalties to 
the union fund so long as the master 
records cut were in use; record executives 
firmly stated that they, as a body, would 
seek court action. 


Wayne Chirps For Phono Distrih 



NEW YORK — The candid camera clicks away, with Exclusive Records chirp 
Francis Wayne and Harry Pearl of Seacoast Distributors, caught in the lens. 
Francis points to her click Exclusive platter of “Happiness Is Just A Thing Called 
Joe”, while phono-man Harry eagerly listens. 


It is well to note that the Taft-Hartley 
Law, outlaws payment of royalties to 
a union for work exacted. Should the 
AFM press for those royalty payments, 
there is a possibility of federal legisla- 
tion or a federal agency stepping in. 

Attendng the meetings at the Hotel 
Waldorf-Astoria were: Frank E. Mullen 
of the National Broadcasting Company, 
Edward Wallerstein of the Columbia 
Recording Company, Richard S. Testut, 
Associated Program Service, Hudson 
Eldridge for the Frequency Modulation 
group and G. Emerson Markham for the 
Television Broadcasters Association. 




...The Tennessee Plowboy 
wishes you and yours 

"A HAPPY NEW YEAR" 

Let me take this opportunity to thank all 
you Juke Box Operators, Distributors, 
and Dealers, for your wonderful support 
of my RCA-VICTOR Records. I'll do my 
best in 1948 to deserve it. 


EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT 

THOMAS A. PARKER s:: 

4218 SAN PEDRO ^ PHONE W3951 

TAMPA 6, FLORIDA 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you* re a real coin machine man! 



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Tk& Clash Box, AutoMMic Music Section 


Pdgd 20 


January 3, 1948 


JUKB BOX OPS SAY: 

2 NNUTE DISKS 
Wia HELP STOP 
CHISELERS 


“The Chiselers Can Chisel Commissions 
But They Can’t Chisel A 2 Minute 
Record,” Juke Box Ops Gleefuliy Claim. 


One of the major points about the 
two minute records, as proposed by 
The Cash Box on the suggestion of 
juke box op, E. J. Pepper of Here- 
ford, Tex., that all juke box ops are 
gleeful about, is the fact that the 
commission chiseler can’t chisel the 
two minute recording. 

As one noted op stated, “Everytime 
we have tried to cut down on our 
commission percentage to the loca- 
tions, some chiseler would come 
along and offer them 507o all over 
again. This not only put us in hot 
water with that particular location 
that was approached by the chiseler, 
but it also hurt us with all the other 
locations. 

“For”, as this op reported, “you 
just can’t cut commissions on one 
spot only. The location owners know 
each other and talk these things over. 
Therefore, we usually send out a 
general letter to all of them at one 
time. In the better spots, we simply 


neglect to mention anything. But at 
least they all got the same letter. 
Therefore, when a chiseler starts his 
work, we are hurt all down the line, 
and it sometimes takes weeks to get 
all matters straightened out again. 

“On the two minute recordings”, 
this operator reports, “those chiselers 
can chisel all they want to, but, they 
can’t chisel the time of the record, 
and that’s a very important thing to 
every juke box operator. 

“In short”, he says, “we can still 
give them the same commission and 
earn more money. And the chiseler 
can’t give them anymore. He has to 
take a beating everytime he walks 
into a spot and tries to chisel. The 
two minute record”, he concludes, “is 


the best answer to the chiseler and is 
the one and only answer for the 
operators. Once again The Cash Box 
has proved to the entire music ma- 
chine business that it is on its toes 
and knows exactly what the opera- 
tors need to earn money so that they 
can continue to buy machines and 
keep the business going at top speed.” 

There is also no doubt that op- 
erator after operator around the na- 
tion realized that one of the most 
important facts backing up the two 
minute records is that chiselers are 
pushed aside. 

The average operator can afford to 
continue on a set commission basis 
and still earn approximately 20% 
more than he is earning at present. 


'THE CASH BOX" IS THE OPERATOR'S- MAGAZIN 
IT IS NOT SOLD ON NEWSSTANDS. 




The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 21 


January 3, 1948 


Short Shots 

From the Hills and Plains 



"My Sweet Love Ain't Around" 


"Rootie Tootie" 

HANK WILLIAMS 
(MGM 19124) 

• Grabbing the spotlight this week 
is this pair by the popular Hank 
Williams and his Drifting Cowboys. 
Top deck, labeled “My Sweet Love 
Ain’t Around” weaves in slow tim- 
ing with loads of sorrowful music 
setting the stage. On the flip with 
“Rootie Tootie”, Hank and the boys 
pick the beat up a beat to offer an 
item the dance crowd should espe- 
cially go for. The wide following of 
Hank and his boys should grab for 
this pair in a big way — we re sure 
you’ll agree. 

"Roses Have Thorns" 

"A Cup Of Coffee And A Cigarette" 
JERRY IRBY 
(MGM 10117) 

# Pair of sides which might meet your 
eye and go a long way toward boosting 
your phono take are these offered by 
Jerry Irby and his Texas Ranchers. Titled 
“Roses Have Thorns” and “A Cup of 
Coffee And A Cigarette” the pair spin 
in mellow timing, with some fine instru- 
mental work offered. Altho they won’t 
stop traffic, they are nevertheless, decent 
listening. 


"I Don't Know" 
"Wrangler Boogie" 

WILLIS BROTHERS 
(Mercury 6071) 

# More mellow tones for the western 
spots and stuff made to start loads 
of feet a-tapping. Pairing the Willis 
Brothers and the Oklahoma Wranglers 
on this piece labeled “I Don’t Know” 
and “Wrangler Boogie”, the platter has 
that odor of buffalo all around. Top deck 
with a repeating theme, while the flip 
spins in fast time. Excellent phono 
material — latch on! 


"Short Cut Cutie Polka" 

"Baby Won't You Setted Down" 

RAY HOGSED 
(Coast 266) 

# Pair of sides with a novelty twist are 
these by the capable Ray Hogsed Riders. 
Offering a polka adaptation on the top- I 
side titled “Short Cut Cutie Polka”, the 
deck stacks up as a phono attraction. 
The flip, as offered should make for 
pleasureable listening moments. Lend 
an ear in this direction. 


Arthur “Guitar Boogie” Smith cut a 
load of snappy wax for Super-Disc this 
past week, with first reports received in- 
dicating the wax to be headed for a storm 
if coin play . . . New York audiences 
were treated to a load of kicks when 
Lonzo and Oscar guested at several New 
York radio stations. Their recording of 
“I’m My Own Grandpa” is really kicking 
up a storm we hear . . . Texas Jim 
Robertson’s Victor platter of “The Miner’s 
Song is a dandy . . . Arthur Godfrey re- 
corded “Slap Her Down Again Paw” — 
what next! . . . Eddie Dean has a ditto 
in “It’s A Boy” . . . Paul Cohen of Decca 
Records out in Nashville cutting a slew 
of wax . . . 

« * « 

Dave Miller, WAAT has a load of folk 
music surprises for the large following 
of fans in the east . . . Bobby Gregory 
cutting more hot MGM platters . . . Billy 
Williams rarin’ to go again after visiting 
with his family n Arkansas . . . Crown 
Records cuts the first two-mnute folk 
platters, with Eddie McMullen leading 
off. Eddie, in recent weeks has become 
an 'important figure as far as phono fans 
are concerned . . . Sally Clark, hillbilly 
singer on station WALL, Middletown, 
New York sketched for a wave of moola. 
Keep your eyes peeled on this gal — she 
really is good! 

• • • 


♦ * « 

Rex Allen has a smash with “Tear- 
drops In My Heart” . . . Tony Gottuso, 
one of the world’s finest guitarists, is 
one of the busiest fellows we know these 
days. He’s recording day and night. 
Tony’s terrific string tickling is a big 
factor in a lot of hit records in the folk 
field today . . . Red Foley’s “Never Trust 
A Woman” really hitting on all eight . . . 

IT'S WHAT*S IN "THE CASH 
BOX" THAT COUNTS 



KING 672 


I'M GONNA CHANGE 
THINGS 

backed by 

I'M NOT SURPRISED 

by HANK PENNY 


. KING ' ■ 

1 540. BREWSTER AVE., CINCINNATI 7, OHIO 


A RUNAWAY in PHILLY 



ORDER FROM YOUR NEAREST DISTRIBUTOR OR DIRECT 

RAINBOW RECORDS 

156 WEST 44th STREET NEW YORK. N. Y. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you're a real coin ninrhine man! 






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The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


January 3 , 1948 




Pago 22 



© NEVER TRUST A 
WOMAN 

Red Foley 
IDecea 46074) 



SIGNED, SEALED AND 
DELIVERED 

Cowboy Copas 

(King 658) 



B-ONE BABY 

C/fffie Stone 
(Capitol 40041) 



TO MY SORROW 

Eddy Arnold 
I Victor 20-24811 



I'LL HOLD YOU 
!N MY HEART 
Eddy Arnold 


(Victor 20-2332) 


ADDITIONAL TUNES LISTED BELOW 
IN ORDER OF POPULARITY 


AFTER YESTERDAY 

Hawkshaw Hawkins 
(King 667) 


KENTUCKY 

Jimmy & Leon Short 
(Dacca 46077) 


EASY ROCKIN' CHAIR 

Roy Acutf 
ICo(umb(a 37961) 


DIXIE CANNONBALL 

Gene Autry 
rCo/umbfo 37963i 






"I'M A-COMIN' 
A-COURTIN' CORABELLE" 
"I'LL BE THERE" 


MAJESTIC No. K7I1 


Getting Terrific Action! 

"A TUNE FOR HUMMING" 

"MY BLUE HEAVEN" 

MAJESTIC No. 1177 


"LASSUS TROMBONE" 

"LOVE TALES" 

MAJESTIC No. 1178 

"MISS YOU" 

"IT HAPPENED IN HAWAII" 


Be sure to listen to our new Radio 
Show — "Sheaffer Porade" for 
Sheaffer Pen Co. 

Sundays, 3-3:30 P.M., E.D.T. over 
NBC— Coast to Coast. 


Cash in on America's Number 1 Juke Box Attraction — 



GO ON 

Ted Daffan 
fColumbfa 37959J 


RECORDS in your machines. 


■*” 













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The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 23 


January 3 , 1948 




BELL BOY BOOGIE 

Todd Rhodes 

(Vitacousttel 

Sensational coin culler in the 
coin spot acjain. 


top 



HASTINGS ST. 
BOUNCE 

Paul Williams Sextet 

(Savoy 6S9I 

Here it is in the second spot — with 
ops raving about it. 


MERRY CHRISTMAS. 
BABY 

Johnny Moore 
(Exclusive 2541 

In sixth place last week into the 
third spot with ops going wild about 
this one. 


I LOVE YOU 
YES I DO 
Bull Moose Jackson 
(King 41811 

.4 truly great recording and an even 
greater money maker. In fourth 
place this week. 


DON'T TAKE YOUR 
LOVE FROM ME 

Hadda Brooks 

.Modern 1531 

Chirp Hadda still rides the boxes 
hot and heavy with this one. 


845 STOMP 

Earl Bostic 
(Gotham 1541 

Breaks into the big time, with ops 
calling this one a real big one. 


WRITE ME A LETTER 



The Ravens 
(National 90381 

The Ravens and another smash 
cookie. In the seventh spot here — 
watch it boom. 



EARLY IN THE 
MORNING 

Louis Jordan 
(Decea 241551 

Hot ’n heavy Jordan keeps his spot 
on the phonos with this attraction. 
In eiphth place this week. 


SINCE I FELL FOR YOU 



Annie Laurie 
IDeLuxe 10821 

.Jppearing on this page for well 
over two months now, with heavy 
play still reported. 


CHANGEABLE 

WOMAN 

Johnny Moore 
Exclusive 2511 

On the bottom, altho coin continues 
to roll in for this wonderful platter. 


I 

i 


) 



"Mention My 

iiAorov i*n^ Goii 
"Hooray. Hooray 

Beatrice Kay 
(Columbia 37922 

A Here’s a dec\c you prad 
• -fV, It’s Beatrice K 

^iss ur way w 

I coinage galore > , an.’ 

throating ^istinguis 

I „er that has so disUng^^^ 

I deck stacks ^ t( 

1 vour tavern spots. 

I ah about that famous 
1 how grand the town reall 
/ punch line title coming 
\ Mitchell Ayres kicks o ^ 

backing in gay 

1 -'^^r"\^:t"sbowr w 

1 “Hoorfy, Hooray, I’m G( 

V ptTo fan- 

1 machines with this one 

I vocal efforts riding th^ 
I Both sides a^ action l 
. \ lent play-^i^’^^ 


my ' 


jocKey*’ 




ON COLUMBIA RECORD No. 37922 


GET IN ON THIS MONEYMAKER- 
ORDER AT LEAST ONE FOR EACH 
OF YOUR MACHINES 



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The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 24 


January 3 , 1948 



The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest 
Play Compiled From Reports Submitted 
Weekly to The Cash Box By Leading 
Music Operators In New Orleans, La. 


O MERRY CHRISTMAS. 
BABY 

Johnny Moore 

l Exclusive 2541 



STORMY MONDAY 
BLUES 

T-Bone Walker 

(Black & mite 1221 


BELL BOY BOOGIE 

Todd Rhodes 

fVif acoustic 1001 1 


o 


THE CHRISTMAS 
SONG 

King Cole Trio 

(Capitol 3111 


I 

J 



LET IT ROLL 

Lucky Millender 

(Decca 241821 



I LOVE YOU YES I DO 

Bull Moose Jackson 

(King 41811 


SIGNATURE RECORDS SETS NEW 
DISTRIB POLICY; EARL WINTERS NAMED 
SALES M ANAGER; NEW PLANT O PERATES 

Diskery Ends Distribution Contract With General 


Electric, Large Backlog 



EARL WINTERS 


NEW YORK — Signature Records, Inc., 
in an official statement of policy to their 
stockholders, disclosed this past week 
that the firm had decided to discontinue 
relations with the General Electric 
Supply Corporation. 

General Electric, for two years, had 
been the exclusive record distributor for 
Signature. Their vast chain of branch 
distribution offices extended throughout 
the nation. 

Robert Thiele, president of the plat- 
tery, pomted out that the General E.ectric 
Supply Corp., had been unable to sell 
records in sufficient quantity for Signa- 
ture to maintain its list of artists and 
operate its plants efficiently. Both had 
been geared to produce approximately 
ten million records per year. Secondly, 
considerable amounts of money had been 
spent in advertising and sales promotion 
in order to assist Gesco in obtaining 
sales. When it became apparent that 
Gesco’s channels were not suited for 
record distribution; it was mutually ag- 
reed that the yearly contract would not 
be renewed, and that Signature would 
appoint independent distributors through- 
out the nation. 


Insures Firm’s Stability 

cially and they now find themselves in 
the position of having to set up new 
distribution. This, Thiele estimated, would 
take between two to three months. In 
the meantime, to continue activities, ad- 
ditional money would be needed, and, 
he pointed out, that while this money 
was obtainable in sufficient quantity, it 
would not be put up unless those people 
making the loan were satisfied that the 
creditors would grant a moratorium until 
the company was operating on a profit- 
able basis. The great majority of Signa- 
ture’s creditors were agreeable to this 
plan, it was learned. 

Thiele further stated that the com- 
pount plant which is now ready to 
pound plant which is now ready to 
operate will reduce the cost of compound 
from 30% to 40%. Thus far, Signature 
has had no difficulty in obtaining dis- 
tributors. Thiele disclosed that the plat- 
tery would first investigate all distribu- 
tors to be assured that they could “do 
the job”. 

Thiele also disclosed that Earl Winters, 
formerly vice-president in charge of sales 
at Modern Music Sale Corp., New York, 
had been appointed National Sales 
Manager. Winters, long known to coin- 
men, music operators, and distributors 
throughout the nation has a wealth of 
experience in the record business. He 
formerly handled many record sales pro- 
motion set-ups with Modern Music, who 
at one time had Capitol Records, Rain- 
bow Records and at present distribute 
Signature and Coast Records. 

Larry Shelton, formerly Record Sales 
Manager of the Milwaukee Gesco organi- 
zation had been appointed Assistant Sales 
Manager, Gerry Ross has been named to 
the post of promotion manager, while 
Dan Priest is to continue in the post of 
press relations. 


O I CAN'T STOP IT 

Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 5201 


GOOD ROCKING 
TONIGHT 

Roy Brown 

IDeLuxe 10931 


© ROCKING BOOGIE 

Joe Lutcher 

(Specialty 3031 


FOOL THAT I AM 

Floyd Hunt 

(Miracle 1041 




Thiele stated that the Shelton, Conn, 
plant, which was to be ready in August 
had just been completed due to the fact 
that the building itself lagged in pro- 
duction schedules. 


Thiele stated that the plattery had 
also built up a tremendous backlog of 
records, thus assuring the firm’s stability 
in the impending recording ban. 


The combination of low sales and lack 
of compound plant, manufacturing basic 
raw material, drained Signature finan- 


OPERATORS. AHENTION 
TOP PRICES 
PAID FOR 
USED RECORDS 

Sell to Chicago's Largest 
Distributor of Used Records. 
WE PAY THE FREIGHT 

WRITE. CALL OR SHIP TO 


We've Moved 
to new and 
larger quarters 


USED RECORD 
EXCHANGE 


New 

Telephone No. 
DICkens 
7060 


4142 W. ARMITAGE AVE. 
CHICAGO 39, ILL. 

Will Pick Up Within 100 Mile Radius 


GREATER THAN EVER! 

FRANKIE 

LAINE 

SINGS TWO WONDERFUL TUNES 

"TWO LOVES HAVE I" 

AND 

"PUT YOURSELF IN MY 
PLACE BABY" 

Mercury Celebrity Series 
No. 5064 



Please mention THE CASH BOX when answerin g ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 




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The C a^h Box, Autotndtic Music Section Page 25 January 3, 1948 

Cleveland Ops Select “Pass That Peace 
Pipe” As January Hit Tune 


Rollin’ ’Round 
Randolph 


By the time you read this Christmas 
will be past with New Years well in the 
offering. But right now as we get ready 
to go to press we find ourselves right in 
the midst of the last minute Xmas rush. 
Randolph street is in a turmoil with 
busy people rushing here and there, last 
minute shoppers, early celebraters, etc. 
From every juke box we hear, “I’m 
Dreaming Of A White Christmas”. 


Several new openings around town for 
the holiday season, Murray Arnold and 
his ork at the Empire Room of the 
Palmer House . . . Nellie Butcher has 
taken over the piano at the Sherman s 
College Inn and gives out with the vocals 
on such successful ditties as “He’s A 
Real Gone Guy” and “Watch Yourself, 
Bub” . . . Jose Melis, the Latin band 
leader, Jeanie Williams, lovely song- 
stress, will stay over at the Sherman 
thru the New Year . . . Ray Morton and 
hir ork continue at the Blackstone’s May- 
fair Room, with Victor Borge and his 
piano nonsense headlining the show . . . 
Phil Levant, is a busy band leader these 
days, making transcriptions, -holding 
down the bandstand at the Blackhawk 
and attending to his booking duties at 
Mus-Art . . . Dorothy Shay, the “Park 
Avenue Hillbilly”, back from New York 
where she cut some sides for Columbia 
Records. Dottie opens at the Boulevard 
Room of The Stevens starting December 
31st . . . 


Jimmy Palmer, had one of the finest 
openings that Chicago has seen in a 
long time, when he opened at the Club 
Martinique this last week. It is pre- 
dicted that due to his unusually fine band 
and excellent show he puts on, the crowds 
will demand that Jimmy stay on at the 
Martinique for a long time . . . Tony 


CLEVELAND, O. — Well over 3000 en- 
thusiastic record fans selected “Pass 
That Peace Pipe” as the Hit Tune of the 
Month selection for January, at the 
Cleveland Phonograph Merchants Hit 
Tune Party, Sunday, December 21, in 
the Victory Room of Chin’s Golden 
Dragon Restaurant. 

The program was broadcast from the 
Victory Room over Station WJMO by 
disc jockey Howie Lund. Lund intro- 
duced the eight new record releases from 
which the selection was made. After the 
records were played, ballots were marked 
and collected. Record albums were then 
distributed as prizes to lucky balloters 
whose names were drawn from the ballot 
box. 

Lund’s special guest of the program 
was vocalist Eugenie Baird, currently 
appearing at the Victory Room. 

“Pass That Peace Pipe” will be placed 
in the number one spot of the 30UU juke 
boxes throughout the Greater Cleveland 
area during the month of January. 

The other tunes played in the order of 
their popularity were: 

“You Were Meant For Me”; “I Feel 
So Smoochie”; “Now Is The Hour”; 
“Please Don’t Play Number Six Tonight”; 
“We’ll Be Together Again”; “Pernaps, 
Perhaps, Perhaps” and Sophisticated 
Swing.” 

A recent statement released by CMI 
Publicity Director James T. Mangan 
lauded the Cleveland Operators trade 
group and Jimmie Ross, vice president 
ox the association, for the extremely 
wonderful work the organization has 
done in the past year, to better public 
relations. 

“Ross, aggressive and promotion- 
minded, conceived the idea of a Hit Tune 
Party for teen-agers, and in March of 
1947, the Cleveland Public Music Hall 
was the scene of a tremendous turnout.” 

“Mr. Ross has advised me”, he con- 
tinued, “that he will continue with this 


work throughout 1948, confident that this 
sure-fire program has done more to fur- 
ther the interests of the industry, more 
so than any other plan.” 

The first year of operation of the 
monthly Hit Tune Party’s has proved 
that thru spirited public cooperation, can 
the industry attain and reach many of 
our visionary goals. The enthusiastic 
reaction of thousands of youngsters and 
their parents conclusively proves that the 
Cleveland phono ops associations have 
demonstrated sincere progressive stand- 
ards for other trade groups to follow. 


20th CENTURY 

Has the Original Hit Recording of 

"I M MY OWN 
ORANUPAW* 

by THE JESTERS 

(Red Latham, Guy Bonham, 
and Wamp Carlson) 

ORDER FROM 

BARRETT D.ST.. 

ij East 21st St., Baltimore, Md. 
ALLEN BIST. Ou.. 

1 / w. Main St.. Richmond, Va. 
RECORD sales, 

2 . 1 , c.. Trade St., Charlotte. N. C. 
RECORD Sm^ES, 

dJX .-ancaster Ave., Monroe, N. C. 
southland D.Si. CO., 

44, i.u 0 v..u.jJ Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 
CHERRY OISl. Co., 

3IJ i.i.ers.od Ave., Jackson. Ille, Fla. 
MONARC.i SauivS cO., 

2>d N. 22, M St., Birmingham, Ala. 
OUNBAn O.S I h> BoT. N u CO.. 

lUOJ N. neiue.soii, Dallas, Tex. 

W. E. HARVEY CO., 

13.2 Ontario, Cleveland, 0. 

W. E. HARVEY CO., 

12649 Lyn.vood Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
TRIANGLE O.ST. CO.. 

I90i Fit.h A enuo, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
MILLNER hECO D SALES. 

1 10-112 N. ISih St., St. Louis 3. Mo. 
CHORD DiST. CO., 

2436 S. LaSalle, Chicago. III. 

G. 4. S. DIST. CO., 

243 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul, Minn. 
NIAGARA MIDLAND CO.. 

