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GRAND OLE OPRY’S 28th ANNIVERSARY 

With this issue. The Cash Box salutes Grand Ole Opry and WSM on 
the program’s 28th anniversary. The occasion is of importance not only 
to the station and the show but to the entire music business which has 
been so beneficially affected by the music which has eminated from 
Nashville. In the top photo, we show a picture of how the Opry has looked 
in recent times while in the inset can be seen Uncle Jimmy Thompson, 
the first artist ever to appear on the program. The lower photo shows 
the crowds which line up for blocks every Saturday night to get into 
Ryman Auditorium from which the program is broadcast. 


THE CASH BOX 


OLUME XV NOVEMBER 28, 1953 NUMBER 10 










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48-selection phonograph. 

Also available as Model 1600, playing 
45 or 78 RPM records. 



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f MODEL 1650 \ 

48-SELECTION -ALL-45 PLAY \ 

\ 

MODEL 1600 FOR 78 OR 45 RPM PLAY 1 

£;<-*# / \ r'. _ 

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Ideal for the location whose requirements 1 

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The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company 


North Tonawanda, N. Y 






(Music Editorial) 

Congratulations 

Grand Ole Opry 


November 28, 1953 

Vol. XV Number 10 

Publishers 
BILL GERSH 
JOE ORLECK 

The Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. 

26 West 47th Street, New York 36, N. Y. 

(All Phones: JUdson 6-2640) 

JOE ORLECK 

• 

CHICAGO OFFICE 

32 West Randolph St., Chicago 1, 111 

(All Phones: DEarborn 2-0045) 

BILL GERSH 
Karyl Long 

• 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE 
6363 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Phone: WEbster 1-1121) 

CARL TAFT 

• 

EXECUTIVE STAFF 
JOE ORLECK, Advertising Director 
BOB AUSTIN, General Mgr., Music Dept. 

SID PARNES, Editor-In-Chief 
NORMAN ORLECK, Associate Editor 
MARTY OSTROW, Associate Editor 
IRA STRASSBERG, Research 
A. ARTESE, Office Manager 
A. FORMAN, Circulation 
POPSIE, Staff Photographer 
BRUNO DUTKOWSKY, Art Director 

• 

ADVERTISING RATES on request. All advertising 
closes Friday at 12 Noon preceding week of issue. 
Advertisements subject to approval of publishers. 

• 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES $15 per year anywhere in the 
U.S.A. Special listing for jobbers and distributors at 
$48 per year includes 40 word classified advertisement 
each week for an entire year (52 weeks) plus the full 
year’s subscription free of charge. Airmail, First Class, 
as well as Special Delivery subscription rates on re- 
quest, Subscription rates for all foreign countries on 
request. 

• 

THE CASH BOX covers the coin operated machines 
industry, and all allied to this industry throughout the 
United States and all over the world. The Cash 
Box is on hand at various American consular offices 
throughout the world. This coverage includes operators, 
jobbers, distributors and manufacturers and all allied 
to: — automatic coin operated music equipment; auto- 
matic coin operated vending and service machines; 
as well as coin operated amusement equipment; in all 
divisions. The music and record fields, recording 
artists, publishers of music, disc jockeys, radio sta- 
tions, and all others identified with, or allied to, the 
music machines industry are completely covered. Manu- 
facturers and distributors of various merchandise, parts, 
supplies, components and all materials used in the vend- 
ing, music and amusement fields are covered by The 
Cash Box. Banks, finance firms, loan organizations and 
other financial institutions, expressly interested in the 
financing of coin operated machines of all types, are 
covered. • 

“THE CONFIDENTIAL PRICE LISTS” 

" The Confidential Price Lists” are the one and only 
officially recognized price quotation guide of all new 
and used machines in the United States, “The Con- 
fidential Price Lists” are an exclusive, copyrighted 
feature of The Cash Box. “ The Confidential Price 
Lists” report each week’s low and high prices for all 
new and used coin operated machines, regardless of 
age, listing all market changes, and continually add- 
ing on all the new equipment as this equipment is 

announced to the industry. “The Confidential Price 
Lists” are recognized by many cities and states through- 
out the country as the “official price book of the 
coin operated machines industry.” They are an in- 
tegral part of The Cash Box and appear in each 

week’s issue. “The Confidential Price Lists” are offi- 

cially used in the settlement of estates, for buying, sell- 
ing and trading of all coin operated equipment, and are 
also officially recognized for taxation purposes. “The 
Confidential Price Lists" are used by finance firms, 
factors, loan companies, bankers, and other financial 
institutions to guide them in making loans to members 
of the coin operated machines industry. They have been 
legally recognized in courts throughout the United States 
and Canada. “The Confidential Price Lists” have been 
acclaimed by the coin operated machines industry. En- 
tire business transactions and legal cases are based 
upon the quotations appearing in "The Confidential 
Price Lists.” • 

CORRESPONDENTS IN LEADING CITIES 
THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES 

• 

ENTIRE CONTENTS COPYRIGHTED 1953 by The 
Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. No reproduction in part 
or whole allowed without written permission from the 
publishers. 


Grand Ole Opry is celebrating its 
28th anniversary this week. Not only is 
this a tremendous achievement as far 
as a radio program is concerned but the 
influence of this show through the 
music it has introduced to the American 
public has been unprecedented. 

In the 28 years since WSM in Nash- 
ville has been sending Grand Ole Opry 
across the airwaves, tastes in popular 
music in this country have undergone a 
drastic change. And certainly the part 
played by the show and artists who per- 
form on it are among the basic causes 
for that change. 

Folk music only a couple of decades 
ago enjoyed popularity in very limited 
areas. It was thought that this less 
sophisticated music could not appeal to 
a cosmopolitan audience, that its attrac- 
tion was strictly local, restricted to 
areas where the folk tradition gave it a 
meaning and attraction to a large num- 
ber of people. 

But with the coming of radio — and 
particularly the Grand Ole Oprv Show 
— large numbers of listeners who never 
had the opportunity before, were now 
being exposed to this kind of music. 
And what’s more, they found in it the 
same fundamental appeal which people 
in folk areas had always known about 
it. They found its directness refreshing. 
They liked its simplicity, its melodic 
strain, its whimsy, its charm. 

When the modern juke box was in- 
troduced in the early nineteen thirties, 
thus reviving a record industry that had 
been given up for lost, it then too be- 
came a powerful method for spreading 
this music. And so in addition to radio 
and Grand Ole Opry, we had the ever 
increasing number of juke boxes across 


the nation bringing folk music to an 
ever increasing audience. 

The change which this combination 
of radio and juke boxes laid the ground 
work for, really began to mushroom 
during World War II. That was a time 
of great movement in our country. 
People who had never been out of their 
hometowns suddenly found themselves 
in very different parts of the nation. 
Listeners who up till then may never 
have even heard folk music were now 
thrown together with people who al- 
ready had a high appreciation of it. And 
this tremendous mobility on the part of 
the public resulted in increased accept- 
ance and understanding of other peo- 
ple’s way of living, including their 
musical tastes. 

Ever since the end of the war, the 
trend towards folk music and its effect 
on the popular idiom has been increas- 
ing steadily. Soldiers and civilians who 
went back to their home areas took with 
them the records and songs which had 
become a very integral part of their 
lives. Folk music spread clear across 
the nation even reaching the remote 
corners of Tin Pan Alley. 

Today large numbers of our popular 
songs, if not taken directly from the 
folk field, are at the very least based on 
the rhythms, thoughts and philosophy 
expressed by folk authors. 

And it all started with Grand Ole 
Opry. 

So congratulations Grand Ole Opry 
and WSM. All of us owe you a debt of 
gratitude for your contribution to the 
music business. And all of us look for- 
ward to celebrating many more anniver- 
0 

saries with you. 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 4 


November 28 , 1953 




A SPECIAL MESSAGE FOR 
ALL JUKE BOX OPERATORS 


The votes in The Cash Box 
poll have been pouring in at a 
greater rate than ever before. 

The enthusiasm and re- 
sponse from operators and 
leaders in the field has been 
tremendous. 

We would like to thank 
everyone who has voted in the 
poll and those who have urged 
others to vote. For these votes 
have shown not only a desire 
to indicate what the best 
moneymaking artists and rec- 
ords of 1953 are, but it also 
indicates a heightened aware- 
ness on the part of operators 
of the value and desirability 
of putting their best foot for- 
ward to the music industry 


and showing it in concrete 
ways just how important the 
juke box industry is to its 
continued prosperity. 

To those of you who, for 
one reason or another, have 
still not voted, we urge you to 
fill out the card in this issue 
and send it in immediately. 

FOR THIS IS YOUR 
LAST CHANCE TO VOTE. 

After this week, the final 
tabuations will be made and 
published. 

Your vote should be in- 
cluded — for you will be doing 
more than just casting a vote ; 
you will be acting on behalf of 
the entire juke box industry. 


Best Record of 1953 


“Song From Moulin Rouge” — Percy Faith - 47692 

“Till I Waltz Again With You” — Teresa Brewer : 47403 

“April In Portugal” — Les Baxter 45269 

“Im Walking Behind You” — Eddie Fisher 44192 

“Vaya Con Dios” — Les Paul & Mary Ford - 41072 

“I Believe” — Frankie Laine 38764 

“Doggie In The Window” — Patti Page j. 35338 

“Pretend” — Nat “King” Cole 34126 

“Crying In The Chapel” — June Valli 32618 

“You, You, You” — Ames Brothers 30065 

“Tell Me You’re Mine” — Gaylords 26529 

“Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes” — Perry Como 25162 

“Why Don’t You Believe Me” — Joni James 23885 

“No Other Love” — Perry Como 23618 

“Anna” — Silvana Mangano 18505 

“Oh!” — Pee Wee Hunt _ 16021 

“Ebb Tide” — Frank Chacksfield 15498 

“Limelight” — Frank Chacksfield 13783 

“Ruby”— Richard Hayman 13291 

“P.S. I Love You” — Hilltoppers 13086 

“Dragnet”— Ray Anthony 12516 

“Say You’re Mine Again” — Perry Como 12384 

“Have You Heard” — Joni James 12242 

“Your Cheatin’ Heart” — Joni James 10618 

“Rags To Riches” — Tony Bennett 9275 

“Eh Cumpari” — Julius La Rosa 8762 

“Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me” — Karen Chandler 8123 


Best Orchestra of 1953 


Ray Anthony 39558 

Les Baxter 36295 

Frank Chacksfield 27629 

Richard Hayman 26192 

Percy Faith 25193 

Hugo Winterhalter 22815 

Pee Wee Hunt — 20163 

Ralph Flanagan 17718 


Ralph Marterie 15,726 

Leroy Anderson 13526 

Mantovani 12992 

Sammy Kaye 12384 

Guy Lombardo 10872 

Monty Kelly 9762 

Louis Armstrong 7921 

Les Brown 5873 


Best Male Vocalist of 1953 


Perry Como 

...... 48739 

Eddie Fisher 

...... 48694 

Nat “King” Cole 

...... 43332 

Frankie Laine — 

...... 42865 

Julius LaRosa 

39173 

Tony Bennett 

....... 37262 

Vic Damone 

32116 

Rusty Draper 

...... 31587 

Frank Sinatra 

....... 26007 


Tony Martin 

Don Cornell 

22521 

17319 

Billy Eckstine 

Darrell Glenn 

14182 

13163 

Guy Mitchell 

....... 11927 

Jimmy Boyd 

9652 

Johnnie Ray 

7792 

Johnny Desmond 

6109 


Best Female Vocalist of 1953 


Joni James _ 47893 

Patti Page 46732 

Kay Starr 41965 

Teresa Brewer 38470 

Eartha Kitt 36321 

June Valli 32198 

Jo Stafford 27653 

Georgia Gibbs 25923 

Dinah Shore 20319 


Doris Day 18757 

Sunny Gale 17821 

Mary Ford 15764 

Karen Chandler 12556 

Peggy Lee 11020 

Dorothy Collins 9863 

Rosemary Clooney 9132 

Gisele MacKenzie 8884 

Silvana Mangano 8176 


Best Vocal Combination of 1953 

13675 
10440 
8906 
8522 
5607 

Best Small Instrumental Group of 1953 


Les Paul & Mary Ford — 39729 

Bill Haley & His Comets 26152 

Johnny Maddox & Rhythmasters 21838 

Three Suns 19742 

George Shearing Quintet 13158 


Hilltoppers 45027 

Four Aces 42894 

Ames Brothers 39679 

Gaylords 32561 

Four Lads 28753 

Mills Brothers 19582 


Modernaires 

Billy Williams 

Ink Spots 

Fontane Sisters 

Mariners 




The Cash Box, Music 


Page 5 


November 28, 1953 



■ 

Best Country and Western Record of 1953 


Best Rhythm & Blues Artist of 1953 


“Mexican Joe” — Jim Reeves 39385 

“Rub-A-Dub-Dub” — Hank Thompson 32645 

“Dear John Letter” — Shepard & Huskey 27621 

“Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes” — Skeets McDonald 23582 

“Crying In The Chapel” — Rex Allen . 16391 

“Keep It A Secret” — Slim Whitman 11762 

“Carribean” — Mitchell Torok 10854 

“Gambler’s Guitar” — Rusty Draper 9606 

Best Country and Western Artist of 1953 

Hank Thompson 39709 Mitchell Torok 17793 

Jim Reeves 36857 Rex Allen 16128 

Skeets McDonald 32091 Slim Whitman 11729 

Jean Shepard 28987 Rusty Draper 10876 

Pee Wee King 25446 George Morgan 8729 

Ferlin Huskey ., 19200 Jimmy Wakely ... .... 6574 

Best Folk Record of 1953 

“No Help Wanted” — The Carlisles 40632 

“Your Cheatin’ Heart” — Hank Williams 37891 

“It’s Been So Long” — Webb Pierce 35319 

“Hey Joe”— Carl Smith „ 30127 

“Kaw-Liga”— Hank Williams , 28059 

“Back Street Affair” — Webb Pierce 25282 

“Crying In The Chapel” — Darrell Glenn 25017 

“I Forgot More Than You’ll Ever Know” — Davis Sisters 18218 

“Take These Chains From My Heart” — Hank Williams 16729 

“A Fool Such As I”— Hank Snow 15928 

“Eddy’s Song”— Eddy Arnold ."12492 

“I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive” — Hank Williams 10219 

“I Won’t Be Home No More” — Hank Williams 9663 

“That Hound Dog In The Window” — Homer & Jethro 8787 

“Is Zat You Myrtle” — The Carlisles 8490 

“Jambalaya” — Hank Williams 7624 

Best Folk Artist of 1953 

Webb Pierce 40285 Ernest Tubb 19787 

Hank Williams 37929 Johnny & Jack 15759 

Carl Smith 35418 Kitty Wells 14563 

Carlisles 34126 Red Foley 12918 

Hank Snow 27873 Tennessee Ernie 9752 

Davis Sisters 26188 Homer & Jethro 7629 

Eddy Arnold 23505 Lefty Frizzell 6175 

Best Rhythm & Blues Record of 1953 

“Hound Dog” — Willie Mae Thornton 41864 

“Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean” — Ruth Brown 39723 

“I Don’t Know” — Willie Mabon 38419 

“Good Lovin’ ” — Clovers 37162 

“Crying In The Chapel” — Orioles 36628 

i “Shake A Hand” — Faye Adams 36219 

“The Clock” — Johnny Ace 34735 

“Baby Don’t Do It”— “5” Royals . 30559 

“Please Don’t Leave Me” — Fats Domino 28481 

“Soft” — Tiny Bradshaw 27889 

“Please Love Me”— B. B. King 27783 

“I’m Mad”— Willie Mabon 27128 

“Help Me Somebody”— “5” Royals 26835 

“Let Me Go Home Whiskey” — Amos Milburn 21411 

“One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer” — Amos Milburn 18526 

“Red Top” — King Pleasure 17847 

“Crawlin’ ” — Clovers 16925 

“Going To The River” — Fats Domino 14775 

| “Cross My Heart” — Johnny Ace 13362 

“I Wanna Know” — Du Droppers 10092 

“I’m Gone” — Shirley & Lee 10007 

“These Foolish Things” — Dominoes 9625 

“Wild Wild Young Men” — Ruth Brown - 7906 

“Third Degree” — Eddie Boyd 7128 


Clovehs - 38629 

Willie May Thornton 37125 

Ruth Brown 36893 ( 

Johnny Ace . _ 33580 

Willie Mabon 32168 

Orioles 30484 

B. B. King 28977 

Fats Domino .7 25693 

Du Droppers 22337 

“5” Royales 18635 

Faye Adams H I 16885 

Tiny Bradshaw ... 13006 

Dominoes ... 12792 

Dinah Washington ............ 12635 

Lloyd Price ; : 10129 

Eddie Boyd ..... r 10068 

Shirley & Lee ..... __ .... 9752 

King Pleasure - ' 8839 

Earl Bostic 7591 

Hank Thompson ......... 6945 

Percy Mayfield 6602 


Most Promising New Orchestra of 1953 


Frank Chacksfield 27654 Sauter-Finegan 15073 

Richard Hayman 21023 Monty Kelly 11732 

Jackie Gleason 8540 

Most Promising New Female Vocalist of 1953 


Eartha Kitt 

.. 31685 

Ginny Gibson 

12060 

Felicia Sanders 

.. 24928 

Jenny Barrett 

10577 

Karen Chandler 

.. 23614 

Joyce Bryant 

8629 

Eydie Gorme 

.. 21117 

Lu Ann Simms 

7391 

Sylvana Mangano 

.. 19443 • 

Georgia Carr 

6413 

Bonnie Lou 

.. 16355 

Barbara Ruick 

6227 

Helene Dixon 

.. 13927 

Vicki Young 

5860 

Most Promising 

New Male Vocalist of 1953 

Julius LaRosa 

. 32640 

Pete Hanley 

12192 

Bob Manning 

.. 27277 

Danny Sutton 

10075 

Jimmy Boyd 

Norman Brooks 

... 26518 
... 21036 

Richard Bowers 

9443 

Bob Dini 

... 20192 

Dick Lee 

8664 

Hamish Menzies 

... 14605 

Ken Remo 

8127 

Most Promising 

New Vocal Group of 1953 


Gaylords 

... 29752 

Four Freshman 

10085 

Lancers 

... 16831 

Paulette Sisters 

7924 

McGuire Sisters 

... 15275 

Marveleers 

4178 


Most Promising New Instrumental Group of 1953 


Bill Haley & His Comets .... 27643 Vince Fiorino Trio 11925 

Joe Loco 15129 Douglas Duke Trio 9752 

Elliott Brothers 3754 

Most Promising New Country & Western 

Vocalist of 1953 

Jean Shepard 25372 Faron Young 12924 

Jim Reeves 24985 Ferlin Huskey 10861 

Bonnie Lou 19688 Carolyn Bradshaw 7518 

Mitchell Torok 13192 Porter Wagoner 4800 

Most Promising New Folk Artist of 1953 


Darrell Glenn 26877 Marty Robbins ... 

Davis Sisters 24619 Jack Cardwell 

Mac Wiseman 19556 Sunshine Ruby 

Little Rita Faye 13428 Jim Lowe 

Most Promising New Rhythm & Blues 
Artist of 1953 


9524 

7393 

6002 

5729 


Faye Adams , 28652 

Willie Mae Thornton 25329 

Willie Mabon 24826 

Du Droppers 24193 

Shirley & Lee 17854 

Crickets 13915 


Clyde McPhatter & Drifters 11483 


Crows 11024 

Vocaleers 10623 

Coronets 9050 

Little Junior 7932 

Prisonaires 5291 

Danny Overbea 3864 


The Cash Box, Music 


Page 6 


November 28, 1953 




AB — Abbott 
AL — Aladdin 
AP — Apollo 
AT — Atlantic 
BA — Barbour 
BE— Bell 
BR — Brunswick 
BU— Bullet 
CA — Capitol 


CD — Cadence 
CH — Chess 
CK— Checker 
CO — Columbia 
CR — Coral 
CY — Crystclette 
DA — Dana 
DE — Decca 
DO— Dot 


COD 

DU— Duke 
DY — Derby 
ES— Essex 
FE — Federal 
4 Star — Four Star 
IM — Imperial 
IN — Intro 
JU — Jubilee 
Kl— King 


E 

LO — London 
MA — Mars 
MD — Mood 
ME — Mercury 
MG — MGM 
MO — Modern 
PA — Parrot 
PC — Peacock 
Pro. 


