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Vol. 9, No. 33 
May 15, 1948 


ONLY WURLITZER Music Merchants are 

backed by a profit-stimulating national magazine 
advertising campaign. See the April 12th issue 
of LIFE and the May 11th issue of LOOK for 
the advertisement illustrated above — the first in 
a sensational new series of full page, four color 


ads that will feature famous recording artists. 
This advertising is making more and more 
location owners want Wurlitzer Phonographs 
— is persuading the public to put more money 
into Wurlitzer Phonographs and that means 
extra profits for every Wurlitzer Music Merchant. 


The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, North Tonawanda, New Tbrk 


i 


WURLITZER MUSIC MERCHANTS 


ON WURLITZER LEADERSHIP 




EXCLUSIVE PROTECTION 
FOR CIGARETTE MACHINES, 
DRINK DISPENSERS, CANDY 
VENDORS, SCALES, ALL OTHER 
AUTOMATIC MERCHANDISERS 

AND SERVICE MACHINES. 

★ 

Exclusive protection by the world famous William 
J. Burns International Detective Agency is offered 
to all cigarette machines, drink dispensers, candy 
vendors, scales, all other automatic merchandisers 
and service machines, anywhere in the U. S. A. 

This internationally famed service can now be 
obtained by operators of the above equipment at a 
very special rate, covering everyone of the auto- 
matic merchandisers and service machines on each 
individual location anywhere in the nation. 

Automatic merchants who wish the ultimate in 
protection at a special rate, arranged exclusively for 
them, should immediately inquire for full details. 

Associations of automatic merchants can arrange 
for an all-inclusive rate for the merchandisers of 
their members. This special feature will meet with 
complete approval of the officers and members. 
Arrangements for meeting with any association 
execntive board are now complete. Associations are 
nrged to make inquiry through a responsible officer. 

★ 

THE COIN MACHINE OPERATORS 
OF AMERICA, INC. 

1309 NEW JERSEY AVE., N. W. 

WASHINGTON 1, 0. C. 

(All Phones: HOBART 3170) 







“THE CONFIDEISTIAL WEEKLY OF THE COIN MACHINE INDUSTRY” 

THE CASH BOX IS THE OPEIL4TOR’S 3IAGAZEVE— 

IT IS NOT SOLD ON NEWSSTANDS 

BILL GERSH, Publisher 
JOE ORLECK, Editor and Advertising Director 

ROBERT E. AUSTI\, General Manager, Music Dept. JOEL FRIEDMAN, Music Editor 

G. BRL^'ER. Business Manager G. BLOOM, Circulation 

LEO SIMON, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BERT MERRILL. St. Louis, Mo. 

L. MILAZZO, Classified Advertising O. S. SIBLEY, Art Director 

CORRESPONDENTS IN LEADING CITIES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES 


IN THIS ISSUE 

May lo. 1948 Vol. 9, No. 33 


TRADE AGREES DIME IS 

“KING OF COINS” Pages 4 and 5 

AUTOMATIC MUSIC SECTION Page 6 

NATION’S TOP TEN TUNES Page 7 

RECORD REVIEWS Pages 9 and 11 

MANUFACTURERS’ NTW EQUIPMENT Page 22 

GENERAL COIN MACHINE SECTION Page 23 

CHICAGO CHATTER Page 36 

EASTERN FLASHES Page 37 

CALIFORNL4 CLIPPINGS Page 38 


PUBLISHED WEEKLY by The Cash Box 
Publishing Co., Inc., 381 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 16, N. Y., Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 4-7797. Branch Offices: 32 West Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago 1, Illinois, Telephone: 
DEarborn 0045 and 1516 Crossroads of 
the World, Hollywood 28, California, 
Telephone: HOllywood 8163. 
CONTENTS COMPLETELY COPY- 
RIGHTED 1948. All rights reserved. 
No publication of any material contained 
herein is allowed without written permis- 
sion from the publisher. 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. All 
advertising closes Friday at 5 P. M. 
preceding week of issue. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATE S5 per year any- 
where in the U.S.A. Special subscription 
allowing free classified advertisement 
each week, not to exceed three full lines. 
848 per year. Subscription rates for all 
foreign countries on request. Three weeks 
advance notice required for change of 
address. 

THE CASH BOX exclusively covers the 
coin machine industry, including oper- 


ators, jobbers, dl-tributors and manufac- 
turers, and all those allied to automatic 
coin operated music equipment; automatic 
coin operated vending machines and serv- 
ice machines as well as all coin operated 
amusement equipment; the music and 
record business, recording artists and pub- 
lishers of music; and all others in any 
fashion identified or allied to the coin 
operated machine industry as well as 
all finance firms, banks and other finan- 
cial institutions expressly interested in the 
financing of coin operated equipment of 
all types. 

THE CASH BOX has been reco^ized by 
various associations of coin machine oper- 
ators thruont the United States as their 
official weekly magazine. 

THE C.M.I. BLUE BOOK division of The 
Cash Box is an entirely separate medium, 
giving all prices of new and used machines 
of all kinds, continually reporting all 
market changes. The C.M.I. BLU’U BOOK 
is officially recognized by many States as 
the “official price book of the coin ma- 
chine industrv-.” 


Talking It Over 


Some of the most exciting talk about 
the country at this time is due to the item 
which appeared here last week regarding 
progress made (and expected) by video 
industry. Music ops have written in stat- 
ing, “This is one report which gave us a 
lot of food for thought.” 

It seems that whenever a group of 
juke box ops get together these days, 
someone pops un with, “What about tele- 
vision?” 

The result has been discussions, pro 
and con, which have raged on and on. 
Many believe that eventually there will 
be a machine built featuring combo of 
coin operated video-radio-phono. 

Therefore the statistics given in this 
column (last issue) and suggested for 
analysis to those ops most interested 
seern to have given many much “food for 
thought.” 

★ ★★★★★ 

We’ve been tipped off to look for a re- 
vival in the bowling alley field, “but this 
time,” the tipster tells us, “you’ll see the 
bowling games come out with 10c coin 
chutes.” 

The fact that some ops are now testing 
pinballs on dime play (giving higher 
free play awards naturally) may have 
interested the bowling games field which 
feels it, too, can get a dime from players, 
j “In fact,” one well known bowling 
game op advises, “I’ve already got one 
machine on test and yon can believe me,” 
he says, “the take jumped over 50 per 
cent the first week. I’m now waiting to 
see how long the take will stay up, or 
whether it will fall down. And,” he con- 
cludes, “if it doesn’t fall, I’m changing 
all my games over to dime play.” 

★ ★★★★★ 

The new electric cigaret machines 
have, quietly and 'efficiently, met with 
quick public approval. It was interest- 
ing for the writer to watch people walk 
up to one of the newest of these ma- 
chines, in an airport location, and op- 
erate them without a moment’s hesita- 
tion, just as if they were used to them 
for years. 

In fact, accidentally meeting vdth the 
1 operator, who had come to service the 
' machine, we learned that this was the 
case in everyone of the locations where 
the new electric cigaret vendors had been 
placed. 

j Thi.=: sort of quick public acceptance 
and approval of a new product, bodes 
well for the future of the industry. 

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 

Juke box ops everywhere have en- 
thusiastically taken to the idea (as sug- 
I gested in an editorial here) of featuring 
I window streamers and other point-of- 
[ sale-advertising aids to help boom play. 

Ops believe that record mfrs and pub- 
lishers can supply the window streamers 
reading, “Listen to America’s new song 
sensation (name of song) and all the 
other new tunes on the juke box here.” 

Belief is that this will help offset some 
of the window streamers now being given 
to retailers by beer and whiskey firms 
for their television sets. Also feel that 
it will definitely help popularize tunes 
for the diskeries and pubberies. 

“And,” as one well known music op 
says, “it will also stimulate sheet music 
sales as well as help exploit artists who 
do the tune.” 

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 

The used machines market is enjoy- 
ing something of a lift around the coun- 
try. At first used sales were spotty, 
wholesalers report, but, in past few 
weeks, they have started upwards, and 
are continuing to go up. 

Return to better sales action in used 
machine field is considered one sure way 
to clear out inventories and give many 
ops working capital. 

“This,” says one of the biggest in the 
used field, “is sure to get sales going for 
new equipment. Ops need new machines,” 
he concludes, “and by getting cash for 
their old equipment can start buying once 
again in better quantity.” 





The Cash Box Page 4 May 15, 1948 

TM lintRttSlfiME 

Foresee New Coin Machine Era With 
Products Resulting from 10c Play 
Enthused. “It’s The Answer”, 


NEW YORK — For the first time in the history of 
the industry there has eome unanimous approval of 
a new plan, a new idea — the entrance of a new era — 
from everyone of the outstanding leaders of this field. 

All agree, “The dime is ‘king of coins’ today.” 

And that, without much further ado, is what the 
nation’s ops need know to go on ahead with plans to 
change over to 10c plays so that, once again, this entire 
field will enjoy the prosperity to which it is accus- 
tomed, and will see its manufactories building new, 
better, different, more thrilling and more enduring 
products to meet with the public’s approval, and 
naturally, to bring even more prosperity, more coin 
into the pockets of the members of this trade. 

There is no longer any earthly doubt that, “The 
dime is the ‘king of coins.’ ” 

Everywhere in the nation. On the transit systems. 
In stores. In every walk of modern American life, the 
dime has superseded the nickel, just as the nickel 
superseded the penny long, long ago. 

There was a time in this coin operated machines 
industry when only penny machines were considered 
profitable. In fact, an outstanding meat packer en- 
tered into the automatic music business and produced 
and presented the “Penny Phono.” 

All amusement machines that were built in those 
days, even the “bells” (the old “slots”) as they are 
known today, were penny play. (Check back on this 
and note the Ic play “bells” which are still in exist- 
ence, and are still reported to be taking in some coins.) 

After that came the pinball, and the modern phono, 
with the result that all changed to meet the new era — 
the 5c play era — and the result was that from thence- 
forth onward the trade continued with 5c play. 

Five eents is dead. It’s finished. The nickel died 
with the entrance of inflation. Best example is the fact 
that the 5c cigar is gone — it has been replaced with a 
10c sign — even tho it’s the same nickel cigar. 

The ice cream cone died — the 5c cone — it’s 10c 
now. The nickel shoe shine is all over — it’s 10c — and 
even more in some place. That 50c haircut (and, 
brother, how they squawked when they made it .50c) 
is now 75c and $1.00 in some barber shops. 

Bus fares were always a nickel. They’re a dime 
today. Even the street cars, elevated lines, subways; 
every mode and type of transportation, has jumped 
from the nickel to the dime. (There’s no in-between 
coin.) 

The Cash Box, years ago, urged the minting of a 
7^c coin. But, with politics what they are in Wash- 
ington, that would take years and years, so merchan- 
disers jumped to 10c. There you are — inflation — but, 
at the same time, opening the wedge for the coin ma- 
chine industry to get its rightful coinage — the new 
“king of coins” — the new coin that is increasing in 
quantity in the pockets of the public — that is jingling 
a merry tune — the dime. 

Long live the “king” — the dime. 

Why? Because the dime will open a new era for all 
coin machine operators. Because the American public 
is now dime-conscious. Because they will NOT BE 
SHOCKED when all coin machines change over to 
10c play. 

Whether the phono op wishes to still eontinue on 


5 plays for 25c — while 1 play is 10c — is up to him. 
But, the amusement game ops, by hiking up their , 
awards — can instantly change over to 10c play in the 
greater majority of their locations. 

The answer is 10c. 

The thin dime, (brother, can you spare it?) is no 
longer the BIG COIN of yesteryear — it is the penny 
of years and years ago — the nickel of yesterday. And, 
therefore, is the coin which the operators of America 
are ready to enthusiastically feature for the coin 
operated entertainment which they offer. 

Phono ops have reported, time and time again, that 
even when they cut down their commissions to the 
locations they were up against it. Why? Because 
when a location owner gets a measley $2 bill as his 
week’s take from a phono — he doesn’t give one damn 
about that machine anymore. He never again puts 
coins into it to stimulate people in the place to play it. 

He, in fact, wants the operator to get it the hell out of ^ 
his place. It’s all over, at least as far as he’s concerned. 

Whatever anyone will tell you or you or you about 
5c play being “traditional” — simply stinks. Because 
New York’s subways always maintained that the 5c 
fare was “traditional.” And no politician had the guts 
to ehange it. 

The day of the nickel is over. It’s dead. It’s gone. 

It’s only used for change — just like the penny is used 
today. It’s the coin that will be placed as “tax” on 
cigarette packages soon. They’ve hiked the tax to 3c 
per paek — they’ll hike it to 5c per pack — watch — and i 

don’t be surprised! 

So, why play for pennies when machines cost more 
than they ever did? When the materials that go into 
the manufacture of those machines recognize the 
“dime as king”? 

The one and only answer is to supersede the nickel 
with the dime, as has every single storekeeper in the ’ 
nation, whether he operates a bar, grill, tavern, ice 
cream parlor, diner restaurant, drug store, or what- 
ever the hell else it is. 

You know it — I know it — we all know it — that the 
dime is the ‘king of coins.” And, everyone of the 
manufacturers in this business knows it, too. They 
know it by the prices they’re paying for materials and i 
components which they formerly purchased AT HALF 
THAT PRICE. 

Therefore, they must (simply must) expect the op- ^ 
erator to get DOUBLE what he’s getting today to meet 
his tremendously increased overhead and eost of 
equipment, so that he can continue on in this business 
profitably and assure these manufacturers that they, 
too, will have a good, solid, substantial business for 
the future. 

Music operators howl over the price of records. .. 
“We paid 18c and 21c before the war,” they say. 
“Today,” they cry, “we pay 49c for pop tunes and 65c 
for race tunes.” And they lament, “How in the hell 
are we going to make a Uving if we have to pay those 
prices for records?” j 

One operator writes, “Collected $8 from a location 
today. Gave the storekeeper $4. Then put some new 
records in the juke box. Where the hell am I when it 
comes to any profit?” 

There’s the answer. That nickels won’t take any 



The Cash Box 


Page 5 


May 15, 1948 


IS “KINli BF COWS” 

Coinmen Prospering and Many New 
Action. Phono and Game Ops are 
Say the Industry’s Leaders. 


operator “off the nut” today regardless of who he is. 
^ And, if this operator thinks he’s outsmarting the world 
hy keeping old records in his machines — he’s nuts. 
Because the world (his world) the American public, 
just won’t be interested in playing his machines any- 
more. And that’s that. 

So, he’s got to have new recordings. New interest. 
New “something” for the players. And, today, the 
k players are dime-conscious, because they’ve got more 
dimes in their pockets than ever before in history. 
The answer? Dime play! 

The old counter games, as stated in an editorial 
here in the May 8 issue, took instant advantage of the 
many pennies which were suddenly appearing in the 
public’s pockets due to the rise of sales taxes thruout 

# the nation — and the counter games boomed — maybe 
too much — but, they boomed, during those old days 
— and their coin chutes left the way open for pennies, 

^ nickels, dimes and quarters — with many an op telling 

* about the “heavier coins than pennies” he collected 
regularly from those machines. 

One of the greatest moneymaking games to ever 
appear in the coin machine industry was the “duck 
jar.” This was a simple candy jar with a floating cork 
duck with a slot in the cover of the jar which allowed 
the player to drop anywhere from a penny to a silver 
dollar. But, he had to make that coin land on the 
duck’s back — and stay there. And he was paid accord- 
ing to the odds. (The entire game sold for about $2 
' and ops earned anywhere from $10 to $100 weekly, 

I and more, with it.) 

But, that only proved that if the “odds are right” 
the players will play and go along with any type coin 
operated machine. They’ll go along with pinhalls, 
rolldowns, one-balls, consoles, bells, arcade machines, 
and all other types of amusement games as long “as 
the odds are there.” 

And, tell me, what in the hell is to prevent a pinball 
or rolldown op from setting odds for 10c play as 
against nickel play? (Remember, this play is all with- 
in the same time limit for what he gets a nickel today.) 

The very same thing applies to the automatic 
phonos. With the ops getting 10c per play they can 
I afford to give the public the finest records, the best 
service, the better machines, and meet ihe public 
approval in every regard. That’s the answer! 

Prosperous ops can do things they can’t do today — 
because the operator, today, isn’t making money — 
he’s losing money, instead. And he can’t go on losing 
^ money — for that means the wind-up of the entire 
automatic music industry. 

The operator MUST he made prosperous. He must 
be shown that the way out is to meet with the one coin 
.. now jingling in the public’s pocket because it was 
brought about by inflationary economic conditions 
NOT OF HIS MAKING. He MUST GET 10c PER 
PLAY. 

And, when he gets 10c a play, he can then buy the 
[ machines he needs, feed that machine the records, 
needles, tubes and all other things it requires and be 
’WAY AHEAD as far as profits on his investment are 
concerned. 

The one firm that bucked 10c play learns now that 
they can’t buck the “inevitable.” There is no such 


thing as a “traditional coin,” especially during an 
inflationary era. Look at the average operator — the 
guy who operates the machines of the very manufac- 
turer who bucked 10c play. Ask him if he’s MAKING 
MONEY? Just ask him! 

The answer is what leaders of the entire industry 
have now agreed to — DIME PLAY. Why? Because 
the dime is “king of coins” in the public’s pocket and 
this industry (even tho late, because all other indus- 
tries have already recognized this fact) must face the 
inevitable— MUST CHANGE TO DIME PLAY. 

Dime is king. 

There is no argument which can offset the fact that 
the dime is today becoming the most popular coin in 
the public’s pocket. 

Maybe some guys don’t like to think about infla- 
tion. If they don’t — they should ask their wives what 
these sweethearts are paying for the meat, onions, 
potatoes and lettuce they’re eating. MAYBE THAT 
WILL MAKE THEM CHANGE THEIR MINDS. 

And if that doesn’t do it — then they should look at 
their BANK ACCOUNTS. Maybe that, because it’s the 
final answer, will do it. 

Or, if that doesn’t do it — THEN LOOK AT THE 
PRICE OF ALL PARTS AND SUPPLIES, ALL OVER- 
HEAD, ALL PRICES OF MACHINES AND, FUR- 
THERMORE, AT COST OF OPERATING TODAY. 
DIME IS KING! 

It’s that thin dime (brother, can you spare a dime?) 
we all laughed at years ago — but — it’s no laughing 
matter for this business today. It’s the salvation of 
this business. It’s the answer to the future. It’s the 
encouragement the manufacturers need to go ahead. 
It’s the basis for new inventive genius to come into this 
industry and bring about better, more unusual prod- 
ucts that WILL EARN MORE PROFITS. 

And, you juke box ops, should ASCAP win in Wash- 
ington — what will you need? Believe me, plenty more 
money than you need today to meet your overhead. 
So, there’s no choice. K you’re smart — you’ll imme- 
diately jump to dime play. And the public won^t 
notice the difference! 

Why won’t they note the difference? Because the 
dime is king. Dimes are jingling in their pockets. 
They’re using dimes all day, every day. They’re pay- 
ing away above what they ever paid. And every store- 
keeper in the nation has switched his .5c ice cream 
cone, for the kids who come to his store, to 10c. 

Are you going to be the nut — caught between the 
nutcracker of two manufacturers’ arguments — one for 
10c play and one against. Well, my friend, if you 
want to he a “nut” and go “broke” that’s up to you. 
But, I believe, because I have faith in everyone of the 
guys who are in this business (because they’re my kind 
of people, they’re educating their sons and daughters, 
they’re sending them to colleges, they’re trying to 
raise them to be fine men and women, and also trying 
to leave them a buck or two when they pass on) that 
these guys, these coin machine operators, whom a lot 
of you guys say, “haven’t the intelligence to know what 
the hell to do to help themselves” are going to switch 
over to 10c play — WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT 
—because they KNOW TODAY THAT THIS IS THE 
ANSWER. 



Success story a la Horatio Alger — that’s the pitch behind “T” Texas Tyler. Causing loads of comment 
throughout the music world, Tyler’s recent disking of the controversial “Deck Of Cards” has boomed the western 
star into the national limelight. Pictured above with New York disk distributors Herman Botein (left) and 
Morton Shad (right) of Georgia Music, the trio eye Tyler’s position in the Folk & Western Music Charts of 
The Cash Box. “Deck Of Cards,” a religious recitation piece, currently occupies the top spot as the nation’s 
number one folk and western tune. Juke box operators throughout the nation report peak play with the disking. 
Tyler’s recent engagement at New York’s swank Carnegie Hall proved to be a winner for him and the huge 
throng who came away delighted. Tex guest stars on the Grand Ole Opry airshow, WSM, NBC this coming 
May 15th. He is also featured on two radio shows eminating from Hollywood, KGER and KXLA. Tex is exclusively 
featured on 4-Star Records. 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 7 


May 15, 1948 


The Nation's 

TOP TEH 



/f?f' 1 



The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play In The 
Nation's Juke Boxes, Compiled From Reports 
Submitted Weekly To The Cash Box By Leading 
Music Operators Throughout The Country. 


AL— Alladin 
AP — Apollo 
AR — Aristocrat 
BE — Beacon 
BU— Bullet 
CA — Capitol 
CN — Continental 
CO — Columbia 
CS — Coast 
CE — Celebrity 
DA — Davis 
DE — Uecca 
DEL — Deluxe 


CODE 

DN — Dana 
EX — Exclusive 
Kl — King 
Ml — Miracle 
MA — Majestic 
ME — Mercury 
MG— M-G-M 
LO — London 
MN — Manor 
MO — Modern 
MU — Musicraft 
NA — National 
RA — Rainbow 


RE — Regent 
SA — Savoy 
SD — Super Disc 
SI — Signature 
SP — Specialty 
ST — Sterling 
TO— Top 

TC — Twentieth Century 
UN — Universal 
VI— Victor 
VT — Vitacoustic 


O SABRE DANCE 

Repeats its position of last week, 
with play zooming throughout the 
nation. 


CO-381 02 — Woody Herman 0. 
DE-24388 — ^Victor Young 0. 
MG-30048 — Macklin Marrow 


SI-15180 — Ray Bloch 0. 

RE-111 — Don Henry Trio 
VI-20-2721 — Freddy Martin 0. 



NOW IS THE HOUR 

In the second spot again. Ops re- 
port this ditty one of their best ever. 


CA-15024 — Margaret Whiting 
CO-38061 — Horace Heidt 0. 
CO-38115— Buddy Clark 
CM-7502— Jerry Wald 0. 
DE-24378 — Bob Carroll 
DE-24279 — Bing Crosby 
LO-110 — Gracie Fields 


MA-1191 — Eddy Howard 0. 
ME-5103 — Les Paul Trio 
MG-10125— Kate Smith 
MU-532 — Shep Fields 0. 
SI-15178— Ray Bloch 0. 
VI-20-2704 — Charlie Spivak 0. 



YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR 

In ninth place last week — this ditty 
makes the big jump to nail the 
third spot. 


AP-1121 — N. Emmett 
CA-15077 — The Sportsmen 
BU-1032 — R. Deauville 


LO-202 — Vera Lynn 
DEL-1171 — Ziggy Lane 
RO-128 — Ken Griffin 
VI-25-1117— Will Glohe 




NATURE BOY 

On the bottom one week ago, the 
sensational “Nature Boy’’ rises all 
the way to notch fourth place here. 


CA-15054 — King Cole 
CO-3821 0 — Frank Sinatra 
DE-24439 — Dick Haymes 
MU-567 — Sarah Vaughan 


RA-10070 — Eddy Manson 



TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE 

In fourth place a week ago — here 
it is in fifth place. 


CA-15059 — The Sportsmen 
CN-1223 — Vaughn Horton 
DN-2015 — Dana Serenaders 
DE-24380 — Andrews Sisters 


FL-5005 — Alpine Belles 
LO-201 — Johnny Dennis 
SP-5505 — Larkin Sisters 
ST-1013 — Dick Hayman 
VI-25-1114 — Henri Rene 0. 


O BECAUSE 

Drops to this sixth spot after a 
sensational ride on top of the heap 
for quite some time. 


AP-1068— Hal Winters 
VI-20-2653 — Perry Como 


© BABY FACE 

Tune was in the fifth spot a week 
ago — drops two positions to grab 
onto the seventh spot this week. 


AP.1114— Phillie All Stars 
CO-30014 — Jerry Wayne 
DE-25356— Henri King 0. 
KR-21 6— Uptown String Band 
ME-2120 — Aqua String Band 


MG-10156 — Art Mooney 0. 
ST-294 — Hum & Strum 
TO-294 — Benny Strong 0. 
PA-1105 — Ferko String Band 
UN-627— Milt Scott 0. 
VI-22879 — Sammy Kaye 0. 



LITTLE WHITE LIES 

Kicking up a storm for quite some 
time, the strong demand of ops 
booms this strong coin culler into 
the limelight. 


CO-38114 — Dinah Shore 
DE-24280 — Dick Haymes 





ST. LOUIS BLUES MARCH 

Bounces back again. A steady coin 
attraction and one that continually 
whirls on the phonos. 