831 Main St.. Buffalo. N. Y. 
NEW ENGLAND MUS.C SUPPLIERS, 

17 Chadwick St., Boston, Mass. 
NOLA RECORD SALES. 

509 Iberville Ave., New Orleans, La. 
TRILON RECORD DIST. CO.. 

1921 Gro e St.. Oakland. Calif. 
BLACK & WHITE DIST. CO.. 

4910 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 
GEORGIA MUSiC CORP., 

478 Tenth Ave., New York City 

Manufactured by 

BALLEN RECORD CO. 

1515 Jefferson St., Phila. 21, Pa. 


Di Pardo, currently at the Bismarck, 
turning the tables by giving a Xmas 
cocktail party for the music boys Christ- 
mas Eve . . . Bob Miller, Contact Mens 
head, arrived in town to give the boys a 
pep-up for their coming tin pan alley 
show . . . Harvey Crawford, formerly 
with Eddie Fens at the Bismarck Tavern 
Room, opens with Art Kassel at the 
blackhawk on January 9th . . . 


Bregman, Vocco & Conn pubbery have 
just secured the rights on the oldie “I’d 
Like To Live In Loveland” from Will 
Rossiter. The boys tell us that this 
number has tremendous possibilities of 
becoming another “Sweet Sixteen” . . . 
Congrats to Kitty Kallen, pretty singing 
star of records, radio and television, who 
is now appearing at the Chez Paree. 
ivitty Will soon become the wife of Bud 
Gra.ioff, New York publicist . . . Jane 
Easton, lovely thrush with Jerry Glid- 
den’s ork, now at the Glass Hat of the 
Congress Hotel, continues to pack in the | 
crowds with the patrons very pleased I 
over her rendition of songs . , . . * 



1 EDDIE "Mr. Cleanhead" 

w {jJohUCiL, iptsuaisaJL bluadu 
MnqsiA, ancL hhu oAdtsidJUvcL 

Exclusive MERCURY Recording Artist 


"RAILROAD 
PORTER’S.BLUES 
"KING FOR A 

L dayIblues ’ 


UNIVERSAL attractions • 347 MADISON AYE.. N. Y, 



Please mention THE CASH 


BOX when answering arts — it proves you^re a real coin machine man! 




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USE T^E "DISC-HITS BOX SCORE" IN SELECTING RECORDS FOR YOUR 20, 24 AND 40 SELECTION PHONOS 

THIS DOUBLE PAGE IS PERFORATED FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE- REMOVE AND PUT ON YOUR BULLETIN BOARD 


mum 


DISC-HITS 
BOX SCORE 

COMPILED BY 

JACK "One Spot" TUNNIS 

IN ORDER OF POPULARITY 

BASED ON 

WEEKLY NATIONAL SURVEY 


U-lIiUlg 

II— Irliticrat 
19-eallet 
Bf-lticktWbUe 
CA-Cipltil 

CK^Htlnentil 
(O-Cilnnkia 
Cl— Crown 
CS-CoBtl 

DC-^ecca 

lU-lelno 


EX— EiclDtht 
Jl-iuke loi 
Kl-XIng 
LI— Lissen 
MA— Milesttc 
ME— Mercnrj 
M6-M-6-M 
MH— Manor 
MO— Modern 
MD— HnsIcriR 
NA— Hatlonil 
RA— latnbow 


RE— ftegent 
SA— SoTOi 
Si— Slfnahiro 
$0— Sonora 
SP-SpeclaU) 
ST— Sterling 
SW-Swanh 
TO-Tog 
TR-Trllon 
UA-Unlted Artist 
UH— Unhersal 
VI-¥Itfor 
VT— Yitacenstlc 


22 


-Bollerina 

CO-38381— BUDDY CLARK 
DE-24265— ENRIC MADREGUERA ORCH. 
ME-5075— JERRY SHELTON TRIO 
MG-10035— JIMMY DORSEY ORCH. 
MU-15116— MEL TORME 
Who 


116.5 111.9 113.7 


I Ev«7 


VI-20-2433— VAUGHN MONROE ORCH. 

Th» Stars WlH R.m*mb#r 

2 — Civilization 102.4 124.8 108.6 

AP-1059— THE MURPHY SISTERS 

You’re BreoAfng Itt A New Haarl 
CA-465— JACK SMITH 

Don't You love Me Anymof? 

CO-37885 — WOODY HERMAN 

Boutevord of Memerfes 

DE-23940— DANNY KAYE— ANDREWS SISTERS 
AAA-7274— RAY McKINlEY ORCH. 

There Thing* Money Con*» Buy 
ME-5067— DICK TWO TON BAKER ORCH. 

MG-10083— 5Y OLIVER ORCH. 

VI-20-2400— LOUIS PRIAAA ORCH 
FortokJng Al! Other* 

3_NeorYou «.9 82.9 100.0 

BU-1001 — FRANCIS CRAIG 
Red Ro*e 

CA-452— AIVINO REV ORCH. 

Oh Peter 

CO-37838 — ELLIOT LAWRENCE ORCH. 

How lucky You Are 
OE-24171— THE ANDREWS SISTERS 
How lucky You Are 
MA-7263— ViaOR lOMBARDO ORCH. 

Zu-Bt 

ME-5066— TWO TON BAKER 

j'm a Lonely little Pefunio 
RA-1001— THE AUDITONES 
SA-657— FOUR BARS 4 A MELODY 
ST-SOOl— OOlORES BROWN 


The Cash Box^ Automatic Music Section 


22 

VU20-2421— LARRY GREEN ORCH. 

Ple-AN/c-l« 

4— You Do 78.4 

CA-438— MARGARET WHITING 

My Future Just Po»»ed 

CO-37587 — DINAH SHORE 

DE-24101— CARMEN CAVALLARO 
How Soon 

MA-12011— GEORGIA GIBBS 

Ftudln' and Fighlin' 

ME-5056— VIC DAMONE 
Angelo Mia 

MG-10050— HELEN FORREST 
Baby. Come Home 

51.15114— LARRY DOUGLAS 

Sleep, My Boby Sleeo 

Vl-20-2361— VAUGHN MONROE O. 


Page 28 


Page 29 


98.3 100.1 


5 — Too Fat Polka 

CO-37921— ARTHUR GODFREY 
For Me end My Gal 
MG-10106— BLUE BARRON O. 
Mickey 

CA-480— THE STARLIGHTERS 


DE-24268— ANDREWS SISTERS 

MA-6022— SLIM BRYANT 
ME-5079— TWO TON BAKER ORCH. 

With a Hoy and a Hi 
MG-10105— BLUE BARRON ORCH. 
Mickey 

VI-20-2609— LOUIS PRIMA ORCH. 

If I Only Had a Match 

6— How Soon 76.6 

CO-37952— DINAH SHORE 
'I Tha 


76.9 94.1 73.5 


E.24101— CARMEN CAVALLERO — BING CROSBY 


TO-1258— JACK OWENS 

Begin The Bekulne 
TR-195— GUY CHERNEY 
Peggy O'Neil 

VI-20-2523 — VAUGHN MONROE ORCH. 

True 

7— 'Serenade of the Bells 58.7 47.1 

CA-75007— JO STAFFORD 

The Genifemen Is A Dope 
CO-37956— KAY KYSER ORCH. 

Po*s That Peace Pipe 
DE-24258— GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 

Sipping Cider By The Zuyder Zee 
MG-10091— BOB HUSTON 

A Tone For Humming 
VI-20-2372— SAMMY KAYE ORCH. 

That * Whof Every Young Girl Should Know 

8— 1*11 Dance at 
Your Wedding 

CA-15009— PEGGY LEE 

Golden Earring* 

CO-37967— BUDDY CLARK— RAY NOBLE 
Tho*o Thing* Money Con t Soy 
MG-10095— HELEN FORREST 
VI-20-2512— TONY MARTIN 

Carolina in the Morning 

9_l Wish 1 Didn't 
Love You So 

CA-409— BETTY HUTTON 

The Sewing Mochine 
CO-37506 — DINAH SHORE 

I'm So Right Tonight 
OE-23977— DICK HAYMES 

Noughty Angefine 
MA-7225— DICK FARNEY 

My Young and Foolish Heart 
MG-10040— HELEN FORREST 
Don't Tell Me 
MU-15117— PHIL BRITO 

VI-20-2294 — VAUGHN MONROE ORCH. 

Tol/ahassee 

10 — And MImi 43.7 

CA-466— THE DINNING SISTERS 
Fun ond Foncy Free 
CO-37819— FRANKIE CARLE O. 


56.4 13.7 31.6 


48.4 40.2 72.9 


36.2 68.4 34.2 


Once In 
OE-24172— DICK HAYMES 

When I'm Not Near 
MA-7262— RAY DOREY 

Freedom Train 
MG-10082— ART LUND 
Jealous 

MU-15114— MEL TORME 

Boufevord of Memoi 
VI-20-2422— CHARLIE SPIVAK 


life 


ME-3072 — ANITA ELLIS 
Love For Love 

MG-10085— JACK FINA ORCH. 


DE-23981— LAWRENCE WELK ORCH. 

Doin' You Good 
OE-23990— BING CROSBY 
Kentucky Babe 

OE-29132— WINGED VICTORY CHORUS 
Army Air Corps 

MA-7224 — GEORGE PAXTON ORCH. 


VI-10-1313— ROBERT MERRILL 

Sweelheort of Sigmo Chi 

13— Pass That Peace Pipe 32.4 

CA-15010— MARGARET WHITING 

let's Be Sweetheart* Agoin 
CO-37956— KAY KYSER O. 

Serenode oi the Bells 
MA-1 176— MARTHA TILTON 

A Fellow Need* A Girl 
ME-5080— HARRY COOL O. 

I Wouldn't Be Surprised 
VI-20-2483— BERYL DAVIS 

14— So For 28.7 

CA-461— MARGARET WHITING 
lazy Countryiide 
CO-37883— FRANK SINATRA 

A Fellow Needs A Girl 
DE-24194— GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 


L Felloi 


L Girl 


ME-5076— THE SHELTON TRIO 
Sentimental Rhapsody 
MG-10085— JACK FINA ORCH. 

Golden Earrings 
Sl-15106— ALAN DALE 
Oh Marie 

VI-20-2402— PERRY COMO 


IS^Papa Won’t You 
Dance With Me? 


27.2 20.5 10.3 


CA-471— SKITCH HENDERSON O. 

Put Yourself In My Place, Baby 
CO-37931— DORIS DAY 

Soy Something Nice About Me 


'old ) 


1 My I 


January 3, 1948 


VI-20-2469— THE THREE SUNS 

16— Two Loves Have I 16.5 

CO-38026— RAY NOBLE— BUDDY CLARK 
Sierra Madre 

DE-24263— GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 

They're Mine, They're Mine, They'n 
ME-5064 — FRANKIE LAINE 

Put Yourself In My Place Boby 
MG-1 0097— BILLY ECKSTINE 
Pool That I Am 


Fellow Needs a Girl 11.7 15.4 17.1 

CA-463— GORDON McRAE 
Body S Soul 

CO-37883— FRANK SINATRA 
So For 

CN-7270 — JIMMY ATKINS 
So For 

DE-24194 — GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 

So For 

^.1165__AAARTHA TILTON 
ME-5063— JOHN lAURENZ 
MG-10109— BOB HUSTON 

Cutest liHle Red Headed Doll 
VI-20-2402— PERRY COMO 

18 I Have But One Heart 10.3 4.2 20.6 

CO-37544 — FRANK SINATRA 


Dec. 22 I 

DE-24154— CARMEN CAVALLERO ORCH. 

Ain icho Ever Cornin' Bock 
ME-5053— VIC DAMONE 

MU-456— phi;. BRITO 

Tango OeLo Roso 
MU-15069— GORDON MocCRAE 
You Go to My Head 
Sl-15130— MONICA LEWIS 

The Whiffenpoof Song 
VI-20-2424— TEX BENfcKE ORCH. 

19— Corabelle 8.4 

CO-37972— FRANKIE CARLE ORCH. 

Who Were You Ki**ing 
MA-1170— EDDY HOWARD 
r/l Be There 

20— Love for Love 6.1 

CA-15006— ANDY RUSSELL 

CO-37940— CLAUDE THORNHILL ORCH. 

Worsow Concerto 
ME-3072— ANITA ELLIS 

Golden Earrings 

MG-10090— HAL MeINTYRE ORCH. 
Jumpin’ Jubilee 

Vl-20-2514— VAUGHN MONROE ORCH. 
Boby Be Good 


ADOITIOKAL TUNES LISTED BELOW IN ORDER OF POPUURITY 


21— Sugar Blues 4.7 

22— Kate 3.8 

23— Gonna Get a Girl 3.7 

24— The Whistler 2.8 

25 — Feudin' and Fightin’ 2.4 

26— You're My Girl 1.9 

27 — I Still Get Jealous ' 1.6 

28— Don't You 

Love Me Anymore? 1.5 

29 — Hand In Hand 1.4 

30 — A Girl That 1 Remember 1.3 

31 — The Gentleman Is a Dope 1.2 

32 — Surprise Symphony 1.0 

33 — The Dum Dot Song 1.0 


1.4 3.4 

4.3 4.8 


18.8 1.5 

5.1 11.1 


34 — Those Things 
Money Can’t Buy 

35— Curiosity 

36— Harmony 

37^Kokomo, Indiana 


-.1.0 

- 1.0 

- 1.0 

- 1.0 


1.3 

2.4 1.2 

3.4 





The Cash Box 


Page 30 


January 3, 1948 



AutomaticMebchandising Section 


Elmer F. Pierson New President of NAMA 


Greene Establishes Memorial Fund 
For Heart Disease Research 



ELMER F. PIERSON 


CHICAGO — Culminating four days of 
successful showing of all types of auto- 
matic merchandising machines and busi- 
ness meetings, Elmer F. Pierson, presi- 
dent of the Vendo Company of Kansas 
City, Mo., was elected president of the 
National Automatic Merchandising Asso- 
ciation for 1948 at its annual Convention, 
December 14 - 17, at the Palmer House, 
Chicago. 

Pierson succeeds Robert Z. Greene, 
president of the Rowe Manufacturing Co., 

l nc. , of New York, whose two terms as 
leader of NAMA came to a close. 

A Kansas City civic leader, Pierson is 
also a director of the National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers. Vendo is con- 
sidered to be the largest manufacturer 
of Bottled Beverage vending machines 
in the country. 

J. Sidney Jones, Southern Vendors, 
Dallas, Texas, was elected vice-president, 
and L. D. Chambers, Peerless Weighing 
& Vending Machine Corp. of Long 
Island City, New York, was reelected as 
treasurer. 

New directors elected are: Clarence 
.\delberg, Stoner Manufacturing Corpo- 
ration, Aurora, 111.; Fred Baehr, The 
Gum Vending Corporation, New York; 
and Alvin Dawson, American Locker 
Company, Boston, Mass. 

Directors reelected are: J. B. Lanagan, 
The Nik-O-Lok Company, Indianapolis, 

l nd. ; R. A. Parina, Messrs. Parina & 
Company, San Francisco, Calif.; and B. 
W. Scheuer, Vendomat Corporation of 
America, Baltimore, Md. 

Directors continuing in office are: 
Nathaniel Leverone, Automatic Canteen 
Company of America, Chicago, HI.; W. 
G. FitzGerald, International Ticket Scale 
Corporation, New York; Ford S. Mason, 
Ford Gum & Machine Company, Inc., 
Lockport, N. Y.; J. Renz Edwards, 
Cigarette Service Company, Kansas City, 
Kan.; and I. H. Houston, Sparcab, Inc., 
New York. 



NEW YORK — The American Heart 
Association announced today that Robert 
Z. Greene, President of the Rowe Corpo- 
ration, has established a $5,000 memorial 
fund to further scientific research and 
education in the heart diseases. 

Canned Fruit And 
New And i ncreased 

CHICAGO, ILL. — A new and steadily 
growing market for the sale of canned 
fruit and health juices through automatic 
merchandising was foreseen today by 
Jack M. Cross, of Telecoin Corporation, 
in an address on the automatic mer- 
chandising of fruit and vegetable juices 
given at the opening business session of 
the National Automatic Merchandising 
Association convention at the Palmer 
House. 

Cross, manager of Telecoin’s Tele- 
Juice division, told operators that in- 
troduction of coin-operated vendors will 
provide an expanding field for fruit 
growers, whose constantly-increasing 
production cannot be handled through 
present grocery store channels. 

He pointed out that Florida fruit 
growers alone produced 90 million boxes 
of citrus fruits last year, and that the 
figure is expected to reach 150 million 
within five years. Texas and California 
he viewed in like proportion. Supplies 
of other juices will also increase, he 
asserted. 

Growers and juice producers see in 
the automatic vendor a vehicle and a 
program which will open to them addi- 
tional outlets for their packs, and are 
already lending enthusiastic cooperation 


The fund was contributed to the H'jart 
Association in tribute to two members 
of the National Automatic Merchandising 
Association who died of heart disease 
during the past year. The deceased 
NAMA members are Ernest Morava of 
Long Island City, N. Y. and Paul Kimball 
of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Greene, who recently retired as Presi- 
dent of the NAMA, is a member of 
the Assembly of the American Heart 
Association. The announcement of the 
memorial fund described heart disease 
as “the leading cause of death in the 
United States, taking the greatest toll 
among our nation’s business leaders.” 

The fund is being applied toward the 
Heart Association’s drive for funds to 
carry forward its program of research, 
public and professional education, and 
development of local heart associations 
throughout the United States. The drive 
will be climaxed during National Heart 
Week, February 8-14. 

The American Heart Association is 
the only national organization devoted 
exclusively to fighting heart diseases 
through organized scientific and educa- 
tional work. Its governing bodies are 
composed of leading specialists in heart 
diseases as well as prominent laymen. 

Health Juices Find 
Market In Vendors 

to the development of the new operation. 

Cross described the three fruit iuice 
vending machines which have just been 
introduced to the market, all of which 
he said will be in full production early 
in 1948. The Tele- Juice machine offers 
the customer his choice of six flavors. 
A dime in the coin chute delivers the 
can to his hand automatically. A knife- 
type can opener built into the Tele-Juice 
is protected in a dust-proof chamber, 
snd is^ kept at a constant temperature 
of 180° F, to prevent rust and bacterial 
growth. The machine operates on a 
^vity principle, dispensing 300 cans of 
eVctrically-refrigerated canned juices. 

The Snively “Dispen-so-lator” offers 
one flavor, vending the drink in a 
sanitary paper cup. United States 
Vending Corp. will shortly introduce its 
“Automatic Store” or “Pik-Ups”, to vend 
either fresh or canned juices. 

Cross pointed out the “wealth of 
health” in vitamin resources which the 
automatic vendors will provide, and 
which widespread utilization of the 
machines will supply in offices and in- 
dustrial plants, theater lobbies, recrea- 
tion centers, transport waiting rooms, 
schools, and countless other locations. 











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The Cash Box 


Page 31 


January 3 , 1948 


AutomaticMerchandising Section 


GREENE PREDICTS TWO BILLION 
DOLLAR MERCHANDISE MACHINE 
BUS INESS WITHIN NEXT 5 YE ARS 

Operators Will Have Half Billion Invested In Equip. 


CHICAGO — In his farewell address as 
president of the National Automatic 
Merchandising Association, before ap- 
proximately 1,000 operators and 125 
manufacturers and suppliers attending 
the 1948 NAMA Convention at the 
Palmer House, this city, Robert Z. Greene 
envisioned a two-billion dollar vending 
machine business — with soft drink 
machines in railroad cars and cross- 
country busses, coin-operated gas pumps 
and food machines along America’s high- 
ways, all-night drug stores and coin 
operated self-service markets. 

Referring to those machines displayed 
at the convention, Greene said “These 
machines are only a forerunner of things 
to come in automatic merchandising. In 
less than five years two billion dollars 
worth of goods and services will be sold 
thru vending machines.” 

Greene predicted that within five years, 
approximately 60,000 people will be, di- 
rectly engaged in the operation of mer- 
chandise and service machines. 

“The manufacturers of automatic mer- 
chandising and service equipment employ 
many thousands of people directly in 
their factories” continued Greene “and 
indirectly many more thousands in fab- 
ricating parts in other plants. At the 
present rate of production, operators will 
have invested over half a billion dollars 
in new equipment within the next five 
years. We have created a new, important 
method of distribution for America!” 

The following figures were obtained, 
he said, with the aid of operators and 
manufacturers of automatic merchandis- 
ing equipment, the heads of trade asso- 
ciations, company officials of large mer- 
chandise suppliers and statistical depart- 
ments of the government: 

There are now in use 200,00 carbon- 
ated bottle and cup beverage machines: 

200.000 five-cent candv machines; 250.000 
cigarette machines; 750.000 penny gum 
and peanut machines; and 350,000 service 
machines such as scales, coin changers, 
toilet locks and parcel lockers. 

Within five years, Greene predicted, 
there will be 750.000 carbonated bever- 
age machines; 400,000 candy machines; 

450.000 cigarette machines; 1,500,000 
penny gum and peanut machines; and 

700.000 service machines of the present 
type now in use — a combined total of 

3.800.000 vending machines. 

“Other silent salesmen are beginning 
to make their appearance selling coffee, 
milk, ice cream, fruit, hot sandwiches, 
insurance and groceries,” Greene said. 
“There are also others, such as postage 
stamp machines, biscuit and popcorn 
machines, which I have not taken into 
consideration, whose accumulated volume 
of sales would represent a substantial 
figure. 

“New machines in the service field are 
also making great strides. Coin operated 
washing machines are already doing an 
annual business of more than $50,000,000. 
More than 1,800 self service laundry 
stores, the majority of which are coin- 
operated, have been opened in the past 
year and a half. In addition, more than 

40.000 coin operated laundry machines 
have been installed in apartments and 
factories. 


“Tomorrow America may expect ma- 
chines selling such products as dried 
groceries, canned goods, frozen foods, 
bread, cheese, soap, cosmetics, gasoline 
and countless other products produced 
on American farms and in American 
factories. 

“Right now there are machines in the 
minds of men that stagger the imagina- 
tion. Through automatic control of heat, 
cold and moisture, amazing developments 
are ahead in vending machines.” 

One of America’s best known industrial 
designers plans for the drug store of 
tomorrow, Greene stated, battery of auto- 
matic merchandising machines along the 
store’s front side wallf These would be 
used during the day to supplement over- 
the-counter sales of standard products 
in greatest demand. The store front 
would be so constructed that at night 
the machines would be swung into posi- 
tion to replace part of the window. The 
public then could purchase emergency 


CHICAGO— One of the machines attract- 
ing a great deal of attention at the re- 
cent NAMA convention was the match 
vendor made for Diamond Match Com- 
pany in 1907. 

Pictured above are several represen- 
tatives of cigarette machine manufac- 
turers who test out the mechanism. 
(L to R): Pete Chris, Eastern Electric 
Vending Machine Corp., N. Y.; E. C. 
McNeil, National Vendors, Inc., Los 
Angeles, Cal.; 0. H. “Jack” Feinberg, 
U-Need- A- Vendors, Inc., Detroit; Allan 
Remley, Rowe Manufacturing Co., Inc., 
Whippany, N. J.; and Neill Mitchell, 
Lehigh Foundries, Inc., Easton, Pa. 


items such as tooth brushes and shaving 
cream after store hours without entering 
the store. This same idea could be applied 
to other types of retailing. 

Concluding his talk, Greene pointed 
out that a great deal of misconception 
about automatic merchandising still 
exists. Every machine with a coin chute 
is not a gold mine, the speaker said. 