PE — Peacock 
PR — Prestige 
RA — Rainbow 
RE — Regent 
RH — Recorded In 
Hollywood 
RM — Rama 
SA — Savoy 
SIT — Sittin' In 


SP — Specialty 
SW — Swingtime 
TE — Tempo 
Tl— Tico 
TN — Tennessee 
UN— United 
VA— Valley 
VI— RCA Victor 
ZO — Zodiac 


Pos. Last 
Week 


o 

© 


EH, CUMPARI 

JULIUS LA ROSA 

CD-1232 (45-1232)— Julius La Rosa 

RAGS TO RICHES 

TONY BENNETT 

BE — Tony Russo 

CO-40048 (4-40041) — Tony Bennett 
DE-2S838 (9-28838) — Georgia Show 


K 1-1 280 (45-1280)— Billy Ward 

and Dominoes 


© 


© 

© 


EBB TIDE 

FRANK CHACKSFIELD O. 


CO-40093 (4-40093)— Ken Griffin 
DE-28875 (9-28875)— 

Charlie Applewhite 


YOU, YOU, YOU 

AMES BROTHERS 

CO-40039 (4-40039)— Ken Griffin 
ME-70198 (70198x45)— Johnny Horton 
MG-11512 (K-11512)— Ken Remo 


LO-1358 (45-1358)— Frank Chacksfield O. 
ME-70177 (70177 x45)— Robert Maxwell 
ME-70126 (70126x45)— Vic Doraone 


VI-20-5325 (47-5325)— Ames Brothers 
VI-20-5386 (47-5386)— Noro Morales O. 



o 



MANY TIMES 

EDDIE FISHER 

CO-40076 (4-40076)— Percy Faith O. VI-20-5453 (47-5453)— Eddie Fisher 


RICOCHET 

TERESA BREWER 

CA-2543 (F-2543) — Vicki Young 
CR-61043 (9-61043)— Teresa Brewer 
DE-28914 (9-28914) — Guy Lombardo O. 

Vata^con dIos" 

LES PAUL & MARY FORD 

AT-15001— Wingy Manone CR-60991 (9-60991)— Jack Smith 

BE-1004 (45-1004)— Larry Clinton O. CY-654 (45-654)— Bob London 

CA-2486 (F-2486) — Les Paul & M. Ford DE-28780 (9-28780)— Guy Lombardo 

CA-2514 (F-2514) — Wes & Mar Tuttle ME-89047 (89047x45)— Anita Day 


VI-20-5454 (47-5454)— Pee Wee King O. 
VI-20-5436 (47-5436)— Gogi Grant 


© 


ST. GEORGE AND 

STAN FREBERG 

CA-2596 (F-2596) — Stan Freberg 


THE DRAGONET 


O 


© 


© 


0 

© 


0 



CD 


ISTANBUL 

FOUR LADS 

CO-40082 (4-40082)— Four Lads 


YOU ALONE 

PERRY COMO 

VI-20-5447 (47-5447)— Perry Como 


VI-20-5522 (47-5522)— Noro Morales 


11) STORY OF THREE LOVES. 12) LOVE WALKED IN. 13) OH! 14) TO BE ALONE 15) DRAGNET 
16) IN THE MISSION OF ST. AUGUSTINE. 17) I LOVE PARIS. 18) OFF SHORE. 19) NO OTHER LOVE 
20) THAT'S AMORE. 21) CRYING IN THE CHAPEL. 22) THAT'S ALL. 23) LOVER COME BACK TO ME 
24) I'LL NEVER STAND IN YOUR WAY. 25) HEART OF MY HEART. 26) P. S. I LOVE YOU 27) LAUGH- 
ING ON THE OUTSIDE. 28) DONCHA HEAR THEM BELLS. 29) THE TYPEWRITER. 30) I SEE THE MOON 
31) MARIE. 32) STRANGER IN PARADISE. 33) SANTA BABY. 34) CHANGING PARTNERS. 35) SWEE1 
MAMA, TREE TOP TALL. 


“ft»j What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 




The Cash Box, Music 


Page 7 


November 28, 1953 






/ 


/ 





/.*i£ 


0 r 

" :■ £■ 



IM GONNA HANG 
UPMOMAAVS a 

STOCKING " 1 

A 'K~7// 


V U 


ON ALL CHARTS 

and 

Heading for TOPS In The Country 
in Pop and R&B 

“MARIE” 


-j 


3 Smashes for 


b/w 


“I GAMBLED WITH LOVE” 


by 


THE FOUR TUNES 



THE ORIOLES 

sing 

IN THE MISSION 
OF ST. AUGUSTINE 


b/w 


tt 


WRITE AND TELL ME WHY” 


JUBILEE # 5127 


JUBILEE # 5128 


‘WHAT ARE YOU DOING NEW YEARS EVE?’ 

b/w 

“LONELY CHRISTMAS” 

JUBILEE # 5017 




Available in 
Canada 
on 

QUALITY 

label 


THE LORD’S PRAYER 

b/w 

“OH HOLY NIGHT” 

JUBILEE # 5045 


‘'■"tfa'flHH/ll ill ^ til' I III * 




“/I’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 



BILLY MAY ORCHESTRA 
(Capitol 2653; F-2653) 

O “C00L WATER” (2:03) [Amer- 
ican BMI— Nolan] The sax sec- 
tion characteristic of the Bill May ork 
is again prevalent as the crew glides 
through an oldie. Real good rhythm 
with Bob Morse chanting the occas- 
sional “Water.” 

© “DIXIELAND BAND” (2:23) 
[Miller ASCAP— Hanighen, Mer- 
cer] The May ork rhythms through 
another jumper with a beat that’s 
tailor made for dancing. A good ar- 
rangement with a Latin segment in- 
cluded. Kids should love it. 


JANE DOUGLASS & TOM O’MALLEY 
(Opportune 2; 45-2) 


® “EMPTY WORDS” (2:46) [Op- 
portunity ASCAP — Gayle, Dou- 
glass] Johnnie Guarnieri and his men 
back pert voiced Jane Douglass as 
she effectively treats a light hearted 
novelty with a cute set of lyrics. 

O “L0VE IS LOVE” (2:08) [Op- 
portunity ASCAP — O’Malley, 
Douglass] Another comical item set 
to a waltz tempo gets the inviting 
treatment of the duet. Jane and Tom 
O’Malley work well together. Good 
stuff. 


LU ANN SIMMS 
(Columbia 40127; 4-40127) 


® “FINI” (2:50) [Frank ASCAP— 
Adler, Ross] A pretty ballad 
from John Murray Anderson’s “Al- 
manac” gets the softness of the Lu 
Ann Simms voice. The Percy Faith 
orking adds to this touching rendi- 
tion. 


© “BAUBLES, BANGLES AND 
BEADS” (2:48) [Frank ASCAP 
— Wright, Forrest] Lu Ann stays 
with the show songs and gives a 
pretty tune from “Kismet” a dreamy 
reading. 


CLARK DENNIS 
(Tiffany 1303; 45-1303) 

0 “MY BUDDY” (3:01) [Remick 
ASCAP — Kahn, Donaldson] A 
tender oldie gets the clear voiced 
tenor fashioning of Clark Dennis as 
the orchestra and chorus assist. His 
strong showing with his “Granada” 
could help this deck. 


© “YOU AND YOUR SMILE” 
(2:53) [Lake Forest ASCAP — 
Murray, Balantine] The lush strings 
of Eddie Ballantine’s ork set up a 
perfect showcase for a terrific show- 
ing on a beautiful ballad. Fine read- 
ing could hit big. 


THREE DONS & GINNY 
f Cora I 61102; 9-61102) 

© “THE JONES BOY” (2:17) [Geo. 

Pincus ASCAP — Mizzy, Curtis] 
The artists who rose to popularity via 
“Say You’re Mine Again,” come up 
with a jump version of a lively ditty 
that looks like it’s gonna be big. Fine 
job. 

® “JUST ANOTHER CHANCE” 
(2:00) [Leeds ASCAP — Mancini, 
Allen] Ginny and the Three Dons 
show their style on this end as they 
ease through a romantic piece with 
a steady beat. 


m cash box 


DISK OF THE WEEK 


“OH! MY PAPA” (3:04) 

[Shapiro, Bernstein ASCAP — Sexton, Turner, Burkhard] 

“UNTIL YOU SAID ‘GOODBYE’ ” (2:22) 

[ASCAP — Akst, Davis, Ager] 

EDDIE FISHER 

(RCA Victor 20-5552; 47-5552) 

over the counter. But it’s such a 
beautiful piece of wax that we must 
say it’s one of Eddie’s best jobs. 
He delivers a sensational vocal ver- 
sion of the melodious “Oh Mein 
Papa” that’s sweeping the country 
as a trumpet instrumental. The 
lyrics are most meaningful and 
Eddie sings them with the utmost 
of sincerity and feeling. The lovely 
melody speaks for itself. Flip is 
another top notch job dubbed “Un- 
til You Said ‘Goodbye’.” A real 
pretty waltz tune that has the 
melodious quality of a Strauss 
waltz. Hugo Winterhalter’s ork 
does its usual top notch job in the 
backdrop. You can’t go wrong with 
“Papa.” It’s a natural. Could easily 
hit the #1 spot. 



EDDIE FISHER 


• A new Eddie Fisher record hits 
the market this week. Actually 
nothing more need be said to con- 
vince the ops and retailers of the 
disk’s potential in the boxes and 


MARY MAYO 
(Benida 5004; 45-5004) 

© “AGAIN, AGAIN AND AGAIN” 
(2:22) [Duchess BMI — Jerome] 
Mary Mayo makes a most graceful 
debut on the new Benida label with a 
potent reading of a feelingful tune 
with a subdued Latin backdrop. Real 
exciting. Could happen. 

© “STAR OF MY DREAMS” (2:48) 
[Baker ASCAP — Bergman] Bill 
Stegmayer’s ork supplies a lush ac- 
companiment for the thrush’s dreamy 
voiced treatment of a tender warm 
love song. Mary has a bright future. 


CHAMP BUTLER 
(Columbia 40126; 4-40126) 

© “NIGHT OF MY NIGHTS” (2:15) 
[Frank ASCAP — Wright, For- 
rest] An interesting piece of special 
material from the show “Kismet” 
gets the vibrant vocal treatment of 
Champ Butler. Number has a beat. 

© “I CAN’T BELIEVE THAT 
YOU’RE IN LOVE WITH ME” 
(2:25) [Mills ASCAP— Gaskill, Mc- 
Hugh] A real sock rhythm is set up 
by the Paul Weston crew for the 
Champ’s belting rendition of an oldie 
on the revival trail. Good jump. 


VERA LYNN 
(London 1382; 45-1382) 

O “Y0U WON’T FORGET ME” 
(2:39) [Feist ASCAP— Goell, 
Feelman] With all the emotion that 
her voice carries, Vera Lynn comes 
out with a lovely reading of a pretty 
ballad. Tune glides into a tango 
tempo that’s effective. 

© “DON’T LEAVE ME NOW” 
(2:49) [Wizell, Day ASCAP — 
Lisbona] Roland Shaw again supplies 
the orking for a touching rendition 
of a heavy bit of material. Tune is 
difficult to remember but treatment is 
full of quality. 


DOROTHY FARMER 
(Allen 241; 45-241) 

0 “SWAMI TELL ME” (2:20) 
[Wemar BMI — Cobert, Mc- 
Gregor] Dorothy Farmer gets an ex- 
citing beat and an interesting intro- 
duction for her rousing treatment of a 
chant. Eerie material on the excit- 
ing side. Well presented. 

© “KING COBRA” (2:00) [We- 
mar BMI — Cobert, McGregor] 
Rodi Comack’s orchestra goes wild on 
a number that sounds like an African 
tribal chant. Real eerie in sound. 
Reminds one of those African wild 
life films. 


DIZZY GILLESPIE 
(Contemporary 358; 45-358) 

0 “IN THE LAND OF OOBLA- 
DEE” (2:28) [—Mary Lou Wil- 
liams] Dizzy Gillespie leads his or- 
ganization through an instrumenta- 
tion and vocal a la bop. Plenty of 
oobla-bleep-bloop talk on the amus- 
ing side. 

0 “MY MAN” (2:30) [Maurice 
Yvain] Dizz demonstrates some 
progressive trumpet work on a slow 
bit that should go well with the jazz 
lovers. 


DOUGLAS DUKE 
(Savoy 1116; 45-1116) 

® “LAURA” (2:28) [ASCAP— Ras 
kin, Mercer] Douglas Duke am 
his two aides present an interestinj 
rendition of a great oldie. Their sof 
and stylish treatment makes gooi 
listening for the quiet hours. 

© “THERE’S A SMALL HOTEL 
[ASCAP — Rogers, Hart] Th< 
Duke again works on the piano am 
the celeste in fashioning anothe 
oldie. Interesting rhythm stylinj 
makes top grade listening. 


WANDA WAYNE 
(King 1290; 45-1290) 

© “TAKE YOUR TEARS” (2:35) 
[Hometown ASCAP — Prosen, 
Wise, French] An interesting bouncer 
gets a colorful reading from Wanda 
Wayne as a chorus lends a hand. Tune 
has a sentimental quality that is in- 
viting. 

® “DON’T FORGET TO WRITE” 
(2:27) [Advanced ASCAP— Law- 
rence, Donida] To a lilting tune with 
a country flavor, Wanda sets up a 
pleasing reading. Tune is beginning 
to click in the pop market. 


RICHARD HAYMAN ORCH. 
(Mercury 70237; 70237 x 45) 


© “SADIE THOMPSON’S SONG” 
(2:24) [Mills ASCAP— Washing- 
ton, Lee] From the coming Rita Hay- 
worth film, stems this lovely sultry 
melody that Richard Hayman presents 
with such color. Harmonica in fore- 
ground is effective. 


© “DRIVE IN” (2:15) [Moonlight 
BMI — Bee] From the blue mood, 
Hayman turns his harmonica to the 
jump beat and rhythms through a 
lively item that makes your feet move. 
Real exciting deck. 


DICK GLASSER 
(Triple A 2522) 

© “ANGELS IN THE SKY” (2:31) 
[Triple A-BMI — Glasser] A sub- 
dued organ backdrop creates a perfect 
religious feeling for Dick Glasser’s 
potent waxing of a terrific piece of 
material. Tune and lyrics have hit 
potential. 

® “IS IT TOO LATE” (2:29) 
[Triple A-BMI— Glasser] The 

warbler sends up an ok reading of 
another of his own songs and the 
results are again good. The tunes 
and words are the feature on both 
ends. 


JO ANN TOLLEY 
(MGM 11630; K-11630) 

‘BUT NEVER MY LOVE FOR 
'YOU” (2:36) [Geo. Pincus AS- 
CAP — Silver, Hoffman] Jo Ann Tol- 
ley offers another fine demonstration 
of her talent on an appealing ballad 
loaded with meaning. Real good ma- 

© “HOW COME YOU NEVER AN- 
SWER” (1:57) [Acuff-Rose BMI 
— Scrivner] A right country flavored 
ditty gets a lively bounce rendition 
from the thrush. Peppy item has that 
handclapping tempo, and her vocal 
dubbing is impressive. 


PEE WEE HUNT 
(Capitol 2647; F-2647) 

© “MAMA’S GONE, GOOD BYE” 
(2:45) [Pickwick ASCAP— Bo- 
cage, Piron] Still riding high with 
his smash version of “Oh!” Pee Wee 
Hunt’s crew lilts through a carbon 
copy of that hit. A catchy instrumen- 
tation of an oldie that could be an- 
other “Oh!” 

© “CONEY ISLAND WASH- 
BOARD” (2:10) [American 
Academy ASCAP — Nestor, Shugart, 
Durand, Adams] Another bit of that 
happy-go-lucky material is set to the 
bounce beat by the gang. Real relax- 
ing listening on the light side. 


I, 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 9 


November 28, 1953 



“II s * What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 




The Cash Box, Music 


Page 1 0 


November 28, 1953 



LAWRENCE WELK 
(Coral 61100; 9-61100) 

© “CONEY ISLAND” (2:19) 
[Trinity BMI — Manson] The 
Champagne Music of Lawrence Welk’s 
ork presents a lively and inviting in- 
terpretation of a catchy theme from 
the flicker “Little Fugitive.” Peppy 
ditty. 

© “JOEY’S THEME” (2:41) [Trin- 
ity BMI — Manson] Another im- 
pressive theme from the same motion 
picture, a melody on the sentimental 
side, makes real pretty listening. The 
ork sends up a real polished job. 


AL MARTINO 
(Capitol 2649; F-2649) 

© “SWEETHEART OF MINE” 
(2:14) [Veronique ASCAP — Pay- 
ton, Araco, Antonio] A1 Martino has a 
real strong contender in this, his best 
job since “Here In My Heart.” A beau- 
tiful reading sung part in Italian 
and with a load of feeling. 


© “BEFORE” (2:10) (John Field 
ASCAP — Jerome] The balladeer 
gets a rhythm accompaniment for his 
bounce reading of a colorful roman- 
tic item. 


BILL DARNEL 
(Decca 28936; 9-28936) 


® “THE GAME OF LOVE” (2:27) 
[Milton Kellem ASCAP— Kel- 
lem] After his very strong showing 
with “Tonight Love,” Bill Darnel 
sends out a solid jump follow-up that 
stands a good chance of making the 
grade. Terrific job. 


® “LET ME LOVE YOU” (2:37) 
[Famous ASCAP — Livingston, 
Evans] With Paul Neilson’s ork again 
assisting, the artist cruises through 
a Latin flavored piece with an invit- 
ing arrangement. 


TED HEATH ORCHESTRA 
(London 1324; 45-1324) 

© “THE PHANTOM REGIMENT” 
(3:09) [Mills ASCAP— Ander- 
son] A great Anderson oldie gets a 
fascinating jump fashioning from the 
solid ork of Ted Heath. A real great 
presentation that jazz lovers oughta 
go wild about. 

• “STRIKE UP THE BAND” 
(1:56) [New World ASCAP— 
Gershwin] The ork offers another 
toe tapping jump treatment of a tre- 
mendous Gershwin standard. The 
piece jumps and makes perfect dance 
music. 


AXEL STORDAHL 
(Capitol 2661; F-2661) 

© “SADIE THOMPSON’S SONG” 
(2:54) [Mills ASCAP— Washing- 
ton, Lee] The smooth treatment of 
Axel Strodahl’s ork offers an added 
quality to this slow bluesy theme from 
the flicker "Miss Sadie Thompson.” 

© “HIGH STRUNG” (2:29) [Shel- 
don BMI — Coleman, Dufault] The 
strings take over on a light and danc- 
ing instrumentation of a lively piece. 
Real pretty. 


m CA8B BBS 


SLEEPER OF THE WEEK 


“LIFE IS JUST A BOWL OF CHERRIES” (2:20) 

[De Sylva, Brown & Henderson ASCAP — Brown, Henderson] 

“OPERATOR 299” (2:10) 

[Karen ASCAP — Skylar, Ackers] 

JAYE P. MORGAN and FRANK DE VOL 
(Derby 837; 45-837) 



JAYE P. MORGAN 


• Jaye P. Morgan, whose first 
Derby disk, “Just A Gigolo,” es- 
tablished her as one of the strong- 


WENDY WAYE 
(Coral 61097; 9-61097) 

“FORTUNE TELLING CARDS” 
(2:51) [Valando ASCAP — Ben- 
jamin, Weiss] Johnny Richards’ ork 
sets op the mood for a pleasant read- 
ing of a good tune by Wendy Waye. 
Thrush has feeling in her delivery. 
“IF ONLY” (2:48) [Valando 
ASCAP — Benjamin, Weiss, 
Lausch] On this end the chirp puts her 
heart into a slow and inviting senti- 
mental country flavored piece. Pretty 
voice. 


JACKIE GLEASON ORCH. 