THE DICKEY BIRD SONG 

Catching coin galore, this plug tune 
breaks into the Top Ten with ops 
booming it throughout the nation. 


VI -20-2722— Tex Beneke 0. 


CO-38085 — Jerry Wayne 
DE-24301 — Larry Clinton 0. 
MA-1234 — George Olsen 0. 


MG-10138 — Blue Barron 0. 
VI-20-261 7— Freddy Martin 0. 



The Cash Box^ Automatic Music Section 


Page 8 


May 15, 1948 


OPS REPORT PRE-WAR DISKS GAVE 
MORE PLAY— MINIMUM OF 100 PLAYS 
REQUIRED TO MAKE PHONOGRAPH 
OPERATION FEASADLE 


NEW YOEK— The results of a recent I 
survey, conducted by The Cash Box to 
determine the minimum play require- 
ments of music operators, definitely 
pointed out that music ops throughout 
the nation are not recei\’ing this basic 
play requirement from recordings ac- 
tively used today. 

Music operators throughout the na- 
tion were quick to fill out the question- 
naii*e circulated among the entire phono- 
graph industry. Many commended The 
Cash Box for seeking such information 
and generally stated that they “hoped 
such information would be brought to 
the attention of record manufacturers.” 

The general consensus of opinion es- 
tablished the basic requirements with 
which music operators can make phono- 
graph operation successful at 100 plays. 
Operators made tests using different ma- 
chines and utilizing different tone arm 
pressure. 

A well noted juke box operator in 
southern California writes, “In setting 
forth our own test requirements, we have 
gone one step further and specified the 
number of plays on a particular make 
machine, at a specified tone arm pres- 
sure, with the use of a coin machine play- 
back needle.” 

“Our own test machine is a model 412 
Wurlitzer, with tone arm pressure set 
at 4 oz., using Pfansteihl, Peromo-Point, 
Areo-Point and other coin machine nee- 
dles. When it is understood,” he con- 
tinues, “that approximately double the 
amount of playings result from each de- 
crease of an ounce in the tone arm pres- 
sure, we feel that 100 plays are the 


minimum amount of plays required from 
all recordings. On this basis we can 
expect 200 plays at 3 oz., 400 plays at 
2 oz., etc.” 

“It is entirely through ignorance on 
the part of the manufacturers that this 
condition of poor wear exists, and it will 
be remedied only by bringing together 
the operators requirements and the man- 
ufacturers problems, and establishing an 
overall standard.” 

Other operators pointed out that pre- 
war recordings gave them as much as 
300 plays at one time. Records today, 
particularly those of manufacturers who 
disregard quality and are intent upon 
releasing their recordings at the utmost 
speed, sometimes wear white after only 
15 plays. 

A group of operators in the middle- 
west suggested that a conference be 
called at the next Coin Machine Con- 
vention, and in industry council, com- 
prising representatives from both the 
music operator field and the manufac- 
turer, be set up to establish and hold true 
a minimum play standard. 

A music operator in Chicago stated, 
“The record manufacturer at times does 
not think of the juke box operator as 
he might think of a retail dealer. It is 
common knowledge that juke box oper- 
ators buy records in large quantities, and 
the percentage of poor accounts in the 
juke box field is much lower than that 
in the dealer field. It’s time the record 
manufacturers got together with the 
operators and discussed their mutual 
problems.” 



All the talk ’ii stuff about the ban 
being over — or shortly coming to a close. 
A guy can’t walk up Tin Pan Alley, Ran- 
dolph St. or Sunset & Vine without hear- 
ing a batch of rumors. And the slant 
that each of these tall stories have. . . . 
Nevertheless the ban continues with slight 
reports of diskers getting more than a bit 
perturbed each and every day. One jovial 
fellow in this recording biz points to 
“Nature Boy” as an example. “Norm- 
ally,” he sez, “we would have been able 
to cut the thing using the best of musi- 
cians. Our platter might not stack up to 
King Cole’s, but the force of distribution 
alone would have accounted for a raft 
of sales. As much as I had to admit it, 
I and the people who buy records are 
not going for a capella disks.” Wunder 
what will hoppeen when the annual “sum- 
mer slump” come around. . . . 

❖ ❖ ^ 

Robbins Music Corp. has assigned its 
Jimmy McHugh-Dorothy Fields standard, 
“Don’t Rlame Me” to Harry Warren 
Music for immediate top plug. Policy of 
intra-assignment of copyright within 
MGM controlled subsidiaries for profes- 
sional exploitation and current sales has 
worked favorably with Feist’s “Peg O’ 
My Heart,” which Robbins exploited last 
summer; Robbins’ “Mam’selle” which 
Feist plugged, _and Robbins’ “Two Loves 
Have I,” which Miller promoted. 

❖ ❖ 


Oh Lordy, did that Kay Starr ever 
break it np at New York’s swank Le 
Directoire. . . . Phil Harris opens at the 
Palladium, London with Jack Benny. 
Harris will use British musicians. . . .With 
Perry Como in Hollywood for MGM 
flicker work, his Chesterfield airshows are 
being broadcast from the west coast twice 
weekly instead of three times a week. . . . 
Roy Acuff shelled out $150,000 this week, 
investing his name and money in a 
recreation area surrounding Dunbar Cave, 
near Clarksville, Tennessee. . . . Ray Mc- 
Kinley going like a house on fire with 
his Victor hit “Airizay.” . . . News of the 
recent fracas between Bob Thiele, prexy 
of Signature and bandleader Ray Bloch 
with two hoods attempting to ransack 
their car in Syracuse is causing local 
gossip in that collegiate city. . . . Irving 
Fields’ “The Wedding Song” makes for 
nice listening. . . . Ted Straeters disking 
of “The Most Beautiful Girl In The 
World” selected as the “Juke Box Record 
of the Week” in Washington, D. C. . . . 
Georgia Music, New York disk distribs 
have added Harold Hirsch to their sales 
staff to cover Brooklyn and Long Island. 
. . . All herald George Scalisi, MGM 
super disk salesman who ties the knot 
this coming week . . . and whatta gal. . . . 

^ ^ ^ 

i- ■ 

Jim Bulleit, prexy of Bullet Records 
announces the appointment of Sandy 
Rederer as Eastern District Manager. ... 
Bullet plans on having Francis Craig, 
Patti Clayton and Bob Crosby on deck 
for the NAMM show in Chicago in June. 
. . . Herman Lubinsky of Savoy propping 
a new platter that will guarantee ops a 
minimum of soo many plays. . . .Herman 
gives us an optimistic outlook for the 
disk industry too. . . . Our hat is off to 
columnist Paul Denis for a wonderful 
time with his new book “Your Career In 
Show Business.” . . . A1 Jolson in New 
York for radio work. . . . Charlie Barnet 
turns nitery operator with the acquisition 
of a club in Hwd. . . . Frankie Laine and 
Shep Fields headline the Cocoanut Grove, 
Los Angeles Starting July 13. . . . Don’t 
miss Benny G. when he breaks with his 
sextet at the Click Club, Philadelphia, 
May 24. . . . Harry James bopping aboard 
the band tour road again. . . . 


THANKS 

PHONO OPERATORS ASS N OF 
EASTERN PA. 

for your selection as 

-CLICK TUNE OF THE MONTH 

“WE JUST COULDNT 
SAY GOODBYr 


Recorded by , 



STERS 


Co\urnt'''® 
RCA V>cYor 

^ecca 

CapHo' 

y^ercury 

Bu\'eY 


* featured in #1 
Spot for month of 
May, on over 
5000 Boxes thru- 
out Penn. 



PUB. BY: Words & Music, Inc. 1650 BWAY, new YORK, N. Y. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 




The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 9 


May 15, 1948 



"Siboney" (2:21) 

"Mama Inez" (2:36) 

BEN LIGHT 
(Tempo 556) 

• Smart piano fashions for music ops 
with wired music locations are offered 
here by ivory stylist Ben Light. It’s the 
plaintive melody of two old favorites that 
show promise here, with Ben’s wonderful 
’88 thumping making for excellent music. 
“Siboney” and “Mama Inez” make for 
top notch dinner music — especially so as 
offered by Light. Novachord and Ham- 
mond accompaniment fill in the back- 
ground to round out the side. Ops that 
have the spots — take notice. 


"Babe" (2:56) 

"Take Me Out To The Ball Game" 
(2:41) 

FERKO STRING BAND 
(Palda 115) 

• Here’s a number that is a cinch to be 
in every music ops machines in no time 
at all. The long awaited tribute on wax, 
to the King of Swat, Babe Ruth, is both 
catchy and stylish in performance. With 
the title of the ditty, “Babe” filling the 
ether throughout the waxing, the great 
Ferko Strng Band bounce back to add 
luster and polish in a big way. Backside 
is the ever-lovin’ standard “Take Me Out 
To The Ball Game,” with a sparkling ar- 
rangement in the offing. Music ops 
should keep their eyes peeled for “Babe” 
— it’s sure fire phono material. 


"Mississippi Mud" (2:56) 

"On The Painted Desert" (3:02) 

TOMMY DORSEY ORCH. 

(Victor 20-2852) 

• Music ops and music lovers are in 
store for a real treat with this one ! 
One of the better Dorsey disks to shine 
in a long time are offered here with bal- 
ladeer Gordon Polk grabbing the spot- 
light and all the glory. Gordon’s round 
and mellow pipes wrap around the en- 
chanting wordage to “Mississippi Mud” 
on the top deck to point the way for an 
avalanche of coin play. Music drifts 
with an excellent beat and band break 
with Gordon purring in smooth sharp 
tones. Backed by the soft and flowing 
rh^hm to “On The Painted Desert,” with 
chirp Audrey Young on deck, the wax 
takes on a prize package air. Music 
offered here is on the romantic side and 
flows easily throughout. “Mississippi 
Mud” will make paddy-cakes jingle. 


"It's Magic" (3:05) 

"It's You Or No One" (3:03) 

DICK HAYMES 
(Decca 23826) 

# Melodic ballading via Dick Haymes 
and a pair of songs that will hypo phono 
play for sure. Top deck, plug tune from 
the Warner Brothers flicker “Romance 
On The High Seas” shows Dick in re- 
splendent manner spooning the magic 
wordage in refreshing fashion. Wax is 
tailor made for the moon-in-June set and 
as such will serve music ops needs well. 
On the flip with “It’s You Or No One” 
from the same motion picture, Dick ren- 
ders this strong piece of sugar-coated 
wax in grade A fashion for another top 
notch performance. Orchestral backing 
by the Gordon Jenkins boys flavors the 
disking immensely. Dick’s wide follow- 
ing will yell loud and long for the pair. 


DISK OTHE WEEK 


"It Only Happens When I Dance 
With You" (3:07) 

"A Fella With An Umbrella" 
(3:02) 

FRANK SINATRA 
(Columbia 38192) 



• There’s no doubt about this 
pair! Sure-fire phono items in the 
very near future are these songs 
from the forthcoming Irving Ber- 
lin flicker “Easter Parade,” as 
offered here by Frank Sinatra. 
Actually there are no A or B sides 
to this platter — both show as ex- 
ceptionally strong contenders for 
phono honors. Frank lends the top 
ditty an air of beautiful simplicity 
as it weaves in slow melodic patter 
behind singing strings. Soft and 
charming fragrance flows easily to 
fill the ether with a shower of em- 
phatic rapture. Frank’s gilded vo- 
cal efforts are sure to be praised 
loudly as is maestro Alex Stor- 
dahl’s wonderful musicianship. 
Backing is a light rhythmic piece 
tagged “A Fella With Ah Um- 
brella” with Frank turning in an- 
other excellent performance. Splen- 
dor and enchantment offered here 
is bound to meet with approval 
from the host of fans Frank has. 
Both sides make for fond dancing 
pleasure and are sure to draw 
raves. Take into account the wide 
publicity the wax will draw and 
music ops have a pair with which 
they are sure to reap harvest! 


"I Still Love You" (2:50) 

"Pool Playing Blues" (3:00) 

AMOS MILBURN 
(Aladdin 211) 

# Light haunting and tender pipes of 
Amos Milburn coupled with this pair of 
tunes sets the stage for a ton of phono 
action here. It’s the topside that we go 
for with Amos offering loads of mellow 
phrases all thru the wax. Cookie weaves 
in slow tempo with Amos tinkling the 
’88 and purring in soft splendor. Flip is 
some stock race material that might grab 
some glory. Dig the title here for the 
bill of fare to this wax. Ops with race 
spots should pay attention to “I Still 
Love You.” 


FIGURES SHOWN FOLLOWING SONG 
TITLES, INDICATE PLAYING TIME 
OF RECORD. 


"Ebony Rhapsody" (2:36) 

"All My Love Belongs To You" (2:50) 

ROY BROWN ORCH. 

(DeLuxe 1166) 

• Pair of sides for music ops with race 
spots spill here with maestro Roy Brown 
twirling the baton. Top deck, featuring 
chirp Ethel Morris winds with a heavy 
beat behind the gal’s favorable vocaliz- 
ing. Wax is made for those that go for 
the hep stuff and like to dance. Flip is 
the current favorite, “All My Love Be- 
longs To You” with the maestro in the 
vocal spotlight. Rendition here is favor- 
able and makes for easy listening. Ade- 
quate backing by Roy’s “Mighty Mighty 
Men” spikes the pair throughout. Wax 
deserves your attention. 


"Farewell Blues" (2:20) 
"Whispering" (2:41) 

DON HENRY TRIO 
(Regent 116) 

• The harmony that this crew display 
point to another coin winner. Following 
on the heels of their smash success with 
“Sabre Dance,” the Don Henry Trio offer 
more potent wax with this rendition of 
the old favorite “Farewell Blues.” Melo- 
dy of the ditty, both haunting and catchy, 
has the combo in fine harmonic styling 
throughout. Refrain here continually 
keeps coming back and makes for won- 
derful listening moments. On the flip 
with another rave fave the crew offer 
“Whispering.” Music ops who cater to 
the crowd that like soft music beneath 
soft lights would do well to look into this 
side. The disk is there for the asking — 
it rates highly. 


"Freight Train Blues" (2:56) 
"Card Playing Blues" (2:41) 

RED SAUNDERS ORCH. 

(Score 2007) 

• More wax for ops with race spots 
with the Chi favorite. Red Saunders on 
deck for the rhythm offered. Both sides 
are done up in stock race fashion with a 
ton of mellow melody seeping thru. Bal- 
ladeer Eddie Redding in the vocal spot- 
light on both sides shows with a fair 
performance. Top side spills with a 
heavy beat behind it and is suited for the 
crowd that likes to jump. Flip is a switch 
to the slow shuffle mood, with Eddie run- 
ning thru the deck for the blues word- 
age, Both sides won’t cause a traffic 
jam, but nevertheless might be suited to 
ops’ needs as filler material. 


"Little White Lies" (2:51) 
"Bread & Gravy" (2:58) 

MARTHA DAVIS 
(Jewel 2002) 

• There’s no denying that this kid can 
sing! It’s chirp Martha Davis spooning 
magic melody to the tuneful oldie “Little 
White Lies.” Altho the song itself is 
currently one of the hotter phono items, 
Martha’s rendition here should spike 
phono play all the more. The gal’s fond 
vocal tricks and own unique styling flavor 
the cookie all the way. Mood is slow and 
tight and is definitely suited to the dance 
crowd. On the flip with some heavy race 
material, Martha displays her versatile 
pipes in nostalgic fashion once again to 
the riff of “Bread & Gravy.” Wax is 
there for the asking — ^we go for “Little 
White Lies” in a big way. 


Only Records Considered Best Suited To The Requirements Of The Trade Are Reviewed On These Pages 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 1 0 


May 15, 1948 




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Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves yoiSre a real coin machine man! 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section Poge 11 May 15, 1948 



"A Fella With An Umbrella" (3:06) 
"Blue Shadows On The Trail" (3:02) 

BING CROSBY 

(Decco 24433) 

• Der Bingle hits the jackpot! More 
music from the widely hailed Ir\dng Ber- 
lin “Easter Parade” film, with Bing 
offering the sure-fire “A Fella With An 
Umbrella” in hit proportions. Bing sings 
behind plush strings that are sure to 
wing this thing and make ops machines 
zing. Platter patter is delightful while 
the vocal chatter is nothing shoit of 
resplendent. It’s a disk that can’t miss 
becoming a "winner. On the flip with a 
featured ditty from the Disney pic “Mel- 
ody Time,” Bing offers “Blue Shadows 
On the Trail” to set the stage for a 
shower of coin play. There are no if’s, 
and’s or but’s connected with this platter 
— it will go like sixty in your phonos. 


"The Shoemaker Serenade" (2:56) 
"Fiddle Faddle" (2:49) 

EDDY MANSON 
(Rainbow 10080) 

• Bound to cause a storm of approval 
in music and phono circles is this bit 
offered by Eddy Manson. It’s the de- 
lightful English hit, “The Shoemaker 
Serenade” that Eddy renders and does 
so in wonderful harmonica tones 
throughout. Stylist instrumentation that 
Eddy spills glows brilliantly all thru 
the platter, boosting its possibilities. 
Melody is both haunting and soothing at 
the same time and shows the harmonic- 
artist at his best. Flip is the current 
booming “Fiddle Faddle.” This side adds 
laurels to Eddy’s gala performance on 
the ton deck and should win wide praise. 
“The Shoemaker Serenade” is the one we 
like. 


"I Wish I Knew The Name" (3:00) 
"Oh How I Miss You Tonight" (3:02) 

JOHN LAURENZ 
(Mercury 5115) 

• Flavorful-favorable sides by song 
spinner John Laurenz and the set-up of 
two favorites titled “I Wish I Knew The 
Name” and “Oh How I Miss You To- 
night” make their bid for phono fame 
here. Music ops should know both tunes 
well — they have been consistent favor- 
ites on the machines recently. John’s 
soft and yet rich, warm tonsils show to 
advantage throughout the entire waxing 
and might be used in the event that ops 
have that open spot on their machines. 
Altho both sides won’t stop traffic, they 
do nevertheless, make for pleasant 
listening. 

"It Only Happens When I Dance 
With You" (3:04) 

"May I Still Hold You" (3:00) 

ART LUND 
(MGM 10184) 

• It looks like another strong wax item 
for balladeer Art Lund with this scin- 
tillating bit from “Easter Parade.” Titled 
“It Only Happens When I Dance With 
You,” Art lends the beautiful ballad a 
touch of plush velvet as he warbles the 
dainty, delicate wordage. String backing 
by maestro Johnny Thompson adds lus- 
ter to the cookie and points all the more 
to Lund’s coin-winning potential here. 
On the backing with another item for 
the cuddle kids. Art spoons the tender 
and charming phrasing to “May I Still 
Hold • You.” Stuff is easy on the ears 
and makes for delightful dancing pleas- 
ure. The many Lund fans will go for 
the pair. Both sides deserve your avid 
attention. 


FIGURES 

SHOWN FOLLOWING 

SONG 

TITLES, 

INDICATE PLAYING 

TIME 

OF RECORD. 



SLEEPER 

OF THE WEEK 


"Steppin' Out With My Baby" 
(3:02) 

"Better Luck Next Time" (3:00) 

GUY LOMBARDO ORCH. 

(Decca 24435) 



GUY LOMBARDO 


• Attractive pair of coin cullers 
in store for music ops throughout 
the nation is offered here by maes- 
tro Guy Lombardo. Wax is from 
the forthcoming mucho ballyhoo 
flicker “Easter Parade” and bears 
the famed Irving Berlin pen. As 
such, it stacks up highly and is 
sure to come in for some heavy 
coin play. Top deck, “Steppin’ Out 
With My Baby” grabs the lead, 
with the Lombardo Trio wailing 
the light and fragrant melody in 
fine measure. Patter is bright and 
makes for easy listening through- 
out. Deck is one that bears watch- 
ing: its nostalgic refrain is a cinch 
to draw loads of buffalo. On the 
flip with more meat for music ops, 
piper Kenny Gardner steps to the 
mike to offer “Better Luck Next 
Time.” Wordage weaves around 
the title throughout, with Kenny’s 
vocal flavor shining in a dazzling 
aura. Both sides of this “must” 
platter make for easy listening and 
dancing pleasure. It’s another boffo 
disking for Guy Lombardo and 
one that will definitely boom phono 
play for music ops. 


"You're Mine" (2:58) 

"The Windshield Wiper Song" (2:50) 
JEFFREY CLAY 
(Dana 2011) 

• Pair of sides for music ops to look 
into are these offered here by piper 
Jeffrey Clay. Tagged, “You’re Mine” 
and “The Windshield Wiper Song,” Jef- 
frey displays his vocal wares in adequate 
fashion throughout the pair. Top deck 
grabs the lead with the balladeer spoon- 
ing romantic vocal magic. Wax is made 
for the crowd that likes to love while 
the music is soft and low. Flip is a bit 
of a novelty tune that sounds fairly at- 
tractive. Both sides are potential win- 
ners and might garner a spot on your 
machine as filler material. 


"Betty Blue" (2:56) 

"I Feel So Smoochie" (2:51) 

LOUIS PRIMA ORCH. 

(Victor 20-2763) 

• It’s another winner for maestro Louis 
Prima with this gay hunk of wax. Titled, 
“Betty Blue,” Louis steps to the vocal 
spotlight to render the happy wordage. 
Ditty is wrapped up around the title and 
weaves in mellow timing throughout. 
Stuff makes you laugh loud and long as 
you listen and fairly reeks with the odor 
of buffalo. On the flip for the tempo of 
“I Feel So Smoochie,” Louis gives out 
with another grade A performance. Ops 
should know this side well since it did 
draw some buffalo not too long ago. 
“Betty Blue” will keep the phonos jing- 
ling with green stuff. 


"The Things You Left In My Heart" 
(2:29) 

"Maybe I Love You" (2:49) 

JUDY TREMAINE 
(Stellar 1007) 

• Shades of Helen O’Connell! As a 
matter of fact this kid sounds more like 
Helen than that famed thrush did her- 
self. A number sure to meet vdth wide 
approval and cause loads of comment is 
this bit titled “The Things You Left In 
My Heart.” Offering a ton of glamorous 
tricks that make you stop and listen — 
and marvel at her wonderful tone and 
quality, Judy lends this piece an air of 
l^autiful musical magic. Instrumental 
background furnished by the Roland 
Moore Trio spikes the cookie all the way 
to boost its coin-appeal. Flip is another 
comer titled “Maybe I Love You.” You’ve 
just gotta hear this kid to appreciate 
her. Both sides of this blue-ribbon pack- 
age of wax are musts on your machine! 


"Don't Get Salty, Sugar" (2:50) 
"I'm So Happy I Could Cry" (2:57) 

JOHNNY MOORE'S THREE BLAZERS 
(Exclusive 268) 

• One of the better platters to be re- 
leased in quite some time by this combo 
stack up as items that may prove poten- 
tial coin winners in the very near futux'e. 
It’s Johnny Moore and His Three Blaz- 
ers offering loads of mellow melody on 
“Don’t Get Salty, Sugar.” Vocal lime- 
light beams brightly on Charlie Brown 
throughout the waxing as he offers the 
tender Ijrics in bright tones that satisfy. 
Flip is toned dovTi a bit with the entire 
crew displaying their wares in excellent 
manner throughout. Both sides should 
garner wonderful reception — take a peek 
into this pair. 


"It's Magic" (3:12) 

"It's You Or No One" (3:10) 

SARAH VAUGHAN 
(Musicraft 557) 

• “It’s Magic” — that’s the story with 
this kid’s pipes! The great Sarah 
Vaughan offei-s this top plug tune from 
the forthcoming Warner Bros, flicker 
“Romance On The High Seas” with the 
refrain spelling coin play in a big way. 
Displaying more force and meaning in 
her pipes than we’ve heard in many a 
moon, Sarah ably shows her nostalgic 
tonsils off to wonderful advantage. Wax- 
ing is one that is sure to go in all types 
of locations. Flip is another ditty from 
the same flicker, and has the chirp purr- 
ing in excellent voice once again. Both 
sides of this disking are bound to meet 
with wide approval. Her rapidly grow- 
ing clan, and that covers loads of ter- 
ritoiy, will yowl like mad for this pair. 
Don’t miss it! 


"A Fella With An Umbrella" (2:47) 
"Steppin' Out With My Baby" (2:35) 
DENNY DENIS 
(London 206) 

• More sweet music from the forthcom- 
ing “Easter Parade” flicker, with Denny 
Dennis to the mike to wail the chaiTning 
wordage. It’s the topside we go for here 
— altho both decks make for wonderful 
listening time. Denny’s soft spooning 
has loads of flavor to it, drawing the 
listener closer to the phono time and 
again. Light bounce pacing of the tune 
is delightful with adequate instrumental 
backing flourishing throughout. On the 
flip with another plug tune from the 
same picture, Denny offers happy and 
carefree wordage to “Steppin’ Out With 
My Baby.” Wax is another top notch 
setting for the balladeer and as such is 
sure to draw raves from his rapidly 
growing clan. Get next to this pair — 
pronto. 