“This new method of retail selling is 
made up of small business. Outside of 
the penny field, there are less than 100 
operators throughout the United States 
who operate more than 500 mechandise 
or seiwice machines. When automatic 
merchandising is universally adopted as 
an aid to self-service, we will become so 
entrenched in the American scene that 
our method of selling will no longer be 
singled out for special taxes. We shall 
be treated just as any other retailer — 
a condition we have a right to expect,” 
he concluded. 


Developes Water Vendor 

ROSETOWN, CANADA — Here’s a 
vendor that the greatest minds in the 
industry probably never thought of — 
a water vending machine. 

James C. Maines supplies drinking 
water to the townspeople, a west central 
Saskatchew'an town. He became tired of 
getting up at all hours of the night to 
sell the Avater, and worked out a plan 
that would keep him in bed, and at the 
same time conduct a profitable water 
business ... he developed a coin-operated 
w’ater vendor to sell two buckets of 
water for five cents. 


Look Over Vendor Made In 1 907 



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January 3^ 1948 


- ^ Tli8 Cash Box 


Page 32 





• ALL EQUIPMENT APPEARING ON THIS AND FOLLOWING PAGE 
LISTED ONLY UNTIL MACHINES ARE NO LONGER IN PRODUCTION. 


]\I U S I C 


MUSIC 


A.M.I. 

Model A $897.50 

Automatic Hostess Complete 
20 Station Unit 14.800.00 

HIDEAWAY CAB. W/Selective Play Mech.: 

W/Amplifier and Remote Volume Control 515.00 

HIDEAWAY CAB. W/Continuous Play Mech.: 

W/Amplifier and Remote Volume Control 482.50 

AV/Amplifier — No Remote Volume Control 470.00 

Complete — No Amp., No Vo'ume Control 410.00 

AIREON 

Blonde Bombshell ' $699.50 

Super DeLuxe Phonograph 897.00 

Fiesta DeLuxe 699.50 

Trio (Wall Box 69.50 

Solo (Wall Box) 46.50 

Impresario (Speaker) 42.27 

Melodeon (Speaker) 52.97 

Carilleoa (Speaker) 56.18 

FILBEN 

Mirrocle Cabinet 325.00 

30 Selection Stowaway Mech 398.00 

BUCKLEY 

Music Box 25.00 

MILLS INDUSTRIES 

Constellation 795.00 

PACKARD MFC. CORP. 

Manhattan Phonograph 1,000.00 

Pla Mor Phonograph (Model 7) 795.00 

Hideaway (Model 400) 450.00 

Wall Box (Butler) 39.95 

1000 Speaker (Paradise) 159.50 

Wall Box (Butler 10c) 41.95 

950 Speaker 57.50 

650 Speaker 19.75 

Spot Reflector 8.50 

PERSONAL MUSIC CORP. 

Measured Music Boxes, 5c-10c 35.00 

Studio Amplifier 505.00 

Studio Timing Control Unit 250.00 

Master Power Supply Units , . 140.00 


WURLITZER 

Model 1100 Standard $959.50 

Model 1080.4 Colonial 899.50 

IVIodel 1071 A Concealed changer with stepper. . 529.50 

Model 1015 Standard 914.50 

Model 1080 Colonial 875.00 

Model 1017 Concealed changer with stepper.... 499.50 

Model 2140 5-1 Oc Wireless 40.00 

Model 3020 5-10-25c 3-wire 69.50 

Model 3025 5c 3-wire 44.50 

Model 3031 5c 30-wire 39.50 

Model 3045 Wireless 54.50 

Model 212 Master Unit 70.00 

Model 215 Wireless Transmitter 17.50 

Model 216 Wireless Impulse Receiver 22.50 

Model • 217 Auxiliary Amplifier 35.00 

Model 218 30-wire Adapter Terminal Box.... 15.00 

Model 219 Stepper 46.50 

Model 4000 8" Metal Star Speaker 45.00 

Model 4002 8" Plastic Star Speaker 45.00 

Model 4004A 8" Metal Itiusiral Note Speaker.. 30.00 

Model 4005 8" Walnut Round Speaker 22.50 

Model 4005A 8" Walnut Round Speaker 25.00 

Model 4006A 8" Deluxe. Walnut Round .Mirror. 35.00 
Model 4007 12" Intermediate Deluxe Speaker.. 135.00 
Model 4008 15" Deluxe Speaker 185.50 

PINS 

BALLY 

Nudgy $289.50 

CHICAGO COIN 

Isle 275.00 

GENCO 

Bronco 279.50 

EXHIBIT 

Star Lite 299.50 

GOTTLIEB 

Humpty Dumpty 294.00 

J. H. KEENEY & CO. 

Ili-Ride 295.00 

P & S MACII. CO. 

Tom Tom 299.00 

UNITED MFG. CO. 

Singapore No Price Set 

WILLIA.MS 

Bonanza 299.50 


ROCK-OLA 

1422 Phonograph (Net) 728.00 

1424 Playmaster 440.00 

Model 1807 Moderne Corner Spkr 107.50 

Model 1906 Remote Volume Control 6.90 

Model 1530 Wall Box 39.50 

Model 1603 Wall Speaker 42.50 

Model 1606 Tonette Wall Speaker 21.50 

Model 1608 Tone-O-Lier Speaker 65.00 

Model 1607 Tonette Wall Speaker 19.75 

Model 1531 DeLuxe Bar Bracket 8.25 

Model 1533 Universal Bar Bracket 3.90 

Model 1795 Wall Box Line Booster 16.35 

SCOTTO MUSIC CO. 

Music Master Cabinet 399.50 

Melody Master Cabinet 335.00 

Remote Master Cabinet 389.50 

SEEBURG 

147-M Symphonola w/remote control 875.00 

147-S Symphonola 805.00 

H-147-M RC Special 525.00 

Wireless Wallomatic 58.50 

Wired Wallomatic 46.50 

5-10-25c Wireless Wallomatic 75.00 

5-10-25C Wired Wallomatic 62.50 

Teardrop Speaker 19.95 

Teardrop Speaker w/volume control 22.50 

Recess Wall & Ceiling Speaker 18.00 

Mirror Speaker 49.50 

Duo Volume Control 21.90 

Power Supply 14.50 

Master Amplifier 53.50 

Master Selection Receiver 118.00 

Wired Master Selection Receiver 105.00 

Electric Selector 86.00 

Remote Speaker Amplifier 44.20 

Solenoid Drum for 147-S 60.50 

SOLOTONE CORP. 

Leveling Pre- Amplifier 44.50 


mUNTF.H CAATFS 


A.B.T. MFG. CORP. 

Challenger 65.00 

BALLY MFG. CO. 

Heavy Hitter 184.50 

w/stand 196.50 

GOTTLIEB 

DeLuxe Grip Scale 39.50 

nOT.F DOWNS 

BALLY 

Hy-Roll 499.50 

CHICAGO COIN 

Roll Down 395.00 

EDELMAN A!MUSE. 

Tin Pan Alley No Price Set 

ESSO MFG. CORP. 

Esso Arrow 499.50 

GENCO 

Bing-A-Roll 499.50 

GREAT GAMES, INC 

Toleroll No Price Set 

GEO. PONSER CO. 

I’ro-Score 495.00 

UNITED MFG. CO. 

Hawaii Roll-Down 395.00 

WILLIAMS 5IFG. CO. 

Box Score 375.50 

0\F-n M T.S 

BALLY 

Jockey Special 645.00 

Jockey Club ” 645!oO 

GOTTLIEB 

Daily Races (F. P. Model) 650.00 



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The Cash Box 


Page 35 


January 5 , 1948 




IT’S GOT ’EM ALL TALKING 


seven 

WAYS TO 
SET OP 

bohos 
SCORE 


WEST COST REPRESENTATIVE 

PHIL ROBINSON 

607 KELTON, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 
EASTERN SALES REPRESENTATIVE 

ALBERT SIMON 

215 W. 64th ST., NEW YORK, NEW YORK 


lUACHIIME CO. 

1725 DIVERSEY BOULEVARD • CHICAGO 14, ILLINOIS 


YES, 7 WAYS TO SET UP BONUS 
SCORE & 3 WAYS TO COLLECT 
THE BONUS . . NEW DOUBLE 
BONUS FEATURE . . 4 LIGHTED 
JUMBO ROLL-OVER BUTTONS 


San Antonio, Texas, Newspaper 
Gives Music Ops Fuii liiustrated 
Page of Favorable Publicity 


SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS — Marvin 
Brown of Joe E. Brown Music Com- 
pany, this city, is using the full page 
story that appeared in the magazine 
section of the San Antonio Express, 
December 14 issue, a local independ- 
ent morning paper, to gain favorable 
public reaction to the juke box busi- 
ness. “It is a partial answer” writes 
Brown “to the ‘stab’ that the Hearst 
Sunday American Weekly pushed at 
our backs. I have posted copies of the 
story alongside bulletin boards in all 
the record distributor salesrooms 
that had pinned the Hearst story up 
for their customers to take note of.” 

The Joe E. Brown Music Company 
protested the malicious statements of 
the recent Hearst story by mailing 
them the printed letter form from 
The Cash Box and by writing a per- 
sonal letter to the editor of that 

I publication. 

1 The full page, illustrated story in 
The San Antonio Express, refers to 
the operator as the party who is con- 
cerned with the everyday perform- 
ance of the machines. “It’s almost 
like being a doctor,” one operator 
told the reporter. “We never have a 
moment to ourselves, what with lo- 
cations calling for all types of service 
— from mechanical to delivering a 
load of nickels. 

Strangly enough, “Popular” music 
is not the most popular in Southwest 
Texas. Operators point out that 


“Cowboy” music heads the list, ac- 
counting for almost 60% of the play. 
It was recorded that the most popu- 
lar of all records of all time was 
“Beer Barrel Polka”, 

The article is concluded with the 
statement that the operators have to 
worry about the details of making a 
business out of the music machines, 
but “Mr. and Mrs. Average American 
are content to drop a nickel in the 
slot and sigh with pleasure as the 
mellow soothing voice of Perry Como 
drifts into the room.” 


2 Williams' 
WINNERS 

* * * 

“BOX SCORE” 

Super Deluxe Roll Down 

“BONANZA” 

5-BALL WITH THE EXTRA 
SPECIAL “BONANZA FEATURE" 
AND THE "PREMIUM FEATURE" 

ORDER NOW! 

KING-PIN EQUIP. CO. 

826 MILLS ST.. KALAMAZOO. MICH. 




Tlow 

(DsdivBMnjq^l 

THE NEW 

JEWEL BELL 
CABINET 

FIITS ANY MILLS 
MECHANIISM 

This $59.50 plus your muchanism 
gives Jewel Bell coverage for 
your location 


REBUILT SLOTS 


Jewel Bell — 5c 
Jewel Bell — 10c 
Jewel Bell — 25c 


.$160.00 
. 165.00 
. 170.00 


Golden Falls — 5c $145.00 

Golden Falls — 10c ..... 150.00 

Golden Falls — 25c 155.00 

Golden Foils — 50c 200.00 

(haad lead) 

AMERICAN 

AMUSEMENT CO. 
158 E. GRAND AVENUE 
CHICAGO 1, ILL. 

(Phone: WHIteholl 4370) 





The Cash Box 


Page 33 


January 3, 1948 



BELLS 


BELL-O-MATIC CORP. 

5c Jewel Bell 248.00 

10c Jewel Bell 2.53.00 

25c Jewel Bell 258.00 

50c Jewel Bell 338.00 

GROETCHEN 

Columbia Twin JP 145.00 

Columbia Del.uxe Club 209.50 


ARCADE TYPE (continued) 
INTERNATIONAL 3IUTOSCOPE CORP. 


Atomic Bomber (Model B) 375.00 

Deluxe Movie Console 150.00 

Deluxe Movie Counter 140.00 

P. & S. 

Tom Tom 299.00 


MILLS SALES CO. LTD. 

Dollar Bell No Price Set 

O. D. JENNINGS 

5c Std Chiefs 269.00 

10c Std Chiefs 279.00 

25c Std Chiefs 289.00 

50c Bronze & Std Chiefs 399.00 

5c DeLuxe Club Chiefs 299.00 

10c DeLuxe Club Chiefs 309.00 

25c DeLuxe Club Chiefs 319.00 

25c DeLuxe Club Chief 429.00 

5c Super DeLuxe Club Chief *. . 324.00 

10c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 334.00 

25c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 344.00 

50c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 454.00 

PACE 

5c DeLuxe Chrome Bell 245 00 

10c DeLuxe Chrome Bell 255.00 

25c DeLuxe Chrome Bell 265.00 

50c DeLuxe Chrome Bell 375.00 

$1.00 DeLuxe Chrome Bell 550.00 

5c Rocket Slug Proof 245.00 

10c Rocket Slug Proof 255.00 

25c Rocket Slug Proof 265.00 


CONSOLES 

BALLY 

Wild Lemon 

Double-Up 

DeLuxe Draw Bell 5c 

DeLuxe Draw Bell 25c 

Hi-Boy 

Triple Bell 5-5-5 

Triple Bell 5-5-25 

Triple Bell 5-10-25 

BELL-O-MATIC 


$542.50 

542.50 

512.50 

532.50 

424.00 

895.00 

910.00 

925.00 


MERCHANDISE MACHINES 

CIGARETTE IMACTITNES 


C. EIGHT LABORATORIES 
"Electro” 222.50 

NATIONAL VENDORS. INC. 

Model 9E (Electric) 321.70 

ROWE 

Crusader ( 8 Col) w Stand 145.75 

Crusader (10 Col) w Stand 162.25 

U-NEED-A VENDOR 

Monarch 6 Col. w Stand 149.50 

Monarch 8 Col w Stand 159.50 


MEBCnANDfSE >T:ND0RS 

A. B. T. MFG. CORP. 

‘‘Auto Clerk” — (Gen’l Mdse.) 

ADA.MS-FAIRFAX CORP. 

Cash Tray Vendor 

ASCO VENDING MACH. CO. 

Nut Vendor 

ATLAS MFG. & SALES CO. 

Bulk Vendor 

AUTOMATIC BOOK MACH. CO. 

“Book-O-Mat” 

DRINK-O-MAT IND. 

"Drink-O-Mat” 

BALLY MFG. CO. 

Drink Vendor 

BERT MILLS CORP. 

“Hot Coffee Vendor” 540.00 


Three Bells, 1947 735.00 

BUCKLEY 

Track Odds DD JP 1250.00 

Parlay Long Shot 1250.00 

EVANS 

Bangtails 5c Comb 7 Coin.. 

Bangtails 25c Comb 7 Coin.. 

Bangtail JP 

Bangtail FP PO JP 

Evans Races 

Casino Bell 

1946 Galloping Dominoes JP 
Winter Book JP 

GROETCHEN TOOL & MFG. CO. 

Columbia Twin Falls 485.00 

O. D. JENNINGS 

Challenger 5-25 595.00 

Club Console 499.00 

DeLuxe Club Console 529.00 

Super DeLuxe Club Console 545.00 

J. H. KEENEY CO. 

Gold Nugget 800.00 

PACE 

3-Way Bell Console 5c-10c-25c $690.00 

5c Royal Console 320.00 

10c Royal Console 330.00 

25c Royal Console 340.00 

50c Royal Console 475.00 

$1.00 Royal Console 650.00 

ARCADE TYPE 

BALLY MFG. CO. 

Big Inning 539.50 

Bally Bowler 539.50 

EDELMAN AMUSEMENT DEVICES 
Flash Bowler 

13'— 8" 475.00 

11'— 8" 450.00 

10—8" 425.00 


CO AN MFG. CO. 

U-Select-It — 74 Model 85.50 

U-Select-lt — 74 Model DeLuxe 95.50 

U-Select-It — 126 bar DeLuxe 127.50 


DAVAL PRODUCTS CO. 

Stamp Vendor "Postmaster” 

HOSPITAL SPECIALTY CO. 

Sanitary Napkin Vendor 

INTERNATIONAL MUT06COPE CORP. 


Photomatic 1495.00 

Voice-O-Graph 1495.00 


KAYEM PRODUCTS 

Vit-O-Mins Vendor 

Dental Kit Vendor 

Chewing Gum Vendor 

LEHIGH FOUNDRIES, INC. 

PX Vendor No Price Set 

MALKIN-ILLION CO. 

“Cigar Vendor” 

NORTHWESTERN CORP. 

“Bulk Vendor” 

REVCO, INC. 

Ice Cream Vendor 

RUDD-MELIKIAN, INC. 

“Dwik-Cafe” Coffee Vendor 

SHIPMAN MFG. CO. 

Stamp Vendor 

TELECOIN CORP. 

Tele- juice 

THIRST— AID. INC. 

Drink Vendor 

U. S. VENDING CORP. 

Drink and Merchandise Vendor 

VENDALL CO. 

Candy Vendor 

VENDTT CORP. 

Candy Vendor 149.50 

VIKING TOOL & MACH. CORP. 

Popcorn Vendor 


No Price Set 
No Price Set 
No Price Set 
No Price Set 
No Price Set 
No Price Sot 
No Price Set 
No Price Set 


The Cash Box 


Page 36 


January 3, 1948 


1947 PRE-INVENTORY CLOSE-OUTS 
REAL LOW PRICES! ! 


ALL 

USED PIN GAMES 
GAMES READY FOR LOCATION 

Spellbound 

Idaho 

Play Boy 

Kilroy 

Baffle Card 

Laura 

Double Barrel 

Midget Racer 

Ballyhoo 

Oklahoma 

Dynamite 

Gold Ball 

Mystery 

Smoky 

Rocket 

South Seas 

Ranger 

Stage Door 

Battle Call 

Super Score 

Vanity 

Canteen 

Big Hit 

Tornado 

Lucky Star 
Rio 

Surf Queens 
Sea Breeze 

Big League 

Amber 

Siesta 

Step Up 

Cyclone 

Havana 

Honey 

Suspense 

Fast Ball 

Maisie 






NEW FIVE BALLS 
Keeney HI-RIDE 
Marvel DOLLY 
Bally NUDGY 
Gottlieb 

HUMPTY DUMPTY 
Williams BONANZA 
United SINGAPORE 
Chicago Coin SEA ISLE 


PACE SLOTS 


KFFNFY BONUS bells 

■vccncf QQLP NUGGET 


BALLY 


ONE-BALLS 
& CONSOLES 


Solotone Boxes, Brand New $15.00 

Personal Music Boxes - 15.00 

Solotone Location Amplifiers 79.50 

Personal Location Amplifiers ............. 89.50 

Personal Studio Amplifiers 335.00 


PARTS 


Wurlitzer 412 Amplifiers 

$14.50 

Wurlitzer 616 Amplifiers ...» 

19.50 

Wurlitzer 24 Amplifiers 

27.50 

Wurlitzer Tone Arms 

15.50 

Wurlitzer AC Motors (1140) 

19.50 

Speakers for 24 or 616 

15.50 

Coin Chutes for 24's 

14.50 


ALL TYPES OF 

MUSIC 

MACHINES 

ANY AMOUNT YOU NEED! 
READY FOR LOCATION! 

WRITE FOR REAL 
LOW PRICES! 


SELLING OUT! PHONO PLASTICS 

WURLITZER: Each 

24 TOP CORNERS. Amber or Red $ 1.20 

24 LOWER SIDES, Amber or Red 4.00 


500 TOP CORNERS 

600 TOP CORNERS, Right or Left 

800 LOWER SIDES 

800 TOP CENTERS. Right or Left. Red 

800 BACK SIDES, Green 

750 LOWER SIDES. Right or Left 

750 TOP CENTERS, Red 

750 MIDDLE SIDES 

950 LOWER SIDES 

SEEBURG: 

HI-TONE MODELS 9800, 8800, 8200 

Lower Sides 

HI-TONE MODELS 9800, 8800, 8200 Domes. 
Yellow, Red or Green 

ROCK-OLA: 

STANDARD, MASTER, DeLUXE or SUPER 
Top Corners 

MILLS: 

TOP DOOR, Yellow or Blue 

ORDER NOW! 

40% DISCOUNT ON ORDERS 
PLACED IMMEDIATELY! 


4.00 

4.00 

13.50 

8.00 
9.50 
8.75 
4.25 
2.00 

10.50 


.. 14.50 


8.00 


12.75 


5.50 


WRITE US FOR SENSATIONALLY LOW PRICES ON ABOVE 

TERMS: 1 /3 DEPOSIT WITH ORDER. BALANCE C.O.D. 

IF YOU NEED ANYTHING IN GAMES OR MUSIC NOT LISTED 
ABOVE — WRITE US! WE CAN SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS! 

RUNYON SALES COMPANY 

593 10th AVENUE. NEW YORK 18. N. Y. 

BRyant 9-2235 


123 W. RUNYON STREET. NEWARK 8. N. J. 

Bigelow 3-8777 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine manl 



The Cash Box 


Page 34 


January 3, 194B 







AT LESS THAN MANUFACTURER'S COST! 

BAT-A-BALL, 


BAT-A-BALL, Sr. 

3DEL 

$8450 


UPRIGHT MODEL 


ORIGINAL 

PRICE 

$249.50 


NOW 

ONLY 


Qooafify 
Is United 

ORDER 

NOW! 


ORIOINAL 

PRICE 

$79.50 


WITH STAND 

NOW 

ONLY ->> 


Jr. 

*295? 


SPECIAL COMBINATION OFFER— BOTH FOR $104.50 

Legal Everywhere, Entirely Mechanical, Ideal For Small Floor Space, Plenty of Play Appeal! 


NOW DISTRIBUTING- 


THE LANDIS ARISTOCRAT 
POP CORN VENDOR 


jrOO«HKH»OOOOOOiKl OUR SUPER VALUES! 

GOLDEN FALLS. Reg. J.P., New Reb. 5c....$135; 10c....$140; 25c....$145 

GOLDEN FALLS, H.L., New Reb. Sc....$140; 10c....$145; 25c....$150 

JEWEL BELL, New Reb. Sc....$170; 10c....S175; 25c....$180 

JEWEL BELL, Replacement Cabinets - Sf.SO 

50c MILLS GOLDEN FALLS. H.L., New Rebuilt 195.00 

?W00000000«HKHKH»01»iKHKHKH>0t«K»<KH«H«HKH>tKHy^^ 


NEW PIN GAMES 

UNITED SINGAPORE W 

KEENEY HI RIDE q 

GOTT. HUMPTY DOMHTY ^ 

EXHIBIT STARLITE * 

CHICOIN SEA ISLE ^ 

BALLY NUDGY ® 

WILLIAMS BONANZA ! 