(Capitol 2659; F-2659) 

© “MYSTERY STREET” (2:38) 
[Mellin BMI — Howard, Plante, 
Philippe, Gerard] TV comedian Jackie 
Gleason conducts the ork through a 
sultrv blues bit with a terrific melody. 
Tune has a feeling. 

“GOLDEN VIOLINS” (2:15) 
[Alamo ASCAP — Twomey, Wise, 
Weisman] On this end the crew glides 
through a lovely tune with a slow 
waltz flavor. Trumpet plays an im- 
portant part here. 


est record name potentials in the 
business, follows through with the 
disk which should really send her 
to the top of the list. It’s the oldie 
“Life Is Just A Bowl Of Cherries” 
backed with a powerful jump called 
“Operator 299.” Both sides of this 
disk could make it. On either end, 
the thrush is backed by Frank De 
Vol and his orchestra. Frank has 
also come up with a couple of or- 
chestrations which give the sides 
a unique feeling. Once this disk 
gets around, Jaye P. Morgan is 
going to be one of the biggest 
names in the business. Better get 
with it fast. 


DANNY KAYE 
(Decca 28953; 9-28953) 

“NOT SINCE NINEVEH” (2:44) 
[Frank ASCAP— Wright, For- 
rest] The great Danny Kaye rhythms 
through a cute ditty from the show 
“Kismet.” Material is enjoyable but 
is too specialized to be commercial. 
Probably is a great show item. 

“NIGHT OF MY NIGHTS” 
(3:07 [Frank ASCAP— Wright, 
Forrest] Another tune from the same 
show, this one with a jump beat, is 
presented by Danny. Interesting. 


CONNIE HAINES 
(Coral 61094; 9-61094) 

® “THE WRONG SIDE OF 
TOWN” (2:38) [Acuff-Rose BMI 
— Helm, Price] Connie Haines offers 
an emotional and moody reading of 
a pretty ballad. The entire reading is 
loaded with feeling. 

O " P I N K SHAMPOO” (1:50) 
[Criterion ASCAP — Allton] A 
catchy and lively ditty with a cute 
and happy appeal is delivered by Con- 
nie a la Teresa Brewer fashion. George 
Cates ork backs. 


FLORIAN ZABACH 
(Decca 28916; 9-28916) 

® “PLINK, PLANK, PLUNK” 
(2:01) [Mills ASCAP— Ander- 
son] A famous ditty tailor made for 
the violin gets a sprite and appealing 
going over by the versatile fingers 
of Florian Zabach. 

© “THE FUNNY FIDDLE” (2:19) 
[Shapiro, Bernstein ASCAP — 
Zabach] The virtuoso makes his fiddle 
laugh as he lilts through a violin 
novelty. Colorful ditty should draw 
spins. 


THE BLUE NOTES 
(Rama 25; 45-25) 

© “TOO HOT TO HANDLE” (2:28) 
[War-Mil BMI— Lee Silver] Joe 
Loco’s ork supplies the rhythmic back- 
drop on this terrific jump item. The 
arrangement is tops and the crew’s 
sound is great too. Real solid tune. 
Could click. 

® “IF YOU’LL BE MINE” (2:26) 
[War-Mil BMI — Smith, Rogers] 
The boys take the famous Wedding 
March melody, set new lyrics to it 
and send out a slow bluesy reading. 

RUSS MORGAN ORCH. 

(Decca 28964; 9-28964) 

© “OH MEIN PAPA” (2:31) [Sha- 
piro, Bernstein ASCAP — Sexton, 
Turner, Burkhard] A smooth and in- 
fectious melody that seems to be 
catching on gets a smooth trumpet 
job via the ork of Russ Morgan. 
Chorus adds to side too. Could hit. 

“GO MAN GO” (2:28) [Ronson 
BMI— Eddie Habat] A lively pol- 
ka ditty is the order of the day on 
this end presented in a happy go 
lucky manner by the Morgan crew. 
Milt Gabler handles the vocal on this 
peppy deck. 


VICENTICO VALDES 
(Seeco 7334; 45-7334) 

© “TENDERLY” (2:36) [—Gross, 
Lawrence] To a soft and inviting 
Latin backdrop, Vicentico Valdes 
eases through a Spanish reading of a 
lovely standard. Real smooth listening. 

® “DANCE MY CHA-CHA-CHA” 
(2:37) [ — Coen] A rhythmic 

mambo beat is the setting for Vicen- 
tico’s reading of a good item. Spanish 
delivery adds a certain appealing 
quality to the deck. Should go well 
in the right spots. 


GEORGIA GIBBS 
(Mercury 70274; 70274 x 45) 

“UNDER PARIS SKIES” (2:39) 
[Leeds ASCAP — Giraud, Gan- 
non] Georgia Gibbs sends up the first 
lyric version of a lovely waltz melody 
that’s been clicking in spots at differ- 
ent times. This could make it a smash. 

0 “I LOVE PARIS” (2:28) [Chap- 
pell ASCAP— Porter] The big 
song from “Can Can” gets a vibrant 
vocal solo from the artist in her in- 
dividual manner. Real top grade job 
on a beautiful tune. Could also make 
noise. 




TBS CASH m 


BEST BETS 


In the opinion of The Cash Box music staff, records listed below. In 
addition to the "Disk" and ", Sleeper " Of The Week, are those most 
likely to achieve popularity. 




★ "THE GAME OF LOVE" 

★ "SWEETHEART OF MINE" 

★ "YOU AND YOUR SMILE" 

★ "MAMA'S GONE, GOOD BYE" 

★ "AGAIN, AGAIN AND AGAIN' 


..Bill Darnel Decca 28936; 9-28936 

Al Martino Capitol 2649; F-2649 

. Clark Dennis Tiffony 1303; 45-1303 

..Pee Wee Hunt Capitol 2647, F-2647 

Mary Mayo . Benida 5004; 45-5004 












Page 1 1 


November 28 , 1953 


The Cash Box , Music 


Jerry Marshall To Take Over WNEW’s 
“Make Believe Ballroom” on Jan. 1st 


Bernice Judis, vice president and 
general manager of New York Radio 
Station, WNEW, announced today 
that Jerry Marshall will he the new 
star of the independent’s “Make Be- 
lieve Ballroom” segments, beginning 
January 1, 1954. Miss Judis revealed 
that when the question of a replace- 
ment for the program first came up, 
it was the consensus of her program 
and sales staff that the 31-year-old, 
Marshall, with his seven years of 
grooming on the high-rated “Music 
Hall” program, was the logical suc- 
cessor. Audience mail and unsolicited 
sponsor suggestions provided over- 
whelming support to the selection. 

However, it was decided that de- 
spite these reactions and Marshall’s 
consistently successful commercial and 
audience rating record, such an im- 
portant choice would not be made 
final until all other possibilities had 
been investigated. There followed the 
consideration of literally hundreds of 
applicants, ranging from the indus- 
try’s top names to obscure personali- 
ties heard on small town outlets. 
Tapes, discs and the prospects in per- 
son formed a steady stream into 
WNEW from every conceivable area. 
“We have the impression that every- 
one who ever stood in front of a micro- 
phone applied for this position, and 
that we listened to them all,” was 
Miss Judis’ summation of the talent 
investigation. 


It became apparent finally that none 
of the possibilities heard gave evi- 
dence of being more right for the 
spot than Jerry Marshall. No one ap- 
peared to be as much a “natural” to 
apply the unique WNEW treatment 
to “Make Believe Ballroom”. It could 
certainly be said that the selection of 
Marshall was made from a field of the 
toughest competition available, both 
in numbers and quality. 

WNEW will present the “Make Be- 
lieve Ballroom”, featuring Jerry 
Marshall, with no changes in time, 
content or format. 


Northern - King Suit Settled 


The suit which Northern Music 
Corporation (a subsidiary of Decca 
Records) brought against King Rec- 
ords, Lucky Millinder and others has 
been settled by payment of $17,500 to 
Northern by the defendants, who al- 
so have paid all Court costs. 

The suit charged that the King Rec- 
ords recording of “I LOVE YOU YES 
I DO”, a popular hit of several years 
ago, is an infringement of Northern’s 
composition “TONIGHT HE SAILED 
AGAIN”, which Northern entrusted 
to Lucky Millinder to record for 
Decca. As part of the settlement, 
King has taken a license from North- 
ern authorizing its recording of the 
composition. 


Happy Halvah 



NEW YORK — With a strong reaction reported on his San Francisco Boys’ 
Allen Record of “Happy Halvah,” Pete Dorain, prexy of Allen, sets up a pro- 
motional camnaign tied in with Joyva Halva. The recently formed diskery 
has already had its first hit blues disk in the Willows’ version of My Dear, 
Dearest Darling.” Pet’s looking for the first pop smash m Happy Halvah. 


KNOWN FROM COAST TO COAST 

LESLIE DISTRIBUTORS 

ONE-STOP RECORD SERVICE 


NEW YORK 

750 — 1 0th AVE. 

(Phone: PLoza 7-1777) 

Cable Address: Expo Record, N. Y. 


HARTFORD, CONN. 
126 Vi WINDSOR ST, 
(Phene HA 5-7123) 


ES 









records 

p RUW*'-- 


SONDRA and JON STEELE 

in their most important record release since "MY HAPPINESS" 


ISSUED IN YEARS! 


BOTH SIDES TOPPING METERS 
EVERYWHERE 


BILLBOARD NOV. 7 


THIS WEEK'S BEST BUYS 


MY HAPPINESS 

NEAR YOU — The Mulcays — Cardinal 1011 
This is recommended particularly to juke 
box operators tho there was retail action 
reported in some areas. It's a top seller to 
operators in St. Louis, New York (difficulty 
in getting disks was noted here), Philadel- 
phia and Buffalo. Strong retail action noted 
in Dallas. L. A. dealers and one-stops said 
"good." Most areas are on "My Happiness." 


THE MULCAYS 

and their 

ELECTRIC HARMONICAS 


NEW RECORDS TO WATCH 

SONDRA AND JON STEELE 
How Much Do You Love Me? (Blasco, 
^SCAP) — Cardinal 1012— First disk 
from pair since "My Happiness," 
five years ago. Disk is spotlighted 
both to herald their return and to 
point up a very good piece of ma- 
terial. It also could stir some 
action. Fiip is "Hold My Love" 
(Blasco, BMI). 


Featuring 

MY HAPPINESS 

B/W 


HOW MUCH DO 
YOU LOVE ME 


NEAR YOU 


CARDINAL # 1011 
Both speeds available 




B/W 


HOLD MY LOVE 

(IN THE HOLLOW OF YOUR HAND) 


phoneTL 

WIRE, V 
WRITE j 


BLASCO MUSIC, INC. 

1221 BALTIMORE, KANSAS CITY(6). M0. 


Manufacturers of Cardinal Records 


CARDINAL # 1012 
Both speeds available 



“ICs What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 12 


November 28, 1953 


Hit Making 



LOS ANGELES— Larry Newton (right) president of Derby Records, offers 
his last words of suggestion to Jaye P. Morgan and Frank De Vol prior to 
their recording session of “Life Is Just A Bowl Of Cherries” and “Operator 
299. Jaye P. handles the vocal on both ends, and Frank De Vol the arrange- 
ment and orchestration. All three look mighty happy about the future of 
the disk. 


SANDY STEWART’S 

GREATEST 

“SATURDAY 

NiGHT’’ 

“I’M GOING HOME” 

5014 


Sutton Scores At 
Ben Maksik’s 


MIKE PEDICIN’S 

LATEST 

“NEVER 

MIND’’ 

b/w 

“MM — BOY!” 

5012 



Manufactured by 

GOTHAM RECORD CORP. 






BROADWAY SENSATION 


Sings Every 
MOOD Record 
To a Hit 



1 \ 


FAY DEWITT 
MISERLOU 


i i 


''Snap-Snap-Snap Your Fingers' 
MOOD # 1014 


MOOD RECORDS 'tunTiVoof 

Cambridge, Mass. 


DEALERS - DISTRIBUTORS 

World's largest selection of specialized 
dance records for dance teachers and 
students . . . tap, ballet, etc. 

Write or Wire 

°USSELL RECORDS 

BOX 328 VENTURA, CALIFORNIA 


NEW YORK — Danny Sutton, young 
RCA Victor vocalist, opened a two- 
week engagement at Ben Maksik’s 
Town and Country Club on November 
17 to a standing room crowd. 

Sutton, who headlined the show, 
warmed up the audience with two well 
received numbers and then sold them 
completely with a strikingly arranged 
and solidly performed “For Me And 
My Gal.” From then on, Danny was 
in, and was called back for several 
encores. 

Sutton is a frustrated ball player, 
who when he found his harmonizing 
in the locker room got more compli- 
ments than his batting, decided to 
hang up his baseball shoes and con- 
centrate on a singing career. 

After six years of “singing for his 
supper” and learning the vocalizing 
trade, Danny began attracting atten- 
tion. He was booked into La Cava, a 
Manhattan nightspot and was held 
over for 26 weeks. This was followed 
by a tour of the country’s leading 
clubs. 

Danny made his TV debut on the 
Kate Smith show last spring and the 
mail response was so impressive, pro- 
ducer Ted Collins signed him as a 
regular repeating feature on the pro- 
gram. Now Sutton is on Victor rec- 
ords and he’ll headline at the Copa- 
cabana in New York this winter. 
Looks like Danny, who couldn’t make 
the big leagues with the bat and ball. 


made it with his vocal chords. 


Tico Bows With 21 EP’s 


NEW YORK — George Goldner, Tico 
Records prexy, announced the addition 
of EP’s to his current line of Latin 
American 45’s, 78’s and LP’s. 

The initial introduction to the trade 
will be 21 EP’s featuring the three 
Latin American stars: Joe Loco, Tito 
Puente, and Tito Rodriguez, 

Goldner says he “spared no expense 
to produce covers of the finest quality 
and most attractive design.” The sam- 
ples will go out to the trade this week. 


1 

//M 


% 







nrr** 


ALL ABOUT DISK JOCKEYS 


THE TEN RECORDS 

DISK JOCKEYS PLAYED MOST THIS WEEK 


PLUS THE NEXT FIVE 


TO APPEAR IN THE NOVEMBER 28TH ISSUE 


1. RAGS TO RICHES Tony Bennett (Columbia) 

2. EBB TIDE v Frank Chacksfield (London) 

3. MANY TIMES Eddie Fisher (RCA Victor) 

4. YOU, YOU, YOU Ames Brothers (RCA Victor) 

5. RICOCHET Teresa Brewer (Coral) 

6. EH, CUMPARI Julius La Rosa (Cadence) 

7. YOU ALONE Perry Como (RCA Victor) 

8. VAYA CON DIOS Paul & Ford (Capitol) 

9. ISTANBUL Four Lads (Columbia) 

10. STORY OF THREE LOVES Jerry Murad (Mercury) 

11) THAT'S AMORE. 12) LOVE WALKED IN. 13) OFF SHORE. 14) 
HEART OF MY HEART. 15) TO BE ALONE. 


Bill Reynolds ( WTMJ-Milwaukee, Wise.) sends out a sheet of the 25 best 
retail sellers compiled through a survey of the retail record stores in the Mil- 
waukee area. Bill airs the top seven on Saturdays 9 to 9:30 P. M. . . . Sandy 
Singer (KCRG-Cedar Rapids, Iowa) says “Changing Partners” is going to be 
another “Tennessee Waltz.” . . . “Albuquerque” A1 Hallaman (WBVP-Beaver 
Falls, Penna.) amazed at the audience reaction to “If They Should Ask Me” 
by Wade Ray. When the disk was issued in March it didn’t raise too much 
reaction. However, last week after one spin the avalanche was on. It now rates 
as number three on the Hallaman charts, crowding “Wig Walk” and “Carib- 
bean.” 


Dick Elliott (WCFL-Chicago) has been getting a terrific response to his 
show featuring The Cash Box Top Tunes. Dick reports “I’ve been getting more 
mail than ever before. The use of The Cash Box charts, 
tunes, reviews and all other info relative to the disk 
biz has proved extremely helpful to me and has 
pleased the listeners tremendously.” . . . Station 
WJNR-Newark, N. J. still working on plans to op- 
erate with an all Negro staff. They will work out of 
offices on Union Ave. in Union, N. J. So far the sta- 
tion will air Ramon Bruce, Hal Jackson, Hal Wade, 
Charlie Green, George Hudson and Babs Gonzales. 
“Moon Dog” (Alan Freed) will have a two hour taped 
show daily. A1 Lampeare, at the helm of the station, 
is handling the reorganization. Joe Cohen, Essex Dis- 
tributors, advises us he has increased his own rhythm 
and blues sponsored time on the station from 1 to 1% 
hours daily. He will also have a Saturday evening 
dance hour, with only dance tunes aired. Mr. Blues 
will handle the deejay chores. . . . David Shedd, Bink- 
ley Distributors, Miami, Fla. (MGM distribs) did a 
yeoman job guiding Jo Ann Tolley around to the disk 
jockies and T. V. personal appearances while lovely Jo 
Ann was headlining the Olympia Theatre, Miami, the 

„ , „ week of November 4. She guested on the shows of Bob 

Marshall, WGBS; Harry Burge of WQAM; and Don “Uncle” Fisher of WQAM. 
Jo Ann also helped to launch a new show called “Disk Jockey On Wheels.” 
WINZ had a huge radio equipped truck patrolling the main streets of the Beach 
and Miami from midnight to 2:30 A.M. Stan Gyson and A1 Zeblow handled 
the mike. Jo Ann’s latest on MGM is “How Come.” 



DICK ELLIOTT 
(WCFL — Chicago) 


“ll’a What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 


WWDC-Washington, D. C. jockies Art Brown and Milton Q. Ford picked 
up the ball when it was fumbled and scored a touchdown last week for the 
Cerebral Palsy Fund. The Cage Bird Society, which had raised $640 for the 
Cerebral Palsy Fund, was robbed and for a time it seemed the “Fund” was 
out the proceeds. However, Brown and Ford appealed to their audiences and 

collected $692.71 to replace the missing funds. So — all’s well that ends well 

and a doff of the cap to Brown and Ford. ... The Four Aces, travelling the 
Merrit Parkway, Conn, on a 300 mile trip to a scheduled one nighter, tuned 
in the car radio at 2 A.M. and picked up their newest, “Stranger In Paradise” 
preceded by a one minute buildup. When the station break came in they learned 
they were listening to jockey Bob Badgley away out in WHO-Des Moines, 
Iowa. When the boys stopped for gas they put in a call to Badgley to thank 
him. He was so flabbergasted by the call that he responded by rescheduling 
his imxt h&lf hour and played only Four Aces tunes. See — it pa vs to be nice 

“Son^s^h^^Wflf J^ E 5 E " Clev ,^ anc L O.) offered a job to wri?e Senior 
Songs That Will Live Forever as a result of his weekly newsletter. 



The Cash Box , Music 


November 28, 1953 


Page 13 




DOROTHY COLLINS 


NEW YORK: 

Winner of the Frankie Laine-Wurlitzer vocalist contest in New York is 
Patty Bross, seventeen years old. Patty will appear on Paul Brenner’s Friday 
night teevee show. . . . Things happening to Joe Leibowitz, Monarch Records, 
in bunches. His Ruth Wallis, “Dear Mr. Godfrey,” a hit and he became a 
grandfather for the second time. . . . Spike Jones coming into New York for 
his first personal appearance in many years. Will put on a revue at the 46th 
St. Theatre. Buddy Basch back in New York after an extended promotional 
trip. . . . Jack Pleis will premier his forthcoming Decca disk “St. Louis Blues” 
on the Jackie Gleason show in January. June Taylor will do the choreography 
and Pleis will be spotlighted playing a grand piano. 

. . . Bernie Lawrence returned from Korea on Novem- 
ber 14. Bernie sang with brother Steve Lawrence for 
King under the name of the Leslie Bros. . ! . A1 Don- 
ahue announces the opening of his West Coast Agency 
on Sunset Boulevard. . . . Joe Piccola signed Lauri 
Layton to a personal management contract. . . . Joe 
Ponepinto, oldest man from the point of service, at 
Lou Boorstein’s Leslie Distributing took the plunge 
last week. Joe and Jean Marie honeymooning in Ber- 
muda. . . . Pint sized Dorothy Collins getting loads of 
“Happy Birthday” greetings this week. . . . Sperie 
Karas going home for Thanksgiving to a great big 
welcome. . . . Derby signed Dwight Fiske. He will 
make an LP and EP titled “Songs My Mother Never 
Taught Me.” . . . Ralph Curtis, who just got out “You 
Are You” and “Why Go On” on Derby is a hit at the 
Thunderbird Hotel, Las Vegas. 