On/y Records Considered Best Suited To The Requirements Of The Trade Are Reviewed On These Pages. 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 1 2 


caWs Hits 



(yyu adjuxJL 


WESTERN 


I’M WALTZING WITH A BROKEN 
HEART 






POPULAR 

(Rhythm, Ballad, Jazz and ISovelty) 


MANANA 

ALL DRESSED UP WITH A BROKEN HEART 
Peg"gy Lee Capitol 15022 


NATURE BOY 
LOST APRIL 
King- Cole 


Capitol 15054 


NOW IS THE HOUR 
BUT BEAUTIFUL 
Mcirgaret Whiting 


Capitol 15024 


BABY FACE 
HEARTBREAKER 
Jack Smith 


Capitol 15078 


TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (The Yodel Polka) 
YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR 
The Sportsmen 




Capitol 15077 


LAROO LAROO LILI BOLERO 
TALKING TO MYSELF ABOUT YOU 
Peggy Lee 


Capitol 15048 



HAUNTED HEART 

I’M MY OWN GRANDMAW 

Jo Stafford 


Capitol 15023 


I’M LOOKING OVER A FOUR LEAF CLOVER 
SPANISH CAVALIER 
Alvino Rey 


Capitol 491 


BEG YOUR PARDON 
MELANCHOLY 
Dinning Sisters 


Capitol 490 


SUSPICION 

FLO FROM ST. JOE MO 
Tex Willicims 


Capitol 40109 


SUSPICION 

CLABBERIN’ UP FOR RAIN 
Jo Stafford 


Capitol 15068 


THE PEANUT VENDOR 

THERMOPOLAE 

Stan Kenton 


Capitol 15052 


THOUGHTLESS 

YOU WERE MEANT FOR ME 

Gordon MacRae 


Capitol 15027 


CIGAREETES, WHUSKEY, AND WILD, 
WILD WOMEN 
PEARLY MAUDE 
Red Ingle 


ANYTIME 
Foy Willing 

Capitol 40108 

DECK OF CARDS 
ROUNDED UP IN GLORY 
Tex Ritter 

Capitol 40114 

SIGNED, SEALED AND DELIVERED 

EASY TO PLEASE 
Jimmy Wakely 

Capitol 40088 

WABASH BLUES 


PEEPIN’ THRU THE KEYHOLE 

Cliffie Stone 

Capitol 40083 

HUMPTY DUMPTY HEART 
TODAY 

Hamk Thompson 

Capitol 40065 

DON’T TELEPHONE— DON’T 
GRAPH (Tell A Wom£m) 
BLUE AS A HEART ACHE 

TELE- 

Tex Williams 

Capitol 40081 


COUNTRY 


SWAMP WOMAN BLUES 
LOVE IN AN AEROPLANE 
Milo Twins 


Capitol 40094 


WHAT’S ANOTHER HEART TO YOU 
A PETAL FROM A FADED ROSE 
Eddie Kirk 


Capitol 40092 


RENO BOUND 
I CAN’T WIN FOR LOSIN’ 
Karl and Harty 


Capitol 4C089 


SWEET THING 
YODELING WALTZ 
The Original Arthur Smith 


Capitol 40086 


BORN LO LOSE 

HOW DO YOU MEND A BROKEN HEART 
Eddie Kirk 


HE’S A REAL GONE GUY 
LET ME LOVE YOU TONIGHT 
Nellie Lutcher 


SEPIA 


FINE BROWN FRAME 
THE PIG-LATIN SONG 
Nellie Lutcher 




Capitol 40116 




i 


COMING UP FAST 


GOOFUS 

THE HILLS OF CALIFORNIA 
Johnny Mercer Capitol 15051 


HELEN POLKA 
MY WIFE HAS GONE AND 
LEFT ME 

The Sportsmen Capitol 15046 


Capitol 15032 


KING SIZE PAPA 

WHEN YOU’RE SMILING (The Whole 
World Smiles With You) 

Julia Lee Capitol 40082 


WHAT’S GOOD ABOUT 
GOODBYE? 

GYPSY IN MY SOUL 

McU-gcU'et Whiting Capitol 15038 


I GOT A BREAK, BABY 
MEAN OLD WORLD 
T-Bone Walker 


Capitol 15033 


THATS WHAT I LIKE 
CRAZY WORLD 
Julia Lee 


Capitol 15060 


HE SENDS ME 
COME AND GET IT, HONEY 
Nellie Lutcher 


BEBOP BLUES 
SHUFFLE WOOGIE 
Joe Lutcher 


NO-NAME BOOGIE 
HIT THE BLOCK 
Joe Lutcher 



BLUE SHADOWS ON THE TRAIL 

LOVE OF MY LIFE 

Andy Russell Capitol 15063 


GIVE ME THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS 
YOU TURNED THE TABLES 
ON ME 

Benny Goodman Capitol 15044 


SPANISH BELLS 

WESTPHALIA WALTZ 

Cliffie Stone Capitol 40096 

MY HAPPINESS 

HIGHWAY TO LOVE 

The Pied Pipers Capital 15094 

IT’S MAGIC 

SPRING IN DECEMBER 
Gordon MacRae Capitol 15072 

RHYTHM RHAPSODY 
RHUMBA BOOGIE 
Chuy Reyes Capitol 15067 

HIP-BILLY BOOGIE 
WHAT IS THIS THING 
CALLED LOVE 

Les Paul Capitol 15070 

WORRY WORRY WORRY 
WE JUST COULDN’T SAY 
GOODBYE 

Hal Derwin Capitol 498 





CC. U.S. PAT. OPP. 




The Cash Box^ Automatic Music Section 


Page 13 


May 15, 1948 



New York 

1. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

2. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

3. HAUNTED HEART (Perry Como) 

4. LAROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Perry Como) 

5. SABRE DANCE (Woody Herman) 

6. NOW IS THE HOUR (Bing Crosby) 

7. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOUE (Vaughn Horton) 

8. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

9. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

10. LITTLE WHITE LIES (Dick Haymes) 


St. Louis, Mo. 

1. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

2. CUCKOO WALTZ (Ken Griffin) 

3. YOU C.AN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Gnffin) 

4. GOOFUS (Johnny Mercer) 

5. ilY HAPPINESS (Jon & Sondra Steele) 

6. THAT AIN’T RIGHT (Frankie Laine) 

7. ST. LOUIS BLUES MARCH (Tex Beneke) 

8. I HATE TO LOSE YOU ( Andretcs Sisters) 

9. MAYBE YOU’LL BE THERE (Gordon Jenkins) 

10. HAUNTED HE.A.RT (Perry Como) 


Birmingham, Ala. 

1. NOW IS THE HOUR (Eddy Howard) 

2. BABY FACE (Art Mooney) 

3. SIBONTEY (Ben Light) 

4. SABRE DANCE BOOGIE (Freddy Martin) 

5. FOLTl LEAF CLOVER (Uptown String Band) 

6. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

7. ST. LOUIS BLUES MARCH (Tex Beneke) 

8. TOOUE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

9. DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

10. BEG YOLTR PARDON (Francis Craig) 


Indianapolis, Ind. 

1. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DE.A.R (Ken Griffin) 

2. NOW IS THE HOUR (Eddy Howard) 

3. M.ANANA (Peggy Lee) 

4. BEG YOUR PARDON (Frankie Carle) 

3. BABY FACE (Henry King) 

6. SABRE DANCE (Woody Herman) 

7. BUT BEAUTIFUL (Eddy Howard) 

8. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

9. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

10. FOUR LE.AF CLO^^ER (Russ Morgan) 


Chicago 

1. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

2. TOOUE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

3. LITTLE WHITE LIES (Dick Haymes) 

4. SABRE DANCE (Woody Herman) 

5. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

6. NOW IS THE HOUR (Grade Fields) 

7. LAROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Peggy Lee) 

8. BABY FACE (Art Mooney) 

9. MANANA (Peggy Lee) 

10. MY HAPPINESS (Jon & Sondra Steele) 


Cleveland, 0. 

1. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

2. TOOUE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

3. LITTLE WHITE LIES (Dick Haymes) 

4. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

5. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

6. SABRE D.VNCE (Macklin Marrow) 

7. MANANA (Peggy Lee) 

8. EBONAT RH.APSODY (Rosetta Howard) 

9. MADE FOR EACH OTHER (Ethel Smith) 

10. BABY FACE ( Art Mooney) 


Greenfield, Mass. 

1. TELL ME A STORY (Sammy Kaye) 

2. ST. LOUIS BLU*ES MARCH (Tex Beneke) 

3. MATINEE (Vaughn Monroe) 

4. FLORENCE (Louis Prima) 

5. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

6. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Walt Dana) 

7. WE JUST COULDN’T SAY GOODBYE 

(Andrew Sisters) 

8. JUST BECAUSE (Frank Yankovic) 

9. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

10. LAROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Peggy Lee) 


Lufkin, Texas 

1. ST. LOUIS BLUES, MARCH (Tex Beneke) 

2. BEG YOUR PARDON (Francis Craig) 

3. NOW IS THE HOUR (Margaret Whiting) 

4. WHAT A FOOL I WAS (Eddy Arnold) 

5. SABRE DANCE BOOGIE (Freddy Martin) 

6. FOUR LEAF CLOVER (Art Mooney) 

7. SEAM.AN BLUES (Ernest Tubb) 

8. BABY FACE (Art Mooney) 

9. BUT BEAUTIFUL (Tex Beneke) 

10. BUBBLES IN ilY BEER (Bob WiUs) 


Los Angeles 

1. XATLRE BOY (King Cole) 

2. ST. LOUIS BLUES ^LARCH (Tex Benehe) 

3. SABRE DAXCE (Macklin Marrovc) 

4. IT ^TAS \TRITTEN IN THE STARS (Tony Martin) 
HAUNTED HEART ( Jo Stafford ) 

6. LITTLE \AHITE LIES (Dick Haymes) 

7. HOORAY FOR LO\^ (Dinah Shore) 

8. VERONICA PLAYS THE HARMONTCA 

(Jimmy & Mildred Mulcay) 

9. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

10. BABY FACE (Art Mooney) 


Syracuse, N. Y. 

1. YOU C.AN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

2. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

3. LITTLE WHITE LIES (Dick Haymes) 

4. HEARTBREAKER (Ferko String Band) 

5. MANANA (Peggy Lee) 

6. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (J'aughn Horton) 

7. LAROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Perry Como) 

8. BABY FACE (Art Mooney) 

9. SABRE DANCE BOOGIE (Freddy Martin) 

10. NO\T IS THE HOUR (Grade Fields) 


Brodhead, Wise. 

1. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

2. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Andretcs Sisters) 

3. BABY FACE ( Art Mooney) 

4. JUST BECAUSE (Frank Yankovic) 

5. SHINE (Frankie Laine) 

6. THOUGHTLESS (Buddy Kaye) 

i. HAUNTED HEART (Guy Lombardo) 

8. THOUSAND ISLANDS SONG (Arthur Godfrey) 

9, DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

10. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 


Saginaw, Mich. 

1. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Andretcs Sisters) 

2. Y^OU CAN’T BE TRUE. DEAR (Ken Griffin) 

3. NOW IS THE HOUR (Grade Fields) 

4. BABY" FACE ( Art Mooney) 

5. BEG YOUR PARDON (Russ Morgan) 

6. ST. LOUIS BLUES MARCH (Tex Beneke) 

7. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

8. BECAUSE (Perry Como) 

9. SABRE DANCE BOOGIE (Freddy Martin) 

10. NATURE BOY' (King Cole) 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 

1. YOU C.\N’T BE TRUE, DE.A.R (Ken Griffin) 

2. B.4BY FACE ( Art Mooney) 

3. NOW IS THE HOUR (Bing Crosby) 

4. FOUR LEAF CLOVER (Art Mooney) 

5. S.\BRE DANCE (Macklin Marrow) 

6. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

7. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Andrews Sisters) 

8. CONFESS (Buddy Clark-Doris Day) 

9. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

10. HAUNTED HEART (Perry Como) 


Tallahasse, Fla. 

1. YOU CAN’T BE TRUE, DE.\R (Ken Griffin) 

2. HAUNTED HE.VRT (Perry Como) 

3. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

4. BUT BE.\UTIFUL (Margaret Whiting) 

5. NOW IS THE HOUR (Bing Crosby) 

6. BEC.-VUSE (Perry Como) 

7. SHINE (Frankie Laine) 

8. TERES.\ (Vic Damone) 

9. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

10. SABRE DANCE (Don Henry Trio) 


Topeka, Kansas 

1. B-\BY F-\CE ( Art Mooney) 

2. M.AlTINEE (Vaughn Monroe) 

3. S-VBRE D.\NCE (Woody Herman) 

4. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

5. HAUNTED HE.A.RT (Perry Como) 

6. THOUGHTLESS (Buddy Kaye) 

7. NATURE BOY (King Cole) 

8. L.\ROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Peggy Lee) 

9. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Andrews Sisters) 

10. NOW IS THE HOUR (Bing Crosby) 


St. Paul, Minn. 

1. YOU C.4N’T BE TRUE, DE.VR (Ken Griffin) 

2. JUST BEC.A.USE (Frank Yonkovic) 

3. BEC.VUSE (Perry Como) 

4. SABRE DANCE (Woody Herman) 

5. THOUGHTLESS ( Guy Lombardo) 

6. HAUNTED HE.4RT (Perry Como) 

7. B.A.BY FACE (Art Mooney) 

8. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Vaughn Horton) 

9. NOW IS THE HOUR (Eddy Howard) 

10. FOUR LEAF CLOLTER (Art Mooney) 


Cedar Rapids, la. 

1. NOW IS THE HOUR (Grade Fields) 

2. SABRE D.\NCE (Woody Herman) 

3. THE DICKEY BIRD SONG (Freddy Martin) 

4. TOOLIE OOLIE DOOLIE (Andrews Sisters) 

5. BUT BE.VUTIFUL (Margaret Whiting) 

6. SHINE (Frankie Laine) 

7. BEC.4USE (Perry Como) 

8. LAROO L.4ROO LILLI BOLERO (Peggy Lee) 

9. THOUGHTLESS (Guy Lombardo) 

10. BEG YOUR PARDON (Frankie Carle) 


Portland, Ore. 

1. YOU C.\N’T BE TRUE. DE.4R (Ken Griffin) 

2. S-4.BRE D.ANCE (Woody Herman) 

3. H.A.UNTED HEART (Perry Como) 

4. .N.4.TURE BOY (King Cole) 

5. BABY F.\CE (Art Mooney) 

6. JUST BEC.\USE (Frank Yankovic) 

7. NOW IS THE HOUR (Grade Fields) 

8. BEC.4USE (Perry Como) 

9. LAROO LAROO LILLI BOLERO (Peggy Lee) 

10. TERES.A: (Vic Damone) 





The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 1 4 


May 15, 1948 


Columbia Records To BEACON 50c PLATTER MEETS WITH WIDE 
issue Collector Item Wax INITIAL RESPONSE-OPS LAUD DISC QUALITY 


I 

I 

NEW YOEK— Columbia Records Cor- ! 
poration is planning on adding a new | 
label to their line to consist of records j 
which have become kno-svn as collector’s 
items. The new series is to be known ' 
as “Special Edition”. 

The release of these recordings will , 
undoubtedly break up to some extent the ^ 
exhorbitant prices which have been j 
charged for these recordings throughout j 
the years. 

Columbia will make available to music 
ops and dealers such artists as A1 Jolson, 
Glen Gray and His Casa Loma Orchestra, 
the Dorsey Brothers orch., Bunny Berri- 
gan, Duke Ellington, Hoagy Carmichael 
and a host of other artists who are sure 
to be in great demand. 

Columbia will press these recordings 
only on order. Minimum standards set 
by the plattery are that dealers and ops 
must purchase at least ten records, priced 
at 60c each plus shipping and insurance 
charges. The platters are supposed to 
retail at $1.00. 

Dealers this past week received a letter 
announcing the release. The letter was 
reported to be sent under George Ava- 
kian’s name on the stationery of the 
American Record Co, Columbia is not 
mentioned in the letter, altho the return i 
address is the same. ! 



JOE DAVIS 

NEW YORK — Initial response by 
music operators in the east and middle 
west, to the new Beacon Record, listed 
to retail at 50c, points to a tremendous 
bonanza for Joe Davis, president of the 
firm. 

Music operators contacted were quick 
to state that the Beacon label would give 
them their first chance in a long time 
to cut overhead operating costs and pos- 


sibly increase their weekly phonograph 
income. 

The new Beacon label, which will 
wholesale to music operators and dealers 
for 33c, tax included, is one of the first 
to come down in price. 

Music operators disclosed that initial 
tests of the Beacon first disk release, 
“Words Can’t Explain” and “Strictly On 
The Safety Side” by the Red Caps, met 
with widespread approval on the part of 
phonograph fans. Ops further stated 
that the platter’s durability is far su- 
perior to many recordings currently on 
the market. 

Davis, a veteran figure in the music 
and recording business has disclosed that 
he will ship orders of records at prepaid 
expense. No territorial distributors are 
involved in the Beacon firm. 

Many music operators pointed out that 
by cutting down on the cost of records, 
one of their largest operational costs, 
they would in turn be able to afford 
better representation on their phono- 
graphs, thus giving the record manufac- 
turer and the recording artist greater 
sales and a wider medium for disk pro- 
motion. 

“The music operator market repre- 
sents a very definite force of sales po- 
tential and exploitation in this music 
industry,” said Mr. Davis. 

“By giving the music operator a record 
that will not only wear well, but one 
that will substantially boost the earning 
power of the phonograph, we believe that 
we are establishing a greater market for 
record sales, heretofore neglected.” 

Davis disclosed that he has a large 
backlog of masters which were never 
issued. Altho the recording artists ap- 
pearing on these records could not be 
learned, it is known that they are artists 
who are in great demand. 

Davis disclosed the signing of maestro 
Vincent Lopez to a recording contract. 
Lopez’ records will headline under the 
Beacon banner. 


Exclusive Cuts “Nature Boy” 


HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.— Leon Rene, 
prexy of Exclusive Records, announced 
the platteries first cutting since the re- 
cording ban went into effect. 

Herb Jeffries flew to Los Angeles to 
wax the popular “Nature Boy” and “Just 
Naive.” -Jeffries was backed by The 
Celebrities, a vocal choir under the di- 
rection of Tom Traynor. Disk jockey’s 
in this area had test cuts of the disk the 
same day the platter was cut, Rene dis- 
closed. 


HEY OPS, RETAILERS-LOOKA HERE! ON JEWEL RECORDS 

HOT OFF THE PRESSES INTO YOUR CASH REGISTER 
JUST RECORDED IT'S DIFFERENT GREATEST SELLING RECORD TODAY 
JUKE-HAPPY NICKEL-GETTING RAPID RETAIL-SELLING 

JEWEL #ON-2006 

“NATURE BOY" 

"Don^t You Want That Stone" 

RECORDED LAST WEEK entirely with voices, MAUDIE BILLREW with the HOLLYWOODAIRES 
SPIRITUAL GROUP doing the NUMBER ONE TUNE in an UNUSUALLY DIFFERENT SPIRITUAL, 
JUMP TEMPO . . . THE GREATEST VERSION of any Tune Ever Recorded . . . RELEASED FIVE 
DAYS AGO and SELLING Over The COUNTERS On The JUKES to The Tune Of 5,000 per day 


and growing BIGGER BIGGER BIGGER. 

GOING STRONG ! 

Another GREAT LATE RELEASE 1 

JEWEL # ON-2004 

JEWEL # R-5006 

"RECESS IN 

“THAT’S A PLENTY” 

HEAVEN " 

“CARAVAN” 

"Why Must 1 Adore You" 

LEW MARCUS and his Nostalgic Piano fol- 

— DAN GRISSOM with Buddy Harper 

lows his last Big Hit “IDA" & “DAR- 

and His Orchestra 

DANELLA" (Jewel R-5005) 


WIRE YOUR ORDER l>fOW 


B & W RECORDING COMPANY 

4910 SANTA MONICA BLVD. NOrmandie 2-8151 LOS ANGELES 27, CAL. 


it fakes money to make money 

—that’s why a lot of smart operators are using Webster-Chicago 
Nylon Needles. Sure it costs more to begin with — but it pays 
off quick. 

These needles cut out costly shut-downs for service calls . . . 
when time is money. AND because Webster-Chicago Nylon Needles 
have the exclusive KNEE ACTION feature they glide smoothly 

and evenly over the record— result: a big increase in record plays. / 

/ 

Try one and convince yourself i 


WEBSTER-CHICAGO NYLON NEEDLES 



WEBSTER. 
CHICAGO 

IVORY 

NYLON NEEDLE 

with Knee Action 
and Precious Jewel Tip 


$3so 


with Knee Action 


-by the makers of Webster-Chicago Record Changers and Wire Recorders 

m WEBSTER-CHICAGO 

^ — 5610 West Bloomingdale Avenue Chicago 39, Illinois 


— makes money for smart operators 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 15 


May 15, 1948 



The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play 
Compiled From Reports Submitted \Teekly 
to The Cash Box By Leading Music Opera- 
tors In New York City's Harlem Area. 



iThe Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play 
Compiled From Reports Submitted Weekly 
to The Cash Box By Leading Music 
Operators In New Orleans. 




O NATURE BOY 

King Cole 
(Capitol 15054) 


NATURE BOY 

King Cole 
(Capitol 15054) 


NATURE BOY 

King Cole 
(Capitol 15054) 


FINE BROWN 
FRAME 

Nellie Lutcher 
(Capitol 15032) 



GOOD ROCKING 
TONIGHT 

Wynonie Harris 
(King 4210) 


GOOD ROCKING 
TONIGHT 

Wynonie Harris 
(King 4210) 


LONG GONE 

Sonny Thompson 
(Miracle 126) 


IF I SHOULD 
LOSE YOU 

Emile Jones 
(Staff 606) 



TOMORROW 

NIGHT 

Lonnie Johnson 
(King 4201) 


RECESS IN 
HEAVEN 

Dan Grissom 
(Jewel 4004) 


REET PETITE 
& GONE 

Louis Jordan 
(Decca 35481) 


NATURE BOY 

King Cole 
(Capitol 15054) 



35-30 

Paul Williams 
(Savoy 661) 


REET PETITE 
& GONE 

Louis Jordan 
(Decca 35481) 


YOU DONT 
LOVE ME 

Camille Howard 
(Specialty 307) 


THE MOJO 

Sax Mallard 
(Aristocrat 2001) 


© RECESS IN 
HEAVEN 

Dan Grissom 
(Jewel 2004) 


ALL MY LOVE 
BELONGS TO 
YOU 

Bull Aloose Jackson 
(King 4189) 


ALL MY LOVE 
BELONGS TO 
YOU 

Bull Moose Jackson 
(King 4189) 


YOU DONT 
LOVE ME 

Camille Howard 
(Specialty 307) 



BUBBLES 

Bill Moore 
(Savoy 662) 


THATS WHAT 
I LIKE 

Julia Lee 
(Capitol 15060) 


35-30 

Paul Williams 
(Savoy 661) 


HEY LITTLE 
GIRL 

Paul Gayten 
(DeLuxe 1138) 


© TIME OUT 
FOR TEARS 

Savannah Churchill 

(Manor) 


TOMORROW 

NIGHT 

Lonnie Johnson 
(King 4201) 


FINE BROWN 
FRAME 

Nellie Lutcher 
(Capitol 15032) 


THERE^S 
NO YOU 

The Ravens 
(National 9042) 



ALL MY LOVE 
BELONGS TO 
YOU 

Bull Moose Jackson 


(King 4189) 


KING SIZE 
PAPA 

Julia Lee 
(Capitol 40082) 


TRAIN BLUES 

Roy Milton 
(Specialty 524) 


LONG GONE 

Sonny Thompson 
(Miracle) 



LONG GONE 

Sonny Thompson 


(Miracle 126) 



DUTCH 

KITCHEN 

BOUNCE 

Arnett Cobb 


(Apollo 778) 


TEAR DROP 
BLUES 

Jimmy Liggins 

(Specialty) 


I LOVE YOU 
YES I DO 

Bull Moose Jackson 
(King 4181) 


MILKY WHITE 
WAY 

Trumpeteers 
(Scare 5001) 


GOOD ROCKIN' 
TONIGHT 

Wynonie Harris 
(King 4210) 


THE TWISTER 

Paul Williams 
(Savoy 665) 


BUBBLES 

Bill Moore 
(Savoy 662) 


The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 16 


May 15, 1948 


“Greek Ambassador’’ Eyes Wurlitzer Phono 



CHICAGO — ^George Givot, “The Greek Ambassador”, “Original Parkyacarcus” anxiously 
eyes the new Wurlitzer 1100 phono during a visit to the Illinois Simplex Co., Chicago. Pic- 
tured with George are (center) Joe Whalen of Bregman, Vocco & Conn and Hugh McGarrity, 
sales manager of Illinois Simplex. All three listen with eager attention to George’s new 
Tele-Record rendition of “My California”. 