BALLY BALLYHOO $160.00 


NEW COUNTER GAMES 


POP-UP (CLOSEOUT) $17.50 

ABT CHALLENGER tt.fS 

FOLOING STAND ll.St 

GOTT. GRIP SCALE 39.50 

GRIP-VUE 49.95 

BASKETBALL, le 34.50 

WITH STAND 44.50 

KICK. A CATCHER 37.50 


OAVAL MARVEL. CIG.REELS 39.50 

IMP., le er 5e 5 14.50 

BEST HAND 30.00 

MEX. BASEBALL 5O.B0 

SKILL THRILL 30.00 

FREE PLAY— SPECIAL .... 30.00 

HEAVY HITTER 160.00 

WITH STAND 175.00 


NEW ONE BALLS- 

BALLY JOCKEY CLUB. P.O.. . .5645.50 
BALLY JOCKEY SPECIAU F.P. 645.50 
GOTT. OAILY RACES. P.0 545.00 


NEW SLOTS 


NEW ARCADE MACHINES 

SPEEDWAY B0MB8I6HT $359.50 

PAS TOM TOM 309.50 

METAL TYPER 445.00 

IDEAL FOOTBALL 3W.M 

MIK-O-SCALE I« IW 

AMERICAN FORTUNE SCALE .. 169.60 


5t lOc 25 50i 

JENNINGS LITE-UP CHIEF $324 $334 $344 $464 

JENNINGS STANDARD CHIEF 269 279 269 369 

MILLS JEWEL BELL 220 225 230 320 

MILLS GOLDEN FALLS. H.L., 2-5 230 235 240 330 

MILLS VEST POCKETS $65.00: MILLS Q. T $115.00 

GROETCHEN DE LUXE COLU M BIA. . .$145.00; J. P. COLUMBI A. . .$1 10.00 


NEW CONSOLES 
W 


BALLY WILD LEMON .... 

BALLY DOUBLE UP 

BALLY HI-BUY • K 

MILLS 3 BEllS 

JENN. Challenger I 

EVANS BANGTAILS _ 

EVANS WINTERBOOK ■ 

EVANS RACES £ 

BAKERS PACERS. 5c, D.D. ... 
GROETCHEN TWIN FALLS ... ! 


ROLL DOWN GAMES 

GENCO BING-A-ROLL 499.50 

auvmNCc. nui-i. 

CHICON ROLL DOWN 395.00 

BALLY HY-ROLL 499.50 

BUCCANEER 449.50 

BIG CITY «9.50 

FSsn 4R«0W 499.50 

PRO-SCORE 499.50 


SLOTS. SAFES. STANDS 

CHICAGO METAL REVOLVAROUNO— OE LUXE 

Single, $1 19.50; Double, $174.25; Triple $262.00 

BOX STANDS $27.50 FOLDING STANDS 12.50 


EMPIRE HAS BEEN APPOINTED BY H. C. EVANS AS 
DISTRIBUTORS IN ILLINOIS. IOWA. MICHIGAN AND 
NORTHERN INDIANA. 


NEW VENDORS 

4-WAY MINT VENDOR. 50 $ 27.50 

sii.vtn KING. It or 5e 

NUT OR GUM BALL 13.95 

SILVER KING hot NUT 

VENDOR 29.05 

VICIUR MODEL V, le GLOBE. II.JO 

CABiNEI liPE 13.75 

250 SANITARY VENDORS, 

CLUTCH HANDLE, BRACKET.. 27.50 


RECONDITIONED 5 BALLS 


bonus bell. 50 .. 51 19.su; 

gold chrome, 50 . $109.50: '0e -*''9-5O; 25o. . $ 29.50 

BLUE FRONT. 5o. $89.50: lOo . $99.50. 250 ..$ 09.5U 

BROWN FRONT. 50 . $99.50: ! 39 

5 c GOLD CHROME. H.L. ... .$1 19.50. lOc $ 29.50 

25c MILLS CLUB CONSOLE Ab'sO 

*00 BLACK CHERRY, NEW REB 

IOC JENN. SILVER CHIEF » ” 

5c JENN. CLUB CONSOLE CHIEF 

COLUMBIA J.P.. 1946 Model 

50 JENN. BRONZE CHIEF, 2-5 

JENN. CIGAROLA, MODEL XV 

JENN. LITE-UP CHIEFS— Ueed 10 Dey* 

50 — $215: lOe— $225 : 25e— $236. 


B9.50 

70.50 

69.50 

109.50 

99.50 

69.50 

49.50 

69.50 

74.50 

64.50 


LUCKY STAR ...$169.50 

MAI 8 IE 145.00 

ROCKET 139.50 

CYCLONE 129.50 

MYSTERY 129.50 

VANITIES 119.50 

KILROY 119.50 

SMARTY 99.50 

DYNAMITE 99.50 

SHOW GIRL 99.50 

OPPORTUNITY ... 89.50 

SPELLBOUND .... 89.50 

SUPER SCORE .. 99.50 

FAST BALL 79.50 

SUPERLINER 89.50 

STEP UP 79.50 

MID. RACER 44.50 

CANTEEN 59.56 

SURF QUEEN ... 39.50 
LITE-O-CARD .... 44.50 
YANK. DOODLE.. 44.50 

FLAT TOP 44.50 

LIBERTY 44.50 

SKY CHIEF 44.50 

BIO PARADE 44.50 

AIR CIRCUS .... 44.50 
KNOCK OUT .... 44.50 
KEEP 'EM 

FLYING 44.50 

SOUTH SEAS 44.50 

SANTA FE 44.50 


VICTORY SPECIAL, AUTO, SHUFFLE $249.50 

CLUB TROPHY, F.P 

PIMLICO. F.P 

•41 DERBY 

RECORD TIME. F.P 

LONGACRE. F.P 

TURF KING. P.O 

JOCKEY CLUB, P.O. 

MILLS OWU I OR 6 BALU F.P, 

LONGSHOT, P.O 

KENTUCKY. P.O 

SPORT KING. P.O 

VICTORY DERBY, P.O J DEPOSrT WITH OSDEM. BALANCE C.O.D. OB SIW4T DMFT 


BRAZIL 44.50 

TRADE WINDS ... 44.50 

5-10-20 $44.50 

STREAMLINER ... 44.50 
UN. MIDWAY ... 44.50 

KISMET 44.50 

BOSCO 44.50 

HI HAT 44.50 

YANKS 44.50 

VICTORY 44.50 

CLOVER 44.50 

FLY. TIGERS ... 44.50 

VELVET 44.50 

WILDFIRE 44.50 

PRODUCTION .... 39.50 

SEA HAWK 39.50 

EAGLE SQUAD. .. 39.50 

JUNGLE 39.50 

STAR ATTRAC. .. 39.50 

BELLE HOP 39.50 

ALL AMER 39.50 

BOLAWAY 39.50 

SHOW BOAT 39.50 

VENUS 39.50 

TOWERS 39.50 

ABC BOWLER ... 39.50 

'41 MAJORS 39.50 

SEVEN UP 39.50 

TEN SPOT 39.50 

MARINES 34.50 


BALLY DLt.uAe. UKaW tsti-L 
too keenly guNos soPlK bell 
5o KEENEY BONUS SUPER BELL 
BAKEKS PACEKS. D.D. I.P. ... 

5 c comb, suplk bells 

BALLY SUN HAYS. F.P 

HI HAND COMB 

WATLING Big game, 5e. P.O. ... 
5c PACE SAKAIOGA SR., P.O. 

5c PACE KEELS. COMB 

JENN. FASl IIME. P.O 

BALLY BIG TOP, P.O. or F.P. ... 
MILLS JUMBO, LATE HEAD ... 
JENN. SILVER MOON. F.P. ... 

5c BALLY CLUB BELL 

EVANS LUCKY STAR 

GALLOPING DOMINOS, J.P 


»JiO .00 

ov.,.uu 

345.00 

395.0U 

7V.5U 

65.59 

99.50 

69.50 

99.50 
69.6U 

59.50 

69.50 
69.50 

69.50 

99.50 

109.50 

119.50 


OKIVEMOBILE $189.50 

EVANS TEN STRIKE. 1947 MODEL 189.50 

EVANS TEN STRIKE Ju.sO 

EVANS SUPER BOMBER 149.50 

BALLY DEFENDER 99-50 

BATTING PRACTICE 

GENCO WHIZZ— Like Neie 

AIR RAIDER 69-50 

CHICAGO COIN GOALEE, Like New IW.50 

GOTT. 3-WAY GRIPS. 1946 Medel 2^ “ 

CHICAGO COIN HOCKEY < 

EXH. HAMMER STRIKER «-U 

BALLY UNDERSEA RAIDER I09.5* 

PIKES PEAK 26.50 

KICKER & CATCHER •*••• 

ABT MODEL F. BLUE 


.Jll 


1012-14 MlLWALlkU AVI’ 


PHONE: EVERGLADE 2600 


♦ CHICAGO 22. ILL, 


fixate # 75 #n«on THE CASH BOX wh^n an*u>ering ad*—il provM you're o real eoin maehime 





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The Cash Box 


Page 37 


January 3 , 1943 


UNITED'S 


SINGAPORE 


Greatest of Them All! 


UNITED MANUFACTURING COMPANY 


5737 NORTH BROADWAY 


CHICAGO 40, ILLINOIS 


FIVE -BALL 
NOVELTY 
REPLAY 

Also Built As a Five-Ball 
Straight Novelty Roll-Down 
. . . Console Cabinet 


SEE 

YOUR 

DISTRIBUTOR 

NOW! 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ath — it proves you* re a real coin machine man! 





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The Cash Box 


Page 38 


January 3, 1948 


"Jiggling" Pin 
Humorous Comment 


Ball Games Gains 
In Pueblo^ Colo. Press 


PUEBLO, COLO. — In a feature story ti- 
tled “Automatic Push-Button Pinball 
Jiggilng Here, and Exponents of Game 
Have Some Misgivings”, the Pueblo 
Chieftain of December 11 treats the new 
“Jiggling” pin games with understand- 
ing and humor. In order to fully appre- 
ciate the article, we reprint it in full. 

“Science is wonderful. For people who 
want to fight wars, it produced the ato- 
mic bomb. For people who want to 
blow soap bubbles, it produced non- 
breakable, technicolor plastic bubbles. 
And now at last science has made a 
contribution to overworked pinball ma- 
chine players. 

“Automatic push-buttom jiggling has 
arrived in Pueblo! 

“Since the dawn of pinballing, jiggling 
has been a manual operation and ardent 
players were frequently bathed in sweat, 
their hands a bloody mass of bruises 
from banging the machines about after 
a strenuous session. Well, almost, that is. 

“Jiggilng is that part of pinballing 
which permits a player to exercise a 
certain amount of control over his ball 
and increase his score by deflecting the 
ball from one scoring bumper to an- 
other. To the uninitiated, jiggling ap- 
pears to be useless, but well-trained pin- 
ballers know that a correctly timed rap 
will bounce the elusive pill right into 

the five thousand hole with a little 

luck. 

“Jigglers generally fall into three 
classes: 

“1. The body weaver. This is the 
player who watches the ball in_ fascina- 
tion as it comes down the scoring area, 
wiggling and weaving his body all the 
while, but transfering little or nothing 
of his motion to the machine itself. The 
object of this type of jiggling is to con- 
trol the ball by the psychological power 
of suggestion, and a few well-turned 
phrases such as “Get in there you so- 
and-so!” are frequently employed. 

“PUSHER TYPE RESORTS TO DEL- 
ICATE SHOVES. 

“2. The pusher. This is the fellow 
who gives the machine delicate shoves 
at opportune moments, each shove either 
scooting the ball over to another scoring 
bumper or sending it racing home, de- 
pending on the spin on it. 

“3. The banger. This is the one who 
slaps some portion of the machine, usu- 
ally the top edge, making a great deal 
of noise. The principal object of banging 
is to make everyone aware that you are 
playing the machine so that if you hap- 
pen to get a high score, everyone will 
notice it. 

“But now things are going to be dif- 
ferent. The hard labor of jiggling, which 
has sent many an enthusiastic player 
staggering into his chair and gasping 
for breath (a condition for which an- 
other drink is the only known cure), is 
over. With the dual-control, pushbutton 
jiggle — known in the trade as a flipper 
— it is only necessary to push a button 
at opportune moments, and the ball goes 
scampering around the scoring area like 
a frightened gazelle. 

“Altho designed as a labor-saving de- 
vice, this mechanization of the pinballing 
sport produced varied reaction among 
ranking Pueblo pinballers. 

“LABOR-SAVING DEVICE MAY DE- 
VELOP WEAKLINGS. 

“Willie Saunders, a charter member of 
the Bessemer Improvement and Pinball- 
ing Society, predicted the populace of 
the nation would become weak and flab- 
by as a result. “Just think of all the 
people whose only exercise is pinball- 
ing,” he said. “Take the work out of it 
and what will you have ? A nation of 
weaklings. What will happen to my ath- 
letic figure?” 


“But Betty Jensen, sponsor of a pro- 
posal to rank pinballing along with base- 
ball and football as a major sport, hailed 
the invention as something which will at 
least make it possible for women to be 
successful players. “Hundreds of women 
right here in Pueblo would like to be 
pinballers,” she said. “With manual jigg- 
ling, it was just too strenuous a game 
for a woman. But with these push-but- 
ton jigglers, I can’t see any reason why 
we shouldn’t become just as expert as 
the men.” 

“Hillery Marsalis, holder of three 
state titles as jiggling champion, said 
he was against it because jiggling 
might become a lost art. “There’s a feel- 
ing of pride and accomplishment in a 
good job of jiggling, and mechanism 
would spoil it . . . oops. I’d have hit 
that five-thousand bumper but my timing 
was off.” 


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(Phone: Canal 7137) 



NOW DELIVERING! 

Williams' 


“Charles F. Keen, an attorney, said he 
would want to check with the Colorado 
athletic commission before making any 
comment. “It is possible wtih a me- 
chanical jiggler that it would be neces- 
sarv to bill pinball tournaments as ‘ex- 
hibitions’ rather than ‘contests’,” he 
warned. 


Greatest 5-Ball 

“BONANZA” 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW! 

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 


“Marion Keating, a leader of the push- 
ing school, was enthusiastic and sug- 
gested an enlargement upon the idea. 
“Why not devise a remote control gad- 
get, such as used on automatic phono- 
graphs, making it possible to insert a 
nickel right in your booth and play a 
couple of fast games without ever get- 
ting up from your seat,” he asked. 

“Why not, indeed?” 



ALSO EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS 
FOR 

AIREON MUSIC 



The NEW Scintillating 

MUSIC MASTER 


Modernize your present equip- 
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OUTSTANDING FEATURES: 

1. Our electric selector is cheat*proof, and /'ooHJJv 

will operate on any mechanism with 

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2. Our selector is equipped with Guardian 
accumulator, multiple push button slide 
switches, 5-10‘25c National slug rejector. 

3. Thirty mirror designs to choose from. 

SOME EXCLUSIVE TERRITORIES STILL OPEN — WRITE, WIRE. PHONE 


BOOTHS 191 & 192 


SCOTTO MUSIC CO 


1000 EAST EL CAMINO AVENUE, NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 











Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 







1 : 















A ^ -V},. • . 



Tlid Cash Box 


Page 39 


January 3, 1948 


(PHONE: VAN BUREN 6636-37-3S-6533) 


hon* console that 
would stand up month 
after month — year after year— and out- 
earn all other coin machines. 

Buckley operators know this to be a 
fact. Experience has proved that no 
other machine can even come_ in a 
close second from the standpoint ot 
earnings. Every day new operators are 
finding out thot the new BUCKLEY 
TRACK ODDS are even more profitable 
to operate than they hoped for. 


'^/250 - 


Buckley gave Music Operators the FIRST prac- 
tical and profitable music box at the LOWEST 
PRICE. Today, Buckley leads the field by offer- 
ing a NEW music box of advanced design and 
perfection at a NEW LOW PRICE. 

Quality of material and workmanship have not 
been sacrificed. This sensational low price is 
the result of economies realized in large quan- 
tity production. 

The new Buckley Music Box is genuinely 
chrome plated, with beautiful red dial plates 
and attractively illuminated. Equipped with 
positive nationally known slug 
rejector and double capacity 
cash box. Complete program 
of selections always in full view, 
Buckley's exclusive features of 
construction, combined with out- 
standing beauty and eye appeal 
makes this the outstanding re- 
mote control music box . . . 
equally popular for wall or bar 
installation. 


FOR MILLS ESCALATOR BELLS 
HAMMERLOID OR WRINKLE 
TOUR CHOICE OF: 

Cherry or Diamond Ornaments, 

Maroon, Copper, Gold, Green, 

Aluminum Gray, Chocolate, Surf 

Blue. 

e Complete new precision-built 
light wood Cabinets expertly 
finished with perfect fit new 
aluminum castings. 

• Club Handle and Handle Col- 
lar chrome plated. 

• Heavy brass chrome plated 
etched Reward Plates, 2/5 or 
3/5. 

• 5e-10c-25c chrome Denominat- 
or Coin Intake. 

e Payout Cups with anti-spoon 
Cup. 

e Drillproof Plates. 


G. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you^re a real coin machine manl 





The Cd^k Box 




Page 40 


January S, 1948 


The True Amusement Machine 
Situation In New York City 


MOTORS REPAIRED 


— SEEBURG — ROCK- 


OLA — MILLS. Rewound to Eectory Speelfiea- 
tioni. Rapid tarvica — rapalrad or aichangad 


wilhin 24 hours after arrival. 

Complete No Extras 


S6.00 


M. LUBER 

503 W. 4Tst (LOngaera 3-5939) New York 



ireon 


MANUFACTURING 

CORPORATION 





IN MUSICAL EQUIPMENT 



GeiiiRml d^pes^ 

1401 Fairfax Trafficwo’^ City, Kansas 

_ i' . ■ ■" 





• • 




,i;- ^S','%'^'<'/'0ap6''Corp.’'itd., 4001 Svl^yplrie Street, Montreal, Que. 


Kr-;' -...- ' - . ’ 

i- Division of Aireon 


A-4 


By THEODORE BLATT 



:: {Editor’s Note : Theodore Blatt, the au- 

[ thor of this article is the attorney for 
the jobbers and distributors association, 
{Coin Machine Distributors of New Y ork 
I’ CiUj) as well as the operators associa- 
» tion {Associated Amusement Machine 
i Operators of New York) in the City of 
I New York. He has represented the com 
i machine industiy since 1927 and has 
specialized in coin machine law. He not 
\ ; not only helped fvanie legislation but 
!' conducted sevenal test cases. He is theve" 

I fore well qualified to talk on this sub- 
ject). 


What is the true picture here in New 
York? There has been so much con- 
jecture, misinformation and wishful 
thinking with regard to the amusenient 
machine field, that neither the manufac- 
turers, local distributors, or operators 
know from day to day whether they are 
in or out of business. In order to clarify 
the situation so that the industry ^_n 
nlav ahead. I hav° decided to ge've this 
brief resume of the local legal situa- 
tion. 

In December of 1941 a pin ball case 
was tried in a local Magistrate’s Court. 
The game had a free game unit, an in- 
dicator showing the number of free 
games won, and a meter showing the 
pay-out. The case resulted in a convic- 
tion and before an appeal could be taken, 
the Police made a wholesale clean-up 
and put the pin balls out of business. 

Our Slot Machine law as it reads to- 
day doss not prohibit the operation of 
amusement games. An amusernent game 
is one which will not give a free game, 
a free ball or emit any slug or token, 
and must be construted that it cannot 
readily be adapted or converted into an 
illegal game. 

The question of adaptability has been 
kicked around quite a bit and while there 
is no clear-cut rule on this subject, it is 
pretty definitely settled that if the game 
cannot b” converted without the intro- 
duction of extraneous parts, it is a legal 
game. 

During the War years we operated 
skee-ball alleys and some locally manu- 
factured roll-downs without any Police 
interference but since the War ended, 
and Chicago has gone into production, 
there has been a very substantial in- 
crease in number of machines operated. 
The Roll-downs of course are quite 
large and the number of available loca- 
■ tions are limited. The question therefore 
, arose about pinball machines. 

Let us take it as an accepted fact that 
a pin ball without the objectionable fea- 
' : tures hereinabove mentioned is not pro- 
i' jhibited by New York Law. Unfortunate- 
ly we in New York do not suffer from 
hostile laws but from a hostile press, and 


it is well known that a hostile press has 
always guided the hands of the public 
officials. The organized operators know- 
ing the temper of the local press has 
tried to obtain the passage of a license 
law which would license amusement 
games and leave the qu°stion as to type 
of games open. Such a law is now pend- 
ing in the City Council and if passed 
the City will license machines that come 
within the following catagory: 

“Whenever used in this article, the 
term “amusement device” shall mean and 
include any machine, apparatus, contri- 
vance, appliance or device whether man- 
ually, mechanically or electrically op- 
erated, in or upon tvhich a game of 
amusement may be played, upon the 
payment of a fee. charge or other con- 
sideration imposed directly or indirectly, 
but shall not include anv machine, ap- 
paratus, contrivance, appliance nr device 
for which a license is repaired under 
any other article of this title.” 

I will not give my interpretation to 
the above definition as to whether or not 
it includes pin bafi machines. Let the 
reader decide for himself. 

The organized operators at the pre- 
sent time operate roll down.s exclusiively 
! and in order not to stir up any adverse 
publicity, they decided to limit the local 
j operation to roll do^vns. Unfortunately, 
we have a rebel in our midst who, not 
! content to work along with the Associa- 
I tion, started putting out pinball ma- 
: chines stripped down to comply with the 
I Law. He also attempted to induce others 
■ to do likewise. As soon as the pin balls 
: hit the streets, there were a number of 


arrests with attendant unfavorable pub- 
licity which has caused us quite a set 
back. 

The City Ofiicials who were formerly 
friendly to the Bill, were put on the de- 
fensive by the newspaper reporters, and 
fearful lest they antagonize civic and re- 
ligious groups, they made public state- 
ments that the Bill is not intended for 
pin ball machines but only amusement 
games. 

It is difficult at this time to state 
what our future course will be, but we 
are perfectly content to a^cen+ a license 
Bill in spite of these statements. 

To further clarify thf> situa*^i'"^. ’p'T 
me say that the present Laws and deci- 
sions do not prohibit the operation of 
any type of amusement game. A license 
does not add to the legality of the 
game and by the same token, failure to 
issue a license does not make tho ga’r)e 
any less legal; but this is a big City 
with a Poliop force numberintr approx- 
imately 17,000. A license costing a rea- 
sonable fee provides a certain amount of 
insurance against unnecessary annoy- 
ance. 

It is also felt by the organized op- 
erators that a properly dra\vn license 
Law would make it possible for the 
Association to police the industry’, keep 
out undesirable elements as well as il- 
legal machines. That is why the Asso- 
ciation is backing the present license 
Law. There are an estimated 5000 roll 
downs now in operation in the City of 
New York, and unless the present Laws 
are changed, they will be permitted to 
continue in operation indefinitely. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX token answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man I 





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i,is.t»E 'as T-r.i’i V I*. • .. , 




The Cash Box 


Page 41 


January 3 , 1948 


Flint Ops Place 
Nearly twice As 
Many Games In 1947 


FLINT, MICH. — Amusement machines in 
this city have nearly doubled since the 
start of licensing in May of this year. 
City Clerk Albert C. Hull reported that 
he has licensed 309 games since May 1, 
compared to 164 in 1946-47. 

In 1943-44 the City licensed 754 ma- 
chines, and its licenses earned nearly 
$10,000 a year. The following year a 
Supreme Court decision outlawed the 
“free play” and other prizes, and the 
games dwindled to 44. 

The increase in licenses is attributed 
to the current popularity for skee ball 
and roll down machines. 

It was disclosed that the city also li- 
censed 42 penny games, and 226 music 
machines. The music licenses showed an 
increase of 4 during the last year. 

Presents Juke Box And 
Records To High School 


i ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. — The stu- 
dents of Elizabeth City High School, this 
city, were jubilent over the presentation 
of a music machne and records for use 
I at their social functions at the school. 

Russell Box of the Carolina Novelty 
I Company, who operates locally, present- 
j ed the equipment to the school. 