CHICAGO: 

Because Pat Morrissey’s disk, “You’re The Greatest,” clicking so well, she’ll 
cut new sides for Decca sometime in Jan’ry. In the meantime, the gal opens 
this week (11/24) at the Black Orchid. If you haven’t seen her perform, be 
sure to be present. . . . Dirk Courtenay (WAAF) reports teeners now coming 
to his Satty show. . . . Lee and the very charming, Mary Petrillo, in the cutest 
discussion we’ve yet heard. As to whether they’re married 14 or 15 years. 
And Lee comes up with the clincher. 15 years. The guy’s just mathematical. 

. . . Jimmy Martin put it this way, “Dave Miller’s got one honey of a clickeroo 
in Eddie Calvert’s ‘Oh Mein Papa’.” . . . Bob (Coffeehead) Larsen, Milwaukee 
dj, in town to say “hello” to Frank Chacksfield. But 
Frank’s plane held up by engine trouble at Minne- 
apolis’ airport, while all waited to greet him at cock- 
tail party at Linn Burton’s Steak House. Morrie 
Goldman, who was with him, was desperate enuf to fly 
him in — himself. . . . Frank and Mrs. Plath — a very 
charming twosome. . . . Marvin Enterprises, Inc., 
started by Marvin Kreenberg, intro’d the “Master” 
label, now out of business, it is reported. . . . Guy 
Cherney of Tiffany on his way to NYC to meet with 
deejays and all others about his new disking. Guy 
an in-law of San Francisco’s Jack Ehrlich. . . . Johnny 
Desmond and Archie Levington absolutely thrilled at 
the way “Woman” taking off. That makes 2 for 
Johnny. With two paisans, Don Cornell and Alan 
Dale, Johnny has “Heart Of My Heart,” also grab- 
bing plenty action. . . . Alan Dale, one sweet kid, flies 
into Chi to be on Howard Miller’s TV show and play 
his part of the “Heart.” . . . Jack Eigen flashing flash of himself and Julie La 
Rosa. Tellin’ the people what a great guy Julie is. How humble he is. And 
thankful for stardom. . . . Brand new deck of Wendy Waye cards from Laurel 
Music. Featuring Wendy’s new Coraling of “Fortune Telling Cards” and “If 
Only.” . . . Sherman Feller phones all the way from Bahston to tell Ernie 
Leaner all about his absolutely gorgeous wife clickin’ like sixty with “She Was 
Five And He Was Ten.” Judy Valentine — of course. . . . George Jay of Hollee- 
wood sends the cutest gold-chained-cai'd all about that “Woman” which Shauno 
O’Desmond cut so beautifully. . . . Ain’t Elaine Stewart a honey ? The gal’s 
got everyone’s comfort in mind at all times. (Thanks a million, Elaine, for 
being ever so swell). . . . Decca offices abuzzin’ this week. Mike Connor in 
town. Larry Green shooing him across Boul Mich. And, Mike’ll know for the 
first time reading it here, that the car that almost hit him as he dashed across 
the Boulevard — was our’s. Decca’s Georgie Shaw also in town covering the 
deejays. . . . Jackie (Charm) Hubbard claims “Eddie wasn’t that sick, buhlieve 
you me.” And, you know what? He wa’n’t. 

LOS ANGELES: 

Gil Bernal, “Mr. Sex on a Sax,” and his group headline the show which 
bowed in with the reopening of the La Madelon Club. . . . The talented song- 
stress, Lena Horne, opened at the Coconut Grove. Jerry Gray and his orchestra 
hold down the bandstand. . . . Capitol just released a beaty arrangement of 
“Istanbul” by Joe Fingers Carr. . . . Hold on to your hats ’cause it looks like 
we’ll hear versions from the Jack Webb theme even through the holiday season. 
Stan Freberg and Daws Butler have come up with another two-sided Capitol 
ditty called “Christmas Dragnet” parts one and two. . . . Gale Clark’s waxing 
of “Music Of Love” and “The Unashamed” on the Fine Arts label has made 
other companies sit up and take notice. . . . Leo Dia- 
mond’s original Ambassador waxing of “Off Shore” 
is receiving such big plays throughout the country 
that it’s climbing fast in all pop charts. The ops here 
have it on most of the boxes but the local jocks haven’t 
given it too much air time. We wonder why? Leo’s 
latest etching of “Sadie Thompson’s Song” also has 
all the indications of a big number. . . . George Shur- 
lock, promotional manager for Decca Distributing 
Corp., recently returned from a trip through the West- 
ern Division calling on deejays and distributors. . . . 
Decca artist, Jeri Southern, recently moved to the 
Hollywood area to make her home. . . . Gregg Hunter, 
New York, also has moved into the area and started 
setting up local offices for Song-Craft Publications. 
Gregg collaborated on the tune “Texas Polka” and 
has been all excited since Bonnie Lou etched the num- 
ber for King Records and it won the Bullseye in The 
Cash Box. 




EARTHA KITT 


COPIED BY MANY — EQUALED BY NONE! 


THE ORIGINAL HIT- 
BY THE COMPOSER 

LEO DIAMOND'S 

Haunting Harmonica Instrumental 

OFF SHORE 


b/w Easy Melody 


Ambassador # 1005 & 45-1005 


JUST RELEASED! two TERRIFIC SIDES — 

LEO DIAMOND ^ 

Playing the song he featured in the new Columbia 
picture starring Rita Hayworth 


SADIE THOMPSON S SONG 


(The Blue Pacific Blues) 


A toe tapping Juke Box Natural 


ON THE MALL 


Both sides with Van Alexander and orchestra 


Ambassador # 1006 & 45-1006 


AMBASSADOR RECORD COMPANY 


1819 W. Pico Bird. 


Los Angeles 6, Calif. 


Phone DUnkirk 8-4027 or DUnkirk 8-7891 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 





The Cash Box , Music 


Page 14 


November 28, 1953 


England’s “Creep” 
To Bow In U.S. 


NEW YORK — The record world 
seems to be going wild about “The 
Creep”. And it all started something 
like this. 

Lester Sims, general professional 
manager of Miller Music, was relax- 
ing one evening last week when the 
Don Hollenbeck’s TV news program 
went on the air. One of the features 
on the show was a short film clip 
which Hollenbeck announced as a 
dance craze that was sweeping Eng- 
land. The picture showed a huge ball- 
room in England with hundreds of 
youngsters swinging on the dance 
floor to a tune called “The Creep”, a 
slow two beat shuffle. 

The next morning Sims rushed to 
the office and ran into Abe Oleman’s 
office raving about the dance and tune 
he had heard on TV. An immediate 
check was made and it was discovered 
that the song belonged to Miller 
Music. 

Other publishers, who had seen the 
same TV broadcast were on the 
phones checking the ownership of the 
tune. However, it remains Miller’s. 

The tune will soon make its debut 
on wax in the United States since 
every major diskery is already cut- 
ting it with their top bands, and some 
independents have also requested the 
song. 

Television shows are being set up 
for the presentation of the tune, and 
Miller Music is going all out on this 
tune, making it its number one plug 
song. 

Sims thinks that “The Creep” will 
be bigger than the mambo. 









Another Smash Hit by 

THE HILLTOPPERS 

featuring the voice of JIMMY SACCA 

“TO BE ALONE” 

and 

“LOVE WALKED IN” 

DOT # 15105 

DOT RECORDS, INC. 

Gallatin, Tennessee 
Phones: 880-881 






^“XkK"Xk“;"X ,, X“X"X“X , *X“X“X' 

GOLD FOR YOU t 

f 

I 
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* 


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£ 


when you feature 
The Golden Trumpet of 

EDDIE CALVERT'S 

“OH, MEIN 
PAPA” 


Essex #336 




RECORDS 

na»-i« sour* ma turn 


PMILADFIPHIA 41, PINNA 


Manufactured and Distributed by Palda Record Company 



Negotiations are in hand to bring 
popular composer Leroy Anderson 
over to conduct a full-size British con- 
cert orchestra for a nation-wide tour. 
. . . Les Perrin back from a most suc- 
cessful U. S. trip with nothing but 
praise for The Cash Box. . . . Met the 
Capitol label executives this week. 
Glenn Wallichs, Mr. Porges, here to 
parlay with E. R. Lewis of British 
Decca label. “Just a friendly visit,” 
Glen Wallichs told me, speaking of 
E. R. Lewis: I would mention that he 
is a real live-wire; always on the ball; 
doesn’t miss a thing in the record 
business, and certainly gets the best 
results. George Aitken, head of the 
Australian Record Company, Ltd., 
also in London. Aside from his own 
labels, Aitken also runs the Capitol 
label Down Under. 

Just heard a forty-five minute show 
called “Vera Lynn’s Christmas Song.” 
Vera sings with the 43-piece BBC 
Show band and chorus conducted by 
Cyril Stapleton. This show was taped 
for the U. S. to be aired on Christmas 
Day and is being offered to American 
networks. I’ll say, right here and 
now, that it’s well worth getting. How 
about it N. B. C. ? 

British bandleader Teddy Foster has 
received and accepted an offer of $5000 
per week for himself and his orches- 
tra to undertake a twelve- weeks tour 
of the United States in May of next 
year. Teddy will visit New York 
early in the new year and will call on 
James C. Petrillo to obtain his sanc- 
tion for this project which would make 
Teddy Foster’s the first British band 
to tour the States since the imposition 
of the Anglo-U. S. ban some years ago. 
... I hear that Harry James may be 
coming to Europe with his full band 
and will play Britain as a solo act in 
the halls. Will Mrs. James make the 
trip too? Who knows! 

I saw Dick Allyn’s Smart record of 
“Devil Eyes” and the Lancers’ waxing 
of “Sweet Mamma Tree Top Tall” in 
the office of a big record company 
executive this week. Did I say that 
man never misses a thing ???... 
Larry Adler starts a D. J. show next 
Sunday over BBC. . . . London shocked 
by Kenton crash. . . . Something tells 
me some pretty American heiress will 
be crashing into the record world 
with, believe it or not, some excellent 
etchings. I hear she turned down the 
top spot on her uncle’s TV show and 
told him she did not wish to make it 
the easy way. . . . Watch out for this 
little spark of LIGHT which may turn 
into quite a Flame; and that’s a very 
good clue to the name of the heiress! 

A little girl who could, I think, have 
quite a following over here is Vicki 
Young. She’s full of life and her rec- 
ord will be issued over here on Janu- 
ary 1st. 

Ted Heath’s cutting “The Creep” 
for the London label. Anything hap- 
pening with this number across the 
Atlantic ? 

This Week’s Best Selling Pop Rec- 
ords: 

(Courtesy “New Musical Express” 

1. Answer Me FRANKIE LAINE 

2. Answer Me DAVID WHITFIELD 

3. Look At That Girl 

GUY MITCHELL 

4. Hey Joe FRANKIE LAINE 

5. Swedish Rhapsody.. MANTOVANI 

6. Pappa Piccolino DIANA DECKER 

7. I Believe FRANKIE LAINE 

8. Chica-Boom .... GUY MITCHELL 

9. Where The Winds Blow 

FRANKIE LAINE 

10. Song From Moulin Rouge 

MANTOVANI 



Listings below ore reprinted exactly as submitted by leading disk jockeys throughout the 
nation for the week ending November 21 without any changes on the part of THE CASH BOX. 


Ed Bonner 

KXOK— St. Louis, Mo. 

1. I'll Never Stand In Your Way 

(Joni James) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. Answer Me Lord Above 

(Frankie Laine) 

6. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

7. I'm Yearning (Don Cornell) 

8. Tipica Serenada (H. Jerome) 

9. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 
10. When My Dreamboat Comes 
Home (Kay Starr) 


Ray Perkins 

KFEL — Denver, Colo. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. Changing Partners (P. Page) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

8. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

9. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


Don McLeod 

WJBK— Detroit, Mich. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. You're On Trial (Don Cornell) 

3. Magic Guitar (Bunny Paul) 

4. You Alone (Perry Como) 

5. Marie (Four Tunes) 

6. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 

7. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. South Of The Border (Sinatra) 
10. Three O'clock In The Morn- 
ing (Monty Kelly) 


Frank Pollack 

KOOL — Phoenix, Ariz. 

1. That's All (Acquaviva) 

2. My Hymn To Her (A. Wayne) 

3. From Here To Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

4. Passionata (Bernie Wayne) 

5. love You So (Peggy lee) 

6. Heart Of My Heart 

(Four Aces) 

7. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

8. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

9. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 
10. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 


Bob Gotsch 

KXOK— St. Louis, Mo. 

1. Three O'clock In The Morn- 

ing (Monty Kelly) 

2. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

3. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

4. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

5. Hi Lili Hi Lo (Ray Martin) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. I'm Yearning (Don Cornell) 

8. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

9. I'll Never Stand In Your Way 

(Joni James) 
10. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 


Don Bell 

KRNT — Des Moines, Iowa 

1. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. Vaya Con Dios (Paul 8, Ford) 

4. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

7. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

8. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

9. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

10. P. S. I love You (Hilltoppers) 


Dirk Courtenay 

WAAF— Chicago, 111. 

1. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 

2. From Here to Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

3. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 

4. Oh, Brother (Mae Williams) 

5. Pa-Paya Mama (Perry Como) 

6. Baby, Baby, Baby (T. Brewer) 

7. The Little Boy That Santa 

Claus Forgot (Nat K. Cole) 

8. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

9. Woman (Johnny Desmond) 
10. Stranger In Paradise 

(Tony Bennett) 


Dave Rosehill 

WGSM — Huntington, L. 1., N.Y. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

5. Hot Dog That Made Her Mad 

(Dick Noel) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

8. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

9. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

10. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 


Jackson Lowe 

WOL — Washington, D. C. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

3. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

4. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

5. Answer Me (Frankie Laine) 

6. I Love Paris (Les Baxter) 

7. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

8. Marie (Four Tunes) 

9. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 
10. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 


Bill Balance 

KNX — Hollywood, Calif. 

1. Stranger In Paradise 

(Four Aces) 

2. I Love My Argentine (Bailey) 

3. Baubles, Bangles, and Beads 

(Peggy Lee) 

4. P. S. I Love You (Hilltoppers) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

8. Just A Gigolo (J. P. Morgan) 

9. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 
10. Hey Joe! (Frankie Laine) 


Lou Barile 

WKAL— Rome, N. Y. 

1. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

2. Changing Partners (P. Page) 

3. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

4. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

5. You Alone (Perry Como) 

6. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

7. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

10. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 


Saxie Dowell 

WGN— Chicago, III. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

3. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

4. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

5. Don't Take Your Love From 

Me (Three Suns) 

6. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

7. My Love, My Love (J. James) 

8. Woman (Johnny Desmond) 

9. Secret Love (Doris Day) 

10. Saving My Dreams (Eckstine) 


Joe Deane 

KQV — Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1. Why Does It Have To Be Me 

(Tony Bennett) 

2. Golden Violins (Chacksfield) 

3. Many times (Eddie Fisher) 

4. You Alone (Perry Como) 

5. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

6. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

7. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

8. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 

9. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 
10. The Baion (Paulo Alencar) 


Buddy Deane 

WITH — Baltimore, Md. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

7. You Alone (Perry Como) 

8. I'll Never Stand In Your Way 

(Joni James) 

9. Dragnet (Ray Anthony) 

10. From Here to Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 


Bates Feuell 

WCAR — Pontiac, Mich. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

3. Magic Guitar (Bunny Paul) 

4. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius la Rosa) 

6. You Alone (Perry Como) 

7. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

8. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

9. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

10. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 


Sandy Singer 

KCRG — Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

3. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. You Alone (Perry Como) 

6. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 

7. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

8. Ford Album 

(Merman & Martin) 

9. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 
10. Dragnet ((Ray Anthony) 


Jay Michaels 

WCAE — Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

2. Answer Me (Frankie Laine) 

3. You Alone (Perry Como) 

4. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

5. There's Danger In Your Eyes, 

Cherie (Tony Martin) 

6. Marie (Four Tunes) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Cow Cow Blues (Jan August) 

9. South Of The Border (Sinatra) 
10. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 


Jack Dugan 

WGAT— Utica, N. Y. 

1 . Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

5. A Baby Cried (Lou Monte) 

6. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

7. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

8. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. Write Myself A Letter 

(Connie Boswell) 


Pat Chamburs 

WFLA — Tampa, Fla. 

1. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

2. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

3. Many Times (Percy Faith) 

4. 38th Parallel (Tom Scott) 

5. My Hymn To Her (A. Wayne) 

6. Story Of Three Loves 

(Liberace) 

7. Off Shore (Axel Stordahl) 

8. From Here To Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

9. Ricochet (Vicki Young) 

10. You're Thoughtless (Madigan) 


John Dixon 

WALA — Mobile, Ala. 

1. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

2. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

3. From Here To Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

4. Apples, Peaches, Cherries 

(Peggy Lee) 

5. Santa Baby (Eartha Kitt) 

6. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

7. Lover Come Back To Me 

(Nat "King" Cole) 

8. When My Dreamboat Comes 

Home (Kay Starr) | 

9. My Hymn To Her (A. Wayne)j 
10. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 


Al Ross 

WBAL — Baltimore, Md. 

1. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

2. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

3. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

4. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

5. From Here to Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

6. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

7. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

8. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

9. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 
10. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts’* 






Page 15 


November 28, 1953 


The Cash Box , Music 



Listings below are reprinted exactly as submitted by leading disk jockeys throughout the 
nation for the week ending November 21 without any changes on the part of THE CASH BOX. 


Howard Miller 
WIND & WMAQ— 
Chicago, III. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

3. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

4. Don't Take Your Love From 

Me (Three Suns) 

5. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

6. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

7. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

8. 1 Love Paris (Tony Martin) 

9. Heart Of My Heart 

(Four Aces) 

10. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 

Al Jarvis 

KFWB — Hollywood, Calif. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

4. Story of Three loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

5. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

6. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

7. Kangaroo (Paul & Ford) 

8. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

9. It Happened Once Before 

(Four Freshmen) 
10. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 

Bob 'Coffeehead' Larsen 
WEMP — Milwaukee, Wis. 

1. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

2. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

3. Messin' Around With Love 

(Louis Bashell) 

4. Don'cha Hear Them Bells 

(Paul & Ford) 

5. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 

6. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

7. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

8. Toys (Eileen Barton) 

9. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 
10. Wedding Bell Waltz (P. Eddy) 

Robin Seymour 
WKMH — Dearborn, Mich. 

1. Magic Guitar (Bunny Paul) 

2. You Alone (Perry Como) 

3. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

4. South Of The Border (Sinatra) 

5. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

6. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

7. Gadabout (David Carroll) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

10. Home Lovin Man (G. Gibbs) 

Earle Pudney 
WGY — Schenectady, N. Y. 

1. You Alone (Perry Como) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. That's All (Nat "King" Cole) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

8. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

9. Granada (Clark Dennis) 

10. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

Wayne Stitt 

WHB — Kansas City, Mo. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Orioles) 

8. Marie (Four Tunes) 

9. 1 Love Paris (Lex Baxter) 

10. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

Harry Burge 
WQAM — Miami, Fla. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

3. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

4. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. Crying In The Chapel 

(Orioles) 

7. You Alone (Perry Como) 

8. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

9. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

10. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

Jerry S. Hughes 
KMLW — Marlin, Tex. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Toys (Eileen Barton) 

3. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

4. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

5. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

8. Dragnet (Ray Anthony) 

9. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

10. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

Norman Hall 

WBNL — Boonville, Ind. 

1. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

2. I'll Never Stand In Your Way 

(Joni James) 

3. Just To Be With You (Fisher) 

4. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

5. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

6. The Typewriter (L. Anderson) 

7. Swamp Fire (Kay Starr) 

8. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

9. Love Me Again (Sunny Gale) 
10. Magic Guitar (Bunny Paul) 

Carmine Anthony 
KGKO— Dallas, Tex. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

4. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

5. Crying In The Chapel (Valli) 

6. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

7. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

8. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

9. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

10. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

Gene Whitaker 
WNCA — Siler City, N. C. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. 1 Love Paris (Les Baxter) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

6. Dragnet (Ray Anthony) 

7. From Here To Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

8. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

9. It's Easy To Remember 

(Bob Manning) 

10. Pa-Paya Mama (Perry Qomo) 

Bill Varney 

WKXL— Concord, N. H. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

3. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

4. Ebb Tide (Vic Damone) 

5. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

6. Sippin' Soda (Guy Mitchell) 

7. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

8. From Here To Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

9. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

10. Oh, Mein Papa (Eddy Calvert) 

Jack McDermott 
WLYN — Lynn, Mass. 

1. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

4. She Was Five And He Was 

Ten (Judy Valentine) 

5. Milwaukee Polka (P. Page) 

6. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

7. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

8. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

9. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 
10. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

Jerry Kay 

WLBR — Lebanon, Pa. 

1. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. 1 Love Paris (Les Baxter) 

6. Before It's Too Late (S. Gale) 

7. Blowing Wild (Frankie Laine) 

8. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

9. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 

Paul Flanagan 

WTRY— Troy, N. Y. 

1. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

4. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

5. My Love, My Love (J. James) 

6. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

7. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

10. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

* 

Sherm Feller 
WVDA — Boston, Mass. 

1. She Was Five And He was 

Ten (Judy Valentine) 

2. Are You Looking (K. Kallen) 

3. You Alone (Perry Como) 

4. Tipica Serenada (H. Jerome) 

5. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

6. Don't Forget To Write (Valli) 

7. Answer Me (Frankie Laine) 

8. My Hymn To Her (A. Wayne) 

9. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

10. Everybody Loves Saturday 
Night (Percy Faith) 

Bill Thornton 
KRLW — Walnut Ridge, Ark. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. No Stone Unturned (S. Kaye) 

4. No Other Love (Perry Como) 

5. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

6. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

7. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

8. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

9. 1 Love Paris (Les Baxter) 

10. 1 Should Have Told You Long 
Ago (Four Lads) 

Jeff Evans 

WLDY— Ladysmith, Wis. 

1. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(Lancers) 

2. Santa Baby (Eartha Kitt) 

3. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

4. Just To Be With You (Fisher) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. Ramona (Mantovani) 

7. Dragnet (Ray Anthony) 

8. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

9. Crying In The Chapel (Valli) 
10. From Here to Eternity 

(Frank Sinatra) 

Tom Edwards 
WERE — Cleveland, Ohio 

1. Stranger In Paradise 

(Four Aces) 

2. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

3. Off Shore (Leo Diamond) 

4. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

5. You Alone (Perry Como) 

6. Toys (Eileen Barton) 

7. Don'cha Hear Them Bells 

(Paul & Ford) 

8. Changing Partners (P. Page) 

9. Heart Of My Heart 

(Cornell, Desmond, Dale) 
10. Tipica Serenada (H. Jerome) 

Ralph Phillips 

WFBR — Baltimore, Md. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

6. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

7. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

8. Velvet Glove 

(Winterhalter & Rene) 

9. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 
10. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

Ed Meath 

WHEC — Rochester, N. Y. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. You're On Trial (Don Cornell) 

3. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

4. Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

5. Three O'clock In The Morn- 

ing (Four Chicks & Chuck) 

6. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

7. 1 Love Paris (Les Baxter) 

8. You Alone (Perry Como) 

9. Are You Looking For A 

Sweetheart (Kitty Kallen) 

10. Stranger In Paradise 

(Four Aces) 


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‘ It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 1 6 


November 28, 1953 


Joe Delaney Named 
Sales Manager of 
Label X 


NEW YORK — Joe Delaney has been 
named general sales manager of Label 
X, it was announced this week by 
Mannie Sacks, vice-president in charge 
of the recording division of RCA Vic- 
tor. 

Delaney will take a leave of ab- 
sence from the law firm of Spring and 
Eastman to accept the assignment 
which starts November 23. He had 
previously held executive sales and 
recording positions with London, 
Decca and Coral Records. 

Delaney left the recording business 
about two years ago to study law at 
Tulane University. He received his 
degree last June and since then has 
been associated with Spring and 
Eastman. 

Sacks said Delaney and Jimmy Hil- 
liard, who is in charge of A&R for 
the new label, will direct its activities. 

While no final decision has yet been 
made on a name, it now appears likely 
that Label X may be it. 


Just Released 


THE RAYMOND 
SCOTT QUINTET 

playing 

"BIRD LIFE IN THE BRONX” 

An Exciting SCOTT Original 


Audivox 105 



■TOMi w WVfliUl iumiik a, IK. 


AUDIVOX RECORDS 

140 W. 57 St. 
N. Y. C, N. Y. 


THE FINEST CHRISTMAS 
INSTRUMENTAL EVER RECORDED 

Mantovani 

“WHITE CHRISTMAS” 

b/w 

"ADESTE FI DELES" 


London 1280 & 45-1280 



r“THE MAN-] 
I WHO DRIVES l 

ni!) m a ii rno»J> 


BIG TRAILERS 


L 


BURNS MUSIC CO. 

43 7th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 




B. B. KING 

BLIND LOVE 

“WHY DID YOU 
LEAVE ME” 

RPM 


Guests Rail at Rael 
In Hilarious 
Testimonial 

NEW YORK— On Wednesday, No- 
vember 18, Patti Page tendered a tes- 
timonial luncheon to Jack Rael, her 
associate, which must certainly stand 
as the most hilarious testimonial on 
record. 

Surrounded by his friends in the 
music, record and general entertain- 
ment business, Jack took a ribbing in 
testimonial speeches the likes of which 
haven’t been heard before. 

The luncheon, which took place at 
the Barbizon Plaza, was off to a crazy 
start when it was discovered that one 
of the waiters was Frank Libuse, who 
was flown in from Chicago for the 
occasion. His antics as a would-be 
waiter had everyone hopping through- 
out the entire meal. 

Patti, who was introduced as the or- 
ganizer of the first Patti Page fan 
club from Oklahoma City, gave her 
talk in a thick Oklahoman ( ? ) accent. 
Tom Rockwell, who said he was there 
in all HUMILITY, gave Jack a plaque 
for distinguished service in the field 
of Patti Page. Irving Green, presi- 
dent of Mercury, gave him a gold rec- 
ord for 1,000,000 records that were 
NOT sold on “One Sweet Letter.” And 
Harry Anger, when introduced as 
head of the theater department for 
GAC, said “That’s a fine introduction. 
There’s one theater in the whole coun- 
try.” 

After all the speeches, Patti pre- 
sented Jack with the tab for the lun- 
cheon which broke up the party. 

Among those present in addition to 
those already mentioned were: Bul- 
lets Durgom, Kappi Jordan, Jack Katz, 
Frances Kaye, Jimmy Hilliard, Jack 
Spina, Mickey Glass, Harry Rosen, 
Roy Kohn, Richard Hayman, A1 Gal- 
lico, Paul Cohen, Bob Austin, Sid 
Parnes, Bernie Scherer, Mickey Gar- 
lock, Howard Sennott, Milton Krasne, 
Art Weems, Dorothy Bidoff and Irving 
Chezzar. 


“Off Shore ’’With Lyrics 


NEW YORK — Decca Records will 
issue a back to back waxing of “Off 
Shore” and “Ebb Tide” this week. 

Dave Ballard, announcer at KFWB- 
Los Angeles, had read special “Off 
Shore” lyrics to his audience with the 
original Leo Diamond disk providing 
the musical background. The reactions 
were so strong Diamond for a time 
considered issuing a new record with 
the lyrics. However — he finally de- 
cided to stay with his version which 
had already been established as a hit. 


Derby Signs Dwight Fiske 


NEW YORK — Dwight Fiske has 
been signed to a recording contract 
by Derby Records, it was announced 
this week by Larry Newton, president. 
Fiske will record eight of his own 
songs for release in an album to be 
called “Songs My Mother Never 
Taught Me.” It will be issued in both 
EP and LP. 



We of The Cash Box staff would like to thank all the distribs for their kind 
words and congratulations about the “Distributor Doings” column. We hope 
that this feature will offer ideas and assistance to all record distribs throughout 
the country. 

The Raymond Rosen Company, Philadelphia distrib for RCA Victor is in the 
midst of a program for the conversion of the old-style shops and stores to the 
new self-service arrangement. The Rosen firm is acquainted with the dealers’ 
problems in this regard and has contacted a manufacturer of store fixtures 
and arranged for custom store layouts utilizing the particular set-up to fit 
the individual dealers’ requirements. In stores where self-service conversion 
has been completed, business has increased from 25% to 75%. The self-service 
system is especially effective in the merchandising of extended play albums 
and long play selections, as it encourages customers to browse through the 
dealer’s stock. A1 Sherman, Western representative for King Records, reports 
that their business for this month has almost doubled in volume over previous 
months. He attributes this surge partly to the smash success of the Billy Wal'd 
and his Dominoes record of “Rags To Riches.” . . . Seewhy Merchandise Co., 
Okeh distrib in Kingston, N. Y. is wrapping up a promotional campaign on 
Sandy Stewart’s and Frank Murphy’s “I Got A Boo-Boo.” A twenty-five dollar 
cash award will soon be made to the person who offers the best definition of 
“Boo-Boo.” Now the company is working on Judy Valentine’s “She Was Five 
And He Was Ten.” . . . Joe Cohen of Essex Distributing in Newark predicts 
that this Christmas will be the biggest ever in the record field. . . . Henry Hilde- 
brand, manager of Interstate Electric in New Orleans, distrib for Columbia 
disks in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Gulf Coast, notices 
an interesting trend this year. In the past, operators in his territory usually 
hated to buy Christmas records, and in many cases waited until the last minute 
when they were forced to buy due to requests for the Yuletide music. How- 
ever, he feels very good about the situation this year. Although it is still early in 
the season, ops are already buying four of his num- 
bers: Liberace’s “Christmas Medley,” Jimmy Boyd’s 
“Santa Got Stuck In The Chimney” and his “I Saw 
Mommy Kissing Santa Claus,” and Gayla Peevey’s I 
Want A Hippopotamus For Christmas.” Many of the 
ops held onto Boyd’s Christmas hit of ’52 saving it 
for this year. But a great number of routes have 
converted to 45 rpm since ’52; thus the majority of 
sales have been on 45’s. . . . Sid Talmadge of Record 
Merchandising Co. in Los Angeles offers another of 
his predictions. He states that “Happiness To My 
Soul” by Faye Adams will be as big as her Herald hit 
of “Shake A Hand.” . . . Alfred Bix in Butte, Montana, is banking on big results 
from two Sentry disks to be out in the near future; “Rio” b/w “Fiesta” and 
“I’m Waiting' For You In The Rockies” b/w “Montana Moon.” . . . Hal-Mark 
Distributing in Charlotte, N. C., is really zooming. The firm reports that their 
Frank Chacksfield “Ebb Tide,” Julius La Rosa “Eh, Cumpari,” and the Lancers 
“Sweet Mama Tree Top Tall” are three of the records in Charlotte’s regional 
top ten list. . . . Mercury Distributors and Gramophone Enterprises merged on 
September first, resulting in a formation of Southern Mercury, Inc. H. C. 
Townsley is president of the corp and Jay Gordon Thornton is v. p. The branch 
managers are Vince Land in Dallas, Wilson Boone in Houston, Joe Power in 
New Orleans and Allen Dunbar in Oklahoma. . . . Irv Shortin of Allied Music 
Sales in L. A. is riding high with Amos Milburn’s “One Scotch, One Bourbon, 
One Beer” and is expecting even bigger things from the artist’s latest Aladdin 
release, “Good, Good Whiskey.” . . . William Penry, former manager of The 
K & K Company, Decca distrib in Omaha has just joined the Iowa distrib for 
Decca as district representative for the Omaha territory. Bill was out of the 
record business for over a year. Bruce Brietenbauch, who also joined the Iowa 
firm and moved out to Sioux City, is talking about ringing those wedding bells 
after the first of the year. Eddie Dunker, manager of Decca’s Iowa branch 
reports that concentrated disk jockey play has made the Four Aces “Heart Of 
My Heart” a big thing in his area. . . . Paul Levy, president of Midwest Dis- 
tributing in St. Louis reports that he has the best seller in the pop and r & b 
market via the Four Tunes record of “Marie.” He’s also looking for a number 
one best seller in Leo Diamond’s “Off Shore.” . . . Sam Clark and Harry Carter 
of Music Suppliers of New England, Inc. MGM distrib in Boston, report a tie-in 
with local dealers and local theaters playing “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.” The 
gimmick involves two tickets to the local theater to see “Blondes” with every 
album purchase. In New York, Sanford Distrib’s Irwin Zucker and Dick Cowitt 
are working in conjunction with the local dealers on a “Blondes Beauty Con- 
test.” Winners will receive a “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” album and other 
prizes. . . . N. I. Saurman, manager of RCA Victor distrib Krich-New Jersey, 
from Newark, takes credit for being the first record distributor to use airplane 
tow signs to promote a record. This was done for Spike Jones’ “All I Want 
For Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth.” Two planes were used and no words 
of the title, artist or record company were abbreviated on the tow. This tow 
was flown over 16 football stadiums on Thanksgiving Day. . . . Jack Lewerke, 
manager of California Record Distributor in Los Angeles distributor of 25 
different lines, is celebrating the firm’s third anniversary. 



“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX Thai Counts” 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 1 7 


November 28, 1953 


NATIONALLY 

...And We Do Mean POP-WISE! 



Sir Charles Dickens 
Immortal Christmas Carol 

(set to a Musical Fantasy) 


EDDY HOWARD 

Mercury 

For the Very, Very Young of Heart — 
Regardless of Age!! 


HOMETOWN MUSIC CO. 

1619 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD ] 


SID PROSEN 

SID PROSEN 

Gen. Mgr. 

Gen. Mgr. 




“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 








The Cash Box , Music 


Page 18 


November 28, 1953 



MONTREAL MEMOS: 





LOUIS JORDAN 

ploying country artists. 


Louis Jordan is the current attraction at the Seville 
Theatre. . . . Rumor has it that the next attraction 
at the Chez Paree will be the one and only Sophie 
Tucker. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe this 
will be the first time the last of the red hot mammas 
has ever played Montreal. . . . Hank Snow’s engage- 
ment at the Seville Theatre came up to expectations. 
He was a solid draw with line-ups outside the theatre 
for almost every performance. He came very close 
to breaking the house record which only goes to prove 
that there is a tremendous audience in this area for 
country entertainers. Let’s hope the management of 
the Seville follows through and brings in other popu- 
lar favorites in this field such as: Carl Smith, Webb 
Pierce, Rex Prophet, Grandpa Jones, etc. . . . The 
Clover Cafe has changed its policy and is now em- 
George Faith, a local artist, 
was brought in to try and catch some of the overflow 
trade from the Seville Theatre. . . . The Hachey Bros, 
and Mary Lou are starting their 5th week at the 
Monterey and it looks as if they will be there most 
of the winter. . . . Arnett Cobb currently at the Latin - 
Quarter. 

OTTAWA NOTES: 

This heading could be misleading as all the show 
places are across the river in Hull where three clubs 
operate with good live talent. The Fairmount and 
the Gatineau which are both very well established. 

The current attraction at the Gatineau, and' doing 
very good business, is Muggsy Spanier. . . . Three 

a weeks ago, Chaudiere Golf and Country Club opened 
its new room. Location has been completely rebuilt 
and is miles ahead of any other club in Canada. Esti- 
mates on the cost of rebuilding run anywhere up to 
$400,000.00. The room is beautifully decorated and 
has a seating capacity in excess of one thousand 
persons. Room will have to book top flight name 
talent to keep the seats full. Their opening show 
featuring Alan Dean supported by the Ving Merlin 
group did tremendous business. . . . Long John Corri- 
gan, popular CFRA disk jockey, back at work after 
a lengthy illness. He is plugging Rex Prophet’s Decca 
recording of “Beautiful Bells” with great success. . . . 
Lee Mendell, Montreal Record Manager of RCA Victor 
GRANDPA JONES in town again on one of his sales and promotion trips. 


HANK SNOW 


Stern & Co. Acquires President’s Stock 


HARTFORD, CONN.— Stern & 

Company, Incorporated, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, announced today that it 
had acquired the stock of its retiring 
President, Francis E. Stern. Mr. 
Stern, widely known in the electrical 
appliance industry, has headed the 
Company for 34 years. He will con- 
tinue his affiliation as a Consultant. 

Mr. Stern, who foresaw the market 
potential for phonograph records and 
his company, was the first to be named 
a distributor for Columbia phono- 
graph records when this trade brand 
was owned and made by the American 
Record Company. Subsequently, with 
the acquisition of the trademark by 
the Columbia Broadcasting Company, 
Stern & Co. pioneered with Columbia 
Records, Inc. in the now established 
mechanical handling and accounting 


methods widely accepted in the in- 
dustry. 

J. Donald Cohon, who as vice presi- 
dent, has been general manager of 
Stern & Co., Inc. since 1946, has as- 
sumed the office of president and trea- 
surer. Richard Gruber, previously 
sales manager, has assumed the vice 
presidency. Miss Rose Beizer, associ- 
ated with the company since its in- 
ception, continues her office as secre- 
tary and credit manager. Mr. Sher- 
man Chinkers who has also been with 
the company since its earliest days, 
has become asst, secretary and asst, 
treasurer. These four, together with 
Earle Fredette, constitute the board 
of directors. 

The Company will continue to han- 
dle its many well established lines. 


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Comprising 

100 

Selections 


AB — Abbott 
AL — Aladdin 
AM — Ambassador CK — Checker 
AP — Apollo CO — Columbia 


AT — Atlantic 
BA — Barbour 
BE— Bell 
BR — Brunswick 
BU— Bullet 
CA — Capitol 
CD — Cadence 
CH— Chess 


CR — Coral 
CY — Crystalette 
DA — Dana 
DE — Decca 
DO — Dot 
DU— Duke 
DY — Derby 
ES— Essex 
FE — Federal 
4 Star — Four Star 


IM — Imperial 
IN — Intro 
JU — Jubilee 
Kl— King 
LO — London 
MA — Mars 
MD— Mood 
ME — Mercury 
MG— MGM 
MO — Modern 


PA — Parrot SP- 

PC— Peacock Pro.SW- 
PE — Peacock TE- 

PR — Prestige 
RA — Rainbow 
RIH— Recorded 
In Hollywood 
RE — Regent 
SA — Savoy 
SIT — Sittin' In 


-Specialty 
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-Tennessee 
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-Zodiac 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

1 — Rags To Riches 

100.8 74.3 

BE— TONY RUSSO 

Many Times 
★CO-40048 (4-40048)— 

TONY BENNETT 
Here Comes That 
Heartache Again 
DE-28838 (9-28838)— 

GEORGIE SHAW 
Let Me Go, DevH 
K 1-1 280 (45-1280) — 

BILLY WARD AND DOMINOES 
Don't Thank Me 


2 — Ricochet 


75.8 


52.0 


CA-2543 (F-2543) — 

VICKI YOUNG 
Affair With A Stranger 
★CR-61043 (9-61043)— 

TERESA BREWER 
Too Young To Tango 
DE-28914 (9-28914) — 

GUY LOMBARDO O. 
Bridge Of Sighs 
VI-20-5454 (47-5454)— 

PEE WEE KING O. 
Oh, Mis’rable Love 
VI-20-5436 (47-5436)— 

GOGt GRANT 
Everyone Knows I Love 
You 


3 — Eh, Cumpari 

71.8 84.5 

★CD-1232 (45-1232)— 

JULIUS LA ROSA 
Till They've All Gone 
Heme 


4 — Ebb Tide 


70.7 


70.4 


CO-40093 (4-40093)— 

KEN GRIFFIN 
Yah, Dear 
DE-28875 (9-28875)— 

CHARLIE APPLEWHITE 
/ Love Paris 
★LO-1358 (45-1358)— 

FRANK CHACKSFIELD O. 
Waltzing Bugle Boy 
ME-70177 (70177 x 45)— 

ROBERT MAXWELL 
Rose Marie 

ME-70126 (70126x45)— 

VIC DAMONE 
If I Could Make You 
Mine 


5 — You, You, You 

62.3 67.5 

CO-40039 (4-40039)— 

KEN GRIFFIN 
No Other Love 
ME-70198 (70198 x 45) — 

JOHNNY HORTON 
MG-11512 (K-1 1512) — 

KEN REMO 

Ufemla 

★VI-20-5325 (47-5325) — 

AMES BROTHERS 
Once Upon A Time 
VI-20-5386 (47-5386)— 

NORO MORALES O. 
The Sheik Of Araby 


6 — St. George And 
The Dragonet 

56.0 62.7 

★ CA-2596 (F-2596) — 

STAN FREBERG 
Little Blue Riding 
Hood 

7 — Vaya Con Dios 

48.3 68.0 

AT-15001 (45-15001) — 

WINGY MANONE 
Song From Moulin 
Rouge 

BE-1004 (45-1004)— 

LARRY CLINTON O. 
P. S. I Late You 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

★CA-2486 (F-2486) — 

LES PAUL 8i MARY FORD 
Johnny 

CA-2514 (F-2514) — 

WES Si MAR TUTTLE 
I Wonder Where You 

Are 

CO-40098 (4-40098)— 

LOS PANCHOS TRIO 
Lo Dudo 

CR-60991 (9-60991)— 

JACK SMITH 

Knothole 

CY-654 (45-654)— BOB LONDON 
My Adobe Hacienda 
DE-28780 (9-28780)— 

GUY LOMBARDO O. 
With These Hands 
ME-89047 (89047x45)— 

ANITA DAY 
Ain't This A Wonderful 

Dor 


8 — Many Times 

39.2 45.7 

CO-40076 (4-40076)— 

PERCY FAITH O. 
In Love 

★VI-20-5453 (47-5453)— 

EDDIE FISHER 
Just To Be With You 


9 Istanbul 

36.0 27.6 

★CO-40082 (4-40082)— 

FOUR LADS 
f Should Have Told 
You Long Ago 

VI-20-5522 (47-5522) 

NORO MORALES 
Am I Blue 


10 — Oh! 