KING 4220 


DON’T FALL IN LOVE WITH ME 

backed by 


Siesta With Sonny 
by IVORY JOE HUNTER 




Juke Box ‘‘NATURALS” 


LARRY VINCENT’S 

**TH0SE WEDDING BELLS 
ARE BREAKING UP THAT 
OLD GANG OF MINE” 

PEARL No. 20 

“LITTLeIiIRL” 

PEARL No. 22 

‘‘DOWN ON THE FARM” 

(Novelty Riot) 

PEARL No. 63 


PEARL RECORD CO. 

Route 1, Box 105, Covington, Ky. 




"\ Had A Dream" 
"Unloved & Unclaimed" 

ROY ACUFF 
(Columbia 38189) 

• It’s the old favorite Roy Acuff 
who grabs all the glory this week 
with his smash disking of “I Had 
A Dream” and “Unloved & Un- 
claimed.” Altho both sides are off- 
ered in plaintive mood, with a sad 
story in the background, Roy’s ex- 
cellent styling draws the listener 
closer to the phono and makes him 
listen attentively. Fond string spot 
on the top deck hypos the platter 
all the way. On the flip with a bit 
of a sordid story of a drowning, 
Roy comes thru for music ops with 
another one that beckons coin play. 
Both sides of this cookie will boost 
ops phono take. 


"Spanish Bells" 

"Tennessee Baby" 

JIMMY DOLAN 
(Modern 20-576) 

• Pair of favorable sides by Jimmy 
Dolan and his Texas Ramblers show as 
items music ops may use to fair advant- 
age in their machines as excellent filler 
material. Top deck gets a novel musical 
interpretation, with the Ramblers dis- 
playing their wares adequately through- 
out. Flip is a straight hill piece, with 
Jimmy’s pipes ringing true. Both sides 
bear investigation, and rate a spot on 
your machine. 

"I Know YouMI Understand" 

"End Of Memory Lane" 

CHARLIE MONROE 
(Victor 20-2834) 

• Charlie Monroe and his Kentucky 
Pardners offer a pair here that might 
meet with ops approval. Utilizing fern 
chirping on both decks, the duo show as 
wax loaded with potentialities. Both 
sides of this platter wear in slow tired 
fashion, with adequate instrumental 
backing weaving throughout. Gal duet 
bounce back on the flip to brighten the 
patter a bit and make for pleasant listen- 
ing time. Both sides won’t stop traffic, 
but might be one of those sleepers. 

"Little Strands of Silver" 

"If That's The Way You Want It" 

DENVER DARLING 
(MGM 10182) , 

• Top notch ballading of Denver Darl- 
ing and a pair of tunes that should 
brighten ops phono take. Top deck, off- 
ered in slow waltz fashion has Denver 
spooning in sincere expression as he tells 
how every strand of silver is a sign of 
love. Flip is a switch to a bright and 
peppy piece that should meet with wide 
appeal. Denver’s wide following should 
account for many a call for this pair. 
The wax definitely is of the better sort 
and will move in your machines. 







The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 1 7 


May 15, 1948 





o 

e 

e 


DECK OF CARDS 

"1" Texas Tyler 
(4-Star 1228) 


ANYTIME 

Eddy Arnold 
(Victor 20-2700) 


WHAT A FOOL I WAS 

Eddy Arnold 
(Victor 20-2700) 


O WALTZ OF THE 
WIND 

Roy Acuff 
(Columbia 38042) 


Mercury Cuts “Nature 
Boy” In England &U.S.A. 

CHICAGO — Mercury Records Inc., 
this city, is scheduled to release their 
version of the boffo song hit “Nature 
Boy,” with their disking offering one of 
the most unique platters in many a moon. 

Mercury cut the musical accompani- 
ment in England, utilizing a full 20 piece 
orchestra. This is undoubtedly the first 
instance in which a disker has gone be- 
yond the American Federation of Mu- 
sicians’ jurisdiction to cut. The musical 
accompaniment master has been flown 
from England to Chicago, where balla- 
deer John Laurenz will dub in the lyric 
to the song. 

Mercury’s “Nature Boy” will probably 
be the only other disk with musical ac- 
companiment to compete with the Capi- 
tol King Cole version. All others thus 
far are a capella. 



rd CONSECUTIVE 
WEEK 



SAVANNAH CHURCHILL 


on MANOR RECORDS 

313 WEST 57 ST. 

IVEW YORK, X. Y. 


© WAITING FOR THE 
TRAIN 

Ernest Tubb 
(Decca 46119) 


ADDITIONAL TUNES LISTED BELOW 
IN ORDER OF POPULARITY 


SIGNED, SEALED AND 
DELIVERED 

Cowboy Copas 
(King 658) 

TENNESSEE WALTZ 

Jimmie & Leon Short 
(Dacca 46122) 

PEPPIN' THRU THE 
KEYHOLE 

Johnny Tyler 
(Victor 20-2620) 

SLAP ^ER DOWN 
AGIN, PAW 

Esmereldy 
(Musicraft 524) 

KLL HOLD YOU IN 
MY HEART 

Eddy Arnold 
(Victor 20-2332) 


MEET THIS BULLET HIT 

RECORD 21034 

DON’T WANT TO MEET 
ANY MORE PEOPLE” 

Backed by 

“HOLD ME” 

by BOB CHESTER & His Orchestra 

Order from your nearest distributor 

BULLET RECORDS 

423 Broad St. (Tel. 6-4573) Nashville, Tenn. 


CHERIO MUSIC says . . . 

Up Your Take With 

"ROSALINDA” 

Recorded By 

DICK THOMAS Decca 46114 

RED BENSON Rainbow 10033 

AL STUART .Embassy 1005-P 

RYTVOC recommends . . . 

T'M A LONELY LITTLE PETUNIA” 

Recorded By 

DICK 'Two-Ton' BAKER Mercury 5083 
Mercury 5083 

LAWRENCE WELK Decca 24197 

TOMMY TUCKER Columbia 

HARMONAIRES Embassy 1001 

THE HAPPY GANG 

Vic (Can.) 56-0022 
Coming Up 

"GIN RUMMY POLKA” 

Recorded by AL STUART Emb. 1004 
1585 BROADWAY. NEW YORK, N. Y. 


JUKE-BOX 

HEADACHES 

DISAPPEAR 


WHEN 
YOU USE 


SYLVANIA 

TUBES 



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box service calls. Don’t 
settle for tubes that may not 
give dependable perform- 
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they’re tops ! 

That's because Sylvania 
Radio Tubes undergo so 
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. . . incorporate so many ad- 
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SYLVANIA 

ELECTRIC 


EMPORIUM, PA. 

MAKERS OF RADIO TUBES; CATHODE RAY TUBES; 
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The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 18 


May 15, 1948 


MUSIC BIZ MAINTAINS OPTIMISTIC STAND 
TOWARD END OF RECORDING BAN 

A Capella Disks Not Meeting With Ops Approval; 

Rumor Disk Officials Huddle With Petrillo 



NEW YORK — Continued optimism on 
the part of music publishers, diskers and 
artists, with regard to the supposed end 
of the current recording- ban, reigned 
throughout the nation this past week. 

The ban. now in its fifth month, seems 
to have been generally accepted by the 
major platteries, with most not seeking 
ways and means other than vocal dub- i 
bing for orchestral background, as a 
substitute for cutting and recording hot I 
song hits. On the other hand, the inde- j 
pendents, who do not have the large back- 
ground of masters that the majors do, 
have continued recording to some extent, 
using non-union musicians and those in- 
struments sanctioned by the Ameidcan 
Federation of Musicians. 

Nevertheless, those affected by the re- 
cording ban continue to foresee an early 
end to the ban. General opinion functions 
around the belief that the major disk- 
eries, many of whom have missed out on 
flash song hits and a large volume of 
sales because of the ban, are seriously 
investigating all possibilities of getting 
around the Taft-Hartley Law, which 
seems to be the thom in the current 
dispute. 

Rumors to the effect that meetings are 
being held between officials and repre- 
sentatives of the recording industry and 
James C. Petrillo, president of the AFM, 
continue to persist. 

While Mr. Petrillo offers no immediate 
statement regarding the possibilities of 
an early settlement, it is rumored that 


discussions both pro and con have been 
entered into. 

Meanwhile the continued flourish of a 
capella recordings seems to have met 
with little approval on the part of music 
operators. Ops report that their phono- 
graph customers have not accepted the 
utilization of vocal backgrounds in the 
place of an orchestra. 

King Records Appoint 
Three New Distribs 

CINCINNATI, 0. — A1 Miller, sales 
manager for King Records, Inc., this 
city, announced this past week that his 
firm had appointed three new distribu- 
tors, two in the Northwest and one to 
sei-vice the Dakotas. 

The Northwest Music Co., Pierre, 
South Dakota, will handle North and 
South Dakota, sales and distribution. 

The Vogue Dist. Co., of Seattle, Wash- 
ington, will service Washington, Oregon, 
western Montana and northern Idaho. 

Utah, western Wyoming, eastern Ne- 
vada and southern Idaho will be covered 
by El Rancho Cordova, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

In addition to the new distributors. 
King now has eleven branches and plans 
on opening additional branches in Nash- 
ville and Pittsburgh within 60 days. 



IF 




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givef*. 


for 




o 




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top the list for: 

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More Pernfio needles sold than all other longlife 
needles combined. 


PERMO POINTS 

Made by the original and world's largest manufacturer 
of longlife phonograph needles. 

PERMO/ 

Chicago 26 


Awarded 

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Best Record 
of 1947 

MEANS 

<<LIVING SOUND” 

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DON'T MISS 
THIS MUST! 

FRANKIE LAINE’S 

THAT AIN'T 
RIGHT " 

MERCURY #5114 


CHICAGO — Eddy Howard is bringing 
’em into the Aragon in crowds . . . reach- 
ing the 6,200 figure some eves... which 
is something to whistle about these days 
. . .in fact, the cab driver, that sage of 
the road, who drove us out to the Aragon 
told us, “Boy, when Eddy Howard’s 
playin’ they all come out here. Even 
from ’way out on the south side.”. . .Joe 
Whalen and Chester Conn (BVC) cover- 
ing the spots together. . .with hustlin’ 
Chester telling us all about the “old days 
in Chi” when he “was young”. . .the gay 
dog. . .he and his “Little White Lies.”. . . 
Joe Sudy at the Bismarck’s Walnut 
Room, in between bites of smelts, telling 
us how he came to record for the Fortune 
plattery. It seems that when Joe played 
Detroit a young gal walked up to the 
bandstand and asked him would he like 
to make a record? Joe, thinkin’ it was a 
kid, answered “yes.” Little did he know 
that the Fortune plattery had sent the 
gal, who was also part owner of the disk- 
ery, and that the actual owner was a j uke 
box op. So there you have the why and 
wherefore of Joe Sudy’s first Fortuhe 
disk which received very neat notice here 
some weeks ago. . . . Armand Baum of 
Dreyer telling us, “ ‘You Can’t Be True 
Dear’ if I don’t get mention”. . .hope 
this takes care of Armand whose song, 
by the bye, is clicking nicely. 


George Givot, “The Greek Ambassa- 
dor,” came to town in a whirl . . . seems 
that George has gone into the record biz 
and is now pressing under the “Tele- 
record” label . . . George has an oldie that 
has plenty of shmaltz in it and, by the 
way, was much, much surprised that we 
hummed the tune for him... it’s “My 
California” . . . done by Con Conrad and 
Cliff Friend . . . and one of the best of the 
oldies. . .with George’s disk destined for 
lots of action if he keeps up that smashing 
sales offensive he has started. . . . Chuck 
Foster is staying on at the Stevens with 
the ice show and will remain right into 
the summer season. . .it should be a very 
nice way to spend a Chi summer. . .with 
an ice show. Chuck. . .Hildegarde, always 
a favorite around our Windy City, will 
have Eddy Oliver’s ork for her opening 
at the Palmer House.. . .Sai’ah Vaughan, 
who just recorded “Nature Boy” for 
Musicraft, proved the power of her grand 
pipes by loading the Civic Opera House, 
week ago Satty night. .. .Jerry Abbott 
had a tough break with his opening at 
the College Inn . . . after rehearsing with 
Herbie Fields all week long. . .he was 
given a mashed up five piecer to back 
him up . . . and it was a race from start 
to finish... with Jerry boiling mad and 
nervous thruout. . .but the kid’s pipes 
still pullin’ plenty of hand clapping from 
the assemblage. 


Chuck and Evelyn Aron of the Aristo- 
crat plattery, who are doing their own 
distributing here, report that they should 
have started y’ars and y’ars ago . . . it’s 
that lucrative . . . and, they also find 
they’re gettin’ their disks into more and 
more juke boxes than ever before. . .good 
luck, kids. ...Dick (Tower) Bradley on 
his way to Noo Yawk to attend Jack 
Owens’ personal appearances on the 
Chesterfield Supper Club, Paul White- 
man and Tommy Dorsey shows . . . and 
will also do some pluggin’ for his latest, 
“Pop Corn Polka.”. .. Eddie Ballentine, 
ork pilot of the Breakfast Club (now in 
(N. Y. C.), can take the bows for this 
latest composition Contrary to all re- 

ports, Chick Kardale is still hard at work 
and pluggin’ away... Chick has “Nature 
Boy” for his plug tune... a swell break 
for a swell guy.. . .George Olsen steps on 
the bandstand at the Edgewater once 
again .June 11... can’t keep him away 
from such a swell spot in the summer- 
time. . .George is doin’ plenty of pluggin’ 
for his “I Found A Rose”. . . Georgie, it 
sounds very good. . . . Armand Klein, for- 
merly with Mood Music, has hied himself 
off to Albuquerque. ' 

’re a real coin machine man! 


The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 1 9 


May 15, 1948 


Apollo Adds Distrlbs 


NEW YORK — Ralph Berson, general 
sales manager of Apollo Records re- 
turned this past week from a trip 
throughout the middle west with a list i 
of newly appointed distributors of the 
Apollo label. 

Latest firm to take over the line is 
G & S Dist. Co., of St. Paul, Minn. 
Others announced recently include the 
S. E. Schulman Co. of Chicago and the j 
Pan American Dist. Co. of Detroit. 

Lou Wendell and Clarence Cecka man- | 
age the G & S fii-m in St. Paul, and will 
distribute the Apollo platter throughout 
Minnesota and the states of North and 
South Dakota. This latest appointment 
brings the number of Apollo’s distribu- 
tors to thirty, in addition to the diskery’s 
branch offices in Los Angeles, Atlanta 
and New York. 

Rube Schoenberg of the S. E. Schul- 
man Co. in Chicago conferred with Ber- i 
son on his return to New York, and j 
plans were set into operation for direct- 
ing major promotion on Apollo’s fast 
rising seller, “If I Live To Be A Hun- 
dred,” by Bob Hannon. 
( 

Pastner Bows Into | 
Disk Distrib Business 


Modern Records Hypo 
“Chinatown” Disk Sale 



NEW YORK — Pictured above with 
Mr. Shayvee Lee, Mayor of New York’s 
Chinatown; Gloria Friedman and Bob 
Duberstein, Modern Records Dist. Co. 
heads, get the go ahead si^ on their 
click Modern platter “Chinatown & | 
Hindustan” by the Aqua String Band. 
Disk is currently climbing in pop music 
circles. 


GUY LOMBARDO 



AT A 

SIDEWALK 
PENNY ARCADE 


DECCA RECORDS ^ 



Iha HsxDhdA 
Tlssid! 

Write, Wire or Phone 
For Complete List and Prices 

Ifll.S. ^UlriLiUng Co. 

1350 E. 61st ST. • CHICAGO 37 
Milt Solstone 


PHILADELPHIA, PA.— Sid Pastner, 
former Sales Manager of Philly’s David 
Rosen, Inc., has established himself as 
a record distributor near the heart of 
Philadelphia at 310 East Thompson 
Street. The solid backing Pastner has 
secured, plus his years of valuable ex- 
perience and organizational talents prom- 
ise that his new finn Pasco Dist. Co. 
will do a top notch job throughout East- 
ern Pennsylvania. 




DEMAND! The ONE and ONLY 

Vocal Duet with The Sensational INSTRUMENTAL Background 


A Terrific Hit with Jocks, Jukes, Sheets and Record Counters. Order ]\oiv ! 


K. C. MUSIC SALES COMPANY 
907 North 18 Street 
Kansas City, Kansas 
K. C. MUSIC SALES COMPANY 
1022 North Western 
Chicago, Illinois 

SCOTT-CROSSE COMPANY 
1423 Spring Garden Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
STANDARD DIST. COMPANY 
1729 Fifth Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
MASS. MUSIC DIST. CO. 

1269 Tremont 
Boston, Metssachusetts 

W. E. HARVEY COMPANY 
12649 Linwood Avenue 
Detroit, Michigan 

W. E. HARVEY COMPANY 
234 Walnut 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

F & M DIST. COMPANY 
7620 Lexington Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 


HURT SALES & DIST. CO. . 
311 D. N. E. 

Childress, Texas 

HARRY FOX ASSOCIATES 
2S19 West 7 Street 
Los Angeles, California 

MILLNER RECORD SALES 
COMPANY, INC. 

110 North 18 Street 
St. Louis, Missouri 

MASTER RECORD SALES CO. 
653 Ninth Avenue 
New York City, N. Y. 

BALLANTYNES 
7221 Northeast Sandy 
Portland, Oregon 

NORTHWEST MUSIC 
Pierre, South Dakota 

DUNBAR DIST. COMPANY 
3004 Ross Avenue 
Dallcis, Texas 


W. M. AMANN DIST. CO. 

115 Olive Street 
Shreveport, Louisiana 

MAJOR DIST. COMPANY 
1P6 DeKalb Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

ROBERTS RECORD DIST. CO. 
1615 Maun Street 
Kansas City, Missouri 

RECORD SALES COMPANY 
351 Edgewood Avenue 
Atlanta, Georgia 

RECORD SALES COMPANY 
2117 Third Avenue, N. 
Birmingham, Alabama 

FOUR STAR RECORDS, INC. 
Box 9096, Station S 
Los Angeles, California 

SCHWARTZ BROTHERS 
3623 12th Street 
Washington, D. C. 

FORTUNE RECORD DIST. 
11839 12th Street 
Detroit, Michigan 


MUSIC SALES COMPANY 
680 Union Avenue 
Memphis, Tennessee 

MUSIC SALES COMPANY 
704 Baronne 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

NIAGARA & MIDLAND CO. 
881 Main Street 
Buffalo, New York 

DAVIS SALES COMPANY 
1010 Seventeenth Street 
Denver, Colorado 

SOUTHLAND DIST. COMPANY 
441 Eklgewood Avenue 
Atlanta, Georgia 

NORTHWEST RECORD 
DISTRIBUTORS. INC. 

714 North 34 Street 
Seattle, Washingrton 

DAMON RECORDING 
STUDIOS, INC. 

1221 Baltimore Avenue 
Kansas City, Missouri 


DAMON RECORDING STUDIOS, Inc. 

1Z21 BALTIMORE AVENUE KANSAS CITY, MO. 





The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 20 


May 15, 1948 



BOX SCORE TABULATION COMFIIIO ON TNI AVERAGE 
INDIVIDUAL PURCHASE ON THE BASIS OF 1000 RIC* 
ORDS- LISTED IN ORDER OF POPULARITY, INCLUDING 
NAME OF SONd, RECORD NUMBER, ARTISTS, AND RE> 
CORDING ON THE REVERSE SIDE. 



CODE 

AL — Aleiddin 

MG^-G-M 

AP — Apollo 

MI — ^Miracle 

AR — Aristocrat 

MN — Manor 

BU — Bullet 

MO — Modem 

CA — Capitol 

MU— <Musicraft 

CE — Celebrity 

NA — National 

CN— Continenta] 

RAr-Rainbow 

CO — Columbia 

RE — Regent 

CS — Coast 

SA — Savoy 

DE — ^Decca 

SD — Super Disc 

D EL — D^uxe 

SI— Signature 

EX — Elxclusive 

SP— Specialty 

JD — Joe Davis 

SN — Standard Phono 

KI— King 

ST— Sterling 

LI — ^Liss^ 

TR — Trilon 

LO — London 

UN— Umversal 

MA— Majestic 

VI— Victor 

ME — Mercury 

VT — ^Vitacoustic 


May 8 May 1 

1 — SABRE DANCE 103.9 101.4 


CO-381 02— WOODY HERMAN 0. 

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot 
DE-24388— VICTOR YOUNG 0, 

For Whom The Bell Tolls 
MG-30048— MACKLIN MARROW 
SI-15180— RAY BLOCH 0. 

Minuet In G 

RE-m — don henry trio 

Turnpike Polka 

VI-20-2721— FREDDY MARTIN 0. 

After You're Gone 

2 — NOW IS THE 

HOUR 103.8 99.1 

CA-1 5024— MARGARET WHITING 
But Beautiful 

CO-38061— HORACE HEIDT 0. 

I'll Never Say I Love You 
CO-38115— BUDDY CLARK 
Peculiar 

CM-7502— JERRY WALD 0. 

/ Hate To Lose You 
DE-24279— BING CROSBY 

Silver Threads Among The Gold 
DE-24378— BOB CARROLL 

Sapphire Of The Tropics 
LO-110— GRACIE FIELDS 

Come Back To Sorrento 
ME-5103— LES PAUL TRIO 

My Extraordinary Gal 
MG-10125— KATE SMITH 

I'll Never Say I Love You 
MU-532— SHEP FIELDS 0. 

Lone Star Moon 
MA-1 191— EDDY HOWARD 0. 

True 

SI-15178— RAY BLOCH 0. 

Nina^Nana 

VI-20-2704— CHARLIE SPIVAK 0. 

Who Are We To Say 

3 — MANANA 85.0 100.9 
CA-1 5022— PEGGY LEE 

DE-24333— THE MILLS BROS. 

/ Wish I Knew The Name 
LO-187— EDMUNDO ROSS 
The Cocoanut 
VI-20-2819— JOE LOSS 0. 

Teresa 

4 — LITTLE WHITE 

LIES 73.1 43.6 

CO-38114— DINAH SHORE 
Crying For Joy 


May 8 May 1 

DE-24280— DICK HAYMES 
Sierra Madre 

VI -27521— TOMMY DORSEY 0. 

5 — BABY FACE 71.3 36.9 

AP-1114— PHILLIE ALL STAR STRING BAND 
Bye, Bye, Blackbird 

CO-30014— JERRY WAYNE & DELL TRIO 
DE-25356— HENRY KING 0. 

Oh, You Beautiful Doll 
KR-216— UPTOWN STRING BAND 
ME-2120— AQUA STRING BAND 
MG-10156— ART MOONEY 0. 

Encore Cherie 
ST-294— HUM & STRUM 
TO-294— BENNY STRONG 0. 
pa-1105— FERKO STRING BAND 
UN-627— MILT SCOTT ORCH. 

VI-22879— SAMMY KAYE O. 

Miss You 

6 — TOOLIE OOLIE 

DOOLIE 66.3 41.2 

CA-1 5059— THE SPORTSMEN 
CN-1223— VAUGHN HORTON 
DA-2015— DANA SERENADERS 
DE-24380— ANDREWS SISTERS 
FL-5005— ALPINE BELLES 
LO-201— JOHNNY DENNIS 
SR-5505— LARKIN SISTERS 
ST-1013— DICK HAYMAN 
VI-25-1114— HENRI RENE 0. 

7 — BECAUSE 60.7 74.4 

AP-1068— HAL WINTERS 
Because 

VI-20-2653— PERRY COMO 

8 — BEG YOUR 

PARDON 56.3 52.5 

BU-1700— FRANCIS CRAIG 0. 

CA-490— DINNING SISTERS 
Melancholy 

CO-38036— FRANKIE CARLE 0. 

The Dream Peddler 
DE-24339— RUSS MORGAN 0. 

ME-5109— SNOOKY LANSON 
MG-10140— ART MOONEY ORCH. 
VI-20-2647_LARRY GREEN 0. 

Can It Ever Be The Same 

9 — HAUNTED HEART 43.8 54.5 

CA-1 5023— JO STAFFORD 

I'm My Own Grandmaw 
CO-38112— BUDDY CLARK 

First Prize At The Fair 
CO-38083— BUDDY CLARK 
Matinee 

DE-24362— GUY LOMBARDO O. 

Saturday Night In Central Park 
DE-24370— BING CROSBY 

Moonlight On A White Picket Fence 
ME-5120— VIC DAMON E 

Tell Me A Story 

MG-1 01 53— GEORGE PAXTON 0. 

Dream Girl 

VI-20-2713— PERRY COMO 
Carolina Moon 
Vl-45-0050— RUSS CASE 0. 

Inside U. S. A. 

10 — THE DICKEY 

BIRD SONG 36.9 20.8 

CO-38085— THE DELL TRIO 
Encore Cherie 

DE-24301— LARRY CLINTON O. 

Ooh! Looka There 
MA-1 234— GEORGE OLSEN O. 