The local press acclaimed Box, calling 
him “a friend in deed”. 

The first showing of the phono was at 
H a dance to honor the football team, and 
I the new machine was one of the big 
attractions of the evening. 





SHERMAN HOTEl^ 

"’«CHICAGO>f 



JANUARY 19,20.2122.1948 



ACTIVE 

Reconditioned 

GAMES 

•NUFF 
SAID! 

For A 
Complete 
List of 
Specials 
Drop a Line 
to Any One 
of Our 

JOE ASH 3 Offices 

Active Amusement Machines Co. 

666 NORTH BROAD ST., PHILA. 30. PA. 
Phone: Fremont 7-4495 
98 CLINTON AVE.. NEWARK 5. N. J. 
Phone: Mitchell 2-8527 
1120 WYOMING AVE.. SCRANTON, PA: 
Pbeee: Scroetee 4-6176 


Happy 

New 

Year 

★ 

SCIENTIFIC 

MACHINE CORP. 

229 WEST 28th STREET 
NEW YORK 1. N. Y. 

MAX D. LEVINE. Pres. 
FRED C. HAILPARN, Treas. 


please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 





Th& Cash Box 


Page 42 


January 3, 1948 



What's worth 
having is worth 
waiting for...* 

DON'T BE 
SATISFIED 
WITH LESS 
THAN THE 
BEST! 


More 

Coming — 

Order from 
Your 

Distributor 

Now! 


wny 

with Gottiieb's 
Great Original — 

FLIPPER 

BUMPERS 


If your route is not producing 
top money, don't blame it on 
"business conditions." The fault is 
with those second-best games you 
bought. Take a tip from the most 
successful operators . . . any Gott- 
lieb game is worth waiting for be- 
cause it pays for itself faster and 
pays you better in the LONG run. 

DAVE GOTTLIEB 


1140 N. KOSTNER AYE., CHICAGO 51, ILL. 


MEMBER 


Baltimore Cancer Fund Dinner Success 



BALTIMORE, MD.— The Damon Runyon 
Cancer Fund Dinner held recently by 
Baltimore coinmen was acclaimed a tre- 
mendous financial success when a total 
of $3,925.40 was collected. 

Irv Blumenfeld, member of the Balti- 
more Distributors Sponsoring Committee 
reported that $1,925 had been collected 
in his territory previous to the dinner, 
and that contributions have been received 
in the weeks following. 

Largest individual contribution made 
at the dinner was for $250 by the Silent 
Sales System of Washington, D. C. and 


Baltimore. 

Donations of $50 each werfe made by 
the Washington Coin Machine Associa- 
tion and Horace Biederman, business 
manager of the association. Still another 
$50 came from the photographer, Irvin 
Pushkin of the Beaux Arts Studio, who 
took pictures of the dinner guests and 
donated the profits from their sale to 
the Cancer Fund. 

The Walter Winchell Cancer Fund 
Movie was shown, and the principal 
speaker of the evening was Dr. Edward 
F. Lewison, Cancer Specialist from John 
Hopkins and Sinai Hospitals in Baltimore. 


Distributor In 
LOUISIANA - TEXAS 
ALABAMA - ARKANSAS 
MISSISSIPPI 
For 

THE NEW 1948 
BUCKLEY LINE 

"CRISS-CROSS" BELL 
DAILY DOUBLE TRACK ODDS 
1948 VYALL & BAR BOX 

AND ALL BUCKLEY ACCESSORIES 
AND EQUIPMENT 

• 

Guaranteed Used Machines 
BELLS— CONSOLES— 1-BALLS— PINS 
The machines are perfect — The 
Prices are right! — Write for List. 

CONSOLE DIST. CO. 

1006 Poydras St., New Orleans, La. 
Phone: RA 3811 

SAM TRIDICO BOB BUCKLEY 


All Machines In Small 
Penna. Town Taxed 


CLYMER, PA. — Following the trend to 
tax coin machines, Clymer Borough 
Council passed regulations for a 1948 
license. 

Music machines, pin balls and cigarette 
machines have been tagged with a $25 
yearly tax, while coin operated movie- 
music machines will have to pay $35 
yearly. The licenses will have to be 
purchased yearly, beginning with Jan- 
uary, and will expire each December 31. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering adi 


■it proves yoiPre a real coin machine manl 





• ^ 


■-4 i 

;i i 

'•I 




January 3, 1948 


The Cash Box 


Pag^ 43 



MEMBER 


A high score of 285,000 con be 
obtained by skillful playing of 
balls. 

Each ball played scores from 1,000 
to 24,000. 

PLUS a bonus score of 50,000 when 
a line is completed VERTICALLY— 
HORIZONTALLY or DIAGONALLY. 

All balls can be played at once, 
yet the ingenious automatic scor* 
ing device will register the score 
of each bail ACCURATELY! 

Score lights up rapidly as thrown 
balls fall into pockets. 

No waiting for balls to register. 

ORDER FROM YOUR > NEAREST DISTRIBUTOR 


Indiana Op Does Big Job For Runyon Fund 


TERRE HAUTE, IND.— Marvin Bland, 
of the Indiana Music Company, this city, 
has an enviable record of collections for 
the Damon Runyon Cancer Fund to his 
credit. Bland, from the inception of the 
Drive, has devoted his time and energy 
to contacting clubs and fraternal organi- 
zations in Indiana and his record of 
achievement is an outstanding one. 

Donations have been secured by Bland 
from the following groups: Muncie Lodge 
#33, Loyal Order of Moose, Muncie, Ind.; 
Terre Haute Lodge #1009, Loyal Order 
of Moose, Terre Haute, Ind.; Meshingo- 
mesia Country Club, Marion, Ind.; NAW 
662 Club, Anderson, Ind.; Elkhart Lodge 
#599, Loyal Order of Moose, Elkhart, 
Ind.; Huntington Post #7, American 
Legion, Huntington, Ind.; Fraternal Order 


of Eagles, Brazil, Ind.; Mishawaka Aerie 
#2083, FOE, Mishawaka, Ind.; Pendleton 
Post #117, American Legion, Pendleton, 
Ind.; Warrick Post #200, American 
Legion, Boonville, Ind.; Bluff ton Lodge 
#242, Loyal Order of Moose, Bluffton, 
Ind.; Kosciuszko Post #207, Gary, Ind.; 
Bicknell Lodge #1287. Loyal Order of 
Moose, Bicknell, Ind.; Gilbert Davis Post 
#157, Churubusco, Ind.; Hobart Beach 
Post #169, VFW, New Albany, Ind.; 
Osceola Post #308, American Legion, 
Mishawaka, Ind.; Polish Alliance Club, 
LaPorte, Ind.; Re 3 mard Hunting Club, 
Madison, Ind.; Sullivan Post #1.39, Sul- 
livan, Ind.; Bruceville Rod & Gun Club, 
Inc.; Bruceville, Ind.; Connersville Lodge 
#1160, Loyal Order of Moose, Conners — 
and many more. 


Season's 

Greetings 

JIMMY JOHNSON 
VINCE MURPHY 

GLOBE DISTRIBUTING CO. 

1623 NO. CALIFORNIA AVE. 
CHICAGO 47. ILL 
(Tel.: ARmitage 07C0) 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you*re a real coin machine manl 





The Cash Box 


Runyon Expands 
Music Operations 



Page January 3 , 1918 



GgaI 

"YOUR FACTORY DISTRIBUTOR" 


BARNET B. SUGARMAN 


NEW YORK. — Barnet (Shugy) Sugarman 
of Runyon Sales Company, this city and 
Newark, N. J., reported that the firm plan 
to expand their present large music oper- 
ating business to this city where they 
intend to place at least 500 machines 
during 1948. 

Sugarman reported, “For some months 
now we have been debating whether we 
should, or should not, expand our music 
operating business which today is the 
largest in Northern New Jersey. After 
much discussion we arrived at the con- 
clusion that the best job we could do 
during 1948 would be to place machines 
thruout New York. We hope”, he stated, 
“to place at least 500 more phonographs 
in this city.” 

Jack Mitnick, general manager of the 
firm’s offices in this city, will head the 
organization to place the 500 machines 
here. He will have 12 men working for 
him who will be on the job constantly 
arranging for placement of machines in 
top spots thruout this city. 

Jack stated, “The best job which any- 
one can do at this time, to assure himself 
a better future in the coin machine in- 
dustry, is to operate automatic phono- 
graphs. We are intent on placing 500 
units in New York. We believe that with 
the force of 12 men which we now have 
working for us that we shall be able to 
place this number of machines in good 
time.” 

Wurlitzer Names 
Redd Distrib in N.C. 


NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y.— Appoint- 
ment of Redd Distributing Co., Inc. as 
authorized distributors of Wurlitzer com- 
mercial phonographs and auxiliary equip- 
ment for the North Carolina territory has 
just been announced by E. R. Wurgler, 
General Sales Manager of The Rudolph 
Wurlitzer Company, North Tonawanda, 
New York. 

The established Wurlitzer distributing 
headquarters for this territory at 620 
West Morehead Street, Charlotte, N. C. 
will be continued by Redd Distributing 
Co., Inc. Offices and showrooms together 
with a completely stocked parts and 
service department, staffed by factory- 
trained experts, will be maintained at this 
address. Hugh McGarrity will be manager 
of the Charlotte office. 

W. S. “Si” Redd, President of Redd 
Distributing Co., Inc., is well-known in 
the phonograph trade. For the past 


Vou and qoup Ladq are cordiailq invifed to attend 

\U PREMIER ShCWIhG ot the new 1948 

fiOCK-OLfl 

"MAGIC GLOW" 

at 

IDEAL MOVELTY COMPAMY 

2823 Locust Street 
St. Louis Mo. 


SUMDAY and MOMDAY 
JanuQpq 4tfi and 5tk 1948 



That every manufacturer, large or small, is dependent upon you 
to the extent that each and every one is na’iing great strides and 
expanding maximum efforts to PLEASE YOU. 

It is for YOUR approval of the new games and to protect YOUR 
business that every manufacturer is trying to outdo hi.mself. At this 
GREATEST SHOW OF THEM ALL given in Chicago by the Coin 
Machine Industry, you will find the latest and newest in MONEY- 
MAKING MACHINES for your customers. 

YOUR LOCATION OV/NEP.S T.ELY UPON YOU in great measure to 
bring them the best. Your favorite manufacturer depends upon your 
advice and your reaction to his products so that he can, with renewed 
zeal, prepare for next year's show. 

So do make plans to come and bring your Distributors and Jobbers 
along to the show at the HOTEL SHERMAN, CHICAGO, JANUARY 
19-22, and while there look us up and see our 

FLASH BOWLER — Bowling Game, and 
EDELCO'S TIN PAN ALLEY— Rolldown 
BOOTHS 15 AND 16 

EDELMAN AMUSiMir-JT &EVECES 

2459 GRAND RIVER (Phons Randolph 3547) DETROIT I, MICH. 


several .years, he has held Wurlitzer dis- 
tributorships for New England and 
Western New York State. Redd Dis- 
tributing Co., Inc. will continue to dis- 
tribute Wurlitzer phonograph equipment 
in these territories in addition to the 
North Carolina territory. 

Mr. Wurgler, in announcing details 
of this appointment, urged all Music 
Merchants in the North Carolina territory 
to make full use of the Wurlitzer facilities 
available to them at Redd Distributing 
Co., Inc. 


More of Everything 
you wont with 

TOM TOM 

It’s Different in Every Way 
Write for Photograph 

P and S Machine Co. 

3017 N. SHEFFIELD AVE. 
CHiCAGO, ILL. 

Phone: DIVersey 2414 



AEMBEB 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 









-r.'hx 



The Cash Box 


Page 45 


January 3, 1948 


JUKE BOX OPS ACCOUNTANT’S STATEMENT 
SHOWS LOSS OF $6.38 ON EVERY $100 TAKEN 
IN BY HIS PHONOGRAPHS DURING 1947 


Sends This Statement to Prove to Ops Why The Cash Box Plan of a 
Better Commish Basis Plus 2 Minute Records is a Must for All Juke Box 
Ops Today. "And," He Reports, "These figures are Too Low, in Our 
Opinion, Considering Today's Phono Prices." 


new YORK — What is probably one 
of the most revealing and authentic 
statements ever yet received from 
any music machine operator arrived 
at The Cash Box offices this past 
week from one of the nation’s most 
outstanding Southwestern juke box 
ops. 

In this statement, which is supplied 
by this operator’s firm of very well 
known accountants from a Southwes- 
tern city, there is revealed a loss of 
$6.38 for every $100 which this op- 
erator took in from his phonos dur- 
ing 1947. 

This operator, considered one of 
the trade’s leaders, has constantly 
urged that The Cash Box’ suggestion 
of a better commission basis (and 
the new" proposal of two minute rec- 
ords) be immediately adopted by all 
the field, to insure the juke box op- 
erator some profit for the huge in- 
vestment which the average phono op 
has in his business today. 

He has stated time and time again, 
“The Cash Box is the one and only 
voice in the industry plugging for 
the operator, and trying with all 
might and main to show him the way 
to better business methods and, there- 
by, greater profits. To at least obtain 
a decent return on his investment. I 
feel therefore,” he writes, “that this 
is the time to bring into the open the 
actual costs with which the average 
operator of only 244 phonographs is 
faced and what he has to do these 
days to even remain in business.” 

There are dozens of ops thruout the 
nation, just as prominent and in ex- 
actly the same position in which this 
juke box operator finds himself to- 
day. These men must come to the 
conclusion that they cannot long con- 
tinue in the industry if they do not 
arrange for a better commission basis 
as well as urge the record manufac- 
turers to produce two minute record- 
ings for them so that they can at 
least show a better percentage for the 
work which they are doing at this 
time and realize, at the same time, a 
decent profit on the huge investment 
which they now have in the juke box 
business. 

These facts and figures, revealed in 
the opposite two columns, should 
cause every juke box operator in the 
nation to think hard and long on the 
fact that he must immediately ar- 
range for a better commission basis 
for himself. 


FROM EVERY $100 TAKEN IN BY HIS MUSIC ROUTE 
THIS NOTED JUKE BOX OP LOST $6.38 BECAUSE 
OF THE FOLLOWING EXPENSES . . . 

During the above period, for each $100 of revenue taken in by our 
approximately 244 phonographs, the following amounts were expended 
for the purposes listed below: 


Commission to “Location” (50%) $50.00 

Salaries & Wages and payroll taxes 19.30 

Automobile and travel expense on routes and 

transporting machines 2.57 

Parts, Supplies & Repairs for machines 3.23 

Phonograph Records bought 4.10 

Advertising & Procuring “Locations” 1.11 

Office expense. Utilities & Telephone 88 

Legal & Miscellaneous expenses 14 

Insurance: PL&PD, WC, Fire, Theft, Auto 

Employee Group Life, etc 84 

Rent on Shop, office and warehouse 52 

State Licenses & Advalorem Taxes 50 


Sub-total $83.19 

Estimated Reserve to replace equipment which 

consists of: 20.00* 

7 Automobiles & trucks 
582 Wallboxes 
244 Phonographs 
and usual auxilliary and spare 
equipment and office & shop eq. 


Estimated amount to be lost on loans 
made to “Location” owners in 

order to hold “Locations” 81 

4% interest on borrowed and invested funds 2.38 


Total costs and expenses per $100 of revenue $106.38 


*This is thought to be too low, in our opinion at todays 
phonograph prices approximating $1000 per unit. 


Mention "The Cash Box" When Answering Ads 


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Page 46 


January 3, 1948 


T 


The Cash Box 


Rudy Greenbaum, Aireon Mfg. 
Corp., Holds New York Meeting 


1 Factory Representatives Present Reported 
! Enthusiastic Over Firm's New Plans And 
iPolicies. Promise Many Surprises For 1948 


! 



R. R. (RUDY) GREENBAUM 


' NEW YORK — Many factory repre- 
sentatives of Aireon Manufacturing 
Corporation, Kansas City, Kansas, 
met with R. R. (Rudy) Greenbaum, 
vice president and general sales- 
i| manager of the firm, here in New 
York this past week and it is re- 
ported they listened to an outline 
I of the new plans and policies which 
this firm has prepared for 1948. 


These men were tremendously en- 
thused, it is reported, over the plans 
outlined for them by Greenbaum, and 
are preparing to launch an outstand- 
ing program, “Which” as one of these 
representatives claimed, “will abso- 
lutely meet the complete and whole- 
hearted approval of every single juke 
box operator in America. 

“In addition to the new ideas and 
new plans that Aireon will present” 
he continued “there will also be a 
great many surprises which are 
bound to change the presejit mer- 
chandising course of the automatic 
music industry.” 

Greenbaum reported that he was 
well satisfied with the results of this 
meeting, and assured the trade an 
early announcement of the firm’s new 
policies. He left for his offices in 
Kansas City immediately after the 
meet to complete all preliminary 
work. 


AS IS 

RE4L CHRISTMAS GIVE-AWAYS 

»35®?a 

BALLY CLUB BELL 
JENNINGS SILVER MOON 
MILLS JUMBO PARADE 
BALLY BIG TOP 
PACES REELS 

MILLS VEST POCKET (Like New) 
WRITE FOR COMPLETE LIST 
1/3 Dep.; Sal. C.O.D. 


DAVID ROSEN. INC. 


85S N. Broad St. 
Pbiladolphio 23, Pa. 
StovonioR 2-2f03 


503 Evoreroan Ave. 
Baltlaior* 23, Md. 
Edmoaien 5322 


WE WISH YOU ALL 
A VERY 

Happy New Year 

SCOTT-CROSSE CO. 

1423 SPRING GARDEN STREET 
PHILA.. PA. — RittenhoBse 6-7712 


SAY. ”1 SAW IT IN THE CASH BOX.” 


C M I CONVENTION 
PROGRAM 


MONDAY, JANUARY 19 
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. — EXHIBIT 


EVENING — Dinner for Pres- 
idents and Executive Secre- 
taries of State and Local As- 
sociations. 


TUESDAY, JANUARY 20 

10 a m. to 12 noon — EXHIBIT 
4 p.m. to 10 p.m. — EXHIBIT 

noon — L uncheon, followed by 
an address by Dr. Preston 
Bradley. 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21 

10 a.m. to 9 p.m. — EXHIBIT 

noon — L uncheon meeting of 
the National Association of 
Amusement Machine Owners. 

EVENING — Dinner and annual 
meeting of all regular mem- 
bers of Coin Machine Indus- 
tries, Inc. 



The Roll Down With 
Bumper Game Action 


GEORGE PONSER'S 

fiho-SafiSL 


Your Money Buys More 
When You Buy Pro-Score 


THE BIG MONEY IS . . . 
THE BIG NEWS 
THIS BIG CAME 

/s Making Everywhere! 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 22 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. — EXHIBIT 

EVENING— Annual Banquet in 
the Grand Ballroom of the 
Stevens Hotel. 


COIN MACHINE MOVIES 

FOR REOULAR PANORAMS AND SOLO-VUES 
REELS OF 8 AND 6 SUBJECTS 
Our Films Get The Dimes 
PRICE $32.50 TO $31.50 Per Reel 

PHONOFILM 

3331 NO. KNOLL DR., HOLLYWOOD 28, CAL. 


MORE ACTION! MORE PUYER APPEAL! MORE PROFITS FOR YOU 

ORDER TODAY FROM YOUR NEAREST DISTRIBUTOR 
Distributors! Act Fast for Available Territories! 

GEORGE PONSER CO. 

158 EAST GRAND AVE.. CHICAGO 11. ILLINOIS • SUPERIOR 4427 

"The Cash Box” Is The Operator’s Magazine 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads— it proves you^re a real coin machine manl 





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The Cash Box 

Joe Hanna Named 
"Most Outstanding 
Young Man Of 1947" 

UTICA N. Y. — Joe Hanna, head of Hanna 
Distributing Company, this city, was se- 
lected this week as the “outstanding 
young man of 1947” by unanimous vote 
of nine leading citizens of Utica. This 
outstanding honor was the result of dis- 
tinguished services in his town, which 
reflects greatly to the credit of the coin 
machine industry. 

Hanna’s name is associated mainly 
with the Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
He was its president last year, and this 
year is state vice president in charge of 
Region Three, which includes 17 Central 
New York counties. He is also a member 
of the local board of directors. Joining 
the organization in 1943, Hanna’s en- 
thusiasm for pubilc service lead to a 
rapid rise in the executive branch. In 

1944 he was elected secretary. In 1945 
he was voted in as vice president, and in 
1946 became its president. 

Hanna considers his outstanding ac- 
complishment for 1947 the establishment 
of the Toy Loan Librarj^ in the YMCA, 
under the sponsorship of the Junior 
Chamber. He is assistant state chairman 
of the American Cancer Society. As 
chairman of the fact-finding committee 
of the Mayor’s Housing Committee, he 
directed the work of locating vacancies 
and finding families who needed housing. 
He also was state committeman from this 
district for the recent funds campaign 
put on by the Disabled American 
Veterans. 

Early in 1947, Hanna served as com- 
mercial industrial committee chairman 
for the St. Elizabeth Hospital fund drive, 
which brought in a total of $550,000 to 
increase hospital facilities in Utica. In 

1945 Hanna lead the drive which sold a 
half mllion dollars in bonds in his city, 
and received the treasury citation and a 
plaque “for patriotic services.” 

These many activities almost brought 
Joe the award for 1946, but he was 
runnerup in what the judges declared 
was “a difficult decision.” 

This year, Hanna was without a rival, 
and was selected unanimously for the 
honor of being “the outstanding young 
man of 1947”. The awarding committee 
was composed of Mayor Colder, James G. 
Capps, William Murray, Henry T. Dor- 
rance, the Rev. James Gordon Gilkey, 
Jr., Samuel J. Abend, Alan Stevenson 
and Charles W. Hall. 

CMI Banquet Tickets 
Must Be Ordered Now 


CHICAGO— James A. Gilmore, secretary- 
manager of Coin Machine Industries, re- 
ports that orders for banquet tickets at 
$10 per plate will be accepted up and 
including January 8th. He has informed 
the exhibitors that they will be entitled 
to one table for every booth they have 
in the convention. 

“All orders must be in our hands with 
check for the full amount on or before 
January 8th” stated Gilmore “as our 
Allocation Committee meets that evening. 
We are hopeful that many Exhibitors 
will not order all the banquet tickets 
they are entitled to because we have 
hundreds of members that cannot obtain 
them unless they are not demanded by 
our Exhibitors.” 

There will be 122 tables in the Grand 
Ball Room, 21 tables in the Grand Ball 
Room balcony, 21 tables in the Foyer 
and 35 tables in the Normandie Lounge. 
Everyone will be moved into the Grand 
Ball Room for the show. There will be 
no dancing. 


Pag^ 47 


r 


January 3 , 1948 




BIG PROFITS with the . . . 

NEW MISTIC DERBY 




rr 


• THE NEWEST RACING 
SENSATION 

• MORE ANGLES THAN AN OLD 
MAID 

• FASTEST NICKEL EARNER 

• THE TAKE WILL RUN YOU DIZZY 

• LEGAL ANYWHERE 

• FAST ENOUGH FOR ARCADES 


OPERATORS SAY: This machine Is the next 
best thing to a slot machine. This is the 
game operators have been waiting for, 
where gambling laws have curtailed cash 
box receipts. It was especially designed 
to give a demonstration of horse racing 
as realistic as though you were actually 
at the track. The special multiple-grooved 
record gives you the same ratio of pos- 
sibility, on each play. There is one chance 
out of five of repeating, and four chances 
out of five of hitting a different groove 
which gives you a different winner. No 
matter how many times the game is 
played, there is still no way of predeterm- 
ining the winner. The mechanism has a 
special mixing device which equalizes the 
percentage of winners coming up. The 
effect is most mystifying, which makes it 
the hottest legal trade stimulator on the 
market. Comes in Deluxe mahogany 
finish cabinet, simple trouble-proof mech- 
anism insures low service cost. 