34.8 34.0 

★CA-2442 (F-2442) — 

PEE WEE HUNT O. 
San 

CO-40062— KEN GRIFFIN 

Crying In The Chapel 
CR-61017 (9-61017) — 

LAWRENCE WELK O. 
Halleluiah I Brother 
DE-28779 (9-28779)— 

THE COMMANDERS 
Meet The Brass 
ME-70182 (70182 x 45) — 

JIMMY PALMER O 
By The Beautiful Sea 
MG-11542 (K-1 1542) — 

ART MOONEY O. 
Cloverleaf Special 
VI-20-5359 (47-5359)— 

SAUTER-FINEGAN O. 
The Moon Is Blue 


1 1 — You Alone 

30.0 40.3 

★VI-20-5447 (47-5447)— 

PERRY COMO 
Pa-Paya Mama 

12 — That’s Amore 

24.9 28.0 

★CA-2589 (F-2589) — 

DEAN MARTIN 
You're The Right One 

1 3 — Changing 
Partners 

23.4 7.0 

B E- 1017 (45-1017) — 

HELEN FORREST 
Lover Come Back To 
Me 

CA-2657 (F-2657) — 

KAY STARR 
I'll Always Be In Love 
With You 
DE-28969 (9-28969) — 

BING CROSBY 
Y'AII Come 

★ME-70260 (70260x45)— 

PATTI PAGE 
Where Did My Snow- 
man Go? 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

VI-20-5515 (47-5515) — 

DINAH SHORE 

Think 

VI-20-5537 (47-5537)— 

PEE WEE KING 

Bimbo 


14 — The Story Of 
Three Loves 

23.0 23.8 

CO-40099 (4-40099)— LIBERACE 
Malden's With Sambo 
DE-28874 (9-28874)— 

JACK PLEIS O. 
Mr. Peepers 

★ME-70202 (70202x45)— 

JERRY MURAD 
Aragonaise 

VI-10-4210 (49-4210)— 

KAPELL & O. 

15 — Heart Of My 
Heart 

20.8 14.0 

★CR-61076 (9-61076) — 

CORNELL, DESMOND, & DALE 
/ Think I'll Fall In 
Love Today 
★ DE-28927 (9-28927)— 

FOUR ACES 
Stranger In 
Paradise 

16 — Love Walked In 

20.1 29.9 

DO-15105 (45-15105) — 

THE HILLTOPPERS 
To Be Alone 


17 — I See The Moon 

19.0 13.7 

★CO-40047 (4-40047)— 

THE MARINERS 
I Just Want You 

DE-28900 (9-28900)— 

DICK TODD 
If I Never Get To 
Heaven 

VI-20-5478 (47-5478)— 

VOICES OF W. SCHUMANN 
All Alone 


18 — Stranger In 
Paradise 

18.3 13.6 

CA-2652 (F-2652) — 

GORDON MacRAE 
Never In A Million 
Years 

★CO-40121 (4-40121) — 

TONY BENNETT 
Why Does It Have 
To Be Me 

DE-28927 (9-28927) — 

FOUR ACES 
The Gang That Sang 
"Heart Of My Heart" 
VI-20-5535 (47-5535) — 

TONY MARTIN 
I Love Paris 
VI-20-5505 (47-5505)— 

RALPH FLANAGAN O. 
The Typewriter 


19 — Off Shore 

15.0 15.0 

★AM-1005 (45-1005) — 

LEO DIAMOND 
Easy Melody 
CA-2630 (F-2630) — 

AXEL STORDAHL O. 
The Piccolino 
CR-61084 (9-61084) — 

MAT MATHEWS 
Easy Melody 
DE-28918 (9-28918)— 

RUSS MORGAN O. 
Idle Gossip 

ME-70252 (70252x45)— 

RICHARD HAYMAN O. 
Joey's Theme 
MG-11610 (K-1 1610) — 

ART MOONEY O. 
Mogambo 


“If* Whafn in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 






The Cash Box, Music 


Page 19 


November 28, 1953 


Best Mingfteco/Bfr 

FROM MORE THAN 15,000 RETAIL OUTLETS! d 


• Tunes are listed below in order of their popularity based on a continuing weekly 
national survey of thousands of record dealers by Jack "One Spot" Tunnis. Each list- 
ing includes the name of the song, record number, artists, and tune on the reverse side. 

• The number underneath the title indicates the actual sale per 1000 records made 
for the week. If the figure is 67.4, it means that for every 1000 records sold that 
week, 67.4 were of the tune indicated — a combination of all the secords on which 
it was available. 

• Indicates best selling record. 


Comprising 

100 

Selections 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

20 — To Be Alone 

14.6 14.1 

★DOT-15105 (45-15105)— 

HILLTOPPERS 
Love Walked In 

21 — I Love Paris 

13.9 8.9 

★CA-2479 (F-2479) — 

LES BAXTER O 

Gigi 

DE-28875 (9-28875) — 

CHARLIE APPLEWHITE 
Ebb Tide 

ME-70274 (70274x45)— 

GEORGIA GIBBS 
Under Paris Skies 
VI-20-5521 (47-5521)— 

FRANKIE CARLE O. 
Flame 

VI-20-5535 (47-5535)— 

TONY MARTIN 
Stranger In Paradise 

22 — Baby, Baby, 
Baby 

12.8 4.6 

★CR-61067 (9-61067)— 

TERESA BREWER 
I Guess It Was You 
All The Time 

23 — The Typewriter 

12.0 7.7 

★DE-28881 (9-28881) — 

LEROY ANDERSON 
Girl In Satin 
VI-20-5505 (47-5505)— 

RALPH FLANAGAN 
Stranger In 
Paradise 


24 — Santa Baby 

10.9 13.9 

★VI-20-5502 (47-5502)— 

EARTHA KITT 
Under The Bridges Of 
Paris 

25 — The Velvet 
Glovte 

9.8 18.4 

OE-28845 (9-28845) — 

GRADY MARTIN 
Dragnet 

★VI-20-5405 (47-5405)— 

WINTERHALTER & RENE 
Elaine 


26 — In The Mission 
Of St. Augustine 

8.4 8.7 

★CO-40061 (4-40061) — 

SAMMY KAYE 
No Stone Unturned 
DE-28913 (9-28913) — 

JIMMIE LOGSDON 
Pa-Paya Mama 
JU-5127 (45-5127) — 

THE ORIOLES 
Write And Tell Me 
Why 

27 — Love Me Again 

7.6 3.9 

★VI-20-5424 (47-5424)— 

SUNNY GALE 
Before Its Too Late 

28 — Tennessee 
Wig-Walk 

7.4 — 

CR-61055 (9-61055) — 

JILL WHITNEY 
That Old River Line 
★ DE-28846 (9-28846) — 

RUSS MORGAN O. 
On The Carousel 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

★ KI-1237 (45-1237) — 

BONNIE LOU 
yand-Me-Down Heart 


29 — Way Down 
Yonder In 
Yew Orleans 

7.3 — 

★CO-40116 (4-40116)— FRANKIE 
LAINE & JO STAFFORD 
Floatin' Down To 
Cotton Town 

30 — That’s All 

7.3 7.2 

★CA-2610 (F-2610) — 

NAT "KING" COLE 
Lover, Come Back 
To Me 

MG-30764 (K-30764) — 

ACQUAVIVA O. 
The Cavalier's Ball 
MG-11604 (K-l 1604) — 

TOMMY EDWARDS 
Secret Love 

31 — I’ll Yever Stand 
In Your Way 

7.1 13.5 

★MG-11606 (K-l 1606)— 

JONI JAMES 
Why Can't I 

32 — Pa-Paya Mama 

7.0 5.9 

DE-28913 (9-28913) — 

JIMMIE LOGSDON 
In The Mission Of 
St. Augustine 

KI-1272 (45-1272)— 

BONNIE LOU 
Since You Said 
Goodbye 


★VI-20-5447 (47-5447)— 
PERRY 


RY COMO 


You Alone 

33 — Marie 

6.9 4.8 

★JU-5128 (45-5128)— 

FOUR TUNES 
I Gambled With Love 

34 — Don’cha Hear 
Them Bells 

6.5 6.8 

★CA-2614 (F-261 4) — 

LES PAUL & MARY FORD 
The Kangaroo 

35 — Sweet Mama 
Tree Top Tall 

6.2 — 

★CO-40104 (4-40104)— 

THE MARINERS 
A Red, Red Ribbon 

★ TR-63 (45-63)— THE LANCERS 
Were You Ever Mine 
To Lose 

36 — Father, Father 

5.9 

★ME-70222 (70222x45)— 

PATTI PAGE 
The Lord's Prayer 

37 — Blowing Wild 

5.5 — 

★CO-40079 (4-40079)— 

FRANKIE LAINE 
Answer Me 


38 — Dragnet 

5.4 9.2 

★CA-2562 (F-2562) — 

RAY ANTHONY O. 
Dancing In The Dark 


Nov. 28 Nov. 21 

DE-28845 (9-28845)— 

GRADY MARTIN 
The Velvet Glove 
LO-1379 (45-1379) — 

TED HEATH 0. 
Sloppy Joe 

VI-20-5398 (47-5398)— 

BUDDY MORROW O. 
Your Mouth's Got A 
Hole In It 
VI-20-5472 (47-5472) — 

SPIKE JONES O. 
Pal-Yat-Chee 

39 — Crying In 
The Chapel 

4.3 8.2 

CO-40062 (4-40062)— 

KEN GRIFFIN 
Oh! 

CR-61018 (9-61018) — 

ART LUND 
Love Every Moment 
You Ltve 
★DE-28758 (9-28758) 

REX ALLEN 
i Thank The Lord 
DE-28762 (9-28762)— 

ELLA FITZGERALD 
When The Hands Of 
The Clock 

DE-48302 (9-48302)— 

SISTER ROSETTA THARPE 
There's Peace In 

Korea 

DU-116— (45-116)— 

THE 4 DUKES 
I Done Done It 
★JU-5122 (45-5122) 

THE ORIOLES 
Don't You Think I 
Ought To Know 
★VA-101 (45-101) — 

DARRELL GLENN 
AVI-20-5368 (47-5368)— 

JUNE VALLI 
Love Every Moment 
You Live 


40 — Milwaukee 
Polka 

4.2 6. 

★ME-70230 (70230x45)— 

PATTI PAG 
My World Is You 

41 — Laughing On 
The Outside 

4.1 5. 

42 — Don’t Forget 
To Write 

4.0 4. 


43 — Kangaroo 

3. 

44 Sound Off 

45 — Hey Joe! 


3.9 


3.8 


3.7 i 

46 — From Here To 
Eternity 

3.6 f 

47 — Secret Love 

3.6 

48 — Caribbean 

3.5 : 

49 — Oh, Mein Papa 

3.3 

50 — Lover Come 
Back To Me 

3.2 f 


Biggest M.O.A. Convention Ever 
Set For March 8, 9 & 10 


OAKLAND, CALIF. — George A. 
Miller, president and general manager 
of M. O. A. (Music Operators of 
America), advised this past week that 
plans are near completion for what he 
terms, “The biggest convention ever 
yet held by M. O. A.” 

According to Miller, “This conven- 
tion has a two-fold purpose. First, to 
present the manufacturers and ex- 
hibitors to the people who will attend. 
Second, for business discussions and a 
look into the future which is mighty 
important to everyone in the music 


business at this time.” 

Miller has not released a list of the 
exhibitors, but he did state, “The list 
is very impressive and, what’s more, 
is growing larger each day. More and 
more firms are anxious to display 
their wares at the forthcoming M.O.A. 
Convention.” 

The convention will be held in Chi- 
cago at the Palmer House, March 8, 
9 and 10, 1954. Many have already 
made reservations at the hotel so that 
they might be assured of the proper 
accommodations. 


MGM Starts Direct 
Disk Jockey Service 


NEW YORK— In a drive to tighten 
up their disk jockey service to radio 
stations, MGM Records has instituted 
a program of direct shipments which 
should give them an edge in getting 
new releases delivered faster to the 
platter spinners of the country. 

Starting with an initial list of 1300 
stations the diskery will address all 
disk jockey records to the attention 
of the station librarian. 

Prior to the new system, the record 
company shipped all D.J. records di- 
rect to the distributor who allocated 
them to local stations. Distributors 
will continue to maintain local disk 
jocked contacts although records are 
to be sent from the factory. 


Crazy, Madly 



WASHINGTON, D. C. — Mindy 
Carson finds Sherm Butler hard to 
get, but she’s on the right track to 
luring him into spinning her new disk 
“Crazy, Madly, Wildly In Love. 
Sherm d.j.’s at WMAL in the D. C. 


A Hit . . . 

The Original 

SAN FRANCISCO BOYS 

singing 

“AWAY UP THERE” 

b/w the Turkish delight 

“HAPPY HALAVAH” 


Allen Record # 240 



Waaaah! 



NEW YORK— G uy Lombardo 
pushes a young lad aside as he makes 
merry with the child’s electric trains. 
Decca has just released Lombardo’s 
record of “Please Bring My Daddy A 
Train, Santa” and here Guy sets the 
picture. With the prominent band 
leader are (left) Alan Jackson, CBS 
newscaster, whose feature story on 
toy trains inspired Carmen Lombardo 
(Santa) to write the song which his 
brother waxed. 

Guy is currently appearing at the 
Roosevelt Grill in the Hotel Roosevelt, 
this city. 

Garber And Dillard 
Sign With Dot 


GALLATIN, TENN.— Randy Wood, 
president of Dot Records, announced 
this week, the signing of Jan Garber 
and Dottie Dillard. Jan was formerly 
with Capitol and Dottie formerly with 
Coral. Both artists will have their 
first releases for the label shortly 
after the first of the year. 

Wood also announced plans to re- 
lease EP’s and LP’s on Johnny Mad- 
dox and the Hilltoppers. He will also 
build up a dance catalog with Jan 
Garber. 



MILLS MUSIC, INC. | 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 





The Cash Box, Music 


Page 20 


November 28, 1953 


TIFFANY 




TIFFANY 

PROUDLY INTRODUCES 

Jh& Yfaw TLcdWial 

GUY CHERNEY 



HIS FIRST RECORD— TWO MAGIC SIDES 


"Song of 
The Shirt 


// 


THEY’LL LOVE IT AS 
... THE LAUGHING SONG 


1304— 1304-T45 
ROBBINS MUSIC 


"Don 't Ever 
Say Goodbye 

SHOULD HIT 
THE VERY TOP 


rr 


RADON MUSIC 


ALREADY HEADING HIGH 

CLARK DENNIS YOU AND YOUR SMILE” 

b/w "MY BUDDY" 1303 — 1303-T45 


RECORDING COMPANY 

332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 
HA. 7-4593 



TBS CASH BOB 

i 






The Top Ten Records — City by City 


New York, N. Y. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

5. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

6. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

7. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

8. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. Off Shore (Richard Hayman) 


Philadelphia, Pa. 

1. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

2. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

3. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

4. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

7. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

8. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. Pa-Paya Mama (Perry Como) 


St. Louis, Mo. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

5. Marie (Four Tunes) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. The Story Of Three Loves 

(Jerry Murad) 

9. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

10. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 


San Francisco, Calif. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Eh, Cumpari (Julius la Rosa) 

3. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

6. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

7. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

8. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

9. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


Memphis, Tenn. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

3. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

4. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

5. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 


Kansas City, Kans. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

7. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

8. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

9. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


Brodhead, Wis. 

1. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. Don't Take Your Love From 

Me (Three Suns) 

4. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

5. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

6. My Love, My Life, My Happi- 

ness (Ames Bros.) 

7. Velvet Glove 

(Winterhalter & Rene) 

8. Laughing On The Outside 

(Four Aces) 

9. Pa-Paya Mama (Perry Como) 
10. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 


Chicago, 


1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

3. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

4. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

5. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. In The Mission Of St. 

Augustine (Sammy Kaye) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 
10. Heart Of My Heart 

(Four Lads) 


Atlanta, Ga. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

4. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

5. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Crying In The Chapel 

(Valli-Orioles) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 


Washington, D. C. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

3. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

4. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 


Shoals, Ind. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

3. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

4. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

5. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

6. Dragnet (Ray Anthony) 

7. Down By The Riverside 

(Four Lads) 

8. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

9. Crying In The Chapel 

(Darrell Glenn) 

10. Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall 

(The Lancers) 


Cincinnati, Ohio 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

4. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

7. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

10. St. George And The Dragonet 
(Stan Freberg) 


Detroit, Mich. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

4. Marie (Four Tunes) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

7. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

8. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

9. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 
10. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 


Cleveland, Ohio 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

5. Ebb Tide (Frank Chackseld) 

6. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

7. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

8. You Alone (Perry Como) 

9. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 
10. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 


Los Angeles, Calif. 

1. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

4. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

5. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

6. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

9. Istanbul (Four lads) 

10. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 


New Orleans, La. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

4. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

5. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

6. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

7. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

8. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

9. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


Nashville, Tenn. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

3. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

4. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

5. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

6. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

7. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

8. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

9. To Be Alone (Perry Como) 

10. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 


Dallas, Tex. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

3. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

4. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

5. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

6. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

7. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

8. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

9. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

2. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

3. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

4. Istanbul (Four Lads) 

5. To Be Alone (Hilltoppers) 

6. St. George And The Dragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

7. Love Walked In (Hilltoppers) 

8. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

9. You Alone (Perry Como) 

10. That's All (Nat "King" Cole) 


Boston, Mass. 

1. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

2. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

3. You Alone (Perry Como) 

4. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

5. That's Amore (Dean Martin) 

6. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

9. Ricochet (Terest Brewer) 

10. St. George And The Dragonet 
(Stan Freberg) 


Denver, Colo. 