Thoughtless 

MG-10138— BLUE BARRON 0. 

My Cousin Louella 
VI-20-2617— FREDDY MARTIN 0. 

If Winter Comes 
VT-22— JOAN EDWARDS 

11 — NATURE BOY 33.2 32.1 

CA-15054— KING COLE 

Lost April 

mu-567— SARAH VAUGHN 

I'm Glad There Is You 

12 — I’M LOOKING OVER A FOUR 

LEAF CLOVER 33.1 59.3 

CA-491— ALVINO REY ORCH. 

Spanish Cavalier 
CO-38100— TINY HILL ORCH. 

Show Me The Way To Go Home 


CO-38082— CODY FOX 


May 8 Moy 1 


/ Only Want A Buddy 
CO-38081— ARTHUR GODFREY 

The Thousand Islands Song 
DE-24319— RUSS MORGAN ORCH. 

Bye Bye Blackbird 

ME-51 00— UPTOWN STRING BAND 
ME-5105— FRANKIE LAINE 
MG-10119— ART MOONEY ORCH. 

The Big Brass Band From Brazil 
MU-543— THE POLKA DOTS 
RA- 10043— JIMMY SAUNDERS 


Heart Breaker 


SI.15117— RAY BLOCH ORCH. 
But Beautiful 

TR-220— ALEXANDER ORCH. 
VI-20-2668— THE THREE SUNS 
Eccentric 

VI-20-2787— CURLY HICKS 
Limehouse Blues 


13 — TELL ME A 

STORY 30.6 27.4 

CO-38050— FRANKIE CARLE 0. 

My Promise To You 

DE-24329— AMES BROTHERS 

ME-5120— VIC DAMONE 
Haunted Heart 

MG-10144— BOB HOUSTON 

VI-20-2761— SAMMY KAYE 0. 

I Wouldn't Be Surprised 


14 — LAROO LAROO 

LILLI BOLERO 30.0 29.1 

CA-1 5048— PEGGY LEE 

Talking To Myself About You 
CO-381 30— FRANKIE CARLE 0. 

Someone Cares 
DE-24404— BING CROSBY 

The Story Of Sorrento 
ME-5121— VIC DAMONE 
My Fair Lady 

MG-10166— BOB HOUSTON 
/ Still Love You 
MU-546— SHEP FIELDS O. 

Hold It Joe 

VI-20-2734— PERRY COMO 

15 — ST. LOUIS 
RLUES MARCH 

VI-20-2722— TEX BENEKE 0. 

Cherokee Canyon 

16 — SHINE 

DE-48074— SLIM GREEN 

What's The Reason 
DE-25354— ELLA FITZGERALD 

Darktown Strutters Ball 
DE-25353— GUY LOMBARDO 0. 

Corn Silk 

DE-24382— THE MILLS BROS. 

Love Is Fun 

ME-5091— FRANKIE LAINE 

We'll Be Together Again 
VI -20-2760— HOT QUINTETTE 
Ebony Rhapsody 

17 — MATINEE 20.7 32.3 

CA-1 5041— GORDON MacRAE 
Feathery Feelin' 

CO-38083— BUDDY CLARK 
Haunted Heart 
DE-24375— BOB EBERLY 

It's All Over But The Crying 
VI-20-2671— VAUGHN MONROE 0. 

If Someone Cares 


29.4 24.4 

26.3 39.8 


18 — THOUGHTLESS 13.8 11.9 

CA-1 5027— GORDON MacRAE 

You Were Meant For Me 
CO-38079— DORIS DAY 

I've Only Myself To Blame 
CS-8039— CURT MASSEY 
DE-24318— GUY LOMBARDO O. 

I'll Dance At Your Wedding 
LO-143— THE SQUADRONAIRES 
That Feathery Feelin' 

MA-1 234— GEORGE OLSON 0. 

The Dickey Bird Song 
ME-51 04— VIC DAMONE 

Love Is So Terrific 
MG-10137— BUDDY KAYE QUINTET 
Carnival In Venice 

SI-15176— RAY BLOCH 0. 

At The Candlelight Cafe 

VI-20-2714— LARRY GREEN 0. 

Wishing 



The Cash Box, Automatic Music Section 


Page 21 


May 15, 1948 


May 8 May 1 

19 — DECK OF 

CARDS 13.3 2.8 

CA-40114— TEX RITTER 

Rounded Up In Glory 

4S-1228— T. TEXAS TYLER 
Sweet Thing 

VI -20-2821— PHIL HARRIS 0. 

Somebody Else — Not Me 

20 — THE THOESA]^D 

ISLAI«>S SOXG 7.5 14.2 

CA-1 5008— JOHNNY MERCER 
Hooray For Love 

CO-38081— ARTHUR GODFREY 

I'm Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover 

MG-10136— KORN KOBBLERS 

VI-20-2619— LOUIS PRIMA 0. 

I'm Living A Lie 


ADDITIONAL TUNES LISTED BELOW 
IN ORDER OF POPOURITY 


21 JUST BECAUSE 5.7 7.8 

22 — WERE WERE MEANT 

FOR ME 5.6 16.4 



23 PEANUT VENDOR 

5.5 

6.6 

24 SUSPICION 

5.4 

— 

25 — WORRY, WORRY, 
WORRY 

5.3 

1.3 

26 — BUT BEAUTIFUU 

5.1 

11.0 

27 — CIGAREETES, WBrtJSKEY 

AND WILD, WILD 
WOMEN 5.0 

5.7 

28 — LOVER 

4.9 

7.9 

29 — AIRIZAY 

4.8 

3.9 

30 — I’VE GOT A CRUSH 
ON YOU 3.9 

4.4 

31 — PIANISSIMO 

2.5 

6.7 

32 — BEYOND THE 
SEA 

2.2 

2.9 

33 — BEST THINGS IN 
ARE FREE, THE 

LIFE 

1.8 

3.5 

34 — ALL OF ME 

1.7 

— 

35 — HEARTBREAKER 

1.6 

4.3 

36 — LOVE OF 
MY LIFE 

1.5 

— 

37 — I LOVE YOU, 
YES I DO 

1.4 

— 

38 — LOVE IS SO 
TERRIFIC 

1.3 

— 

39 — I WISH I KNEW 
THE NAME 

1.2 

— 

40 — GOOFUS 

1.0 

1.4 


SINGS THE MOST SENSATIONAL 
JUKE BOX TUNE OF 1948 . . . 

”Aly California" 

BACKED WITH 

"Darktom Strutters Ball" 

on Tele-Record No. 4803 

Disk Jockeys ★ Retail Record Stores 
ir Juke Box Ops Are Going Absolutely 
NUTS Over This Biggest Moneymaker 
of 1948— MORE THAN A SONG— EVEN 
MORE THAN A RECORD— It’s The One 
And Only Incomparable GEORGE GIVOT 
Singing COIN INTO JUKE BOXES! 
It’s The Gay Old Big Time All Over Again! 

ORDER TODAY FROM . . . 

TELE-RECORDS, INC 

FAIRMONT HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine mani 



The Cash Box 


Page 22 


May 15, 1948 



MUSIC 


MUSIC 


BELLS 


A.M.I. 

Model A w/ play meter ...... $897 .50 

Model A without play meter , . 887.50 
Automatic Hostess Complete 

20 Station Unit 14,800.00 


HIDEAWAY CAB. W/Continuous 
Play Mech. : 

W/Amplifier & Rem. Vol. Con. 482.50 
W/Amplifier-No Rem. Vol. Con. 470.00 
Complete — No Amp., No 

Vol. Con 410.00 

5c 3 wire 40 selection wall box 53.50 
5-10-25c 3 wire 40 sel. wall box 59.50 
Stepper for 10 wall boxes . . . 39.75 
Stepper for 25 wall boxes . . . 42.75 

AIREON 


Coronet 400 495.00 

Blonde Bombshell 595.00 

Fiesta DeLuxe 595.00 

Super DeLuxe 595.00 

48' Model Hideaway 299.50 

48' Model trio wall and bar box 59.50 

48' Carilleon Speaker 37.50 

48' Melodeon Speaker 27.50 

48' Impressario Speaker .... 19.50 


4005A 8" Walnut Round Spkr. $25.00 
4006 A 8" Deluxe, Walnut 

Round Mirror 35.00 

4007 12" Inter. Deluxe Spkr. 135.00 

4008 15" Deluxe Speaker . . . 185.00 


PINS 


BALLY 

Ballerina 289.50 

CHICAGO COIN 

Trinidad 275.00 

GENCO 

Trade Winds 289.50 

EXHIBIT 

Banjo 299.50 

GOTTLIEB 

Jack ’N JiU 294.00 

MARVEL 

Leap Year 289.50 


Leap Year w/4 coin chute. . . 299.50 


25c Super DeLuxe Club Chief . $344.00 
50c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 454.00 

PAC*E 

5c DeLuxe Chrome Bell .... 245.00 
10c DeLuxe Chrome Bell .... 255.00 
25c DeLuxe Chrome Bell .... 265.00 
50c DeLuxe Chrome Bell .... 375.00 
$1.00 DeLuxe Chrome Bell. . 550.00 


CONSOLES 


BALLY 

Wild Lemon 542.50 

Double-Up 542.50 

Hi-Boy 424.00 

Triple Bell 5-5-5 895.00 

Triple BeU 5-5-25 910.00 

Triple Bell 5-10-25 925.00 

BELL-O-MATIC 

Three Bells, 1947 735.00 

BUCKLEY 

Track Odds DD JP 1250.00 

Parlay Long Shot 1250.00 


FILBEN 

Maestro 595.00 

Mirrocle Cabinet 325.00 

30 Selection Stowaway Mech.. 398.00 

BUCKLEY 

Music Box 25.00 

MILLS INDUSTRIES 

Constellation 795.00 

PACKARD MFG. CORP. 

Manhattan Phonograph 695.00 

Hideaway Model 400 383.00 

Model 1000 Spkr. — Paradise. 129.50 
Butler Wall Box Hi-Chrome 5c 32.50 
Butler Wall Box Hi-Chrome 10c 33.95 

950 Speaker 35.00 

650 Speaker 16.50 

ROCK-OLA 

Magic-glo Phonograph. . .No Price Set 
1807 Moderne Corner Spkr.. . 107.50 
1906 Remote Volume Control 6.90 

1530 WaU Box 39.50 

1603 Wall Speaker 42.50 

1606 Tonette Wall Spkr 21.50 

1608 ToneOLier Spkr 65.00 

1607 Tonette Wall Spkr 19.75 

1531 DeLuxe Bar Bracket . . . 8.25 

1533 Universal Bar Bracket. . 3.90 

1795 Wall Box Line Booster. . 16.35 

SEEBURG 

148-M Symphonola 965.00 

148-S Symphonola 895.00 

H-148-M RC Special 564.00 

Wireless Wallomatic 58.50 

Wired Wallomatic 49.75 

5-10-25c Wireless Wallomatic. 87.50 
5-10-25c Wired Wallomatic . . 75.00 

Teardrop Speaker 19.95 

RS4-8 Recess Wall & Ceil. 

Spkr 18.00 

1948 Door & Dome 102.50 

WURLITZER 

1100 Standard 999.50 

1080A Colonial 899.50 

1017A Cone, chngr. w/stepper 529.50 

1015 Standard 914.50 

1080 Colonial 875.00 

1017 Cone, chngr. w/stepper. 499.50 

2140 5-lOc Wireless 50.00 

3025 5c 3-wire 49.50 

3045 Wireless 59.50 

3020 5-10-25C 3-wire 69.50 

3031 5c 30-wire 39.50 

212 Master Unit 70.00 

215 Wireless Transmitter. . . 17.50 

216 Wireless Impulse Receiver 22.50 

217 Auxiliary Amplifier .... 35.00 

218 30-wire Adptr. Term. Box 15.00 

219 Stepper 46.50 

4000 8" Metal Star Speaker. . 45.00 

4002 8" Plastic Star Speaker. 45.00 
4004A 8" Metal Musical 

Note Speaker 30.00 

4005 8" Walnut Round Spkr. . 22.50 j 


J. H. KEENEY CO. 

Cover Girl 265.00 

UNITED MFG. CO. 

Wisconsin 275.00 

WILLIAMS MFG. CO. 

Virginia 299.50 


COUNTER GAMES 

A.B.T. MFG. CORP. 

Challenger 65.00 

BALLY MFG. CO. 

Heavy Hitter 
w/stand . . 

GOTTLIEB 

DeLuxe Grip Scale . . 

GROETCHEN MFG. CO. 

Camera Chief 


ONE- BALLS 

BALLY 

Gold Cup, F. P. . 

Trophy, P. O. . . 

J. H. KEENEY CO. 

Favorite 


645.00 

645.00 


No Price Set 


39.50 

19.95 


184.50 

196.50 


BELLS 

BUCKLEY 


Criss Crosse BeUe No Price Set 

BELL-O-MATIC CORP. 

5c Jewel Bell 248.00 

10c Jewel BeU 253.00 

25c Jewel BeU 258.00 

50c Jewel BeU 338.00 

5c Bonus BeU 258.00 

10c Bonus BeU 263.00 

25c Bonus BeU 268.00 

5c Black Gold BeU 258.00 

10c Black Gold BeU 263.00 

25c Black Gold BeU 268.00 

5c Melon BeU 248.00 

10c Melon BeU 253.00 

25c Melon BeU 258.00 

GROECHEN 

Columbia Twin JP 145.00 

Columbia DeLuxe Club 209.50 


O. D. JENNINGS 

5c DeLuxe Club Chiefs .... 299.00 
10c DeLuxe Club Chiefs .... 309.00 
25c DeLuxe Club Chiefs .... 319.00 

25c DeLuxe Club Chief 429.00 

5c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 324.00 
10c Super DeLuxe Club Chief 334.00 


EVANS 

Bangtails 5c Comb 7 Coin . No Price Set 
BangtaUs 25c Comb 7 Coin.No Price Set 


BangtaU JP No Price Set 

BangtaU FP PO JP No Price Set 

Evans Races No Price Set 

Casino BeU No Price Set 

Winter Book JP No Price Set 


GROETCHEN TOOL & MFG. CO. 


Columbia Twin FaUs 485.00 

O. D. JENNINGS 

Challenger 5-25 595.00 

Club Console 499.00 

DeLuxe Club Console 529.00 

Super DeLuxe Club Console. . 545.00 

J. H. KEENEY CO. 

Gold Nugget 800.00 

Wild BeU No Price Set 

PACE 

3-Way BeU Console 5c-10c-25c 690.00 

5c Royal Console 320.00 

10c Royal Console 330.00 

25c Royal Console 340.00 

50c Royal Console 475.00 

$1.00 Royal Console 650.00 


ARCADE TYPE 


BALLY MFG. CO. 

Big Inning 539.50 

Bally Bowler 539.50 

H. C. EVANS CO. 

Bat-A-Score No Price Set 

EDELMAN AMUSEMENT DEVICES 
Flash Bowler 

13'— 8" 475.00 

11'— 8" 450.00 

10'— 8" 450.00 

Belgian Pool 319.50 

INTERNATIONAL MUTOSCOPE CORP. 

Deluxe Movie Console 150.00 

Deluxe Movie Counter 140.00 

Fishing Well . 375.00 

Silver Gloves 375.00 


PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

GLASS SIZES — PIN GAMES 


Bally 21 X 41 

Chicago Coin 21 x 41 

Exhibit 21 X 41 

Gottlieb 21 x 43 

Keeney 21 x 41 

Marvel 21 x 41 

United 21 x 41 

WiUiams 21 x 43 


• ALL EQUIPMENT APPEARING ON THIS PAGE LISTED ONLY UNTIL MACHINES ARE NO LONGER IN PRODUCTION. 


The CcLsh Box 


Page 23 


May 15, 1948 



FOR MILLS ESCALATOR BELLS^ 
HAMMERLOID OR WRINKLE 
YOUR CHOICE OF: 

Cherry or Diamond Ornamenti, 

Maroon, Copper, Gold, Green, 

Aluminum Gray, Chocolate, Sort 

Blue. 

e Complete new preeition>bullt 
light wood Cabinets enertly 
finished with perfect fir new 
aluminum eastings. 

• Club Handle and Handle Col- 
lar chrome plated. 

• Heavy brass chrome plated 
etched Reward Plates, 2/5 or 
3/S. 

• 5e-10c-25c chrome Denominat- 
or Coin Intake. 

• Payout Cups with anti-spoon 
Cup. 

e Drillpreof Plates. 




Buckley gave Music Operators the FIRST prae- 
lical and profitable music box at the LOWEST 
PRICE. Today, Buckley leads the field by offer- 
ing a NEW music box of advanced design and 
perfection at c NEW LOW PRICE. 

Quality of material and workmanship have not 
been sacrificed. This sensational low price is 
the result of economies realized in large quan- 
tity production. 

The new Buckley Music Box is genuinely 
chrome plated, with beautiful red dial plates 
and attractively illuminated. Equipped with 
positive nationally known slug 
rejector and double capacity 
cosh box. Complete program 
of selections always in full view, 
Buckley's exclusive features of 
construction, combined with out- 
standing beauty and eye appeal 
makes this the outstanding re- 
mote control music box . . . 
equally popular for wall or bar 
installation. 



*/ 250 - 


horse console that 
would stand up month 
otter month — year after year and out- 
eorn all other coin machines. 

Buckley operators know this to be a 
fact. Experience has proved that no 
other machine can even come In o 
close second from the standpoint of 
earnings. Every day new operators ore 
finding out that the new BUCKLEY 
TRACK ODDS are even more profitable 
to operate than they hoped for. 



4223 WEST lARE STREET • • • CHICAGO 24. ILIINOIS 


(PHONE: VAN lUREN &A3 6-37-38-5533) 



Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves yoiv're a real coin machine man! 




The Cash Box 


May 15, 1948 


Page 24 


it 



There is no 
substitute for 

QUALITY!" 


ORDER FROM YOUR 
DISTRIBUTOR TODAY! 


1140-50 N. KOSTNER AVE. member 
CHICAGO 51, ILLINOIS 


FLIPPER BUMPERS 

(Patent Pending) 

'AVAILABLE NOW> 

bumper 
kit 

Original Gottlieb^ Flipper^Bu'’*®^® '"sfaMafion of 2 
5-Ball gome. Ue 

cZ7ete"Kit gZ17.$2 .95 

ORDER DIRECT FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


2 COMPLETE SEQUENCES — "JACK" - “JILL"! 

• BONUS AND BONUS BUILD-UP! 

• DOUBLE BONUS! • ADVANCE BONUS! 

• HIGH SCORE! • FLASHING EYES! 


ORIGINAL 


SOLID AS THE ROCK OF GIBRALTAR 
IN POPULARITY-PLAY-PROFITS! 


JACK ■ JILL 


SENSATIONAL 

PRICES 

ON 

USED 

PHONOGRAPHS 

AND 

GAMES! 

WRITE 

FOR 

PRICE 

LIST! 

SCOTT-CROSSE CO. 

1423 SPRING GARDEN STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
RIttenhouse 6-7712 


AaiYE 

RMoadItloMd 

GAMES 

'NUFF 
SAID! 

For A 
Complete 
List of 
Specials 
Drop a Uao 
to Any One 
of Oar 
3 OfficM 

Active Amusement Machines Co. 

««4 NORTH IROAD ST., PHILA. 30, PA. 
PhsM: Prcment 7-449S 
9S eUNTON AVE., NEWARK S, N. J. 
PImm: MHchcR 2*8S27 
lilt WYOaiNO AVE., SCRANTON, PA. 
PSom: Scraatofl 4-0174 


Weather Improves; 
Arcade Biz Shows 
Suhstantial Increase 

Look Foward To Big 1948 

NEW YORK — Due to the unusually 
adverse weather conditions tl\at pre- 
vailed thruout the month of April, arcade 
owners report that their 1948 season was 
off to a poor start. However, many ar- 
cade men point out that the month of 
April is always uncertain, and that many 
arcades open only for week-ends during 
this month. In addition many other ar- 
cades start preparing for the season dur- 
ing this month and open up around the 
middle or end of May. 

“It’s been my experience” stated an 
old time arcade man “that April is 
always a gamble with the elements. Many 
arcade men try to rush the season, and 
open up early, hoping to benefit by a few 
nice week-ends. If things don’t go right, 
then they start moaning. However, the 
real outdoor arcade season begins the 
end of May, and it looks to me that we’re 
in for a real big season.” 

This past week-end was bright, sunny 
and warm in most parts of the country, 
and the reaction was felt immediately. 
Arcade owners report that their receipts 
showed up very well, augering well for 
the balance of the season, if they get any 
break at all in the weather. 

Distributors and wholesalers of arcade 
equipment report that sales of machines 
have been brisk during the past few 
months, with arcade owners replacing 
many obsolete pieces with newer ma- 
chines. In addition, they report, more 
new arcades have been built to open this 
year, than for many years in the past. 
“It seems that building supplies have 
been more available this spring than for 
quite some time” stated a supplier of 
arcade equipment. “We’ve been called 
upon to lay out quite a few new arcades, 
and to supply the machines. Naturally 
these new amusement places bought a 
large percentage of new equipment, in 
addition to the standard arcade ma- 
chines.” 


Console Distrib. Co. 
Opens Offices In 
Good Hope, La. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— Bob Buckley 
and Sam Ti’idico, Console Distributing 
Company, Inc., with offices in this city, 
announced that they had opened a new 
shop in Good Hope, La., to take care of 
the refinishing and overhauling of all 
type of coin operated games. 

Distributors for Buckley’s “Criss 
Crosse Bell,” “Daily Double Track Odds” 
and “Parlay Long Shot,” the firm will 
maintain a complete line of parts at both 
offices. 

“The Good Hope offices are located on 
the old river, just twenty minutes drive 
from the city” states Buckley. “We have 
set up signs along the Airline Highway, 
directing coinmen to the shop. In addi- 
tion to a complete line of equipment and 
supplies, we keep a factory trained man 
available for operators to consult at all 
times. We also have three trucks ready 
on a moment’s notice to pick up and de- 
liver any machines.” 

Tridico and Buckley report that busi- 
ness continues to improve with each suc- 
ceeding week, and they look forward to 
a record breaking year. 


Indication Of Things 
To Come — 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF.— The Associ- 
ated Press reported this week that Rohr 
Aircraft Corp., this city, had recalled 
100 former women employees due to the 
shortage of men to handle the necessary 
increased work. 

Expert economists expect this condi- 
tion to become ordinary once again when 
the goveiTiment’s defense money starts 
circulating. 



JOE ASH 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 


The Cash Box 


Page 25 


May 15, 1948 


AMI Model “B Phono Introduced 


To Distribs At 



JOHN HADDOCK 


GEAND RAPIDS, MICH.— AMI pho- 
nograph distributors from all over the 
country gathered at the factory here for 
a two day meeting, Friday and Satur- 
day, May 7 and 8. 

The feature of the meet was to present 
to the distributors the new AMI phono- 
graph, Model “B.” In addition, the dis- 
tributors and factory officials set up a 
policy for the^ sale of the equipment, de- 
cided upon a date for the formal intro- 
duction of the machine to the operators 
thruout the country, toured the factory 
to gain first hand information on the 
production facilities of the company, and 
climaxed the two days with a gala ban- 
quet at the Morton House, Grand Rapids. 

John Haddock, president of AMI, Inc., 
and Lindy Force, general sales manager, 
spent two hectic days, greeting all their 
distributors upon their arrival in Chi- 
cago, then at the plant. 

“We were tremendously pleased and 
excited over the manner in which our 
distributors reacted to their introduction 


Two Day Meet 

I 

to the Model ‘B’ phonograph” stated | 
Haddock, “and it’s their opinion that | 
the music operator will in turn go for it 
in a big way.” 

Distributors attending the meeting 
were: Sam Strahl and Ange Cangelier, 
American Coin-A-Matic Machine Co., ; 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Robert Wenzel, Auto- I 
matic Games Supply Co., St. Paul, | 
Minn.; E, B. Alley, Automatic Music | 
Systems, Richmond, Va. ; Mike Spagnola 
and Phil Weinstein, Automatic Phono- 
graph Distributing Co., Chicago; Jack 
Mitnick and Harry Poole, Beacon Coin 
Machine Co., Boston, Mass.; H. W. 
Dolph, H. W. Dolph Distributing Co., 
Tulsa, Okla. ; Paul Bleck, General Music 
' & Novelty Co., Fond du lac. Wise.; 

Morris Hankin and Jack Lovelady, Jr., 

H & L Distributors, Atlanta, Ga. ; Harry 
I Devereoux, Koers Distributing Co., 
Rapid City, S. D.; Hari*y Lief, Lief 
Music Distributing Co. ; Max Marston, 
Marston Distributing Co., Bill Schetter, 
Jack R. Moore Co., Portland, Ore.; 
Frank Murphy, Murphy Distributing 
Co., St. Louis, Mo.; R. E. Padfield, Musi- 
cal Sales Co., Kansas City, Mo.; W. H. 
Richardson, Pioneer Distributing Co., 
Charlotte, N. C. ; George Ptitman, Pitt- 
man Distributing Co., Davenport, Iowa; 
Dave Rosen, David Rosen, Inc., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; Barney Sugerman and Abe 
Green, Runyon Sales Company, New 
York and Newark, N. J. ; Willie Blatt, 
Supreme Distributors, Inc., Miami, Fla.; 
Leonard Goldstein, T & L Distributing 
Co.; Pat Ryan, Vogue Western, Salt 
Lake City, Utah; Allan Wallace, Wal- 
lace Distributing Co., Mineral Wells, 
Texas; R. Warncke, R. Wanicke Co., 
Houston and San Antonio, Texas; and 
Bill Wolf, Wolf Distributing Co., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

In addition to the distributors, mem- 
bers of the trade press, and others were 
on hand. 