SPECIAL LOW PRICE — $149.50 


WRITE — WIRE — CALL 




SHORELINE DISTRIBUTORS 

2303 No. nth STREET. SHEBOYGAN. WISCONSIN 

(PHONE: DIAL 5619 or 4349) 




The Oreafesf Values for fhe NEW YEAR! 


Reconditioned 

PHONOGRAPHS 

Wurlitzer 780, 

Colonial $295 

Wurlitzer 850 295 

Wurlitzer 800 275 

Wurlitzer 500 165 

Rockola De Luxe.... 1 50 
Seeburg 8800 

Lo-Tone 295 

Seeburg Plaza .... 1 85 

Mills Empress 150 

Mills Throne 125 

Aireon — 1946 

Like New .......... 325 

WORLD 

2330 N. WESTERN AVE. 


SPECIAL! 
Keeney HOT TIP 

One-Ball 4-coin 
Multiple free play 
with jackpot. 

Brand new 
Original crates 
2 Available $350 


Terms: 1/3 Down 
Balance Sight Draft 
or C.O.D. 

If you Don't See What 
You Want — WRITE! 


Guaranteed 

CONSOLES 

Mills Orig. Three-Bells, 
5c-10c-25c Recond 

Repainted $250 

Mills 1947 Three Bells 

5c-10c-25c 410 

Keeney Twin Bonus 

Super Bell 595 

Keeney New Twin 
Bonus Super Bell 1 000 
Keeney 3-Way Bonus 

Super Bell 795 

Pace Twin Reels 

10c-25c 125 

Jennings Silver Moon 

5c 75 


WIDE DISTRIBUTORS. Inc. 

CHICAGO 47 EVErglade 2300 


SEND YOUR ADS IN NOW FOR 
THE BIG 3 CONVENTION ISSUES 
of "THE CASH BOX" 


PRE-CONVENTION 
JANUARY 17 


CONVENTION 
JANUARY 24 

SEE PAGES 8 & 9 


POST-CONVENTION 
JANUARY 31 


Remember! IMPORTANT! Remember! 

THE PRE-CONVENTION ISSUE WILL BE DISTRIBUTED 

MONDAY. THE FIRST DAY OF THE SHOW ON 
THE EXHIBIT FLOORS 

THE CONVENTION ISSUE WILL BE DISTRIBUTED ON 

TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY 
JANUARY 20 - 21 and 22 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you^re a real coin machine man! 






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The Cash Box 


Page 48 


January S, 1948 


ADVERTISERS 
IN THIS ISSUE: 


Active Amusement Machines, 

Philadelphia, Pa 41 

Aireon Mfg. Co., Kansas City, Kans 40 

American Amuse. Co., Chicago, 111 35 

AMI, Inc., Chicago, 111 41 

Eddy Arnold 10, 19 


• * * 

Ballen Record Co.. Phila., Pa 25 

Bally Mfg. Corp., Chicago, 111 Back Cover 

Buckley Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111 39 


Chicago Coin Machine Co., Chicago, 111 35 

Console Distributing Co., 

New Orleans, La 42 

Coven Distributing Co., Chicago. Ill 48 

Crown Nov. Co., New Orleans. La 38 

• • • 

Edelman Amusement Devices, 

Detroit, Mich 44 

Empire Coin Machine Exchange, 

Chicago, 111 36 

Exclusive Records, Hollywood. Calif 19 

• • • 


COVEN’S COIN CORNER 


USED FIVE BALLS USED SLOTS 


ACTION $19.50 

BAFFLE CARD 79.50 

BIG HIT 49.50 

BIG PARADE 34.50 

CAPTAIN KIDD .... 19.50 
DOUBLE BARREL .. 39.50 
EAGLE SQUADRON .. 29.50 

FLAT TOP 29.50 

KNOCKOUT 39.50 

LAND SLIDE 19.50 

LAURA 49.50 

LIBERTY 49.50 , 

METRO 19.50 ' 

SEA HAWK 24.50 

SKYRAY 19.50 

STAGE DOOR I 

CANTEEN 49.50 

Terms; 


STARS 19.50 

STATE FAIR 69.50 

SUPER LINER 69.50 

SURF QUEEN 49.50 

SUSPENSE 69.50 

TEN SPOT 19.50 

VENUS 19.50 

WILD FIRE 19.50 

USED CONSOLES 

TRIPLE BELL 5-5-25C 

(Like New) $575.00 

BIG GAME F.P., 5c 24.50 

USED ARCADE EQUIPMENT 

ADVANCE 

SHOCKER $15.00 

EVANS SKI BALL.. 39.50 
1/2 Deposit — Balince C.O.D. 


MILLS BLACK CHERRY lOo.. $149.50 
mills chrome lOe (Rebll).. 149.50 
MILLS CHROME 25c (Rebuilt).. 149.50 
MILLS VEST POCKET 

(Reconditiooed) 24.50 

COLUMBIA FRUIT 5 & lOc 49.50 

COLUMBIA DE LUXE 5 & lOc . . 59.50 

SPECIALS 

NUDGY (Floor Model) $175.00 

FINAL CLOSEOUT 149.50 


PARTS SPECIAL 


RUBBER RINGS 

Per 100 

Extra Large 


$2.25 

Large 


2.03 

Medium 


1.75 

Small 


140 

HEAVY HITTER 

STANDS 


(Wood) 


each 


or Sight Draft 


EXCLUSIVE BALLY DISTRIBUTOR 



Genco Mfg. & Sales Co., Chicago, 111. 

Globe Distr. Co., Chicago, 111 

D. Gottlieb & Co., Chicago, 111 

• • • 


Eddy Howard 


• * • 

Ideal Nov. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 


.43 

.43 

.42 


.22 


.44 


Beatrice Kay ‘3 

K-C Nov. Co., Phila, Pa 48 

King Pin Equipment Co., 

Kalamaiioo, Mich 3a 

King Records Co., Ccincinnati, 0 21 

* « « 

Luber, M., New York City 40 

* * * 

Malverne Dist., Inc., N. Y. C 17 

Mercury Records, Chicago, 111 24 

Mills Industries, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

lns.de Front Cover 

Modern Records, Hollywood, Calif 25 


Packard Mfg. Corp., Indianapolis, Ind 48 

Phonofilm, Hollywwood, Calif 46 

George Ponser Co., Chicago, 111 - 46 

P. & S. Machine Co., Chicago, lU 44 


Rainbow Records, N. Y. C._ 

The Ravens 

Rosen, David, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Runyon Sales Co., N. Y 

Andy Russell - 

• • • 


21 

17 

46 

34 

,„....16 


Scientific Mach. Corp., N. Y. C 41 

Scott-Crosse Co., Philadelphia, Pa.„ 46 

Scotto Music Co., No. Sacramento, Calif 38 

Shoreline Distributors, Sheboygan, Wls 47 

Specialty Records, Inc., Los Angeles. Cal..l7 


United Mfg. Co.. Chicago 

Used Record Exchange, Chicago, 111. 


Eddie Vinson - 35 

V-P Distributing Co., St. Louis, Mo 38 

Vitacoustic Records, Chicago, 111 11 

• • • 


Williams Mfg. Co., 


Chicago, 111. 

lns.de Back Cover 


World Wide Distributors, Inc.. 

Chicago, 111 — 47 

The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co., 

No. Tonawanda. N. Y Front Cover 


USED FIVE-BALL GAMES 


Genco Honey. . .$125.00 


Rio 95.03 

Show Girl 65.03 

Superllner 60.03 

Gold Ball 125.03 

Step Up 55.00 

Spellbound 55.03 

Sea Breeze . . , 55.00 

Ha. anas 99.50 


Cyclone 

$110.00 

Smarty 

60.03 

Big League .... 

40.00 

Su:pense 

40.00 

Surf Queens .. 

40.00 

Mexico 

175.03 

Fast Ball 

45.00 

Dynamite 

60.00 

Stage Dr. Cant. 

. 35.00 


Write (or complete list of pre.war games. 
Terms: one-third Dep.. Balance C.O.D. 

K. C. NOVELTY COMPANY 

419 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA 6, PA. 
(Phones: Market 7-6391, Market 7-4641) 


Pingame License Reduced 
80% Despite Protests Of 
Church & School Groups 


HACKENSACK, N. J. — Protests of 
church and school groups and a number 
of individuals opposed to reduction of 
license fees proposed by the City of 
Hackensack from $500 to $100 annually 
for the operation of pinball machines and 
similar amusement devices were defeated 
this past week when the City Council 
moved unanimously to adoption of the 
amendment to its 1945 ordinance. 

The ordinance also carries a new $25 
annual license for juke boxes. 

Members of the Council spearheaded 
by Councilmen Herbert F. Myers, Jr. and 
John E. Engel, in their support of the 
proposed reduction, stressed that re- 
venue anticipated from the lower license 
is needed by the city. Both these men 
said that the proposed reduction had 
received more consideration than any 
other matter before the Council, and had 
been introduced only because they were 
convinced that the $500 annual fee was 
confiscatory, and the City was losing a 
source of needed revenue by continuing 
it. 


Councilmen Arthur S. Barrett, A. R. 
Granito and Mayor Paul J. Foschini ag- 
reed with this reasoning in qualification 
of their favorable votes. 

The groups and individuals protesting 
the reduction argued it would increase 
the tendency to juvenile delinquency. 

Safeguards were placed in the or- 
dinance in the form of prohibiting those 
under 18 years of age to use the ma- 
chines, setting a distance of 200 feet 
from any school or church, and prohibit- 
ing any prizes, free games, or gambling 
on high scores. 

Councilman Myers’ arguments thruout 
the hearings was based on his belief that 
the $500 license would not stand a court 
test because it is confiscatory. 


Magnificent Manhattan 

M akes 
M ueh 
M ore 
M oney! 

M usic 
M en 
M arvel! 

Created by HOMER E. CAPEHART 


Lack Of Coin Demand 
Puzzles U. S. Mint 


WASHINGTON, D. C. — Officials of the 
United States mint report that there has 
been a tremendous dip in the demands on 
them for new pennies, nickels, dimes, 
quarters and even half dollars, and they 
are greatly puzzled by this strange 
condition. 

Usually, they report, the call has been 
for more and more coins in periods of 
booming business, and let-ups in the de- 
mand have come only when sales were 
sliding. They point out that this year has 
shown unprecedented employment and 
business ringing up new records all over 
the country, but the mints have been 
having such a coin making slack they 
have laid off more than half the 2,900 
employes they had a year ago. 

In the last five months, the mint has 
sent out only 706,000,000 coins of various 
denominations, or about one-third less 
than in the same months of a year ago. 
For the first eleven months, this year’s 
mint deliveries were only half of last 
year’s. 

Pennies and nickels together make up 
$338,000,000 of the $1,384,000,000 cir- 
culating in coin form, with dimes, 
quarters and half dollars accounting for 
$894,000,000 and silver dollars 
41152,000,000. 




Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 





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The Cash Box 


Page 49 


January 3, 1948 






The Yule fjeason has fully descended upon us, the 
air is filled with good cheer and lots of that good old 
holiday spirit, its a swell time of the year because 
practically everyone gets into the spirit of the thing 
which makes things nrighter all around, wouldn^t it 
be swell if that Christmas spirit lasted all year, huh? 

Lots of the boys that attended the recent N.A.M.A. 
show are still talking about it, with more and more 
coin men showing greater interest in the vending biz. 
Still running into some of the out of town vending 
exhibitors trying to get train reservations out of town 
its puh-lenty tough, a few words of advice to coin 
men planning to attend the forthcoming C.M.I. con- 
vention according to all indications this coming show 
will be the biggest ever held with the greatest attend- 
ance of coinmen ever gathered at one time. So — be 
sure that you have a place to lay your weary head 
the town will be loaded good and sleeping in Grant 
Park this time of the year is not recommended be- 
lieve me. Also and we quote a railroad official be 
sure of your return train or plane reservations before 
you leave home hitchhiking is hard on the feet. 

Rambling around the windy city a few days before 
the Yule holiday is really something, everybody busy 
wrapping packages, decorating trees, addressing 
Christmas Cards and doing last minute shopping. 
Seems as though work stops this week . . . Louis (Da 
Preem) Prima put on a terrific mostly imprompt 
act after he received his “Cash Box” award on the 
stage of the Oriental Theatre this past week. It was 
Louis closing show and he went to town doing a 
solo jitterbug dance and generally brought down the 
house. We hear that the 'JTheatre people are begging 
Prima to come back soon . . . 

Dropped in over at Coven Distrib. Co., found 
“Bally” Sally (Goldstein) in the midst of Xmas cards 
and presents (shows what a popular gal she is), Sally 
thinks Christmas is wonderful but likes New Years too 
and is anxiously awaiting the coming of 1948 and the 
big celebration that the New Year always brings. Ben 
Coven is busier than ever these days. Ben says their 
place has been overflowing with visitors lately, with 
lots of them stopping in to see his miniature model 
railroad . . . Ran into Evelynn Aron of Aristocrat 
Records, who was dashing around the town, dropping 
off packages and playing Santa Claus to her many 
friends . . . Larry Frankel of Frankel Distrib. Co. hit 
the big town this past week to do some last minute 
Xmas shopping . . . Vince Murphy of Globe Distrib. 
Co. very pleased over the results their showing at the 
N.A.M.A. show and now busy making plans for the 
forthcoming convention . . . Carl Morris of Micro- 
Master Co. all thrilled over the wonderful Christmas 
present he received from his partner Don Anderson, a 
brand new 1948 Cadillac. Carl says he’s beginning to 
believe in Santa Claus all over again . . . Dick Hood 
busy as the proverbial bee these days, tending to his 
duties over at H. C. Evans & Co. and lining up talent 
for the Coin Machine Convention banquet dinner. 
Dick tells us that this will be the biggest and best 
convention we’ve ever had and promises that the 
entertainment will be the best also . . . Bumped into 
Milt Salstone of M. S. Distrib. Co., huddling with 
several well known coinmen. Milt is one boy that 
really gets around this town, in and out of diflferenl 
coin machine circles . . . Sam Gensburg of Chicago 
Coin back from Florida, looking fit, hale and hardy 
while Sam Wolberg gets ready to visit the sunny 
south land over the holidays. 

We hear from Gwen Desplenter of CMI Public Re- 
lations Bureau that their offices have been as busy as 
Grand Central Station these past few weeks. Gwen 
says many of the out of town coinmen that were here 
to attend the N.A.M.A. show dropped in to say “hello”, 
and also to offer their donation for the Cancer Drive 
. . . Spoke with Chili Galgano of the Used Record Ex- 
change. Chili tells us business is very good, with a 



definite pick-up over the holiday season . . . Howie 
Freer of Empire Coin still talking about the N.A.M.A. 
show and the marvelous opportunities that the vend- 
ing field offers. Gil Kitt, another fast talking coin- 
man, who can talk himself into some of the best deals 
we’ve ever seen — more credit to you Gil . . . J. R. 
Bacon and Bill Lipscomb of O. D. Jennings & Co. 
settling down to a normal routine after all the turmoil 
of the N.A.M.A. show. This will last for a few days 
then we’ll have to swing right into plans for the 
convention say the boys . . . “Perk” Perkins of Amer- 
ican Amusement Co., on the run and going at twice 
his normal pace, trying to make up for the time lost 
due to the holidays. 

Talked with Art Weinand of Rock-Ola Mfg. Corp., 
who is just about the busiest coinman in this town. 
With National Rock-Ola Days but a short time away, 
things at the Rock-Ola plant are really humming and 
Art is right in the middle of it all. The Rock-Ola 
distribs are anxiously awaiting the big three days, 
January 3, 4, 5, when they will unvail the new phono, 
and from all reports the ops are really in for a treat. 
This one is a honey, say the distribs . . . Art treated 
us to a very unusual tour of the Rock-Ola plant, 
which started in the lower basement and ended at the 
top floor of the factory. After seeing these things it is 
easy to understand how Rock-Ola holds the position in 
the phono field . . . Bernie Schutz of Coin Amusement 
Games, Inc. looking very pleased over the tremendous 
pick-up in biz. Bernie says if things keep up as they 
have been going of late 1948 promises to be a very 
prosperous year for all . . . Found Lindy Force and 
Joe Caldron in a huddle at their offices of AMI talking 
over plans for the distribution of the new AMI 40 
selector wall box which we hear is in volume pro- 
duction now . . . Fulton Moore of Williams Mfg. Co. 
reports things rolling along with shipments on their 
new roll down “Box Score” going out in ever increas- 
ing numbers . . . 

AI Stern of World Wide Distributors turning all the 
employees loose early this week to give them time to 
do their Yule shopping . . . George Ponser looking 
forward to a happy New Year because his new roll 
down “Pro-Score” is catching on around the country, 
we hear . . . Lee Jones at P & S Machine Co. quietly 
making plans for the forthcoming coin show. Lee is 
keeping his plans under wraps and will blast when 
the time is ripe . . . Herb Jones of Bally Mfg. Co., is 
putting on a rousing finish to raise the pledged 
quarter million dollars that the coin machine industry 
expect to raise by show time. Herb says, “we’ll do or 
die” . . . The boys over at United Mfg. Co. are not in 
to much of a mood for work this week and are 
getting an early start in celebrating the holidays . . . 
Sol Gottlieb of D. Gottlieb & Co. still traveling thru 
the south calling on distribs and spreading good cheer 
but expected back shortly. Meanwhile brother Nate 
keeps busy answering all the phone calls coming in 
from distribs for Gottlieb games . . . Gene Bates over 
at Pace Mfg. tells us that Ed Pace is feeling much 
better after his recent illness and is back at the office 
on the job again . . . Art Freed, now associated with 
Chicago Simplex, busy taking over his new duties 
here, while Gordon Sutton gets into the swing of 
things back in New York. Looks like everyone broke 
even, Chicago lost Sutton and gained Fried. 

Well it looks like another year has past as we are 
about to enter the year of 1948, the Chicago repre- 
sentative of “The Cash Box” recently removed from 
sunny California to the windy city takes this oppor- 
tunity to thank the many swell coinmen and record 
firms who have been so swell and co-operative in 
helping me make this transition. The last year has 
been a very interesting one and I look fonvard to the 
year of 1948 with bright hopes for a happy and pros- 
perous one for all coinmen everywhere and I take 
this opportunity to wish you, one and all, a happy, 
healthy and very prosperous 1948. 



jf 




M 






The Cash Bnx Page 50 



January 3, 1948 


EASTERN 

FLASHES 


Altho this week was short due to the Christmas 
Holidays, with firms starting to celebrate from 
Monday on, there was quite a bit of work done. The 
jobbers and distributors association (Distributors 
Association of New York City) held a board of 
directors meeting that lasted practically all Tuesday 
afternoon. While the sale of equipment was off, 
quite a few operators bought amusement games to 
fill in on locations for the coming holidays. 

55- « Jfr 

Ben Becker, Ben Becker Sales Company (Bally 
regional sales representative) spends most of the 
week in Chicago, but hurrys home for the Christmas 
holidays. He’s got two boys to take care of, and 
they’re looking for those presents . . . With Hymie 
Rosenberg, H. Rosenberg Company, handling the 
business end of the company this week, Sid Wer- 
theimer took charge of the social activities, handing 
out the liquid refreshments . . . Jack Ehrlich, who 
recently formed the Hart Distributing Company to 
job amusement games in Brooklyn, selling plenty of 
equipment . . , Bill Ferber, Ferber Automatic Music 
Company, bedded with a bad case of the flu . . . 
Abe Stept, Stept Sales Company, Johnstown, Pa., 
visits the city, and spends considerable time with 
Murray and Bill Weiner of U-Need-A Vendors. Leo 
Willens also seen with the cigarette manufacturing 
boys. Murray tells how thrilled he was at the tre- 
mendous reception given the U-Need-A electric 
cigarette machine which was displayed at the recent 
NAMA convention in Chicago. 

* * 

Due to the snow storm that hit the city on 
Tuesday, Jack Rubin of Esso Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Hoboken, N. J., traveled from Brooklyn to 
the factory by subway, train and bus. This was the 
first time in years that Rubin failed to take his 
car out, and he not only froze half to death on the 
way, but complained about the length of the many 
rides. "I could have gone to San Francisco” cried 
Rubin . . . Steve Qiunn, sales manager for Al 
Schlesinger’s Cole Enterprises, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
seen at the Tenth Avenue offices of Seaboard New 
York Corporation, where a number of the com- 
pany’s converted pinballs were on display. Steve 
reports that Cole is reconverting these pinballs for 
New York City use . . . Quinn reports that Cole will 
have a new game to exhibit at the coming CMI 
convention in January. 


R. R. (Rudy) Greenbaum, vice president and 
general sales manager of Aireon Manufacturing 
Corporation, Kansas City, Kansas, visits the city for 
a few days and meets with many of the company’s 
representatives. Rudy reports that his firm will be 
making a tremendously important announcement 
for all music operators very shortly . . . Irv Fene- 
schal, Milrose Music Company, and International 
Distributing Corporation, Brooklyn, back on the 
job after a seige of the flu . . . We understand that 
Jack Fitzgibbons is very ill and that there is little 
hope for his recovery ... Nat Cohn, Modern Music 
Sales Corporation, getting ready for a startling an- 
nouncement to the trade. 

♦ 

Who was the local big shot (?) distributor whose 
filthy language in Hymie Rosenberg’s office em- 
barrassed Hymie and caused his wife to blush crim- 
son . . . Art Herman, Herman Distributing Com- 
pany, Brooklyn, doing a big jobbing trade along 
Coney Island Avenue (Brooklyn’s coinrow) . . . 
Lou Hirsh, Silvertone Music Company, back from 
a few week’s vacation in Miami Beach. Lou reports 
that he saw quite a few coinmen, a few of those 
being Morris Marder, Murray Blaine, Willie Blatt, 
Bob Jacobson, Lee Rubinow and Herman Gross . . . 
Robert Mishelow, Reliance Music Company, Long 
Islarfd music op, in the hospital with a heart ailment 
. . . Plenty of activity at Seacoast Distributors, what 
with everyone getting the offices ready to receive 
the new Rock-Ola phono, and prepare for the big 
party they’re running on January 3, 4 and 5. 

» » 

Barney (Shugy) Sugerman, Runyon Sales Com- 
pany, reports that his firm is expanding his Jersey 
music operations into New York City . . . Mike 
Munves refuses to do any business this week at all, 
celebrating the arrival of Christmas and New Years 
days ahead of time . . . Coinmen are having trouble 
booking railroad passage to the Coin Machine Show. 
Especially those who wish to leave a few days ahead 
of time. Frank McAuliffe of the New York Central 
has set up a few cars for his coin machine friends 
to leave New York City at 4:45 P.M. on Saturday, 
January 17. It’s the Commodore Vanderbilt, and 
you had better hurry and make your reservations 
now. 

H-a-a-a-p-y NEW YEAR!!! 