1. You, You, You (Ames Bros.) 

2. Ebb Tide (Frank Chacksfield) 

3. St. George And The bragonet 

(Stan Freberg) 

4. Eh, Cumpari (Julius La Rosa) 

5. Vaya Con Dios (Paul & Ford) 

6. Rags To Riches (Tony Bennett) 

7. Many Times (Eddie Fisher) 

8. Ricochet (Teresa Brewer) 

9. Oh! (Pee Wee Hunt) 

10. You Alone (Perry Como) 


“Jt 5 * What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 



Page 21 


November 28, 1953 




HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 


ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 


SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 




MONEY HONEY 

Drifters 
(Atlantic 1106) 


DRUNK 

Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 


BLUES WITH A 
FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 7 80) 


TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 70214) 


MARIE 

Four Tunes 
(Jubilee 5128) 


ROSE MARY 

Fats Domino 
(Imperial 5251) 


I HAD A NOTION 

Al Savage & Joe Morris 
(Herald 417) 


Stars Over Harlem 


Just can’t help but think about what 
a pleasure it was to sit with Ray 
Carrol, (He’s of the Willie and Ray 
W.H.O.M. series) and dig- wonderful 
strains of London Record’s very ear 
pleasing album “Autumn Leaves” 
which spotlights the terrific piano 
stylings of Britain’s great keyboard 
artist Ralph Sharon. . . . Good to see 
Eddie Jefferson & the James Moody 
Combo back in our midst. They’re cur- 
rently keeping the folks good n’ happy 
in Birdland and vicinity. . . . Joe 
Grippo seen scrambling like mad hit- 
ting the jocks and dealers with Epic 
Records big one “Man On The Beat” 
which features the baritone sax of a 
stellar musician billed as simply Lee 
Roy who turns out to be Ray 
Anthony’s brother. . . . Harlem wel- 
comes with open arms Don Robey and 
Irv Marcus’ latest sizzler by the hard 
hitting Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thorn- 
ton, “I Ain’t No Fool Either” b/w 
“The Big Change”. “Fool” is penned 
by Joe Turnero and Peacack prexy Don 
Robey in answer to the current Willie 
Mabon big deal “You’se A Fool”. . . . 
On the loose again and making a 
whole lot of noise is B. B. King with 
his latest “Blind Love” b/w “Why Did 
You Leave Me” and Fats Domino’s 
“Something’s Wrong” b/w “Don’t 
Leave Me This Way”. Harlem retail- 
ers as happy as a bee in a rose garden 
whenever they receive new waxings 
by this dynamic twosome. . . . When 
D.J. Jack Walker played host to Edna 
McGriff, Joya Sherrill (she’s the for- 
mer Duke Ellington thrush), Yaretta 
Dillard (she unveiled her latest Savoy 
pressing), such record personalities 
as Joe Carroll, Johnny Wallace (he co- 
wrote “Mama” with vocalist Herb 
Lance), Joe “Jay-Dee” Davis were 
just a few of those on the premises 
digging everything. ... A pleasure to 
lunch with King’s Henry Glover who 
just raved & raved & raved about 
Earl Bostic’s recent slicing “Off 
Shore”. (Boy would I like to be the 
writer of this one.) . . . Mahalia Jack- 
son’s “I Wonder If I Will Ever Rest” 
looks like it’s ready to take off any 
minute. But big in the Harlem area. 
The flip side “Come To Jesus” could 
easily do the trick too as everybody 
seems to just love both waxings. . . . 
New diskery Timely Records should 
coin a batch of nickels with their new 
one by The Ambassadors entitled 
“Darling, I’m Sorry I Made You Cry”, 
for Harlem’s little ladies are just hum- 
ming the “Darling” etching over and 
over again. . . . Jimmy De Loache (he 
formerly sang bass with The Blenders) 
just signed with Phil Moore’s manage- 
ment set up who immediately inked 
him for a session with RCA Victor 
which takes place sooner than shortly. 

. . . Harlem likes: “Sorry About The 
Whole Darn Thing” (Woody Herman’s 
latest), Eartha Kitt’s sexy rendition 
of “Santa Baby”, The Dominoes’ 
“Rags To Riches”, King Pleasure’s 
“Sometimes I’m Happy,’ and the Faye 
Adams-Joe Morris stellar two sider 
“I’ll Be True” b/w “Happiness To My 
Soul”. . . . D.J. Phil Gordon takes it 
upon himself each week to round up 
some of the top record stars and en- 
tertainers, load them into his vehicle, 
and trek way out to Bellevue to enter- 
tain the wounded. . . . Harlem’s Rock- 
land on Nov. 28 has one of the nation’s 
top mambo aggregations on hand for 
the evening along with the band of 
James Moody & Art Blakey’s array 
of star performers. Should be a groovy 
night. . . .Tommy “Doc Jive” Small’s 
new nightly stint out Bklyn going 
great guns. 


Joyous Jordan 



NEW YORK — Louis Jordan, top flight chanter, apparently getting a kick 
out of The Cash Box item reporting his signing by Aladdin Records. Seated 
with Louis is deejay Jack Walker while in the center, pointing to the story 
is Joel Turnero, tunesmith and arranger. 


Original Blind Boys 
Celebrate 10th Anniv. 


HOUSTON, TEXAS— The Original 
Five Blind Boys (Jackson Har- 
moneers) celebrated their 10th an- 
niversary in Houston Sunday. They 
appeared with the Christland Singers, 
Soul Stirrers, Pilgrim Travelers and 
the Spirit of Memphis in a mammoth 
spiritual program which they spon- 
sored. Four of the original members 
are still with the group. They are 
Lawrence Abrams, Lloyd Woodard, 
Percell Perkins and Archie Brownlee. 
The fifth member is J. T. Clinkscales. 
The group was organized in Jackson, 
Miss. The Five Blind Boys who re- 
ceived The Cash Box Disk Jockey 
Award for 1953, have been recording 
for Peacock label since 1950. 


Treadwell To Manage 
Earl “fatha” Hines 


NEW YORK — George Treadwell, 
former trumpeter-bandleader, who 
masterminded the career of Sarah 
Vaughan from an obscure choir girl 
singer in the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 
Newark, New Jersey to one of the 
country’s top singing stars, grossing 
over $1,000,000 in show business, ex- 
clusive of her record royalties, will 
manage Earl “fatha” Hines, the 
noted composer-bandleader. Tread- 
well, who also manages rhythm and 
blues singer Ruth Brown, plans to 
expand his offices, currently at 1650 
Broadway to larger quarters soon. 


THREE NEW BABES! 

JUST RELEASED 
Nashboro # 539 

“GET YOUR SOUL RIGHT” 

b/w 

"When They Ring Them 
Golden Bells" 

by the FIRESIDE GOSPEL SINGERS 

Excello #2015 

“SWEET BYE AND BYE” 

b/w 

"Have Faith And Believe" 
oy the SERMONAIRES 

Excello #2020 

“YEAH, IT’S TRUE” 

b/w 

"Love Me Baby" 
by BERNIE HARDIS ON 

SOME TERRITORIES OPEN! 

NASHBORO RECORD CO. 

177 3rd Ave. No. Nashville, Tenn. 

(6-2916) 


FOR SALE 

SLIGHTLY USED 45 rpm RECORDS 
$21 per 100 • $200 per 1000 

SLIGHTLY USED 78 rpm RECORDS 
$15 per 100 

Choice selection. State pop, hillbilly or race. 
1/3 deposit. You pay shipping charges. Contact 

Al Abel, FIDELITY DISTRIBUTORS 

666 10th Ave. (JUdson 6-4568) N. Y., N. Y. 


FATS DOMINO'S 


“Don’t Leave Me This Way” 

b/w 

“Something’s Wrong” 


Imperial # 5262 


m 


imperial fiecotols 


Another triumph for the sparkling keyboard technique 
of JOE LOCO 

"BAION" and "GEE" 

Tico 10-208 


What the trade now calls the LOCO treatment 
makes this the greatest version on wax 

THE SADIE THOMPSON SONG' 


(from the picture "Sadie Thompson") 

Tico 10-207 


b/w "BLUE PACIFIC BLUES' 



220 W. 42nd St., 
New York, N. Y. 

(Wl 7-0652) 


“ft’s What's in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 




The Cash Box , Music 


November 28 , 1953 


Page 22 



UWTA&TS 


IfTorttlB o 


"0 tJiNi 

The Big Change It 

£ Peacock # 1626 ^ 


The Big Change 

Peacock # 1626 

GATEMOUTH BROWN 

with a great instrumental 

GATE WALKS TO BOARD 

b /w 

Please Tell Me Baby 

Peacock #1619 


AND INTRODUCING! 

ROBERT KETCHUM 

Peacock's Newest Sensation Singing 

SHE'S GONE FROM ME 

b/w 

Stockade 

Peacock # 1623 


RECORDS, Inc. 

2809 Erostus Street, 
Houston 26, Texas 




“RAGS TO RICHES” 

“DON’T THANK ME” 

“SANTA’S LITRE SWELLS” „„ 

“T00DLE LOO TO YOU” King 1288 

“CHRISTMAS IN HEAVEN” 

& His Dominoes 

“RINGING IN A BRAND NEW YEAR” King 1281 


Billy Ward 
& His Dominoes 
King 1280 



THE CASS BOZ 


1 • 1 

on I 

in 

in is 

HARLEM 

\ CHICAGO'S 

NEW 

■ South Side j 

L ORLEANS 1 


The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play, Compiled From Reports Submitted Weekly To 
The Cash Box, By Leading Music Operators In New York City's Harlem Area; Chicago's 

South Side, and New Orleans. 


MONEY HONEY 

H Drifters 

(Atlantic 1106) 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

ROSE MARY 
Fats Domino 
(Imperial 5251) 

SHAKE A HAND 

mb&M 1 Faye Adams & Joe Morris 

(Herald 4 16) 

TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 70214) 

BANANA SPLIT 
Kid King's Combo 
(Excello 2009) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
Ad-tt BOURBON, ONE BEER 
Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

SOUL ON FIRE 

Lavern Baker 
(Atlantic 1004) 

DON'T DECEIVE ME 

K ■ Chuck Willis 

<0keh 6985> 

BLUES WITH A 
FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 780) 

1 HAD A NOTION 

Al Savage & Joe Morris 
(Herald 417) 

MARIE 

Four Tunes 

WMP (Jubilee 5128) 

DRUNK 
Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

1 DON'T KNOW 
WHAT I'LL DO 

Sugar Ray 
(Checker 783) 

TV IS THE THING 

m LA Dinah Washington 

(Mercury 70214) 

MONEY HONEY 
Drifters 

(Atlantic 1106) 

MONEY HONEY 

Drifters 

(Atlantic 1106) 

RAGS TO RICHES 

ny Dominoes 

(King 1280) 

LOVER COME 
BACK TO ME 
Nat "King" Cole 
(Capitol 2610) 

HEART BREAKER 

Ray Charles 
(Atlantic 1008 ) 

MOTOR HEAD BABY 

Young John Watson 
(Federal 12131) 

PERFECT WOMAN 

Bl O Four Blazes 

(United 158) 

MARIE 

Four Tunes 
(Jubilee 5128) 

WRITE AND TELL 
flB ME WHY 

Wlf Orioles 

(Jubilee 5127) 

SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 

BLUES WITH A 
FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 780) 

SOUL ON FIRE 

9 [ I 1 Lavern Baker 

(Atlantic 1004) 

RAGS TO RICHES 

Dominoes 
(King 1280) 

DRUNK 
Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

j| in 1 

IsAN FRANCISCO! 

HONEY HUSH 

H ■ Joe Turner 

(Atlantic 1001) 

in | 

NEWARK 

I'LL BE TRUE 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 419) 

III | 

MEMPHIS | 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

n BLUES WITH A 

FEELING 

Little Walter 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

1 HAD A NOTION 

Al Savage & Joe Morris 
(Herald 417) 

ONE SCOTCH. ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

DRUNK 
Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

BLOODSTAINS 
ON THE WALL 

Honey Boyd 
(Specialty 4 76) 

GEE 

Wi A The Crows 

m (Rama 5) 

SOUL ON FIRE 

LaVerne Baker 
(Atlantic 1004) 

THAT'S WHEN 1 MISS 
YOU SO 

Eddie Boyd 
(Chess 1552) 

FEELING GOOD 

■SA Little Junior 

(Sun 187) 

NADINE 

Coronets 
(Chess 1549) 

MAD LOVE 
Muddy Waters 
(Chess 1550) 

DRUNK 

■ LA Jimmy Liggins 

(Specialty 470) 

MEMORIES 

Earl Bostic 
(King 4653) 

NO BLOW, NO SHOW 

Bobby Bland 
(Duke 115) 

SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morns 
(Herald 416) 

ROSE MARY 

Fats Domino 

(Imperial 5251) \ 

GOING DOWN 
TO BIG MARY'S 

Helen Thompson 
(States) 

marie 

ft! A Four Tunes 

(Jubilee 5128) 

BABY, IT'S YOU 

The Spaniels 
(Chance 1141) 

BABY, IT'S YOU 

The Spaniels 
(Chance 1141) 

ROSE MARY 
Ml ■ Fats Domino 

MtM (Imperial 5251) 

BLIND LOVE 

B. B. King 
(RPM 395) 

DRUNK 

Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

1 HAD A NOTION 

At Savage & Joe Morris 
illJ (Herald 417) 

MONEY HONEY 

Drifters 
Atlantic 1106) 

GOOD LOVIN' 

The Clovers 
(Atlantic 1000) 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 




The Cash Box, Music 


Page 23 


November 28, 1953 



The Top Ten Tunes Netting Heaviest Play, Compiled From Reports Submitted Weekly To 
The Cash Box, By Leading Music Operators in Dallas, Los Angeles and Other Cities Listed. 


MONEY HONEY 

Drifters 

(Atlantic 1106) 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

MARIE 

Four Tunes 
(Jubilee 5128) 

RAGS TO RICHES 

Dominoes 
(King 1280) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 
Wiw Amos Milburn 

(Aladdin 3197) 

GEE 

The Crows 
(Rama 5) 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

1 HAD A NOTION 

n ■ Al Savage & Joe Morris 

(Herald 417) 

SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 

BANANA SPLIT 

Kid King's Combo 
(Excello 2009) 

SHAKE A HAND 

flsv Faye Adams & Joe Morris 

WtM (Herald 416) 

MONEY HONEY 

Drifters 
(Atlantic 1106 

DRUNK 

Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

MEMORIES 

■ |W Earl Bostic 

(King 4653) 

BLUES WITH A 
FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 780) 

TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 70214) 

TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 7 0214) 

ROSE MARY 

Fats Domino 
(Imperial 5251) 

RAGS TO RICHES 

Dominoes 
(King 1280) 

yiy BLOW YOUR HORN 

BIB Benny Green 

(Decca 28824) 

TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 70214) 

THE FEELING 
IS SO GOOD 

The Clovers 
(Atlantic 1010) 

MARIE 

Kl ■ Four Tunes 

(Jubilee 5128) 

MARIE 

Four Tunes 
(Jubilee 5128) 

SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 

CRYING IN THE 
ITI) CHAPEL 

ul/ The Orioles 

(Jubilee 5122) 

FEELING GOOD 

Little Junior 
(Sun 187) 

WRITE AND 
TELL ME WHY 

The Orioles 
(Jubilee 5127) 

I in § 

| DALLAS If 

HONEY HUSH 

A ■ Joe Turner 

(Atlantic 1001) 

in | 

iASHVILLE Is 

ROSE MARY 

Fats Domino 
(Imperial 5251) 

in 

HOALS, INDJ 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

1 WANT TO 
THANK YOU 
The "5" Royales 
(Apollo 449) 

HONEY HUSH 

Joe Turner 
(Atlantic 1001) 

SHAKE A HAND 

Faye Adams & Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 

>fy BLIND LOVE 

■C -A B. B. King 

(RPM 395) 

SHAKE A HAND 
Faye Adams 8, Joe Morris 
(Herald 416) 

PERFECT WOMAN 

Four Blazes 
(United 158) 

MONEY HONEY 

n B Drifters 

(Atlantic 1106) 

BLUES WITH A 
FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 780) 

PLEASE DON'T 
LEAVE ME 

Fats Domino 
(Imperial 5240) 

BLOOD STAINS 
BsB ON THE WALL 
Ml# Honey Boyd 

(Specialty 476) 

FEELING GOOD 

Little Junior 
(Sun 187) 

TV IS THE THING 

Dinah Washington 
(Mercury 70214) 

DRUNK 

m SB Jimmy Liggins 

(Specialty 470) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

ONE SCOTCH, ONE 
BOURBON, ONE BEER 

Amos Milburn 
(Aladdin 3197) 

— EVERY DAY 

IN THE WEEK 

Christine Kittrell 
(Republic 7055) 

GOOD LOVIN' 

The Clovers 
(Atlantic 1000) 

BLUES WITH 
A FEELING 

Little Walter 
(Checker 780) 

MAD LOVE 
BSB Muddy Waters 

^^P (Chess 1550) 

1 WANT TO 
THANK YOU 
The "5“ Royales 
(Apollo 449) 

NADINE 

Coronets 
(Chess 1549) 

1 DON'T KNOW 
Cl WHAT I'LL DO 

Y^P Sugar Boy 

^ (Checker 783) 

DRUNK 

Jimmy Liggins 
(Specialty 470) 

TOO MUCH LOVIN' 

The "5" Royales 
(Apollo 448) 

^fK HEART BREAKER 

■ ill Ray Charles 

(Atlantic 1008) 

PERFECT WOMAN 

Four Blazes 
(United 158) 

MARIE 
Four Tunes 
(Jubilee 5128) 



8508 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif. 



/ JAY DEi: 


DADDY ROLLIN' STONE 
By OTIS BLACKWELL 


JAY-DEE #784 


JOE DAY1S 

RECORD MANUFACTURER 

1619 Broadway (Circle 5-7658) New York, N. Y. 



f 



<Jkralf> 



HEADING FOR #1 

“I HAD A NOTION” 

AL SAVAGE 

with Joe Morris Ork. Herald #417 

Greater than "SHAKE A HAND" 
FAYE ADAMS 
with Joe Morris Ork. 

“I’LL BE TRUE” 

Herald #419 


X ... ENJOY DANCING . . . t 

\ SEECO’S “DANCE DATE” SERIES 4 

^ on Long Playing 33-1/3 rpm 
<* features 

2 MACHITO and his £ 

2 Afro-Cubans LP #30 |R 

K CESAR CONCEPCION ORCH. LP #31 f 


Afro-Cubans LP #30 

r A CESAR CONCEPCION ORCH. LP #31 r . 

PEDRO VILLA RIVERSIDE 4 

f. ORCH LP #32 r 4 

f SONORA MATANCERA LP #34 ^ 





The RECORD 
Is So Good! 

“THE FEELING 
IS SO GOOD” 


THE REALLY DIFFERENT RECORD 

SIT DOWN SERVANT” 

by 

SWANEE QUINTET 

Nashboro 538 


STILL SELLING BIG! 

“BANANA SPLIT” 

by 

KID KING'S COMBO 

Excello 2009 
Some Territories Open 

NASHBORO RECORD CO. 

177 3rd AVENUE NASHVILLE, TENN. 

(6-2916) 



“OH BABE” 

b/w 


\ 


i “MY SABBEST HOUR” \ 


Aladdin # 3214 


Lowell Fulsom 


| “DON’T LEAVE ME BABY” 0 

i b/w I 

j “CHUCK WITH THE BOYS” j 




sobbw' aga/m w/t# 


new / 

jThits/ 


I 


0 


0 


I 


o 


(( I It 

b/w 

“AT LAST” 

THE VELVETS 

# 112 

“THE MAN I CRAVE” 

b/w 

“LOVE NEEDS 
A HELPING HAND” 

SADIE BIRCH 

# 121 

“TOO MUCH 
COMPETITION” 

b/w 

“MY KINDA WOMAN” 

ALLEN BUNN 

# 124 

“JUICY FRUIT” 

b/w • 

“SECOND FLOOR REAR” 

TINY GRIMES 

# 123 



301 West 125th St., N.Y.C. 


“I ?s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Count s” 





The Cash Box , Music 


Page 24 


November 28, 1953 



TAMPA RED 
(Victor 20-5523) 

O “S0 CRAZY ABOUT YOU 
BABY” (2:48) [Tannen BMI — 
Tampa Red] Tampa Red sings a slow 
southern style blues effectively. Red’s 
got gal trouble. He’s heartbroken. 
She left him without a word. A strong 
plate. 


® “SO MUCH TROUBLE” (2:58) 
[Tannen BMI — Tampa Red] A 
similar deck. Similarly handled by 
the chanter. 