Not just another rolldown 
game — but the greatest — 
steadiest, biggest money-maker 
in all rolldown games’ history 
— the others are gone — but 
“Pro-Score” is still selling — 
and selling bigger than ever — 
that’s why, because of volume 
production, we are now in a 
position to offer you — a new 
low price — get over on “the 
right side of the fence” — 
write for new low price today ! ! 


^AjO-ScoA£ -AT 


NEW LOW 
PRICE 


GEORGE PONSER CO 


158 E. GRAND AVE. 

CHICAGO 11, ILL. 

(PHONE: SUPERIOR 4427) 


250 WEST 57th ST. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

(PHONE: CIRCLE 6-6651) 



Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you^re a real coin machine man! 


The Cash Box 


Page 26 


May 15, 1948 





<xmuna 


NEW AMI PHONOGRAPH WITH 40 SELECTIONS 
AND STARTLING NEW FEATURES. 


"^fPa/cA neocl io€e/:’i o/nn^mricement 



REAL BUYS! 

Completely 

RECONDITIONED 
LIKE NEW 

WOOD BALL 
ROLL DOWNS 

TOTAL ROLLS $ 69.50 

CHICAGO COIN ROLL 
DOWN 129.00 

ESSO ARROWS 115.00 

ADVANCE ROLL 145.00 

HY ROLLS 265.00 

STEEL BALL 
ROLL DOWNS 

HAWAII $169.50 

GOLD MINE 189.50 

SINGAPORE 189.50 

TROPICANA 229.50 

BERMUDA 229.50 

COVER GIRL 229.50 

RUSH YOUR ORDERS 

1/3 Dep. with Order 
Bal. C. O. D. 

RUNYON 
SALES CO. 

593 Tenth Ave., New York 18, N. Y. 
Tel.: LOngacre 4-1880 




Readies Two 
New Consoles 



J. RAYMOND BACON 

CHICAGO — J. Raymond Bacon, vice- 
president of 0. D. Jennings & Company, 
this city, announced that the firm is in 
production on its new model bell console, 
and that initial deliveries are now being 
made. 

The console is available in nickel, 
dime, quarter, half dollar and dollar 
models. The machine will be produced 
under two names, those being shipped to 
the Western States tabbed “Prospector” 
and those sent to the Eastern territory 
named “Monte Carlo.” 

“These two consoles are exactly the 
same” stated Bacon, “except for the 
names. Attention will be called to our 
‘drawer full of silver,’ referring to the 
drawer near the base of the machine that 
holds 1,000 coins.” 

Bacon further stated that operators 


Re-enters Jobbing 
AndDistributbgBiz 



HAROLD KLEIN 

MILWAUKEE, WIS.— Harold Klein, 
well known midwestern coinman, fully 
recovered from a recent heart attack, 
announced that he is re-entering the coin 
machine business as a jobber and dis- 
tributor. 

Previously Klein conducted a distribu- 
ting business under the name of Klein 
Distributing Co., and then later on was 
associated in the manufacture of a roll 
down game under the nam.e of Great 
Games, Inc. 


who have been given a look at these con- 
soles have placed substantial orders de- 
manding priority in delivery. 

Meanwhile, the firm goes along stead- 
ily with its production of the Standard 
Chiefs, Super DeLuxe Club Chiefs, Chal- 
lengers and Club Consoles. “Business 
has been going great guns” states John 
Neise, sales manager, “and we are look- 
ing forward to a great, reception of the 
new ‘Prospector’ and ‘Monte Carlo’ con- 
soles.” 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man 


t 


The Cash Box 


May 15, 1948 


Page 27 




Hundreds of operators know from actual ex- 
perience that Track Odds and Parlay Long 
Shot are the greatest money-makers ever 
offered^ to the coin machine trade. 

If yea- don't know it. here's your chance to 
find out — and it won't cost you a cent. Both 
Track Odds and Parlay are available in 
nickel or quarter play — for straight cash or 
check payout. 

Order a sample today on our thirty days' free 
trial offer explained below. 


BUCKLEY TRACK ODDS 
AND PARLAY LONG SHOT 


TRACK ODDS 


PARIAY lOK IT 

Illn»tration on the tight show* E .. / PABIAY 

top gloss. Notice the big odd. — 
10-15-20-25-30 to 1 plus jacket os 
high os 500 to 1. Naturally 
the PARUIY is a reel fororite 
with long shot players. It's 
an Ideal companion console 
lot the TBACK ODDS. 


iHEMBtR 


nisstration at the left shows the TRACE ODDS 
top glass. From one to seven coins may be 
played at one time. Winner Is. indicated by 
me spinner and odds chonger shows odds. 
Players like the TRACE ODDS because it is 
easy to understand and gives them ACTION 
end THRILLS. 


SPECIAL OFFER! 


Try it before you buy iti Pay no money down I 
Thirty days’ free trial to established operators! 
We are making this special offer to prove to you 
that- Track Odds and Parlay Long Shot will give 
you better mechanical performance and will make 
you more money than any other console. Let us 
know the type of location in which Track Odds or 
Parlay Long Shot will be placed and we will recom- 
mend the model for your particular loeatlon. 


PHONES: VAN SUREN 6636-6637-6638-6533 


U 


Please mention THE CASH BOX ichen anstcering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine manl 






The Cash Box 


Page 28 


May 15 , 1948 


% 



THE LION BEVERAGE VENDER is now being manufactured to vend 
9 oz. drinks of Pepsi-Cola. For complete details write for Bulletin X. 

LION MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

MANUFACTURERS OF BALLY COIN-OPERATED GAMES 
2640 BELMONT AVENUE CHICAGO 18, ILLINOIS 


LYMO Industries, Inc., Exclusive Distributors 

MERCHANDISE MART CHICAGO 54, ILLINOIS 


Serves 1200 drinks from a single servicing 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 





The Cash Box 


Page 29 


May 15, 1948 



WATCH THE PLAY! 
YOU, TOO, WILL SAY 

VIRGINIA! 


-k PREMIUM AND DOUBLE PREMIUM SCORE 
ir PYLON LIGHTS 

ir 5 ADVANCE PREMIUM ROLLOVERS 
AND FAST PREMIUM BUILD-UP 

ir SCORE TO 900,000 

ir AMAZING 6-FLIPPER ACTION 


ORDER 

FROM 

YOUR 

DISTRIBUTOR 
TODAY ! 


^WillumU 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

161 W. HURON STREET 
CHICAGO 10, ILLINOIS 



DAVID ROSEN, Inc. 

EXCLUSIVE AMI DISTRIBUTOR 
503 EVERGREEN AV. I 855 N. BROAD ST. 
BALTIMORE 23. MD. PHILA. 23, PA. 
Edmonson 5322 | Stevenson 2-2903 


SPECIAL EXTRA SPECIALS 

RECONDITIONED FIVE BALLS 
VERY CLEAN AND MECHANICALLY A-1 

BALLY VICTORY SPECIALS $150.00 

GOTTLIEB HUMPTY DUMPTY... 135.00 
CHI COIN BERMUDA 140.00 

UNITED’S SINGAPORE $135.; TROPI- 
CANA $150.; HAWAII 100.; and 
MEXICO $90. 

1/3 Deposit Required, Balance C.O.D. 

CROWN NOVELTY CO., Inc. 

920 Howard Avenue, New Orleans 13, La. 

Phone: CAnal 7137 Nick Carbajal, Gen. Mgr. 


MOTORS REPAIRED '^SEl^^G— RC^- 

OLA— MILLS. Rewound to_ Factory Specifica- 
tions. Rapid service — repaired or exchanged 
within 24 hours after arrival. A A 

Complete No Extras 
M. LUBER 

503 W. 4l$t (LOngacre 3-5939) New York 


Please mention THE CASH 


United Coin Holds Filben Showing 



MILWAUKEE, WIS.— United Coin 
Machine Company, this city, held its first 
showing of the Filben Corporation’s new- 
est phonograph “Maestro” at the Wiscon- 
sin Hotel on May 2, and capacity crowds 
thronged the showroom continuously 
thruout the day. 

Operators partook of the refreshments 
and were treated to a continuous fiow of 
entertainment furnished by stars of 
stage, screen, radio and records. Head- 
ing the array of talent was Bobby Breen, 
foiTner protege of Eddie Cantor. Ac- 
companying Breen was the genial maes- 
tro Johnny Davis, one of “Milwaukee’s 
own.” Among other personalities seen 
were: Tommy Sheridan, modem pianist; 
Mark Steger of the Vocalaii-es; Bob 
Scott, songwriter; Ted Wayne, orchestra 
i leader; Jimmy LaMare, manager of 

BOX when ansicering ads 


Claude Thornhill’s orchestra; Clyfe Gor- 
don the singing bellboy; Joey Sanger, 
former world’s lightweight champion; 
and Jimmy Sherrer, middleweight con- 
tender. Also in attendance was Pat 
Graham, former runner-up for the “Mr. 
America” title, and present holder of the 
“Mr. Wisconsin” strong man title. 

In addition to Harry Jacobs, Jr., and 
Harry Jacobs, Sr., heads of the firm and 
their entire staff, two lovely professional 
models acted as hostesses to the visiting 
coinmen. On hand also were officials 
from the Filben Coi*poration. 

Pictured above surrounding a Filben 
mechanism are: Sam Mannerino, on the 

board of directors of Filben Corporation; 
Harry Jacobs, Sr.; Harry Jacobs, Jr.; 
and Sam Dmcker, vice president of Fil- 
ben Corporation. 


— it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 




The Cash Box 


Page 30 


May 15, 194B 




Chicago Coin COMPANY 

1725 DIVERSEY BOULEVARD, CHICAG0 14, ILLINOIS 


REAL BARGAINS! 


KEENEY BIG PARLAY- 

ONE BALL PAYOUT $150.00 

BUCKLEY AUTOMATIC DICE 

MACHINE 35.00 

BALLY SKY BATTLE GUN 65.00 

WURLITZER 5C0 KEYBOARDS . 110.00 
15 PRE-WAR PIN GAMES, 

GOOD ORDER, all for 100.00 

OLSHEIN DISTRIBUTING CO. 


n 00-02 BROADWAY, ALBANY 4, N. Y. 


ALL TYPES OF NEW AND USED MACHINES 

READY FOR D E L I V E R Y ~ W R I T E — W I R E — P H 0 N E 


LAKE CITY AMUSEMENT CO. 

1648 ST. GLAIR AVENUE, CLEVELAND, OHIO 

(PHONE; CHERRY 7067-8) 


See Us 

For 

ALL 

PRODUCTS 


R. R. “Rudy” Greenbaum Resigns 
From Aireon; To Hoad Finance Corp. 


ROCK-OLA 

"MAGIC- 
GLO" 
PHONO 


More 

Glitter 

More 

Glamour 


Burns Protection 
For Coin Machines 
Creates Great Stir 

WASHINGTON, D. C. — Hirsh de La 
Viez, Coin Machine Operators of Amer- 
ica, Inc., this city, reports that the firm 
has received a wonderful response from 
operators thruout the nation regarding" 
the protection service being rendered for 
the coin trade by the William J. Burns 
International Detective Agency. 

Thru the offices of the Coin Machine 
Operators of America, coin machine com- 
panies can be protected on all their equip- 
ment on their routes by the Burns De- 
tective Agency at a special rate. This' 
service can be obtained to cover cigarette 
machines, drink dispensers, candy ven- 
dors, scales, music machines, etc. 

“Experience has taught us,” states 
Hirsh, “that the best way to combat 
vandalism is to prevent it. The display 
of Burns ‘Warning’ signs has proved to 
be one of the most effective preventive 
measures. This sign creates in the minds 
of persons planning a wrongful act, the 
psychological effect that the entire or- 
ganization of Burns is employed to pro- 
tect all the equipment, and even the 
location where it is displayed. Further- 
more, Burns’ operatives are on guard 24 
hours a day and are instructed to be alert 
for information of interest to the sub- 
scriber to this service, and when in the 
vicinity of a machine bearing one of their 
‘Warning’ signs, to be watchful to pre- 
vent any activities of criminals.” 


NEW YORK— R. R. (Rudy) Green- 
baum announced this week that he had 
resigned as Vice President and General 
Sales Manager of Aireon Manufacturing 
Corporation, Kansas City, Kansas, to as- 
sume the presidency of Product Credit 
Corporation, a new national general 
financing corporation. 

Product Credit Corporation will estab- 


R. R. (RUDY) GREENBAUM 


lish its headquarters in New York City. 
Bob Waggener, well known in coin ma- 
chine financing circles, joins Greenbaum 
in this firm and will act as general oper- 
ating manager. 

Greenbaum in announcing his resigna- 
tion from Aireon stated “It was with 
great reluctance that I leave this great 
phonograph company and its wonderful 
personnel. However, the opportunity pre- 
sented itself to enter this new finance 
firm, and I couldn’t possibly refuse. I 
am happy to know that I leave Aireon at 
a time when the sales of the new “Coro- 
net 400” phonograph is booming, and 
prospects for the future are indeed 
bright.” 

Complete information regarding the 
details of the new organization will be 
made shortly, stated Greenbaum. 


FROM YOUR DISTRIBUTOR 


TODAY! 


BALL GAME TODAY 


ORDER 


Distributor in LOUISIANA 
TEXAS • ALA. - ARK. and MISS, 
for 

THE NEW 1948 
BUCKLEY LINE 
CONSOLE DIST. CO. 

1006 Poydras St., New Orleans, La. 
Phone: RA 3811 

SAM TRIDICO BOB BUCKLEY 

“CRISS-CROSS" BELL; DAILY DOUBLE 
TRACK ODDS; 1948 WALL & BAR BOX. 


2 Rotl-down lanes allow 
scoring from both top 
and bottom of lanes. 


Upon passing thru 
lanes, descending 
ball registers score- 
contacts flippers, and 
can be kicked back 
up lanes for double 
and triple score. 





The Cash Box 


Pase 31 


May 15, 1948 


Wurlitzer National 
Magazine Ads Feature 
Famous Record Artists 



NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y.— The 
Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, this city, 
have launched its 1948 national magazine 
schedule of Wurlitzer juke box ads, and 
are convinced that the theme is based on 
one of the most logical advertising tie-in 
campaigns ever presented. Co-featured 
with the music machines are top record- 
ing artists and their testimonials to the 
fidelity of Wurlitzer music. 

A1 Jolson, his full color portrait and 
statement that Wurlitzer music “Gives 
You Everything I Put Into My Songs,” 
established the new theme of the Wur- 
litzer series. This initial ad, which ap- 
peared in the April 12th issue of Life and 
the May 11th Look, has already created 
widespread interest among juke box op- 
erators who appreciate Wurlitzer’s na- 
tional advertising helps to keep coins 
flowing into their juke boxes. 

Commenting on the new series, M. G. 
Hammergren, Vice President and Direc- 
tor of Sales of The Rudolph Wurlitzer 
Company, stated, “Juke boxes are one of 
the principal outlets for phonograph rec- 
ords. Many of our outstanding recording 
artists proudly attribute much of their 
popularity to the tremendous impetus 
given th'^ir efforts by the network of juke 
boxes e.-, ending to every city, town and 
hamlet in this land. 

“We deemed it a natural to picture 
some of America’s leading entertainers 
in our advertising for 1948. Such promi- 
nent personalities frequently are asked to 
testify in favor of products on which they 
are not authorities. Here is one, music, 
on which they can speak with authority 
and their words will carry weight. 
Everyone we approached freely volun- 
teered a statement complimenting Wur- 
litzer Phonograph music. And,” he added, 
“since the initial advertisement appeared, 
a great many more have evidenced their 
interest in testifying to the fidelity with 
which our instrument reproduces their 
music.” 

Mr. Hammergren concluded by say- 
ing: “The present series is a continuation 
of the Wurlitzer Company’s advertising 
campaign launched two years ago. The 
purpose of this advertising is to keep 
more money flowing into Wurlitzer juke 
boxes than would otheinrise be the case 
under comparable business conditions. 
Today tavern and restaurant business is 
off, but collections from Wurlitzer juke 
boxes are much higher than in the past 
under similar business conditions. More 
and more location owners are insisting 
on having Wurlitzer Phonographs. 

“Beside the direct benefit to Wurlitzer 
Music Merchants and the indirect benefit 
to the Wurlitzer Company itself, we feel 
that Wurlitzer national advertising is 
the greatest force for better public rela- 
tions in the industry. 

“In previous magazine ads we depicted 
the wholesome entertainment our juke 
boxes provide for people of all ages. In 
the present series the juke box is asso- 
ciated with great recording artists — men 
and women whose pictures and state- 
ments lend prestige and dignity to the 
business. The outstanding characteidstic 
of this advertising is giving the public 
a better understanding and appreciation 
of the constructive part that juke boxes 
play in the American way of life.” 



Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 










The Cash Box 


Page 32 


May 15, 1948 


TRADE SPEAKS BEFORE N.Y.C. C OUNCIL 

Max Levine of Scientific Acciaimed for Dramatic Ciosing 
Speech. George M.Giassgoid,Sam Markowitz, Sidney H. Levine, 
Attorneys on Hearings. Ex-G.l. Ops Speak Weii. Dave Gottiieb 
Teiis of Industry. City’s D. A.’s, Police Comm., Schooi Supt., 
Parents’ Org. Oppose. Oratory on Side of Coinmen. But 
N. Y. C. Councii Wiii Now Vote Whether Games Operate. 


NEW YORK — Without any doubt the 
greatest gathering in the history of the 
coin machine industry’s amusement ma- 
chine business was present at the New 
York City Council meeting (Thursday, 
May 6, 1948), to fight passage of a bill 
which would close this town to pinballs 
and other types of coin operated amuse- 
ment machines. 


Manufacturers representative of the 
entire amusement industry in this field 
were all present at these hearings. As 
one well known reporter stated, “This is, 
without any doubt, a full dress re- 
hearsal.’' 

Never before have there been gathered 
together everyone of the nation’s well 
known manufacturers. Never before 


PHONOGRAPH ROUTE FOR SALE 

Located in LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, a 24 hour town. 3G Phonographs 
mostly 1947 and 1948 Models. Also Continuous Music by wire in the 
finest Resort Hotels and Bars. Locations within a Two Mile radius. 
Permanent Army Air Base now being activated. Excellent opportunity 
and will stand rigid investigation. 

EARL V. BUCHANAN 

(PHONES: 1770 or 1392- R) 


OPERATORS ONLY - • 


FREE AD LISTING 

READ THESE IMPORTANT RULES! As a subscriber to THE CASH BOX (The 
One and Only Operators’ Maga 2 ane — IT IS NOT SOLD ON NEWSSTANDS) you are 
entitled to a FREE listing in each and every week’s issue of whatever machines and mer- 
chandise you may want to BUY or you may have for SALE. Your list must reach THE 
CASH BOX, 381 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 16, N. Y., no later than Wednesday 
noon of each week. Your listing will be given a special code number and all inquiries 
will be sent directly to you for your consideration without any inquirer knowing who you 
are. YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS WILL BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL. You can mail 
your list in each week on your own letterhead, or even on a penny postcard, but, your 
name, address and phone number MUST BE ENCLOSED or else your list will not be 
published. VERY IMPORTANT: Please do not list prices of any merchandise or machines 
you have for sale or want to buy. 


TEAR OFF, FILL OUT, AND MAIL THIS PART IMMEDIATELY TO: 

THE CASH BOX, 381 FOURTH AVE., NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 

Please list the following in the next issue at no charge to me : 


NAME . . 
FIRM . 
ADDRESS 


such grand oratory with the members 
of this field taking the lead by a wide 
margin. 

Opposing them were the District At- 
torneys of the five Boroughs, Police 
Commissioner Wallander the Associate 
Superintendent of Schools, the Parents’ 
Organization, representing 130,000 moth- 
ers and others. 

The speech, which seems to have cap- 
tured the imagination of all present, 
was that of Max D. Levine who heads 
Scientific Machine Corp. and, as he stated, 
altho he makes equipment which is not 
concerned with the hearing, he threw 
everything to the winds to come in and 
wind up the day’s oratory with one of 
the most moving and dramatic speeches 
ever heard in the New York City Council 
chambers. In fact, the applause spoke 
tremendously well for his speech. 

Dave Gottlieb, president of Coin Ma- 
chine Industries, Inc., also talked and 
spoke very well. The ex-G.I. ops who 
were called on did a grand job. In fact, 
as far as oratory was concerned the coin 
machine business’ representative carried 
the day. 

George M. Glassgold, attorney well 
known to the entire trade, led the opposi- 
tion to the sponsored bill. Ai 'ing him 
were Samuel Markowitz and Sidney H. 
Levine. These latter attorneys also spoke 
and impressed the Council. 

But, all is now before the Council. 
They will vote on whether the bill, backed 
by Police Commissioner Wallander, Li- 
cense Commissioner Fielding and the five 
district attorneys as well as the repre- 
sentatives of the Parents’ Organization, 
etc., should be passed. 

It is believed, tho that full deliberation 
will be given to this bill which was origi- 
nally requested for passage by Mayor 
O’Dwyer. 


•LUMILINES - LAMPS 


BIG BULBS: 7J4, IS, 25, 40, 60 ©in *i fl 
Watt. 120 in case. Per case.. ^ * U.ilU 
LUMILINES — 24 in case, 75c each. 40 Watt, 48 
in. long-. Fluorescent, 80c each. Special price 
on Fluorescent for AMI. 

If IPs A Bulb — We Have It ! 
GOVERNMENT EXCISE TAX INCLUDED 
ON ALL LAMPS. 

ARCADE BULB CO ^ street, 

HnUHUt DULD UU. york 10, N. Y. 


COIN MACHINE MOVIES 

FOR REGULAR PANORAMS AND SOLO-VUES 
REELS OF 8 AND 6 SUBJECTS 
Our Rims Get The Dimes 
PRICE $32.50 TO $38.50 Per Reel 

PHONOFILM 

3331 NO. KNOLL DR.. HOLLYWOOD 38. CAL. 


USED PIN GAMES WITH 
FLIPPERS! 


BALLYHOO $54.50 

BAFFLE CARD . 44.50 

SUPERLINER 39.50 

KILROY 54.50 

SUSPENSE 39.50 

AMBER 64.50 

BIG HIT 34.50 


OLSHEIN DIST. CO. 


1100-02 BROADWAY 
ALBANY 4, N. Y. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 



The Cash Box 


Page 33 


May 15, 1948 


OPERATORS'EQUIPMENT 


IMPORTANT: Address all answers to THE CASH BOX, 381 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW 
YORK 16, N. Y. In your letter you must refer to code number of listing in which you are 
interested. Your name will be sent directly to the operator by THE CASH BOX. Operators 
only, who are subscribers to THE CASH BOX, are entitled to a listing free of charge each 
week for whatever equipment they want to buy or have for sale. No prices are allowed 
to be advertised in these free listings. Operators' names and addresses are always kept 
strictly confidential. 