'Ui., 





;• J. 


f 


^ J 




The Cash Box 


Page 51 


Janiitiry 3, 1948 



With 

STEVE MASON 



CALIFORNIA 

CLIPPINGS 




J 


Although the southland’s Xmas wasn’t white as 
many of the country’s holiday hamlets were, it was 
no less festive. Hollywood’s Christmas Tree Lane 
and the beeyootiful California sunshine more than 
made up for whatever lack of Yuletide snow we 
might have had . . . One of record row’s most gala 
events was a yuletide party given by the family 
j Bihari of Modern Records. The party served a two- 
fold purpose, that of having all of their many 
friends together for a bit of Xmas cheer, and as a 
good luck send-off to Modern chirp Hadda Brooks, 
who leave: this fair city for a personal appearance 
tour in the east . . . Prexy Jules Bihari leaves this 
week for a much needed vacation up around Death 
Valley. 

Capitol Records western star Tex Williams has 
three of the big motion picture studios vying for his 
terrific talent . . . Warners, Universal, and Republic 
all want his signature on the dotted line . . . seems 
as if Tex made a short some months back, and box 
office figures really made the producers sit up and 
take more than passing notice . . . Gordon MacRae, 
the "Bogart of the Baritones” is due out here next 
month tor some picture work at Warners . . . how 
that lad can sing too!!! That wonderful gal at 
Capitol, Eve Stanley gives out with the following 
information about Capitol’s latest releases, all due 
f out this week, vis; Benny Goodman and orchestra 
with "Oooh, Look-A There, Aint She Pretty?” and 
"Sweet and Lovely” . . . The Philharmonica Trio 
with two oldies in brand new style "Charmaine” 
backed by "Lullaby of Broadway”, and the King 
Cole Trio in their inimitable style, rendering 
"What’ll I do” and "I Feel So Smoochie” . . . Grab A 
listen you ops, they’re nickel nabbers . . . 

Art Rupe, prexy of Specialty Records held up all 
of his releases until after this week, in order to get 
i in all of the sessions before the Petrillo edict takes 
effect. Rupe has really been pressing some terrific 
juke box stuff with Roy Milton and Jimmy Liggins 
heading the list of recording artists . . . Mercury 
; Records L.A. distribution center on Pico Blvd. has 
jfl been doing a land office bizness, with all the gals 

I rushing in to get those fine platters by Frankie Laine 
and Vic Damone . . . The brothers Mesner, (Leo 
and Eddie) of Aladdin Records have been very busy 
waxing all kinds of records. 

Things along coin machine row continue to hum 
right along in spite of the Xmas holidays . . . many 
of the folks along the row are amazed that there 
has been no appreciable slackening of biz as is usu- 
ally the case when the end of the year rols around 
. . . Elky Ray of Gold Coast Coin Machine Ex- 
change is still rubbing his hands gleefully over the 
tremendous success Gottlieb’s new five-ball "Hump- 
ty-Dumpty” continues to enjoy all over the south- 
land . . . Elky tells us that wherever one of the 
games is put on location, the take for that spot has 
averaged a thirty percent increase . 

Jay Bullock’s One Stop Record Service seems to 
be the answer for many an out of town op who 
wants to pick up all of his records in one place 
rather than taking a whole day to visit a number 
of independent distribs all over town ... Jay is in 


a position now to supply practically anything need- 
ed for juke boxes insofar as records, needles, bulbs, 
etc. ... If you’re in the market for a good used 
juke box, he has those too . . . Jack Simon and 
partner Jack Ryan of Sicking Distributors are both 
beaming over the tremendous play being given all 
of the roll-downs by ops . . . Paul Laymon really 
has his hands full showing ops all of the new Bally 
Games, "Hy-Roll”, "Big-Inning”, "Wild Lemon” 
"Double-Up” etc. . . Paul has asked this correspond- 
ent to remind all of you that the Runyon Cancer 
Drive is still very much active, and that the finest 
Xmas present you can give, for a very great cause, 
would be a check made out to the RUNYON 
CANCER FUND . . . Laymon will see that your 
check reaches Dave Gottlieb in Chicago by conven- 
tion time . . . Fred Gaunt of General Music has been 
handling some really nice orders for Buckley bells 
as well as making some fine sales of "Pokerino” roll- 
downs . . . Danny Jackson of Automatic Games 
received a wonderful Xmas present ... A couple 
of very juicy orders for bells from a few of the 
Reno and Las Vegas Clubs . . . Charlie Robinson’s 
general manager A1 Bettelman is back in town after 
some extensive travelling around the southland see- 
ing ops. A1 made a fast circuit this time so as to 
be back in Los Angeles for the Holidays . . . M. C. 
"Bill” Williams of the Williams Distributing Com- 
pany, and a rabid baseball fan too, tells us he can’t 
wait for the baseball season to start, so he bides his 
time playing the new Williams roll-down "Box- 
Score”. His only comment, "I only hope the Dod- 
gers can run up scores like I can”!!! 

Bill Wolf and Nels Nelson are back in town after 
both making trips up to Fresno, San Bernardino 
and vicinity . . . Bill tells us that some very nice 
sales have been made in California of late, on AMI 
equipment . . . Lyn Brown has shipped two plane 
loads of Advance Rolls to the east . . . we’re in- 
formed that these games were brought in on trade 
for Ponser’s Pro-Score . . . Len Micon of Pacific 
Coast Distribs held open house for all of his many 
friends and customers in the coin machine business 
last week . . . drinks flowed freely, sandwiches and 
the like were devoured, and a very good time was 
had by all . . . Micon left us with this bit of start- 
ling information to ponder over, quote: "Genco’s 
Bing-A-Roll is taking in more money on location 
than any other roll-down on the market!!!” 

The flu bug sems to have caught just about every- 
one in town . . . Now Prexy Leon Rene of Exclusive 
Records has done gone and caught it . . . Speaking of 
Exclusive reminds us that last week wound up their 
final recording sessions, and Mr. Rene hastens to 
assure you ops that a star-studded three year supply 
of records is on tap, and three years of such talent 
as Herb Jeffries, Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers, 
Frances Wayne, and Buddy Baker is three years of 
money making records for the juke boxes . . . Exclu- 
sive held their annual Xmas party last week for all 
of the Exclusive talent, disk jocks, and loads and 
loads of friends and well-wishers . . . Before closing 
the cover this week, we want to say once again to all 
. . . The best of business success to everyone, and a 
prosperous New Year . . . 




ST. L 0 U 1 S NEW ORLEANS, LA. 


By BERT MERRILL 

Yule parties flourished in all coin machine digs 
this week, with bonuses for employes, gifts for 
everybody, and many a turkey-slicing. VP Dis- 
tributing Company, W. B. Novelty, Olive Novelty, 
Ideal Novelty, J. S. Morris & Sons, Star Novelty 
and AMI Distributing, were among those who 
Santa’d their employees on Christmas Eve. 

■Js 

Dan Baum, who closed up Baum Distributing 
Company a week or so ago, checked in to inform 
''The Cash Box'’ that he’s going to take a "three or 
four month rest” from coin machine cares. While 
Walter Gummersheimer will carry on at Universal, 
Dan figures he’s earned a little relaxation. Dan and 
Walter partied up with Barney Frericks to attend- 
ing the vending machine show in Chicago last week, 
where they were guests of Diamond Match Company 
and Universal Match Company at parties described 
as mild "lulus”. 

* * * 

Dripping with Christmas cheer were Fred Weale 
of Farina, Illinois; Freddie Voucher from Festus, 
Mo.; Bill Keller of Anna, 111., and "Jolly Joe” from 
Bemld Novelty Co., Bemld, 111. They chorused a 
few bars of popular carols here and there around 
the circuit. 

* * * 

All eyes are on Ideal Novelty Company’s January 
4th unveiling of the 1948 Rock-Ola. Prexy Carl 
Trippe promises the affair to be one of the tradi- 
tionally peppy Ideal events, and a long list of people 
from Rock-Ola will be on hand to mitt the guests. 
Ideal wiped off the last Rock-Ola for this year and 
delivered it to Andy McCall of McCall Novelty, 
along with nine others as we went to press. 


Bill Hollified returned from Chicago where he 
visited at the NAMA show and was reported to have 
been very much impressed with all the new vending 
machines he saw there. But, Bill didn’t light in 
Nola very long. He decided to take off for Virginia 
with his wife and daughter’ to visit the home folks. 
This is the first time in seven years that Bill went 
home. (And there’s no doubt, from the storm re- 
ports we’ve read about here, that the Hollified 
family must have been playing around in the snow.) 

« « -{c 

One of the meanest guys in the world was that 
thief who robbed the Pace home while the family 
was burying beloved Julius (Papa) Pace. We’re 
told that the robber or robbers took safe and all, 
and that the loss amounted to over $5,000. We 
hope they sure catch these crooks . . . Mr. Matranga, 
who was acting manager for Dixie Coin Machine 
Co. while all excess were gone, reported a great big 
birthday party for his son right during the Holiday 
festivities. Looks like the Matranga family must 
have had one grand time of it. 

* * 

Ben Robinson, I’m told, is plenty satisfied with 
those Mills Coca-Cola cup vendors, especially since 
he heard from the show that so many, many 
operators were crowding this booth to also get some 
of them. (Hey, Ben, what’s that expression you 
use every hour on the hour about this industry?) 

. . . Dan Cohen returned from his visit to Chicago 
quite impressed with what he saw while there and 
wondering just what lines would be the best for 
him. 

« « « 


■{( « « 

Incidentally, Andy had a lot to weep about the 
day we called at his oflSce. With bookkeeper Charley 
Haehle and telephone gal Rose Hamm both hors de 
combat with colds, Andy was doing all of the 
honors for McCall Novelty himself. 

•{« * * 

Prize Christmas gift of the year was the new 
Plymouth which Carl Trippe delivered to wife 
Margaret on Christmas Eve. And Carl calls it a 
tough year! 

« ■(: « 

Bill Sadler, prominent op took his family on a 
long holiday trip, destination unknown. Lee Turner, 
another, won’t enjoy Christmas much until he gets 
rid of nasty cold which has hung on for weeks. 

!{• ♦ Sf- 

Phonograph rentals hit an all time holiday high 
this month, when every rusty turntable which could 
be refurbished went out on rental. Something like 
340 of them will be in service for New Year’s Eve 
parties, according to a survey among those who 
got on the rental bandwagon. 


Sam Tridico and Bob Buckley of Console Dis- 
tributing Co. are tearing up the roads since their 
showing at Tregle’s Dreamland Ballroom delivering 
all those new Buckley machines they sold at this 
exhibit. Seems like both Sam and Bob are on their 
way for a big, big year, with more and more of 
the boys calling around to ask for more and more 
of those new machines . . . Haven’t been able to 
get in touch with Nick Carbajal of Crown Novelty 
Co. Seems that Nick hasn’t been in his office these 
past few days. 

« * « 

Well, well and well — Dave Martin became a 
Daddy — after all that nervous waiting and, from 
what I hear, daddy’s doing alright — he came thru 
with flying colors ... By the way, hear that Lupe 
Buckley wants to see some snow this winter for the 
first time in her life. She may fly north . . . The 
holidays have sort of kept things quiet and given 
some of the men here a chance to relax again. But, 
all are now looking forward to the big convention 
in Chicago with most of the men here planning to 
just see the last few days of the show for they want 
to be present during election time. 


* 










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The Cash Box 


Page 53 


January 3, 1948 


r w ( 

Mliji ) 




w u A D T 

. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION •l•^■l■ ^ JL i 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE $1.00 PER LINE 

OR ANY FRACTION THEREOF WHERE LINES RUN OYER. EACH LINE MEASURES 7Vj INCHES LONG. 
FIGURE APPROXIMATELY 12 TO 14 WORDS PER LINE. CLOSING DATE IN N. Y. C. EVERY WED., 5 P. M. 

(ALL CLASSIFIED AOS — CASH WITH ORDER) 

USE ENCLOSED GIANT CARD FOR CONVENIENT MAILING 
SPECIAL NOTICE TO $48 PER YEAR SUBSCRIBERS 
YOUR FREE WEEKLY CLASSIFIED AD PRIViLEGE CONTINUES. MAXIMUM SPACE 3 
LINES. ALL LINES. OR ANY FRACTION. OVER 3 LINES WILL BE CHARGED AT THE RATE 
OF $1 PER LINE. 


WANT 


WANT - FOR Cash. Post-war Rolldown Games; Advance Rolls; Total Rolls; Tally Rolls; 

Sportsman Rolls, etc. KEOKUK APPLIANCE CO., 420 MAIN, KEOKUK, IOWA. Tel : 2497 

WANT — The used records from your boxes. We buy steadily all year round. Top prices paid. 
SELL to Chicago's Largest Distributor of Used Records. We pay the freight. Write, Call 
or Ship to: USED RECORD EXCHANGE, 1736 N. KEELER AVE., CHICAGO 39, ILL. Tel; Cap. 7852 

WANT - To Purchase for export shipments - Model 1015 Wurlitzer, 1946 AMI's 146 and 147 
Seeburgs. State quantity and your lowest price in first letter. BADGER SALES CO., INC., 

2251 W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 

WANT — New & used Wall Boxes, Adaptors & Speakers ; Twin 16 Adaptors for Rock-Ola ; Mills, 
Jennings F.P. Mint Vendors ; Solotone, Personal Music Boxes, Amplifiers, etc. Any 25 cycle 
equipment. ST. THOMAS COIN SALES LTD., ST. THOMAS, ONT., CAN. 

WANT — Keeney Bonus Super Bells 2-Way 50 & 250 ; Bally Triple Bells ; Exhibit Rotaries ; Mutoscope 
Fan Front & Red Top Diggers ; Wurlitzer 1015 Phonos ; Victory Specials ; Gott. Daily Races or any 
late F.P. One Ball Games. Quote best prices, quantity & condition in first letter. M. A. POLLARD 
CO., 725 LARKIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO 9, CALIF. Tel: ORdway 3070. 

WANT -Wurlitzer Model 304 Steppers. Will pay $8. ea. ’ K-T ENTERPRISES, 1139 - 17th ST., ~ 
PORTSMOUTH, OHIO. 

WANT — Will buy any quantity used Slot Machines, all makes & models. Also Columbias, 
Gooseneck Mills Q.T's, Vest Pockets. Quote your lowest prices in first letter. All 
machines must be in first class condition. AUTOMATIC GAMES CO., 2858 W. PICO BLVD., LOS 
ANGELES 6, CALIF. 

WANT - Mutoscope Fan Front and Red Top Diggers ; Keeney Three Way Bonus Super Bells ; Bally 
Special Entrys ; Bally Entry; Draw Bells, etc. ; Packard Boxes; 1015 Wurlitzers ; Seeburgs. 
WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 3126 ELLIOTT AVE., SEATTLE 1, WASH. Tel: Garfield 3585. 

WANT - 5 Ball F.P. G. Fly, Trapeze, Humpty Dumpty, Superscore, Hawaii, Mystery, Mexico, 

Nevada, Ginger, Tornado, Coed, Wurlitzer 1015' s. Must be clean & in A-1 condition. State 
quantity & lowest price in first letter. Will pay $90. for Seeburg Vogues, $50. for Wurl. 

71's & 81's, NOBRO NOVELTY CO., 369 ELLIS ST., SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF. 

WANT - DuGrenier "S' Model Cigarette Machines. L & H VENDING, 4807 FOSTER AVE., BROOKLYN. N.Y. 

WANT - Bally Draw Bells ; Triple Bells ; Keeney Super Bonus Bells for cash or will trade new pin 
games, new or used Roll Down games. Mills 3 or 4 Bells, Late Heads. SILENT SALES CO., SILENT 
SALES BLDG., 200 - 11th AVE. SO., MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. 

WANT - Used Juke Box Records Used Juke Box Records Used Juke Box Records. 

Unlimited quantities. Write or wire. FIDELITY DISTRIBS., 332 E. 188th ST., BX. 53, N.Y. 

WANT — Panoram Prcfjectors only. Need not be in working condition. All parts must be there. 
Quote lowest price in first letter. AMUSEMENT ARCADE, 419 - 9th ST. N .W., WASHINGTON, D.C. 

WANT - 6 SR-2Z Seeb. Wall-O-Matic Select. Receivers. P.M. YEO, 540 S. DIVISION AVE., GRAND 
RAPIDS, MICH. Tel: 38003 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — 30 Advance Rolls, nearly new $245. ; 3 Total Rolls $110. ; 2 - 1946 Seeburg 

$495. L. MARTINO, 7933 SANTA MONICA BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Tel: Hemstead 6815 

FOR SALE — Wurlitzer 24 $75. ; Seeburg Envoy $125. ; Wurlitzer 580 Speaker $50. All 
these machines in perfect order with good looking cabinets. VEMCO MUSIC CO., 218 
FRANKLIN ST., FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Tel: 2123. 

FOR SALE - We have them in stock. Contact us for your Hirsh Fed Balls for state of Florida. Best 
money maker out today. Trouble free. Immediate delivery. Make us cash of^er on any new 

or used pin tables you need. MURRELL AMUSEMENT CO., 1058 S. FLORIDA AVE., LAJCZLAND, FLA. 

Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering, «''.s — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 



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The Cash Box 


Page 54 


January 3 , 1948 



FOR SALE - Total Rolls with buttons $165. ; Advance Rolls $275. WANT - Wurlitzer 1015 's. 
Dynamite & Show Girl. Wire Price. ACTIVE DIST. CO., 488 - 10th AVE. , N. Y. C. Tel; LO. 4-5126 
FOR SALE - Premier Barrel Rolls, almost new. 4 - 12' models, 1-7' model. Best offer. 

Write, wire. AMUSEMENT SERVICE, 20 S. W. TEMPLE, SALT LAKE CITY ], UTAH. Tel; 3-2324 

FOR SALE - Mills Four Bells 5-5-5-50 $50. ; Glitter Gold Mills 50 play $50. ; Jumbo Free Play 
$20. ; Glitter Gold 10 Q.T. $20. ; Wurlitzer Mod. 500 $100. ; Wurlitzer Mod. 800 $200. ; Seeb. 
9800 $200.; Nat'l. Cig. Mach. 9 cols. $50. Goal3e $75.; Undersea Raider $30. BELMONT 
VENDING CO., 703 MAIN ST., BRIDGEPORT, OHIO Tel: 750 

FOR SALE — Four Aces ; ABC Bowler, Hi Dive ; Horoscope ; Leader ; Seven Up ; Ten Spot ; Arizona ; 
Argentine; Bolaway; Capt. Kidd; Four Roses; Gobs; Slugger; Metro; Bandwagon; Star Attraction 
& any other pre-war games $29.50 ea. Amber; Dynamite; Fiesta; Spellbound $89.50 ea. State 
Fair; Step Up $79.50 ea. ; Cyclone $124.50; Playboy $149.50; Fast Ball $85. ; Kilroy $110. 

$2. additional for crating. Machines are all in good working order. 1/3 deposit with all 
orders. S. & A. VENDING CO., 39Ti - 13th AVE., NEWARK, N. J. Tel; Market 3-6146 

FOR SALE — 30 Unit Wired Music Set. Rock-Ola Stations. 25 Jennings Wired Music Cabinets and 
5 Mirrored Deluxe Cabinets. Complete with Record Racks $7500. BADGER SALES CO., INC., 

2251 W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 

FOR SALE - Good paying operation that can be expanded. 43 Late Wurlitzer and Seeburgs ; 

10 Free Play Pin Games. Also Retail Record Store. Located Northern 111. Will pay out 
18 months. Ten Grand will handle. Balance - Terms. Owner entering manufacturing. ALSO - 
Estiblished distribution and repair service. Pays overhead. Operations can be added. 
Fertile territory. Investment returned 15 months. Owner wishes to retire. COLEMAN 
NOVELTY CO., 1025 FIFTH AVE., ROCKFORD, ILL. Tel: Dial 4-6512 

FOR SALE — Ten Keeney Three Way Bonus Bells, like brand new $1100. ea. ; Ten Evans Bangtails 
1947 Models, used ten days $450. ea. SPEER COIN MACHINE SERVICE, 418 THIRD ST., SANTA ROSA, 
CALIF. Tel; 3713. 


FOR SALE — Auction. Make us an off er on the f ollow ing Consoles ; 17 - 50 Lucky Lucres ; 6 Galloping 
Dominoes J.P. ; 6 - 5 -100 Pace Twin Reels ; 2 Evans Lucky Stars ; 11 - 100 Big Games ; 3 - 50-50 
Pace Twin Reels ; 2 - 100 Pace Reels Jr. ; 16 - 50 Big Games. HY-G MUSIC CO., 1415 WASHINGTON AVE. 
SO., MINNEAPOLIS 4, MINN. Tel; At. 8587. 

FOR SALE - 30 Advance Rolls, nearly new $245. ; 3 Total Rolls $110. ; 2 - 1946 Seeburg 
$495. L. MARTINC, 7933 SANTA MONICA BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Tel; Hemstead 6815 

FOR SALE - Attention! We have brand new pin games in original crates. Will trade for 
Seeburg Guns, Western Baseballs, 1 Lite League and or one Goalee. Write today. COIN 
AMUSEMENT GAMES, INC., 1023 E. 47th ST., CHICAGO 15, ILL. 

FOR SALE - Photomatic, like new, latest model, used 3 months $1095. ; 1 Voice Recorder 
$575. ; 2 Packard basement units $325. ea. ; 1 Tilly Roll $65. ; 1 Chicoin Hockey $49.50; 
Keeney Air Raiders $69.50. SILENT SALES CO., SILENT SALES BLDG., 200— 11th AVE. SO., 
MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. Tel; Nestor 5720 

FOR SALE - Have no room. Will sell at great sacrifice machines ready for location. Take 
your pick of several of each of the following machines; Spot-A-Card, Sea Hawk, Snappy, 

Seven Up, Monicker, Jungle, Four Roses, Glamour, Gun Club, Horoscope, Victory, Knockout, 

New Champ, Argentine, ABC Bowler and more games too numerous to mention. $25. ea. F.O.B. 
Boston, Mass. Write, phone or wire us. OWL MINT MACHINE CO., 26 BRIGHTON AVE., ALLSTON, 

MASS. Tel; Al gonquin 4-3216 

FOR SALE - Seeburg Telephone Hostess Music System. 15 Units complete with electrical selector 
mechanisms. Slightly used, and consisting of 8 Seeb. Maestro E.S. Double Line, 7 Seeb. Maestro 
E.S. Single Line, 1 Rock-Ola Spectro Vox with Seeburg single line amplifier, 1 double-line 10 
turntable board, 1 single line 10 turntable board, 4 record racks-3,000 capacity. Will take best 
offer. MITCHELL NOVELTY CO., 1629 W. MITCHELL ST., MILWAUKEE 4, WIS. Tel; Mitchell 3254 

FOR SALE - 53 Brand new Solotone Boxes $9.75 ea. ; 10 brand new Location Amplifiers $55. ea. 
KING-PIN EQUIPMENT CO., 826 MILLS ST., KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

FOR SALE - New Equipment; Genco Advance Rolls & Bally Nudgy (write) ; 2 Bally Bally Hoo $150. ea. 
Used Equipment; Total Roll (write) ; 3 Strikes 'N Spares, excellent condition $700. ea. Also 
good selection of used Pin Games, ready for location. KING-PIN DISTRIBUTING CO., 3004 GRAND 
RIVER AVE., DETROIT 1, MICH. Tel; Temple 2-5788. 

FOR SALE - 100 Rolldown Games - Playballs, Tally Rolls, Total Rolls, Advance Rolls, etc. 

All machines in good condition. Write or phone for price. Ted Seidel, general manager. 
AMUSEMENT SALES, 577 TENTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY. Tel; LOngacre 5-8879 

FOR SALE - Mills 1947 "Three Bell", like new $425. ; Set 50-100-250 Club Bells, new cabinets, 
guaranteed equipment $575. ; 50 & 100 Orig. Mills Bonus Bells, rebuLlt - Silver Hammerloid 
(write) ; 25 Slot Machine Packing Boxes $45. ; 25 Pin Game Boxes, wire bound $50. ; Mills Slot 
Locks $16. doz. ; new Cash Boxes $10. doz. Bargain list Free. COLEMAN NOVELTY CO., 1025 
FIFTH AVE. , ROCKFORD, ILL. Tel: 4-^152 

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FOR SALE 


FOR SALE - We have a large quantity of pre-war games. United Conversion games, and 
post-war games for immediate delivery. K. C. NOVELTY CO., 419 MAPiKET ST., PhILA. 6, 

PA. Tel; Market 7-4641 

FOR SALE — DuGrenier W $75., WD $85., completely o-;^rPauied, equipped with double dime mechan- 
ism, choice of new beautiful two-toned blue and grey or maroon and grey. Terms; 1/3 down, 
balance C.O.D. SILENT SALES CO., SILENT SALES B.,.G , 20 j - 11th ST., MINNEAPOLIS 11, MINN. 

FOR SALE - Extra Savings on our famous used games: Exhibit’s Smoky $80. ; Vanities $85. ; 
Rangers $115. ; United's Rio $80. ; Havana $90. ; Mexico $135. ; Nevada $150. ; Williams' Tornado 
$100. Cyclone $120., Torchv $135.; Chicoin's Kilroy $90. 1/3 deposit required. CROWN 

NOVELTY CO., INC., 920 HOWARD AVE., NEW ORLEANS, LA. Tel: CA. 7137 


FOR SALE - Strikes 'N Spares — Greatest money making Games ever put on location. Latest 
model with new type paris, cables, shields, etc. Mechanically perfect. Original cost 
$1100., like new $600. Total Rolls, converted to "Champions", new type Advance Odds. 

New Scoring Glass. Rollover Button playing field. As good as any and better than most 
new rolldown games on the market $225. ; 3-Way 5-10-250 Keeney Super Bonus Bell, floor sample, 
like new $1000. ; Keeney Single 50 Super Bonus Bell $375. PARAMOUNT DISTRIBUTORS, 528 MAIN 
ST., BEACON, N. Y. Tel: Beacon 900. 

! FOR SALE - One Balls: 3 Victory Specials $175- ea. ; Longacres & Dust Whirls & Thorobreds 
! $55. ea. Five Balls; Big League, Surf Queen, Big Hit, Streamliner, South Seas, Grand 

I i^ Canyon $35. ea. Baffle Cards & Kilroys $90. ea. C & M SPECIALTY CO., 832 CAMP ST., NEW 

ORLEANS, LA. 

' FOR SALE - Attention New York City Operators ! 200 Pre-War Pin Games converted for city 

operation $40. ea. Your opportunity for big returns on a small investment. Be ready! 

I Stock up now before the big rush for games raises prices. Hurry! They won't last long. 

• PARAMOUNT DISTRIBUTORS, 528 MAIN ST., BEACON, N.Y. Tel; Beacon 900. 

FOR SALE — All kinds of used machines in perfect condition. Write us for lowest prices. 

BRILLIANT MUSIC CO., 4606 CASS AVE., DETROIT 1, MICH. Tel: lEmple 1-7455. 

! FOR SALE — 30 Advance Rolls, nearly new $245. ; 3 Total Rolls $110. ; 2 - 1946 Seeburg 

I $495. L. MARTINO, 7933 SANTA MONICA BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Tel: Hemstead 6815 

FOR SALE — Mills greatest proven money makers - original Black Cherry Bells, Golden 
Falls, Vest Pocket Bells, all like new. Lowest rrices, quality considered. Mills 
Three Bells, repainted original factory colors $275. ; late head Mills Four Bells $200. 

Save with safety. Trade and buy with authorized Mills and Keeney Distributors. Established 
1905. SILENT SALES CO., SILENT SALES BLDG., 200 - 11th AVE. SO.. MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. 


FOR SALE - 6 ft. Bowl-O-Bowl, electric scoring (bowling game) fl. sample $99.50; 14 ft. 
Bowl-O-Bowl, fl. sample $139.50; Mutoscope Voice-O-Graph '46 ,350 slot, like new $950.; 
Chi-Coin Baseball, new $150. SILENT SALES SYSTEM, 635 D ST., N.W. WASHINGTON 4, D. C. Tel: 
District 0500 

FOR SALE - Contact Taran Dist., Inc. for the lowest prices on used phonographs. Also 
delivering the latest Pingames by United, Chicgo Coin, Williams, Exhibit, Marvel & Genco. 
TARAN DIST., INC., 90 RIVERSIDE AVE., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

FOR SALE — AMI Telephone Hostess Music — Units of ten or morel Like new, reconditioned. Wire, 
phone or write for real low price. RUNYON SALES CO., 123 W. RUNYON ST., NEWARK, N. J. Tel : 
Bigelow 3-8777. 

FOR SALE — 4 A.B.T. Challengers, all crated $50. 1/3 deposit. Close-out Sale. SAM 

BISHOP, 12 COLLINS ST., CARIBOU, MAINE. 


FOR SALE — 1 No. 1017 Wurlitzer Hideaway, very clean with Plastic Star Speaker $295. ; 1 Wurl. 
Twin 616 Hideaway Packard Adapter $95. ; 1 new Packard Hideaway floor sample $335. ; 2 Packard 
No. 1200 Speakers, new $100. ea. ; 1 - 100 new Pace Chrome Bell $150. ; 1 - 250 new Pace Chrome 
Bell $155. AUTOMATIC AMUSEMENT CO., 1000 PENNSYLVANIA ST., EVANSVILLE 10, IND. Tel; 3-4508. 

FOR SALE — Panorama $199. ; Pop Ups $14. ; Wurlitzer 500 $95. ; Air Raiders $10. ; Paces Racers 
$35. ; Super Zetas $5. ; 12 record Seeburg $25. ; new style Masters $10. ; ABT Targets $8. ; 
slightly used Panoram Film $10. ; Peep Show Film $12. ; American Eagles $3. ; Vest Pockets 
$25. ; Groetchen Columbia $25. ; 1941 J. P. Galloping Dominos $45. ; Seeburg Jap $35. ; Bear 
Ray Gun $40. CAROLINA VENDING MACHINE CO., R No. 2, ALBEMARLE 2, N. C. Tel: 838J 

FOR SALE - Advance Rolls $325. ; Total Roll $150. ; Sportsman Roll $150. ; Goalee $100. ; 

Tally Roll $75. ; Rol-A-Score $150. ; Bang-A-Fitty $250. ; Rapid Fire $25. ; Super Triangle 
$60. MOHAWK SKILL GAMES CO., 56 MACARTHUR DRIVE, SCOTIA, N. Y. 

FOR SALE — Victory Specials $245. ; Special Entry $395. Excellent condition like new. 

50 Chrome $75. ; 100 Brown and Blue Fronts $75. ; 250 Brown Fronts $85. M. A. POLLARD 
CO., 725 LARKIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO 9, CALIF. Tel; ORdway 3-3069. 

FOR SALE — Late Five Ball Marble Tables for sale. Worth the money or will trade for 
other five ball tables. Wire - Wire - Phone. OSCAR GLICKMAN, 211 MAIN ST., BIG SPRING, 
TEXAS. Tel: 230 


P/#wuu> menlinn THE CASH BOX when answering nAs it pmres ynn're n real rnin machine man! 




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The Cash Box 


Page 56 


January 3, 1948 


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COIN MACHINE 


CUSSIFIED ADVEBTISINO SECTION 


FOR SAME 


FOR SALE - $15. ea. : All American, Argentine, American Beauty, Band Wagon, Big 3, Bolaway, 
Boscc, Brite Spot, Capt. Kidd, Duplex, 4 Aces, Hi Hat, Horoscope, Hungles, Legionnaire, 
Monicxer, Mustang, 1-2-3, Owl, 7 Up, Shangri-L?, Spot Pool, Star Attraction, Velvet, Venus, 
’42 Home Run. $20. ea. : Air Circus, Big Parade, Grand Canyon, Hollywood, Idaho, Knockout, 
Laura, Liberty, Midwway, Oklahoma, Riviera, 2ni Front, Sun Valley. T & L DISTRIBUTING CO., 
1321 CENTRAL PARKWAY, CINCINNATI 14, OHIO Tel: Main 8751 

FOR SALE - 10 Keeney Three Way Bonus Super Bells, like new, guaranteed perfect 
mechanically and outward appearance $800. ea. Terms: 1/3 Deposit, balance C.O.D. 

ADVANCE AUTOMATIC SALES CO., 1350 HOWARD ST., SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

FOR SALE - 10 - 616 Wurl. $75. ea. ; 2 - 600R Wurl. $150. ea. ; 1 - 1940 Rock-Ola C.M. $90. ; 

3 Seeburg Mayfairs $150. ea. ; 2 Seeburg Regals $175. ea. All above machines in excellent 
condition. X-CEL NOVELTY CO., 1929 W. TIOGA ST., PHILA. 40, PA. Tel: RA. 5-8705 

FOR SALE — One Deluxe Photomatic Mutoscop'^, ns^d 60 days $995. ; two Keeney Bonus Bells 
5 & 250, like new $475. ea. ROY FOSTEP, 2206 SO. MINN AVE., SIOUX FALLS, S. DAKOTA. 

FOR SALE - Wurlitzer Model 600 phonograpns xn A-i snape $115. ea. ; complete Musical 
Telephone Music System, includes Studio amplifiers and wall boxes. We bought these cheap 
and will turn them over for a cash offer, if interested. HIRSH COIN MACHINE CORP., 1309 NEW 
JERSEY AVE.. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FOR SALE - Goin' Out Of Business. 10 Strikes 'N Spares. Also a good paying route of 19 Strikes 
'N Spares on location. Also 40 brand new Test Quests counter games. Write for complete details. 
BAUM DISTRIBUTING CO., 2332 LOCUST ST., ST. LOUIS 3, MO. 

FOR SALE - Seeburgs : Classic $125. ; Mayfair 3^130. ; Hi-Tones 8800 & 9800 $140. ; L.-Tone 
$250. ; Complete Hideaway $100. Wurlitzer: 50DX $125. ; 600K $125. ; 600R $115. ; 700 $215. ; 
850 $215. ; 950, new plastics $225. ; model 320 Wall Boxes $10. ea. Rock-Olas: '39 Deluxe 
$120.; Standard $110. ANGOTT SALES CO., 2616 PURITAN, DETROIT, MICH. Tel; Un. 40773 

FOR SALE - Wurlitzer 600 $100. ; 750E $295. ; 500 - $100. ; Rock-Ola 1940 Super $100. Write 
for complete list. DAVE LOWY & CO., 594 TENTH AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. Tel: BRyant 9-0317 

FOR SALE — Brand new Columbus 10-50 Peanut Vendors : 10 Ball Gixm Vendors in Stock. Brand new 
Daval 50 Free Play Cigarette or Fruit Reels. Write: H. M. BRANSON DISTRIBUTING CO., 516 SO. 

2nd ST., LOUISVILLE 2. KY. Tel; Wabash 1501. 

FOR SALE - 30 Advance Rolls, nearly new $245. ; 3 Total Rolls $110. ; 2 - 1946 Seeburg 
$495. L. MARTINO, 7933 SANTA MONICA BLVD., LOJ ANGELES, CALIF. Tel: Hemstead 6815 

FOR SALE - 2 - 100 Black Cherry $155. ea. ; 8 ABI Challengers $25. ea. ; 2 Bally Big Top 
C.P. $40. ea. ; 50 Paces Reels C.P. $50. ; 50 Draw Bell $265. ; Wur. 850 $275. ; 2 Bat-A-Ball, 
new $20. ea. ; 2 Wur. 412 $60. ea. ; Genco Step Up $70. ; Wagon Wheel $50. ; Suspense $65. ; 

Air Circus $40. HUTZLER VENDING MACHINE CO., 200 WINCHESTER AVE., MARTINSBURG, W. VA. 

FOR SALE - Pilot Trainer, used only four months. Cannot be told from new. I am closing my 
arcade. $500. f.o.b. Los Angeles. Add $25. for crating. Send or wire 10% deposit. WM. 
NATHANSON, 2738-1/2 CINCINNATI ST.. LOS ANGELES 53, CALIF. 

FOR SALE - Used Cigarette Machines. For sale as is but all working. Just off location. 

F. 0. B. Phoenix. L S 11 column Champion DuGreniers $85. each; L S 9 column DuGft’eniers 
$75. each; S 7 column S & M DuGreniers $35. each; Model 500 U-Need-A-Paks, 9 or 15 
column $80. each; 9 A National $90. each; 10 column Rowe Presidents $100. each. Talman 
Andress, ANDRESS CIGARETTE SERVICE, 1504 GRAND AVENUF, PHOENIX, ARIZONA. Tel; 4-4660 

FOR SALE - This Week's Specials! Suspense $69.50; Surf Queens $39.50; Step Up $65. ; Double 
Barrel $44.50; Big League $49.50; Undersea Raider $75. An exceptional buy on slightly used 
AMI Phonographs. Write or Call. HANNA DISTRIBUTING CO., 169 CAMPBELL AVE., UTICA 4, N. Y. 
Tel: 6-386 

FOR SALE - Good News ! Limited quantity brand new Adams Model G.V. 10 Gum Machines, color - 
red and blue - six columns - compact - slug proof - immediate delivery $24. F.O.B. Anderson. 
Unlimited quantities of Adams 10 Vending Gum 510 per box of 100 pieces. 1/3 deposit with 
all orders. JOE E. FLOYD, 513 TAYLOR ST., ANDERSON, S. C. Tel: 1794-M 

FOR SALE - Improved Williams' All Sta^’F, like new $350. ; Ballyhoo $110. ; Surf Queens $40. ; 
Bally Big Leagues $40. ANTHONY HIRT, 2303 N. 11 ST., SHEBOYGAN, WIS. Tel: Dial 5619 

FOR SALE - 25 Model 80 Kirk Astrology Scales $169.50 ea. THE VENDING MACHINE CO., 205-215 
FRANKLIN ST., FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Tel: 3171. 

FOR SALE - DuGrenier, Rowe, National and Uneedapak cigarette and candy machines, all models, 
under market prices. All in good working condition, ready for location. Also all other coin 
equipment. Uneedapak parts. Want - Will buy anything. Send us your list. MACK H. POSTED. 

6750 NORTH ASHLAND AVE., CHICAGO 26, ILL. 


FOR SALE - Keeney Three Way Bonus Bells. Just off location. A-1 condition. $800.00. 
One-third denosit with order, balance C.O.D. W. & M. AMUSEMENT COMPANY, P. 0. BOX 277, 
INYOKERN, CALIF. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX trlten nnsirering n/h it nrnres you’re n rent coin tnnrhine mnn! 



The Cash Box 


Page 57 


January 3, 1948 


W TO ( 


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1/ A D T 


^ CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION Xl H 1 

J 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — Used Pinball Mamchines ; Genco Skeeballs |75. ; Ten Strikes $25. ; Western Baseball 
|50. ; Vest Pockets 46-47 models; '38 Tracktimes |75. Call or write. WESTCHESTER AMUSEMENT 
CO., 86 OAK ST., YONKERS, N. Y. Tel; Yonkers 5-9797 

FOR SALE - 5 Ball Pin Games. All thoroughly reconditioned, cleaned, rails refinished, packed 
in good cartons. At $25. : Sporty, Blondie, Big Town, Formation, Big Chief, Crossline. At 
$30. ; Four Roses, Band Wagor, Twin Six, Ten Spot, ABC Bowler, Flat Top, Chubby, Wild Fire. 

At $35. : Towers, Show Boat, All American, Sky Ray, Spot Pool, Gun Club, Dixie, Clover, Hi 
Hat, Champ, School Days, Laura, Legionnaire, Venus, Seven Up. At $45. : Arizona, Surf Queen, 
Midget Racer, Big League. At $75. Superscore. One Balls F.P. : Sport Special $45. ; Dark 
Horse $60. ; Blue Grass $65. Immediate shipment. 1/3 deposit, bal. C.O.D. W. F. KEENEY 
MFG. CO., 7729 CONSTANCE AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 

FOR SALE - Guaranteed Used Machines - Bells ; Consoles ; One-Ball ; Pins. The machines are 
perfect, the prices are right! Write for list. CONSOLE DISTRIBUTING CO., 1006 POYDRAS 
ST., NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

FOR SALE - Genco Advance Rolls $334.50; Esso Stars Alley Rolls (with new Esso Arrows 
parts) $279.50: Genco Total Rolls $139.50. NATIONAL NOVELTY CO., 183 E. MERRICK ROAD, 
MERRICK, L.I., N.Y. 

FOR SALE - 30 Advance Rolls, nearly new $245. ; 3 Total Rolls $110. ; 2 - 1946 Seeburg 
$495. L. MARTINO, 7933 SANTA MONICA BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Tel: Hemstead 6815 

FOR SALE - Or trade; 8 No. 3020 Wurlitzer Wall Boxes, dime, nickel & quarter play. Will 
trade for Williams' All Star baseball game or $400. cash. K-T ENTERPRISES, 1139 - 17th 
ST., PORTSMOUTH, OHIO. 

?0R SALE - Personal Music and Soiotone boxes. Axso btuaio ana location amplifiers. Wire, 
ohone or write for real low price. RUNYON SALKi CO., 123 W. RUNYON ST.. NEWARK 8, N. J. Tel: 
Bigelow 3-8777 

FOR SALE - Ray Gun Operators ! Those old Seeburg and Bally Guns can make new profits 
again! Write for information on our new extra moving target Units. COIN AMUSEMENT 
GAMES, INC., 1023 E. 47th ST., CHICAGO 15, ILL. 

FOR SALE - 12 Bally Nudgys ; 20 Bally Silver Streaks. All brand new and in their original 
crates. Close out sale. Write or phone for our special price. MINTHORNE MUSIC CO., 

2920 W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Tel; Parkway 2177 


PARTS AND SUPPLIES 


FOR SALE — Handy Dandy Pistol Grip Soldering Iron. Quick Heating, saves time & labor. Can be 
Operated directly from a 110 AC or DC line. Limited number. While they last $3.95 ea. SILENT 
SALES CO., SILENT SALES BLDG., 200 - 11th AVE. SO., MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. 

FOR SALE - Parts and supplies for all types coin operated machines. Send for Free illustrated 
wall chart. Lists over 1200 different items frcm A to Z. If you operate coin machines you should 
be on our mailing list. Coin Chutes, clocks, fvses, glass locks, rubber rings, wrappers, etc. 
Largest parts suppliers in the U.S.A. BLOCK MAI BLE CO., 1425 N. BROAD ST., PHILA. 22, PENNA. 

FOR SALE - We are now closing out our stock of Black Cherry and Golden Falls Case and Casting 
Assemblies for $30. ea. Assembly includes Castings, Wood Case, Club Handle, Drill Proofing, 
Award Cards, Jack Pot Glass, etc. WOLFE MUSIC CO., 1201 W. MAIN ST., OTTAWA, ILL. Tel; 1302 

FOR SALE - Wholesale Radios-Parts, etc.; Pilot lites Special! No. 47 $40. per 1000; No. 51 
or 55 - 10 for 48^, 100 for $4.40, 300 $.042 ea. ; Nos. 40, 46, 44, 47 - 10 for 58^, 100 for 
$5.30, 300 $.05 ea. ; Tube cartons for GT tubes (1-3/4" x 1-3/4" x 3-1/2") Bundles of Fifty 
50^!; Radio Tubes; 1LC6-980 ea. (6SK7GT 35^ ea. Center pins broken but tubes good). 

BELMONT RADIO SUPPLY, 1921 BELMONT AVE., CHICAGO 13, ILL. 


FOR SALE - Pin Game Cartons. Heads Separate, leg wrappers and proper fillings. Best pin game 
cartons made, 310 lb. test cardboard, $3. ea. on order of 10, $2.85 ea. on order of 25, $2.75 ea. 
on orders of 100. Let us know your needs. We also carry a complete list of Bally & Evans games 
& parts. PALISADE SPECIALTIES CO., 498 ANDERSON AVE., CLIFFSIDE PARK, N. J. Tel: Cliff side 
6-2892. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


NOTICE - Music Operators; You cannot afford to pass up the Saving & Service we offer; you 
take no chances because we Guarantee every Needle we Re-Sharpen. Drop a card for Details & 
Shipping Containers. Give it a Try. RE-SHARP NEEDLE SERVICE, BOX 770, FT. DODGE, IOWA. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 


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The Cash Box 


Page 58 


January 3, 1948 


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COIN MACHINE 


CUSSIFIED ADVEBTISING SECTION 


MISCEUAM£OUS 

NOTICE - Want. Used Juke Box Records - Used Juke Box Records - Used Juke Box Records. 
Unlimited quantities. Write or wire. FIDELITY DISTRIBS., 332 E. 188th ST., BX. 58, N. Y. 

NOTICE - Music Ops! Make your Counter Models earn you money! Wurlitzer Counter Trays; - 
Edges restored to Factory Specifications and New Rigid Centers $4.20 set of 12. Don't Pay 
More ! Service in 36 Hours. Do not send badly bent or hammered Trays. Ship Railway Express 
or Parcel Post. A-1 MUSIC CO., 4808 CONSHOHOCKEN AVE., PHILA. 31, PA. 

NOTICE — Save 50 to 75% of record cost. Order the new Xtalyte lightweight tone arm 
today. Less than one Oz. pressure. Adaptable to all models Wurlitzer & Seeburg 
Phonographs. Complete with Volume Control $12.45. BUSH DISTRIBUTING CO., 257 
PLYMOUTH AVE. NO., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Please mention THE CASH BOX when answerin r a !s — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 


PASS THIS SUBSCRIPTION ON TO A FRIEND!! 

“THE CASH BOX” 

"The Confidenf/a/ Weekly of The Coin Machine Industry" 

381 FOURTH AVENUE. NEW YORK 16. N. Y. 

PLEASE ENTER MY SUBSCRIPTION FOR ONE YEAR. ENCLOSED FIND CHECK FOR $15.00 

(ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE) 

NAME 

FIRM 

STREET 

CITY ZONE STATE 




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MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 
161 W. Huron St. 
Chicago 10, Illinois 


TO DAMON RUNYON 






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Otlerru (Christmas 


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for the 


Damon Runyon 


Fund for Cancer 


Research 


Sure, you’ve givea to the Damon Runyon Fund for Cancer Research. 

And you’ve given to plenty of other good causes in 1947. 

But you knovt^ in your heart you can afford another five, ten or twenty dollars . . . maybe another 
hundred, if the holiday spirit is strong within you. You’ll feel better 

Christmas day . . . happier, more satisfied with life, 
more hopeful for the future ... if you sit down now and write another check 
for the Damon Runyon Fund and mail it today to Ray Moloney. 


BALLY MANUFACTURING COMPANY • 2640 BELMONT AVE., CHICAGO 18, ILLINOIS 




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