WANT — Bally Victory Specials and used Eurekas. FOR 
SALE — Or will trade the following: 1 Seeburg Casino; 2 
Seeburg Vogues; 1 Seeburg Classic; 1 Wurlitzer 800; 1 
Wurlitzer 950; 1 Wurlitzer 600K; 4 Wurlitzer Victory, 
600, 500 and 2-24s; 2 Wurlitzer 616; 4 Wurlitzer 412s- 
(Code #58919) 


FOR SALE — 6 Evans 1947 Ten Strikes. Or will exchange fol- 
iate pins. What have you to offer? (Code #515929) 

FOR SALE — Music, Wall Boxes, Five Ball payouts, over 
$10,000 worth new five balls on route 15 years old, city over 
90,000, heavy building program in progress. Roason for 
selling given by mail. (Code #515902) 

FOR SALE — Free Plays. Big Tops, Jumbo Parades, Silver 
Moons, Wurlitzer 71 & 61, Hockeys, Guns, Grips, Target 
Guns, Empty phonograph cabinets for Wurlitzers, Rock- 
Olas, Seeburgs, Parts galore for all pre-war phonographs, 
Solotone Boxes, Amplifiers. (Code #515905) 

FOR SALE — In central Massachusetts route established for 
20 years consisting of One Balls and Pin Games. About 100 
machines on location, all late equipment, complete shop 
trucks and service organization. Operators net receipts well 
over $40,000. For detailed infoimation write (Code #515910) 

WANT — Active partner for Juke and Pin game route in 
Connecticut. Must know business. Good for expansion. 
Cash needed about $20,000. (Code #515916) 

FOR SALE — Have large quantity of ABT targets will sell 
cheap. (Code #515939) 

FOR SALE — Wurlitzer 600R, 616, 412, Rock-Ola Standard, 
Seeburg Regal. Make offer. All in good condition. (Code 
#515925) 

WANT — 6 column Rowe Royal and 6 and 8 column Rowe 
President cigarette machines. FOR SALE — 3-10 column 
Royals and 3-10 column Presidents, completely refinished 
and overhauled. (Code #515926) 


WANT — New or used Packard Adapters for Wurlitzer 24s. 
(Code #515913) 

FOR SALE — 1947 Columbia Bells, interchangeable, used, 
cheap; all makes five-ball FP pin games pre-war, at give- 
away prices; 1 Super Bell, comb., 5c play; 1 Club Bell, 
comb., 5c ; 1 Club Bell, comb., w/button, 5c; 1 Pace’s 
Reels Jr., P.O. 5c; 1 Pace’s Reels, comb,, w/rails 5c; 3 
Bally High Hands 5c; 1 Shoot- Your- Way-To-Tokyo; 1 
Rapid Fire. (Code #515914) 

WANT — ^Victory Derby P.O. For Sale — Free play games: 
Carousel, Kilroy, Playboy, Torch Flamingo, Rocket, Cyclone. 
(Code #515928) 

WANT — Used route records. Pay top prices plus freight. 
(Code #515933) 

FOR SALE — HiTones, Envoys, 24A’s, perfect condition. Just 
off location. No reasonable offer refused. (Code #515903) 

FOR SALE — 1 Bally Eureka, perfect, cheap. (Code #515917) 

FOR SALE — 2 Rowe 10 col. Presidents; 1 Rowe 8 col. 
President; 2 Rowe 8 Col. Royals; 2 Mills 8 col.; 1 Stewart 
McGuire 8 col.; 1 Rowe Penny inserter. Mills Solo Vue; 
Exhibit Bluebird; Exhibit three Love Meters; Exhibit 
Wishing Well; 1 Watling Fortune Scale; 3 small .Jennings 
Scales; 1 Jensen Convertor; 1 Keeney Texas Leaguer; 
Challengers; route of penny Peanut Vendors, counter 
games. Make offer. (Code #515937) 

EXCHANGE — Will trade Bally Triple Bell new only two 
weeks on location for either of the following: Keeney’s Two 
Way Bonus Super Bell or Keeney’s Gold Nugget. (Code 
#515920) 


WANT — Panorams full view or Peek. Also want parts for 
Panorams. (#515931) 


WANT — Wurlitzer 331 Bar Boxes, Wurlitzer 320 Wall Boxes. 
(Code #515935) 


FOR SALE — .Jennings Chief, Mills Blue Front, both are 5c 
play 3-5 pay; Watling 5c Big Game Hunter F. P. console; 
Old model 25c Pace Slot; Mills Q.T. pre-war model. All 
are in good condition. Will trade five for Bally DeLuxe 
Draw Bell. (Code #515915) 


FOR SALE — Pinballs and rolldown games. Wood or steel ball 
rolldowns. All merchandise is guaranteed. Write now and 
tell us what you need and what you want to pay. Wefil 
meet the price. (Code #515936) 


WANT — New free play pinball closeouts, used post-war 
games. Panorams and reels of film. (Code #58922) 

FOR SALE— Mills Melon Bell .5c; Mills Black Chrome^c^ 
Mills 25c Extraordinary. (Code #515927) 

WANT — New or used 30-wire Wall Boxes, adaptors and 
Speakers. Adaptors for Rock-Ola any kind. (Code 
#58938) 

FOR SALE — Sacrifice. Best offer takes all. 10 Bing-A-Rolls 
nearly new; 4 Advance Rolls; 1 Pro Score. Also Juke Box 
route, complete, 18 machines on location. (Code #515934) 

FOR SALE — A-1 bargains. Cigarette and Candy Vending 
machines. All makes, models, lowest prices. What have you 
to sell. (Code #515922) 

FOR SALE— 2 Genco Advance Roll; 1 Genco Total Roll; 2 
Singapores; 1 Genco Bubbles. No reasonable offer refused. 
All guaranteed to be in good shape. (Code #515904) 

FOR SALE — Brand new Personal and Solotone non-selective 
music boxes. These are the best and the latest. Absolute 
sacrifice. Name your own price. Write quick. (Code 
#515932) 


WANT — Used 9 Ft. Bank Balls and Bally Bowlers. (Code 
#515906) 


WANT — Coin operated Radios. State make and price. 2 hour 
timer preferred. Also used or broken gum ball and pistacio 
machines, either 5c or Ic. Will also consider vending ma- 
chine routes. (Code #515918) 

WANT — Goosenecks; Blue Fronts; Mills Q.T. (Code #58930) 

FOR SALE — 9 consoles. Mills 1947 model Three Bells, in 
use only 2 months. 67 slots. Mills Black Cherry, Mills Blue 
Fronts and Mills Cherry Bells. All machines just off location 
and in perfect shape mechanically and in appearance. ( Code 
#515912) 


FOR SALE — Mills 10c Bonus like new. Mills 5c Silver Chrome 
like new. Mills 5c Jewel like new. Mills 10c Extraordinary 
like new. (Code #515923) 


WANT — Milco checks in 10c and 25c denominations. (Code 
#58920) ^ 


FOR SALE — 2 Master Gum Venders, 125 pounds inch 
bubble gum, 5 Cash Trays u sed. (Code #515930) 

WANT — A few Watling Scales, no other make wanted. Clean 
and in good condition, ready for location. Prefer Junior Tom 
Thumb, Fortune Tom Thumb or 500 Series Fortune. (Code 
#515908) ^ 

FOR SALE — 2 Model “A” AMI, 1947 phonos. Used only 6 
months. Am selUng out. Make me your highest offer in 
first letter. (Code #515924) 

FOR SALE— 1 Jennings Black Hawk, used only two weeks, 
late type jackpot, knee action, pays 3-on-l cherry; 1 
Watling 5c and 1 25c like new. Highest bidder will get 
one or all. (Code #515937) 

FOR SALE — 7 Bally DeLuxe Draw Bells. (Code #515909) 

FOR EXCHANGE — 1 Telomatic industrial and background 
wired music studio. (Code #515921) 


WANT — Williams All Stars. Will trade brand new pinballs 
for same. (Code #515907) 

FOR SALE — 2 Voice-O-Graphs, late model. (Code #58918) 

WANT — Only brand new merchandise, packed for export. 
What have you to offer? (Code #515938) 

FOR SALE — 10 Wurlitzer Model 500 clean, 5 Wurlitzer Vic- 
torys clean, 8 Packard Wall Boxes clean, 5 Kilroys same as 
new. Write and tell us what you want and what you will pav 
(Code #515901) ^ ^ 


FOR SALE — 8 Pre-Flight Trainers, complete -with maps and 
projectors, used only 3 months, will sacrifice. (Code 
#58923) 


FOR SALE — 375 phonographs on locations largest city in the 
deep south. Net income from $90,000 to $115,000 yearly. 
In whole or part. Owners retiring after 20 years in business! 
Will show books to potential buyers. Eversrthing verified. 
Finest locations. First time route offered for sale. (Code 
#515911) ' 


FOR EXCHANGE — Pace & Black Cherries 10c & 25c to 
trade for 5c slots. (Code #515919) 


May 15, 1948 


The Cash Do 


Page 34 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


COIN MACHINE 


MARr 


CLASStFiED AD RATE 8 CENTS PER WORD 

COUNT ALL COPY, NAME AND ADDRESS. MINIMUM AD $1.00. 
(ALL CLASSIFIED ADS— CASH WITH ORDER.) 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO S48 PER YEAR SUBSCRIBERS 

YOUR WEEKLY CLASSIFIED AD PRIVILEGE CONTINUES. 
MAXIMUM WORDS— 40. ALL ADS OVER WILL BE 
CHARGED AT RATE OF 8^ PER WORD. 


CLOSING DATE IN N. Y. C. EVERY WED., 5 P. M. 


WAN 


WANT — To Purchase for export shipments — Model 1015 Wur- 
litzer, 1946 AMI’s 146 and 147 Seeburgs. State quantity 
and your lowest price in first letter. BADGER SALES CO., 
INC., 2251 W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 


WANT — The used records from your boxes. We buy steadily all 
year around. Top prices paid. Sell to Chicago’s Largest 
Distributor of Used Records. We pay freight. Write, Call 
or ship to: USED RECORD EXCHANGE, 4142 W. ARMI- 
TAGE AVE., CHICAGO 39, ILL. Tel.: Dickens 7060. 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — We have them in stock. Contact us for your 
Hirsh Red Balls for state of Florida. Best money maker out 
today. Trouble free. Immediate delivery. Make us cash offer 
on any new or used pin tables you need. MURRELL AMUSE- 
MENT CO., 1058 S. FLORIDA AVE., LAKELAND, FLA. 


FOR SALE — Mills greatest proven money makers — original 
Black Cherry Bells, Golden Falls, Vest Pocket Bells, aD. like 
new. Lowest prices, quality considered. Mills Three Bells, 
repainted original factory colors $275; late head Mills Four 
Bells $200. Save with safety. Trade and buy with authorized 
Mills and Keeney Distributors. Established 1905. SILENT 
SALES CO., SILENT SALES BLDG., 200 - 11th AVE., SO., 
MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. 


FOR SALE — 5 Balls: Baffle Cards, Kilroys $55 ea. ; Play Boys 
70 ea. ; Streamliners $20 ea.; Sky Blazers $15 each. All 
above are in top condition. Terms: 1/3 deposit. C. & M. 
SPECIALTY CO., 832 CAMP STREET, NEW ORLEANS 
13, LA. 


FOR SALE — Operators! We have a large number of Pay Off 
Consoles — various makes — from $20 up; all in good work- 
ing condition. Also Slots, Pin Balls and Music. We will not 
be undersold. Tell us what you need and be sure to get our 
prices on guaranteed equipment. VIRGINIA NOVELTY CO., 
400 WATER ST., PORTSMOUTH, VA. Tel.: Portsmouth 
1025. 


WANT — Used Juke Box Records. Unlimited quantities. Top 
prices paid. We pick up within a radius of 150 miles. Write 
or wire. HARMEL MUSIC CO., 2809 OCEAN AVE., BROOK- 
LYN 29, N. Y. 


WANT — Used juke box records. Highest prices paid. Unlimited 
quantities. We purchase all year ’round. Compare our prices 
before selling your records. We pay freight. Call, Wire, Write 
FIDELITY DIST., 1547 CROSBY AVE., BRONX 61, N. Y. ' 
Tel.: UNderhUl 3-5761. 


WANT — New and Used Wall Boxes, Adapters and Speakers; 
Twin 16 Adapters for Rock-Ola; Mills, Jennings F. P. Mint 
Vendors; any 25 cycle equipment. ST. THOMAS COIN 
SALES, LTD., ST. THOMAS, ONT., CANADA. 


WANT — Will buy any qpiantity used slot machines, all makes 
and models. Also Columbias, Gooseneck MUIs Q.T.’s Vest 
Pockets. Quote lowest prices in first letter. Machines must 
be in first class condition. AUTOMATIC GAMES CO., 2858 
W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 


WANT — 1 DeLuxe Bally Draw Bell, and Triple Bell; Keeney’s 
Three Way Twin and Single Super Bonus Bells; Mills orig- 
inal Black Cherry Bells. No quantity too small or too large. 
Spot Cash! SILENT SALES COMPANY, 200 ELEVENTH 
AVE., SO., MINNEAPOLIS 15, MINN. 


WANT — All makes and models 5c, 10c, 25c, 50c Slots. Cash 
waiting. MAR-MATIC SALES CO., 48 W. BIDDLE ST., 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 


WANT — Escalator Slot machines. War Eagles, Blue Fronts, 
Brown Fronts. State price and condition. EAST COAST 
MUSIC CO., 10th & WALNUT STS., CHESTER, PA. Tel.: 
CHester 2-3637. 


WANT — Bally Triple Bells; Bally Eurekas; Mutoscope Diggers; 
Late Rock-Ola, Wurlitzer & Seeburg phonos. Will buy 
overstocks of late pin games for re-sale. Quote best prices, 
quantity & condition in 1st letter. M. A. POLLARD CO., 
725 LARKIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO 9, CALIF. Tel.: 
ORdway 3-3069. 


WANT — Operators with obsolete equipment that \4'ould like to 
turn them into cash. You can get Three Hundred ($300.00) 
for your twelve records and up phonographs. For details 
without obligation write. WALKER MUSIC CO., 2711 
HAMPTON BLVD., NORFOLF, VA. 


WANT — Used records. Will positively pay more. Sell to the 
East’s largest distributor of used records. Will pick up. 
Write, call or ship to BERNARD MUCHNICK, 1315 NO. 
52nd ST., PHILADELPHIA 31, PA. Tel.: GR 3-8628. 


WANT — Twin and Triple B onu s Super Bells. State condition 
and price in first letter. WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 1226 
S.W. 16th AVENUE, PORTLAND, ORE. 


FOR SALE — Mills Four Bells, perfect $50; 1 Barrel Roll Skee- 
ball $50; Jennings Cigarolla $30; Undersea Raider $50; 
Loudspeaker $5; Seeburg Envoy $200; Mills Empress $200; 
Watling 10(J Rol-A-Top $50. BELMONT VENDING CO., 703 
MAIN ST., BRIDGEPORT, OHIO. Tel.: 750. 


FOR SALE — Brand new Columbus 1^-5^ Peanut Vendors; 
14 Ball Gum Vendors in Stock. Brand new Daval 54 Free 
Play Cigarette or Fruit Reels. Write: H. M. BRANSON 
DISTRIBUTING CO., 516 SO. 2nd ST., LOUISVILLE 2, 
KY. Tel.: Wabash 1501. 


FOR SALE — 10 Keeney Three Way Bonus Super Bells, like 
new, guaranteed perfect mechanically and outward ap- 
pearance $800 ea. Terms: 1/3 Deposit, balance C.O.D. 
ADVANCE AUTOMATIC SALES CO., 1350 HOWARD ST., 
SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 


FOR SALE — 10—616 Wurl. $75 ea.; 2 — 600R Wurl. $150 
ea. ; 1 — 1940 Rock-Ola C.M. $90; 3 Seeburg Mayfairs $150 
ea. ; 2 Seeburg Regals $175 ea. All above machines in 
excellent condition. X-CEL NOVELTY CO., 1929 W. TIOGA 
ST., PHILA. 40, PA. Tel.: RA. 5-8705. 


FOR SALE — 25 Model 80 Kirk Astrology Scales $169.50 ea. 
THE VENDING MACHINE CO., 205-215 FRANKLIN ST., 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. Tel.: 3171. 


FOR SALE — Guaranteed Used Machines — Bells; Consoles; 
One-Ball; Pins. The machines are perfect, the prices are 
right! Write for list. CONSOLE DISTRIBUTING CO., 
1006 POYDRAS ST., NEW ORLEANS, LA. 


FOR SALE — Selling Out! Brand new and used Steel Ball 
rolldown Games and Wood Ball Rolldown Games. Tell ns 
what you need. Make offer. Box 133, c/o The Cash BoXf 
381 Fourth Avenue, New York 16, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — 5 Ball Pin Games. All thoroughly reconditioned, 
cleaned, rails refinished, packed in good cartons. At $25: 
Sporty, Blondie, Big Town, Formation, Big Chief, Cross- 
line. At $30: Four Roses, Band Wagon, Twin Six, Ten 
Spot, ABC Bowler, Flat Top, Chubby, Wild Fire. At $35: 
Towers, Show Boat, All American, Sky Ray, Spot Pool, Gun 
Club, Dixie, Clover, Hi Hat, Champ, School Days, Laura, 
Legionnaire, Venus, Seven Up. At $45: Arizona, Surf 
Queen, Midget Racer, Big League. At $75: Superscore. 
One Balls F.P. : Sport Special $45; Dark Horse $60; Blue 
Grass $65. Immediate shipment. 1/3 deposit, bal. C.O.D. 
W. F. KEENEY MFG. CO., 7729 CONSTANCE AVE., CHI- 
CAGO, ILL. 


FOR SALE — New Black Cherry and Golden Falls Case As- 
semblies for $40 each. Each Assembly consists of Castings, 
Wood Case, Club Handle, Drill Proofing, Award Card, 
Jack Pot Glass, etc. completely assembled and packed in 
individual carton. Write us for list of prices on new, used 
and rebuilt slots. WOLFE MUSIC CO., 1201 W. MAIN ST., 
OTTAWA, ILL. Tel.; 1312. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX when answering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 




The Cash Box 


Page 35 


May 15, 1948 



FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — Mills Original Black Cherries, all late serial 
numbers: 5^ S139.50; 10c S144.50; 2o<} S149.50. Golden 
Falls; S154.50; 10;^ S159.50; 23^ S164.50 — 1 or 2 
cherrv pavout. AUTOMATIC GAAIES CO., 2858 W. PICO 
BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 


FOR SALE — Roll Do^tis: Advance Rolls S173; 14ft. Bang*A> 
Fitty S150; Sportsman Roll S60; Rol-A-Score $50; Bing-A- 
Roll $300; Hv-Roll $275; Hawaii $200; Singapore $250; 
Tropicana $300. MOHAWK SKILL GAMES CO., 86 SNOW- 
DEN AVE., SCHENECTADY 4, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — the original change dispenser Nickle Nudger 
$3.45 ea. Write for quantity prices. Victory Specials $125 
ea.; Gottlieb Dailv Races $175; Keener Hot Tip $235; 
Strikes ’N Spares $295. WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 1226 
S.W. 16th AVE., PORTLAND 5, ORE. Tel.: AT 7565. 


FOR SALE — 5-Ball Pin Games, shipped in good cartons: Base- 
ball $69.50; Big Hit $24.50; Bonanza $124.50; Broncho 
$104.50; Co-ed $99.50; Cover Girl $99.50; Crossfire $69.50; 
Fast Ball $29.50; Flamingo $99.50; Gold Ball $89.50; Havana 
$79.50; Hawaii $124.50; Honey $79.50; Kilroy $49.50; 
Lightning $64.50; Lucky Star $82.50; Maisie $99.50; 
Melody $174.50; Mexico $99.50; Mystery $69.50; Nevada 
$124.50; Opportunity $24.50; Oscar $74.50; Playboy 
$84.50; Ranger $89.50; Stage Door Canteen $29.50; Stormy 
$174.50; Superliner $49.50; Tornado $69.50; Super Score 
$49.50. Immediate shipment, subject to prior sale. 1/3 de- 
posit. balance C.O.D. HIRSH COIN MACHINE CORP., 
1309 NEW JERSEY AVE., WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 


FOR SALE — The Biggest Show In Town Is Always At Crowu. 
Bally Victory Specials $150; Victory Derby $135; Daily Races 
$195; Sunny $135; Humpty Dumpty $140; Singapore $140; 
Bemmda $140; Tropicana $155; Hawaii $105; Mexico $95. 
These machines are excellent and the prices are right. 1/3 
Deposit required, balance C.O.D. CROWN NOVELTY CO., 
INC., 920 HOWARD AVE., NEW ORLEANS, LA. Tel.: CAnal 
7137. Nick Carbajal, Gen. Mgr. 


FOR SALE — Completely refinished, one ten station Automatic 
Hostess Unit, can be used as 1st, 2nd or 3rd unit; 10 Solo- 
tone Boxes; 1 Solotone location amplifier; 1 Solo tone Studio 
amplifier. Slake us cash offer on anv or all. AL/TOMATIC 
PHONOGR-APH CO., 105 E. RICHMOND AVE., PEORIA, 
ILL. Tel.: 2-2134 or 3-3511. 


FOR SALE — 50 Original Black Cherry Bells; 25 Watling 1948 
Slots; 10 Pace Consoles; 1 Mills Four Bells. Double Safes, 
stands, new and used. No reasonable offer refused. MAR- 
MATIC SALES CO., 48 W. BIDDLE ST., BALTIMORE 1, MD. 


FOR SALE — or trade. 10 Batting Practice in perfect condi- 
tion, improved with hardware cloth on inside of glasses; 50 
Free Play Marble Tables, nothing later than 1947 models; 
2 Seeburg remote control pipe organ speakers. This equip- 
ment just off location. Sell or trade for Slot Machines. 
LEE NOVELTl COMPANY, 1004 SPRING STREET. 
SHREVEPORT, LA. Tel.: 2-4545 or 3-3625. 


FOR SALE — 9 10c Watling Big Games, best console built. 
Owing to closed lerritoiy will take $25. ea. Also 6 Lucky 
Lucres at $50. ea. First come, first served. 1/3 down, C.O.D. 
HY-G MUSIC COMPANY, 1415 WASHINGTON AVE., 
SOUTH, MINNEAPOLIS 4, MINN. Tel.: ATlantic 8587. 


FOR SALE — Williams All Stars used but very clean $275.; 2 
Photomatics, inside lights, repainted, good condition $325. 
ea.; Spotlite, brand new $175.; this is a verv good arcade 
piece. KING-PIN EQUIPMENT CO., 826 MILLS ST., 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 


FOR SALE — New and Used Phono Records. New records are 
last year’s popular labels. Used are in excellent condition, 
plavable on both sides. Write for prices. ART SCHEER. 
2254 HAVILAND AVE., BRONX 61, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — W illiams All Stars $250; Goalees $120; Nudg>s 
w ith 8 flippers $160; Cover Girls $190; Ballyhoo $80; Rockets 
$60. A-1 Condition. FESSLER COIN CO.. 714 CENTER 

AVE., SHEBOYGAN, WISC. Tel. 5721. 


FOR SALE — 15 Dynamites, 10 Spellbounds $20 ea.; 15 new 
United Tropicana, write for close out price. K. C. NOVELTY 
CO., 419 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA 6, PA. Tel.: MAr- 
ket 7-6391. 


FOR SALE — Test Quest, combination question and answer ma- 
chine closing out. Legal anywhere. $32.50 brand new. Extra 
questions and answers 50c each. IDEAL NOVELTY' COM- 
PANY, 2823 LOCUST ST., ST. LOUTS, MO. 


FOR SALE — Bing-A-Roll $249.50; Mam’selle $129.50; Tropi- 
cana $159.50; Treasure Chest $139.50; Lady Robin Hood 
$179.50; Bermuda $159.50; Ylimi rolldowu $159.50. First 
class condition, packed to ship anvwhere. 1/3 dowu. 
NATIONAL NOVELTY CO., 183 E. MERRICK RD., MER- 
RICK, N. Y. Tel.: FR 8-8320. 


FOR SALE — 7 Model 80 Kirk Astrology' Scales $139.50 ea. ; 
4 ABT Targets like new $15 ea.; 100 Sun Pistachio Nut 
Y enders, will ship sample $5 ea. PARRISH MUSIC CO., 
BOX 97, SMITHFIELD, N. C. Tel.: 210-J. 


FOR SALE — Two Rock-Ola Plajuiasters ; Six Buckley Boxes; 
Tone Column; lots of parts $300. ABC NOVELTY’ CO., 
2509 SO. PRESA ST., SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 


FOR SALE — Diggers: 10 Ylutoscopes Roll Chutes, 12 Exhibit 
YIerchantmen, 10 Erie hand operated Diggers, 8 Bnckley, 20 
Exhibit Iron Claws model E-F-G, 10 Ylutoscope Junior Dig- 
gers hand operated $49 each, 10 Exhibit Rotaiy Merchan- 
disers (Pusher Tvpe). Buv as manv as vou need. Getting 
scarce. NATIONAL, 4243 SANSOM ST., PHILADELPHIA 
4, PA. Tel.: Boulevard 5775. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


NOTICE — Music Operators. Ylotors rewound $5.50; Wurlitzer 
counter model trays refinished and rebushed $6.50. BILL’S 
PHONO YIOTOR REPAIR. 5947 EMERALD AVE., CHI- 
CAGO 21, ILL. Tel.: ENglewood 8192. 


NOTICE — Ylusic Ops: We re-grind your used phono needles 
scientifically and gnarantee complete satisfaction. Hunflreds 
of operators use the service constantly. It’s a big saving. 
Write for complete details and free shipping containers. 
RE-SHARP NEEDLE SERVICE, BOX 770, FT. DODGE, 
IOWA. 


NOTICE — Now available. Route Mechanic with 18 years in 
the Coin Ylachine Business. One balls, five balls, consoles, 
slots and mnsic. Married. Sober. Reliable. Now employed 
as manager route 125 phonographs, 200 pin balls, also con- 
soles and slots. Present emplover will furnish references. 
Write Box 25, care of THE CASH BOX, 381 FOURTH 
AVENUE, NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 


PARTS & SUPPLIES 


FOR SALE — Tubes, 60% off list, standard brands. All tubes 
boxed. Extra special: RCA-6C4 45?; YI-46, YI-47, M-48 Bulbs 
$4.50 per 100. Send for our- latest tube list. ENGLISH 
SALES CO., 620 W. RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 


FOR SALE — Parts and supplies for all types coin operated 
machines. Send for Free illustrated wall chart. Lists over 
1200 different items from A to Z. If you operate coin ma- 
chines vou should be on our mailing list. BLOCK MARBLE 
CO., 1425 N. BRO AD ST., PHILA. 22, PEN/S A. 


FOR SALE — Radio Tubes, 60% off in quantities over .50. 
Popular brands! Can be assorted. All types in stock. Tele- 
vision Lens for 10" screen, $24. Ylazda bulbs. No. 47, $40 
per 1000. No. 40, 44, 46 and 47, $4.50 per 100. No. 51 or 
55. $4 per 100. Bulbs can be assorted. BELMONT RADIO 
SUPPLY CO., 1921 BELMONT AVE., CHICAGO 13, ILL. 


FOR SALE — Skee Ball & Ray Gun Operators, Attention! #1489 
Chilco Gun Lamps 45? ea.; ~2.A4G Tubes $1.41 ea.; 
i^928 All Directional — Photo Tubes — $3.21 ea.; ABT new 
Coin Chutes $2.50; slides 73? ea.; Resistors for Wurlitzer 
Skee Ball $1.20. Send for our new Skee Ball, Ten Strike, 
Rav Gun parts list. RELIABLE PARTS CO., 2512 IRVING 
PARK RD., CHICAGO 18, ILL. Tel.: IRving 4600. 


FOR SALE — Pencil Soldering Irons $1.25 each. Thousands of 
coin machine parts. Parts made to specification for vour 
special needs. JOE MUNVES, 615 TENTH AVENUE. NEW 
YORK, N. Y. Tel.: PLaza 7-2175. 


Please mention THE CASH BOX tchen ansicering ads — it proves you’re a real coin machine man! 


The Cash Box 


Page 36 


May 15, 1948 



Reaction to the editorials which appeared in the May 1 
and May 8 issues regarding 10c play for amusement ma- 
chines, such as pinballs, rolldowns, bowling alleys and 
various other equipment, was instantly noted in this city. 
Some of the largest manufacturers immediately arrang- 
ing for tests. One of the best known called in one of his 
distribs who arranged a test on a 10c pin game. The test 
was just about as difficult as it could ever be. A 10c 
pinball being placed alongside of a 5c game in the same 
spot where the 5c machine had already been getting action. 
Results? In three days (from Friday to Sunday) the 5c 
machine took in $12 and the 10c unit took in $17. As the 
test continues, it is generally believed that a great many 
others will be switching their coin chutes on all new 
games to 10c play. Where free play awards are made, 
same cards are used, but, instead of the two free plays 
for two nickels they are now worth two dimes. Where 
amusement action only is considered, more free plays are 
given. For example, instead of the two on the 5c machine, 
ops suggest four for the same score on 10c machines. 

In the phono field majority agi'ee with proposal that 
there be one play for 10c and five plays for 25c. “This will 
quiet any argument as to raise in price,” they say, “for 
five plays for 25c still obtainable.” Furthermore quarter 
action keeps machines going, and duplication of tunes 
earns ops more money. It is well known that most players, 
those who will insert quarters, will pick two or three of 
the same top ten tunes, therefore duplication. 

We believe the above reports will prove of value to all 
concerned. And now down to general business in the 
Windy City. . . . Bill O’Donnell at Bally, one of the busiest 
execs in town . . . full of youthful pep, vim and vigor. Bill 
is proving himself one of the outstanding salesmanagers 
in our town . . . with Phil Weinberg to one side of him, 
Dan Moloney on the other and Georgie Jenkins standing 
in the doorway just looking on. Bill spouted off pretty 
good, one day this past week, on his hopes for “10c play 
going away over the top.” . . . Tommy (Dapper Man of 
the Year) Callaghan still down in San Juan, Puerto Rico, 
enjoying the darkness as well as the lighted days, and 
getting himself all sunburned. . . . Otis Murphy also away 
enjoying the sunshine. . . . Ben Coven, new Beau Brummel, 
in and out of Bally, saying this and that, and very much 
elated over some things he’s doing right now, with biz 
picking up all down the line for Coven Distribs. 

Jack Cohen of J. C. Music Co., Cleveland, and who is 
also prexy of the Ohio and Cleveland phono ops assns., 
pulled into town this past week with Sanford Levine, also 
of the Ohio and Cleveland assns., advising that he (Jack) 
had got into a very interesting conversation with Dudley 
C. Ruttenberg of CMI at the Minneapolis airport to the 
point where they didn’t hear their plane announcement 
and so missed it. Jack and Ruttenberg taking one plane 
and Sandy being forced to wait a few hours before he 
could get a ride in. Said Sandy, “That Jack can talk planes 
out of the sky.” . . . Dave Gensburg of Genco back in town 
after an eight month stay in his California home and get- 
ting back on the ground floor of events here. . . . Myer 
Gensburg leaves for a visit out of town ... so Lou remains 
to help Dave get going here once again . . . and action 
started almost the moment Dave walked into the plant. 

Sam Stern of Williams Mfg. Co. flies back from Boston, 
after a hurry-up visit, with the remark, “I wanted to get 
back quick” . . . and from what Sam further says, it seems 
like more action is taking place. “We sold more Virginia 
so far than we believed we ever would, and” he continues, 
“orders are still coming in” . . . and Skeet Moore of 




CHICAGO 

CflAnER 


Williams standing alongside Sam, vigorously nods his head 
in agreement, saying, “That ain’t nothin’ yet, just watch 
those shipments, Virginia is setting a record.” . . . Jim 
Mangan of Mangan & Eckland is one of the busiest ad 
and public relations execs in the Windy City at this time. 
Seems some of the nation’s largest firms are seeking Jim’s 
services. And Jim advises that he will, very soon, have 
an important announcement for all the trade. . , Ted 
Rubenstein of Marvel Manufacturing Co. absolutely 
thrilled at the swing to dime play because his pinball, 
“Leap Year,” features the “plus 4” chute which allows the 
player to insert 5c, 10c 15c and up to 20c per game. Says 
Ted, “The time has come when the pinball ops simply must 
get more coin to take care of higher overhead and in- 
creased costs. We hope all the ops will follow the new 
trend.” 


Billy DeSelm over at United Manufacturing Co. right 
on the ball this past week ... so busy, in fact, that he 
just hasn’t had time to leave the plant and is working 
away speedier than ever ... so he says . . . but, checking 
into matters, we learn that Herb (the music critique) 
Oettinger is out of town and that Ray Riehl is busy in 
his own department . . . so . . . Billy has to work, whether 
he likes it or not . . . and that photo we mentioned last 
week . . . well, Ray Riehl didn’t snap it. . . . Nate Gottlieb 
one of the busiest of the busy boys this past week as their 
new game, “Jack & Jill,” begins to get out into the 
territories all over the country. “Seems,” Nate says, “that 
the more games we get out the more they want” . . . like 
crackerjack, hey, Nate? . . . Didn’t catch up with Ed Levin 
this week over at Chicago Coin . . . seems Ed is busier 
than ever . . . watching that big, new addition to the Chi- 
cago Coin factory going up and going up fast . . . from 
what we saw of it . . . the plant should be all completed in 
about 30 to 60 days . . . and mighty, mighty impressive . . . 
drop around and take a looksee for yourself ... Just can’t 
catch up with Lindy Force over at AMI this week . . . 
Lindy rushing here and there . . . getting ready for the 
big show in Grand Rapids on May 7 and 8 when all of 
their distribs will be present to see the Model “B” AMI 
phono (which was previewed at the Minneapolis four states 
convention) and discuss thisa and thata about it . . . and 
also hear the price for the first time, we’re told. 


Dick Hood over at H. C. Evans on the phone until he 
reaches the point where he says, “Hey, my arm’s 
gettin’ tired,” so that’s that . . . We hear that Jack Cox 
of Rock-Ola Manufacturing Corp. bedded at the Berwyn 
Hospital in Berwyn, 111., is now on the road to recovery 
. . . and all who know Jack very, very happy to get this 
news . . . Talking to Art Weinand this past week disclosed 
the fact that Rock-Ola phonos are being shipped in greater 
quantity and that biz is reported to be definitely picking 
up everywhere . . . that’s the kind of news we like to 
hear . . . A1 Stern over at World Wide Distribs keeping 
himself busy these days on the long distance phone as ops 
call in for this and that with A1 working like a beaver 
to supply their wants . . . Gerry Haley very busy over at 
Buckley Manufacturing with a sudden rush for more of 
the Buckley Wall & Bar Boxes. The “Criss Cross Belle,” 
according to Gerry, still continuing its run far ahead of 
anything else . . . Eddie Hanson out of the office one day 
this past week . . . the newlyweds moving to new quarters 
. . . which is really something to obtain these days . . . John 
Neise has been enjoying terrific business at 0. D. Jennings 
... In fact, one fellow came in and bought machines in 
carload lots, and he is stock-piling them in warehouses . . . 
Jennings is finding that more and more of the operators 
are calling for equipment than ever before. 


Page 37 


May 15, 1948 


The Cash Box 



Big news of the week for the games industry hei'e was 
the fight being put up in opposition to the bill that is being 
presented to the City Council. The industry held a meeting 
on Tuesday (May 4) at Manhattan Center. They were 
advised by the featured speakers to write letters to the 
councilmen on the committee, and have location owners, 
employees, and everyone effected by the bill do the same. 

The public hearing was held on Thursday (May 6). 
Fifteen speakers for the bill and eleven who opposed it 
were heard. The most effective and dramatic talk was 
made by Dax D. Levine of Scientific Machine Corporation. 
Levine pointed out that the equipment being manufactured 
by his firm wasn’t in controversy, but he spoke simply and 
convincingly about the merits of the equipment that would 
be effected by adverse legislation. Max was warmly con- 
gratulated by all present. The spokesmen for the bill. 
Police Commissioner Wallander, the District Attorneys, 
et al., laid great stress on the members of the industry. In 
one part, Wallander stated “Gang violence is likely to flai'e 
in the city unless Mayor O’Dwyer’s bill is adopted.” Dis- 
trict Attorney Samuel J. Foley of the Bronx also used the 
same theme. “Vicious racketeering elements directly at- 
tributable to this industry (pinball) was responsible for 
wide spread criminal activity,” he stated. 

George M. Glassgold, counsel to the games operators, 
told the committee that the pinball manufacturers were 
average individuals of good character. He urged regula- 
tion of the industi’y by the city, including a ban against 
children playing the machines. 

Dave Gottlieb, president of CMI, told the body that 
the manufacturers did a gross business of $30,000,000 a 
year. Sidney Levine spoke about the earnings of the 
equipment, stressing the fact that the machines only gross 
between $5 to $30 per w^eek. The individual GI operators 
made a most impressive stand. They spoke of seeking 
advice from the city officials prior to investing their money, 
and money they borrowed under the GI Bill of Rights, and 
were told that the equipment was legal, and that they could 
proceed to operate them. 

The Committee, headed by Councilman Samuel Di 
Falco, is expected to report out the measure for Council 
action soon. 

* * * 

Harry Siskind, Master Automatic Music Co., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., vacationing in Miami Beach, Fla. . . . Nat Cohn, 
Modern Music Sales Corp., Bob Thiele and Earl Winters, 
Signature Records, a three-some walking along coinrow. 
Nat still retains most of the suntan he brought back with 
him from Miami Beach . . . Thieves who broke into the 
offices of Sparcarb, Inc., operators of drink vendors, made 
away with 375 pounds of nickels, dimes, and quarters, 
estimated around $4,000. Police reported that the thieves 
entered the building thru a window on the second floor and 
descended to the first floor where the safe was kept. They 
drilled a hole in the safe and opened it with a collapsible 
jimmy, an operation which police state took several hours. 
The burglars overlooked some additional 300 pounds of 
coins. “Fortunately” said L. McCough, treasurer of the 
company, “they left behind $1,200 which was in the safe, 
but in another compartment.” 

* * * 

R. R. “Rudy” Greenbaum, popular coin machine execu- 
tive, announced his resignation as vice president and gen- 
eral sales manager of Aireon Manufacturing Corporation, 
phonograph manufacturers of Kansas City, Kan. Rudy 
left the phono firm to head a general national finance cor- 
poration, Product Credit Corp., and will establish head- 
quarters in New York City. Bob Waggener, who has been 
associated with several of the largest finance companies 
in the coin machine industry, is to be associated with 
Greenbaum as general operating manager . . . Tony (Rex) 
DiRenzo and Leo Knebel, Rex-Lee Enterprises, report that 
they have been making grand progress with the sale of the 
Rock-Ola phono. The company is also featuring a feather- 
weight pick-up and amplifier, which they claim increases 
the playing life of records . . . Dave Stem, Seacoast Dis- 
tributors (Rock-Ola distributors), Newark, N. J., states 
that the demand for Rock-Ola phonos in his territory keeps 


increasing each week. The firm also handles the Pfanstiehl 
needle and Watling Scales in this territory. Not satisfied 
with all this, and jobbing of games too, Dave is looking 
for other lines . . . Sol Trella, Elkay Music Co., resting up 
at his Sai'asota, Fla. home again. This is the third trip 
this season. 

* * * 

Barney (Shugy) Sugerman and Abe Green, Runyon 
Sales Company, drive out to Grand Rapids, Mich, to the 
AMI factory for the national distributors meeting. Sey- 
mour Bushnell, Standard Factors, Inc., goes along with 
Shugy and Abe. Before leaving for the midwest, Shugy 
supervised a showing of the AMI mechanism at a service 
class. On hand for Runyon were Manny Daddas, who 
conducted the class, Morris Rood, Iiwing Kempner, James 
Jackson and Johnny Zwicker. Among the operators and 
mechanics who attended were: B. Stecher, Nat Fass, Mike 
Cignarelli, Tommy Lee, Irving Holzman, Morris Brilan, 
David Noll, Saul Levine, Sam Quinto, Milton Abramowitz, 
Harry Zoll, Walter Carey, Rudy Gingras, Walter Kotch, 
Peter Sveitceta, Vincent Goetz, Al Claire, Phil Schwartz, 
Bill Goetz and Sam Lerner. 

* * * 

Sol Silverstein, Hub Enterprises, Baltimore, Md., 
played host to many music operatoi's who attended the 
showing of the Aireon “Coronet” phono at the Gray Room 
of the Hotel Emerson. The showing was held Saturday 
and Sunday, May 1 and 2. On hand was a service engineer 
from the factory, and Ben Palastrant, eastern regional 
sales representative of Aireon . . . Louis Boasberg, New 
Orleans Novelty Co., New Orleans, La., in town for the 
week, and takes in all the latest shows and entertainment 
palaces . . . Willie (Little Napoleon) Blatt, Supreme 
Distributors, Inc., w'rites that he and Jack Lovelady worked 
out a deal. Lovelady took over the operation of the route, 
and Willie retains the distributing part of the company 
. . . Cy Jacobs, Interstate Music Co., Boston, Mass., spends 
a week in the big city just relaxing and having some fun. 

* * * 

Joe Young and Dan Kipnis, Young Distributing Co. 

(Wurlitzer distribs) proudly handing out reprints of the 
beautiful full page Wurlitzer ads that appears in the 
April 12 issue of “Life” and the May 11 issue of “Look.” 
This ad is a colorful spread featuring Al Jolson and the 
W’urlitzer 1100 . . . Meanwhile over at Newark, N. J. 
Wurlitzer offices, Jim Sisti and Mike Colland busy taking 
care of the Jersey music ops. 

* * * 

Jack Rubin, who is busy taking care of his business in 
Hoboken, N. J., hustles around with an eye to acquiring 
a fast moving Arcade — and other propositions in the coin 
industry . . . C-Eight Laboratories, manufacturers of the 
electric cigarette machine, gets a spread in the May issue 
of Die Casting magazine . . . Dick Shaw, Shaw Music 
Company, has his troubles — his twins are in bed, the boy 
with chicken pox, and the girl with scarlet fever . . . The 
Automatic Music Operators Association getting ready to 
have the time of their lives at an outing at the Laurels 
Country Club in Monticello, N. Y. the last week-end in 
June. A soft-ball baseball game is scheduled, as is a golf 
tournament. We hear that some of the boys are secretly 
practicing right now . . . Abe Levine, Federal Music Co., 
tells us that the printed title strips are going big with 
local music ops. Federal is distributor here for Star Title 
Strip Co. . . . Joe Munves, Economy Supply, tells us of the 
nice sized order phoned in as a result of his ad in The 
Cash Box . . . Dave Rosen, Philadelphia, distributor for 
AMI in Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Md., out at Grand 
Rapids, Mich, for the big distributor meet. 



The Cash Box 


Page 38 


May 15, 1948 



CALIFORNIA CLIPPINGS 

Los Angeles city ops and distribs continue to make head- 
way, public relations-wise at least, in their defense against 
olRcials’ clampdown on rolldowns. .. Following release on dem- 
onstration of skill game by newspapers, local radio station 
went for story and broadcast a recount of event. . .Art Crane 
was at the demonstration controls once again and none other 
than Len Micon, Pacific Coast Distrib for Genco, handled the 
narration ... While Len may not be causing Don Wilson and 
Jimmy Wallington any sweat on announcig laurels, he did a 
fine job of stating the ops’ case and describing how Bing-A- 
RoUs, Total-Rolls, Pokerinos, etc. are not “pinball” machines 
and thus not subject to city ordinance governing same. 

Several local columnists have also interested themselves 
in the political heat being poured on the boys . . . Among them 
is the widely read Edith Gwynn, whose “Rambling Reporter” 
column is the genesis of the movie trade’s bible, the Hollywood 
Reporter ... Gy wnn, who also appears in N. Y. Morning Tele- 
graph, Philly Inquirer and a half dozen other big papers, 
wrote: “They pick on Hollywood for concerning itself with a 
lot of trivia, but dig this: With L. A. out in front in the 
nation’s Crime Parade, the downtown police have launched 
an all-out crusade against a miniature bowling game! The 
issue is now being aired in the local municipal courts and boils 
down to ‘are the holes on the boards objectives or obstructions?’ 
If the former, it’s a skill game and legal; if the latter, it’s a 
pinball machine. How busy can you get?”. . .Meanwhile the 
lads are out of action and sweating out an appeal and several 
other legal hearings. 

Charlie Fulcher just back in from sales trip to San Diego 
on biz for Mills Sales and reports that Black Gold is bringing 
in the green down Mexico way... Jack Simon of Sicking Dis- 
tribs getting ready to play host to Bill Marmer of Cincy’s 
Sicking Co. and waiting for Gottlieb’s new Jack and Jill 5-ball 
. . .Ran into Chi Coin’s Phil Robinson at Sicking and told him 
his artist brother-in-law is a brother Welfare Fund colleague 
of ours... The gypsy in Bill Wolf came out again and he’s 
en route to Chicago and Grand Rapids, Mich., for AMI distrib 
meet. . .His Nels Nelsen busy with AMI selectors. . . Solotone’s 
F. E. Wilson and partner due back from Texas where they 
showed their super new record and radio combo selector unit 
to interested parties. . .Bill Williams out plugging “Virginia” 
5-ball where it’ll do the most good. 

Paul Laymon rearranged his showroom this week so that 
Bally’s new console beauties form neat design in center of 
floor and 5-balls and rolldowns form a frame around the walls 
. . . Lyn Brown, in addition to shuffling along in fine style with 
his shuffleboards, broke out with Scientific’s new “Pitch ’Em 
and Bat ’Em” this week. . .We played a few games, found it 
good sport and should be as legal as baseball itself .. .Auto- 
matic Games’ Georgie Warner back from Arrowhead and Big 
Bear on a buying and selling spree. . .Especially buying for a 
heavy demand of used equipment from Wyoming, Utah and 
Nevada. . . Sammie Donin was on tap but Georgie Jackson was 
bedded down with a cold... Len Micon of Pacific Coast Dis- 
tribs busy with Genco’s “Trade Winds” outside of city and 
in there pitching all the way with city ops on present rolldown 
situation. .. Had interesting chat with Gordon Roper, Harry 
Goldman, Gabe Orland, W. R. Marriott and several other 
city ops on same. . .The boys are all worried but still optimistic 
that justice and a fair shake will prevail in the end. 

Record-wise, the town is still buzzing with bootlegging and 
counterfeiting. . .Paul Reiner, Black and White head man and 
leading spirit behind the platteries’ organized campaign to 
stamp out the vicious racket, hopped up to San Francisco on 
a clue... Leo Mesner of Aladdin, Art Rupe of Specialty and 
Ben Pollack of Jewell somewhat encouraged by investigation 
progress and Miracle’s injunction action against a St. Louis 
distrib specializing in handling alleged phoney discs. ..Rumor 
has it that ersatz labels are being printed in L. A. and bogus 
pressing centered in Detroit. . .Local Internal Revenue inves- 
tigators tell us “Nothing offlcial yet in rounding up suspects. . . 
still working on it” . . . Most indie outfits hit hard by the racket 


now claim that their hit numbers sales just about halved by 
the illegal cookies. . .As Ben Pollack puts it, re his “Recess in 
Heaven”: “If they had been satisfied with horning in on 10 
per cent of your sales, it might have been written off to plug- 
ging expenses. . .but when they try to beat your sales, that’s 
too much.” 

Art Rupe reports his artists all on road at present and 
ribs that Roy Milton, Jimmy Liggins, Nelson Alexander Trio 
and The Pilgrim Travelers keeping “Pappy” broke by calling 
him collect from all over country, telling him how fine they’re 
doing. .. Specialty’s sales mgr. John Davis now in Cleveland 
and sends Art glad tidings that Camille Howard’s “You Don’t 
Love Me” is a big thing there. 

Joe Bihari of Modern Records raving about Little Willie 
Jackson’s “Little Willie’s Boogie” and “You Can Depend on 
Me” and Jimmy Witherspoon and A1 Wichard Sextet’s “Ge- 
neva Blues” and “Cake Jump”... All the Biharis in town for 
change, with Jules taking it kinda easy these days, and enter- 
taining Modern distrib Tony Valerio down from San Fran- 
cisco... Joe really went on about way Miracle’s “Long Gone” 
has caught on with locals . . . Bill McCall of F our Star still 
planning litigation on “Deck of Cards” bandwagon climb by 
other companies ... or so he says . . . Bill also points out that 
his outfit pioneering with “Whoa Sailor” by Maddox Bros, 
and Rose is drawing other diskeries to cut in on the honey . . . 
Well, somebody’s gotta be first. . .and somebody’s gotta be last. 


MINNEAPOLIS 

The Four State Northwest Regional Convention held at 
the Radisson Hotel in Minneapolis on April 26 and 27 was a 
successful one. Senator Homer Capehart, president of the 
Packard Manufacturing Corporation, who was to be the guest 
speaker at the banquet was unable to come at the last minute. 
The show drew a large attendance. Bill Gersh of “The Cash 
Box” was able to attend this convention and gave a stirring 
talk at the business meeting. 

Don Hunder, a graduate of Law School at the University of 
Minnesota, who has been blind since he was six years old won 
his first case in court. His brother is Bill Hunder, successful 
operator at Wheaton, Minnesota. Don has helped Bill take 
care of the route when he was not attending school, during 
summer semesters. .. Paul Atlas of the Howard Sales Com- 
pany is back at the Veteran’s Hospital, same ailment (back) — • 
injuries suffered during World War II. 

Additional visitors who attended the two day convention 
in Minneapolis are as follows: G. E. Bard and Mr. Peterson of 
the Cub Products, Huron, South Dakota. Bismarck, North 
Dakota had a very fine turn out, as Bob Westrum of the 
Westrum Music Company, Wally McFarland of Wally’s Nov- 
elty Company, and Roger Chester of the Chet’s Amusement 
Company were also there. 

R. M. Shea of Wessington, South Dakota and Mr. and Mrs. 
Ike Piearson of Bridgewater, South Dakota spent the week in 
Minneapolis giving Mrs. Piearson the opportunity to replenish 
her summer wardrobe. .. Harold Weixel of Eureka, South 
Dakota, spent a few days in Minneapolis, his first visit in over 
a year. Norman Gefke of Sioux Falls, South Dakota also 
visiting. . .Cleve Angen of Portland, North Dakota dropped 
into Minneapolis and spent a few days visiting his son who 
is attending the University of Minnesota. . .Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Stone of Rice Lake, Wisconsin drove into Minneapolis to spend 
just the day, spent a few hours at the convention, then drove 
back home... Joe Blenker of Junction City, Wisconsin, also 
in town for the meeting. .. Mark Coughlan of Mankato, Min- 
nesota, J. Allen Redding of Houston, Minnesota, Gabby Clu- 
seau of Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Hank Krueger of Fairfax, 
Minnesota, also in town for the day . . . Jerry Hardwig and 
Urban Kost, the jovial operator from St. Clpud drove into 
Minneapolis and made the rounds, 



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