BUDD JOHNSON 
(Atlantic 1013) 

© “OFF SHORE” (2:54) [Cri- 
terion ASCAP — Diamond, Gra- 
ham] The mood piece now breaking 
so big in pop is given a spine tingling 
sax treatment by Budd Johnson. A 
top deck and a must for sax enthu- 
siasts. 

© “DON’T TAKE YOUR LOVE 
FROM ME” (2:47) [Whit- 
mark ASCAP — Nemo] Johnson comes 
up with a slow lush reading of the 
melodic oldie. Music to relax by. 


EARL BOSTIC 
(King 4683) 

© “OFF SHORE” (2:45) [Han- 
over ASCAP — Diamond] The 

Bostic fans will go for this one. Earl 
treats the tune to a sax version that 
raises the hackles. Low lights, sway- 
ing dancers and weird. A great treat- 
ment. Both this and the Budd John- 
son deck reviewed above are top flight 
sax readings. 

© “DON’T YOU DO IT” (2:58) 
[Lois BMI — Bostic] Bostic rides 
a merry jumpside sax showcase. 


FREDDIE SIMON 
(Combo 33) 


© “SAX-O-RUMBA” (2:10) [F. 

Simon] Sax section carries the 
ball on a l’hythmic slow rhumba for a 
stimulating deck. 

® “COOL SOUP” (2:36) [F. 

Simon] A quick beat etching on 
the progressive kick. Sax again holds 
the featured spot. 


JO JO ADAMS 
(Parrot 788) 


© “CALL MY BABY” (2:41) J< 
Jo Adams, with a distinctive anc 
pleasing styling, sings a middle tempt 
blues bounce against a background ol 
solid orking. Etching a peppery decl 
that moves. 


© “REBECCA” (2:39) Adair 
handles a chuckley item with ligl 
hearted advice to his gal. Suggestivi 
but not too much so. 


TBS CASH BOB 


* AWARD O THE WEEK* 


“SOMETHING’S WRONG” (2:40) 
[Commodore BMI — Bartholemew] 

“DON’T LEAVE ME THIS WAY” 
(2:18) 

[Commodore BMI — Bartholemew] 

FATS DOMINO 
(Imperial 623) 

# With his current dish “Rose 
Mary” still climbing on the charts, 
Fats Domino introduces a new plat- 
ter, “Something’s Wrong,” that 
looks like money in the bank. Dom- 
ino has that golden touch, as ex- 
emplified by the two gold records 
he was recently awarded by his 
diskery. His handling of the mel- 
odic slow blues ballad is sincere and 
plaintive as he wonders why “bad 
luck always falls on me.” The 
under lid, “Don’t Leave Me This 
Way,” is a middle tempo bounce 
performed with an engaging lilt. 
Domino heartbrokenly tells of his 
woman’s plans to leave him. . A 
good Domino deck that could 
happen. 


“BLIND LOVE” (2:39) 
[Modern BMI — King, Taub] 

“WHY DID YOU LEAVE ME” 
(2:40) 

[Modern BMI — King, Taub] 

B. B. KING 
(RPM 395) 

• B. B. King has another fine 
etching that should prove a solid 
follow up to his current hit, “Please 
Love Me.” The upper lid, “Blind 
Love,” is a slow blues sorrowfully 
chanted by the distinctively stylized 
chanter. King, with tears flowing 
down his cheeks, watches his 
woman stopping everyone she 
meets in the streets. King is pow- 
erful and the guitaring helps no 
end in putting the waxing over the 
top. The reverse deck, “Why Did 
You Leave Me,” is a similar item 
tenderly and emotionally dished up. 
King’s impressive trick of riding 
a note upwards colors his style. 
Two powerful etchings. 


“TORTURED SOUL” (2:38) 
[Arc BMI — Boyd, Dixon] 

“THAT’S WHEN I MISS YOU SO” 
(2:37) [Arc BMI— Boyd] 

EDDIE BOYD 
(Chess 1552) 

• Eddie Boyd rides high with a 
slow sorrowful blues titled, “Tor- 
tured Soul,” that he sells in simple 
but appealing fashion. The tune 
is light, the backing easy, and Ed- 
die’s vocal emotional. Eddie sings 
of his tortured soul and pleads with 
his woman to love him. Powerful 
in its simplicity. Could be another 
big one for the chanter. The flip, 
“That’s When I Miss You So,” is 
a middle tempo Latin beat blues 
sung with feeling against a lilting 
guitar backing. A good deck, but 
honors go to the top lid, “Tortured 
Soul.” 


“MY MIND IS WORKING (2:41) 
[Savoy BMI — Kirkland] 

“I AIN’T GONNA’ TELL” (2:40) 
[Aladdin BMI — Toombs] 

VARETTA DILLARD 
(Savoy 1118) 

• Varetta Dillard backs two belt- 
ing sides and comes up with some 
fine juke box material. The “Easy 
Easy Baby” gal throws all her 
blues and sexy stylings into this 
pair. She sings out “My Mind Is 
Working,” a slow jump item with 
an earthy set of lyrics that de- 
scribe her mind as working along 
the lines of getting a man to pay 
the expenses. The flip, “I Ain’t 
Gonna’ Tell,” is another sizzler set 
to a quicker tempo. Varetta growls, 
squeals and grunts a lightly sug- 
gestive story of what her man 
can do. Orking is go-go on this 
side and ops have a solid pair of 
live ones on this release. 


THE USE BOX 


SLEEPER! or THE WEEK 


MAHALIA JACKSON 
(Apollo 278) 

© “1 WONDER IF I WILL EVER 
REST” (3:15) [Bess Music 
BMI] Mahalia Jackson emerges from 
a soft swaying chant and tom tom beat 
background to a full voiced treatment 
of a dramatic and exciting religious 
item. One of the best spirituals waxed 
in a long, long time. 

® “COME TO JESUS” (3:21) 
[Bess Music BMI] Mahalia Jack- 
son treats a slow religious side to a 
sensitive reading. 


JOHNNY OTIS 
(Peacock 1625) 

© “ROCK ME BABY” (2:25) 
[Memo BMI — Phyllis Otis] The 
Johnny Otis aggregation belts out a 
quick beat rocker with colorful lyrics. 
Chantress does a potent job selling the 
tune. Powerful deck that could grab 
lots of action. 

© “YOUNG GIRL” (2:45) [Memo 
BMI — Phyllis Otis] Otis and his 
ork read a slow blues tenderly. Vocal- 
ist lends the proper feeling. 


MAXWELL DAVIS 
(Aladdin 3216) 


® “HEY BOY” (2:00) [D & M 
Music BMI — Maxwell Davis] 
Maxwell Davis blows an enthusiastic 
sax reading of a gay bouncer. 

JOE LOUIS STORY 
_ (2:45) [Harman Mu- 

sic — George Bassman] The flip is a 
sweet and mellow waxing of the mel- 

-vrl i n -fvrvm tVic» flip 


© “THE 
THEME” 


SARAH McLAWLER TRIO 
(Brunswick 84024) 


© “BODY AND SOUL” (2:41) 
[Harms ASCAP — Green, Sour, 
Heyman, Eyton] Sarah McLawler, 
wizard of weird organ sounds, teams 
up with Richard Otto, who produces 
some weird sounds of his own on the 
violin, and the result is a most unusual 
disk. It’s a combination of pop, pro- 
gressive jazz and semi-classical. Per- 
sonally love it but question its com- 
mercial appeal. 

© “YESTERDAYS” (2:38) 
[Harms ASCAP — Kem, Har- 
bach] The lovely Kern, Harbach 
oldie waxed with the same unusual 
treatment. Comments are the same. 


T-BONE WALKER 
(Imperial 336) 

© “I MISS YOU BABY” (2:32) 
[Commodore BMI — Freddie Si- 
mon] T-Bone Walker chants a soft, 
slow blues with tenderness. He pleads 
for the return of his baby. 




“I’M ABOUT TO 
MIND” (2:28) 
BMI — J. Williams] A 
blues similarly etched. 


LOSE MY 
[Commodore 
similar slow 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 25 


November 28, 1953 



NEW YORK: 


George Goldner puts down his Dale Carnegie “How to Stop Worrying And 
Start Living” long enough to rave about his new Joe Loco release on Tico. 
Loco lends a raambo swing to a rhythmic baion on the side titled “Baion” and 
George says if this doesn’t stir you up nothing will. Loco backs it with a marabo 
treatment of the r & b hit “Gee”. . . . Carl Lebow, new A & R at Deluxe Records, 
King subsid, hectic at his New York office as he interviews talent and cuts 
audition dubs. Carl has several ai’tists lined up for 
contract and will make his announcements in a week 
or two. . . Story in last issue identified Carl Lebow as 
manager of The “5” Royales and Charlie Ferguson. 
Carl is in partnership with Ike Berman of Apollo Rec- 
ords on the personal management of the group and 
Ferguson. Apollo’s current “5” Royales hit, “I Want 
To Thank You” and “All Righty” headed right for 
the charts as the tempo of sales picks up each day. 
For a thrill listen to Mahalia Jackson sing “I Wonder 
If I Will Ever Rest.” A terrific authentic Afro-Negro 
spiritual. . . . Herman Lubinsky, Savoy Records, get- 
ting rave comments on his new Varetta Dillard re- 
lease “(That’s The Way) My Mind Is Working” and 
“I Ain’t Gonna Tell”. Varetta has two solid jump sides 
that could break into big money makers. . . . Over at 
Cosnat Distrib, Elliot Blaine is handling about fifteen 
or more of the top rhythm and blue hits in the country. Just ask him, “What’s 
going, Elliot,” and he can run off a string of hits for ten minutes without 
pausing for breath. Herb Dexter, also of Cosnat and Jubilee, tells us they’ve 
just signed a terrific blues belter, 18 years old, named Patricia Allen. Herb says, 
“When you listen to her “5 Long Years” and “No More Life” you’ll see what 
I Mean”. . . . Syd Nathan, King prexy, chuckling ’cause everyone told him he 
was late with his Dominoes “Rags To Riches”. Disk is already showing terrific 
sales power and says Syd, “It is also selling big in the pop locations”. . . . 
Lee Magid, Central Records, cut his first session last week and he’s come up 
with two great sides. Lee will have them out this week. He’s particularly 
strong on “Oo-Wee Mr. Jeff (Please Be Yourself)” by 
Georgia Lane and “Looka Here Mattie Bee” by 
Emmitt Hopson and The Ragmuffins. . . . Pete Dorain, 

Allen Records, going out on a tour of the south all 
the way to the coast this week. He’s got the new 
Jimmy Newsome “I’m Gonna Chunk You Down” for 
rhythm and blues as well as his pop plug tune, “Happy 
Halvah”. . . . Joe Davis, Jay-Dee Records in Philly all 
week. Davis, whose “Daddy Rollin’ Stone” by Otis 
Blackwell is selling heavily in Eastern and Mid-west 
areas, is planning another session shortly with Black- 
well. Joe has a couple of ideas planned for the future 
that sound like money in the bank for his distribs. 

He’s been working some time on an LP to be called 
“Joe Davis’ Merry Minstrel Show”, complete with 
interlocutor, and will be ready for the trade in about 
five or six weeks. He also has four sides by Arthur Ferrante and Lou Teicher, 
famous gimmick piano duo, which he will release as an EP. . . . Ahmet Ertegan 
informs us that Atlantic has signed another vocal group called The Comets. 
Atlantic already has two of the hottest vocal quartets in the biz. The Clovers 
and Clyde McPhatter and his Drifters. Joe Turner, on top of the charts with 
his “Honey Hush”, currently touring the Texas spots. . . . With prexy Sid 
Siegel on a biz trip to Mexico, Bob Rosen bizzy, bizzy over at Seeco. Bob tells 
us Machito and his Afro-Cubans have been called back, by popular demand, to 
do a tour of South America. Machito will conduct Latin American Jazz Con- 
certs, TV shows and Radio. The visit will stretch over about four weeks and 
will cover most of the S.A. countries. Foremost in Machito’s library will be 
his current Seeco hit “Dragnet Mambo”. . . . Herald Records turning up nothing 
but sevens and elevens. While it was obvious from the very beginning that 
Faye Adams’ “I’ll Be True” would be another big hit, it now develops from 
distributor reaction that the side will be every bit as big if not bigger than 
“Shake A Hand”. In the first week of sale it broke carzily and stiff armed its 
way right into number one position in Newark, N.J. In last week’s column, re- 
ferred to Braverman as Al. Correction please. It’s Jack Braverman — and the 
Herald combo is 2 Jacks and an Al. ... Joe Cohen, Essex Distributors in 
Newark, N.J. extends his already potent sales factor, his Mr. Blues show on 
WNJR-Newark, N.J., from one hour nightly to one and one-half hours. In addi- 
tion the Cohen boys (that’s Joe, Ir.v and Pop) have added a new slot, 9 to 9:30 
Saturday nights, to be called “Dance Parade” and featuring jumps and party 
items for dancing. . . . Johnny Otis in Houston last week for four days. He and 
his J. 0. All Stars backed Little Richard, Joe “Papoose” Fritz and Luvenia 
Lewis on records that each of them cut. After the Bayou City, Otis and his 
band did four days at Kansas City’s Orchid Room. 

CHICAGO: 

Mahalia Jackson currently doing a series of dates thruout the South 
for Community Chest Red Feather groups. . . . Bob Shad, A & R man 
for Decca R & B thru town this past week to record Sister Rosetta Thorpe and 
Marie Knight. . . . Pat Morrissey preparing to move into the Black Orchid 
11/24, along with Decca’s Bobby Short. . . . George Shearing currently starring 
at the Blue Note. Until 11/25. Then, on Thanksgiving nite, the one and only 
Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong takes over. . . . Rocky 
Rolf all smiles as he reports that Victor’s latest wax- 
ing by the Du Droppers beginning to look like their 
biggest seller to date. . . . Art Sheridan hoping that 
having had Stan Lewis of Stan’s Record Shop, Shreve- 
port, La., revise the title of Art’s latest disk, will 
prove to be good luck once again. Seems when Stan 
changed “Yakety-Yak” to “Honey Hush,” it zoomed 
to the top of the “Hot Charts.” Now Art is hoping 
the same will hold true for “Just A Lonely Christmas” 
which Stan renamed from “A Lonely Christmas.” . . . 
Irv Marcus in town for a wee kor so, saying hello to 
all his friends. And bringing them up to date on 
Peacock and Duke. . . . Looks like (hie!) “Drunk” by 
Jimmy Liggins will soon be added to Specialty’s list 
MAHALIA JACKSON 0 f hits. . . . While talking to Daddy-O Daylie, a coupla 
days ago, we discovered that this bop-talkin’ deejay 




BILLY WARD & 
THE DOMINOES 




EDDIE BOYD 

“TORTURED SOUL” 

b/w 

"THAT'S WHEN I 
MISS YOU SO" 

Chess 1552 


II 

[ 


CHESS 

recordJI corp 


750 E. 49th 5T. 
CHICAGO. ILL 


13 

I u 


SUGAR BOY 

I DON’T KNOW WHAT 
I’LL DO” 

b/w 

"OVERBOARD" 

Checker 783 



RN’B RAMBLINGS (Cont) 

also possesses composing talent. Told of several of the tunes he’s penned. Some 
mighty fine ones, too! Incidentally, to start your day right, we recommend 
as real good listening, Daddy-O’s early morning program on WAIT. 

LOS ANGELES: 

Time to get into the Yuletide swing. From Coney Island to the Sunset Strip, 
all you cats can dig some crazy Christmas licks, when Louis Armstrong opens 
his bag of tricks with “Is Zat You Santa Claus” and “Cool 
Yule” (Decca). On the more serious side the Bihari 
Brothers recently released “God Gave Us Christmas” 
on the Modern label. This beautiful offering is ably done 
by Oscar McLollie and his Honey Jumpers. Leon Rene 
wrote the tune and his professional manager, Parker 
Prescott, came in from New York for conferences and to 
help arrange the recording sessions. Initial reaction to the 
tune has been good and everyone thinks it can can be a 
big number. Another all time Christmas favorite “Silent 
Night” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” has been dressed 
up by the Pilgrim Travelers and released under the Spe- 
cialty label. . . . Charles “The Bird” Parker recently com- 
pleted a brief appearance here in LA with his band after 
which he left for engagements in Chicago and the East 
Coast. . . . Amos Milburn etched another of his famous drink songs for Aladdin 
called “Good, Good Whiskey” b/w “Let’s Have a Party”. Eddie Mesner predicts 
it will be even bigger than “One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer”. Other new 
Aladdin releases include the Five Keys arrangement of “Oh Babe” and “My 
Saddest Hour.” . . . Lew Chudd of Imperial Records reports that Fats Domino’s 
latest release “Don’t Leave Me This Way” and “Something’s Wrong” is click- 
ing off big in all areas. Other current releases on Imperial include Jody Leven’s 
“Hey Liberace” and a new Slim Whitman offering titled “God Built the Stair- 
way to Heaven”. Lew left on a business trip to the east Coast last week. . . . 
Louis Buckley of Nashville, Tennessee announces that “Take Me Back” by 
Linda Hayes on the Hollywood Records label is big and he has named his new 
package “The Linda Hayes Special”. . . . Ralph Bass, A & R for King and 
Federal, recently stated that he had cut two new sides featuring Mickey 
Rooney doing “Alimony” and “Bouillabasse.” New sessions were also cut by 
the Ink Spots who are currently appearing at Larry Potter’s Supper Club. The 
popular group waxed their own arangement of “Ebb Tide” on the King label. 
King, New York Distrib. getting phone calls for Carl Lebow all week, but, Carl 
at the 146 West 54th office. 



LOUIS ARMSTRONG 


“fl’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 1 


November 28 , 1953 



\ 

i 

1 

1 


THE 


i 

1 

I 

♦ 

T 

y 


Congratulates 

WSM 


i 

I 


^ % 


Of 


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i 

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1 

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§ 

i 

i 

I 


GRAND OLE OPRY 

-And S(t Of Al heir Staff -And -Artists On A heir 

\ 

28th ANNIVERSARY 


| 

P 

i 


i 

1 

| 

1 

I 

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1 

1 

| 

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Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 




The Cash Box , Music 


November 28 , 1953 


Page 2 



CITATION OF ACHIEVEMENT 

AWARDS 

To the writers and publishers of the 
great folk tune leaders of 1953 
on the occasion of the celebration of 
the 28th Anniversary of 

GRAND OLE OPRY 

Along with these citations go BMI's 
Best wishes and congratulations to 
- Radio Station WSM, Nashville, Tenn. 


| PUBLISHERS 

x 

ACUFF-ROSE PUBLICATIONS 
| AMERICAN MUSIC, INC. 

J BRAZOS VALLEY MUSIC CO. 

i CEDARWOOD PUBLISHING CO., INC. 

I CENTRAL SONGS, INC. 

£ FAIRWAY MUSIC CO. 

| FORREST MUSIC CORP. 

| FOUR STAR SALES COMPANY, INC. 

5 FREDERICK MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 

| HILL & RANGE SONGS, INC. 

OLD CHARTER PUBLISHING CO., INC. 
'& PEER INTERNATIONAL CORP. 

| TANNEN MUSIC, INC. 

VALLEY PUBLISHERS, INC. 


SONGS 


WRITERS 

* 

v 

BACK STREET AFFAIR 


? 

BIG MAMOU 

CHET ATKINS 

? 

BUMMING AROUND 

BOUDLEAUX BRYANT 

X 

Y 

Y 

CARIBBEAN 

BILL CARLISK 

1 

CRYING IN THE CHAPEL 

MARTHA CARSON 

Y 

X 

DEAR JOHN LETTER, A 

LINK DAVIS 

* 

Y 

DON'T LET THE STARS GET IN YOUR EYES 

ARTIE GLENN 


FULL TIME JOB 

PETE GRAVES 

V 

X 

GAMBLER'S GUITAR 

AUTRY GRISHAM 

$ 

Y 

GOING STEADY 

EARL GRISWOLD 

y 

t 

♦♦ 

GUY WHO INVENTED KISSIN' 

JIM LOWE 

i 

HEY JOE 

J. D. MILLER 

? 

1 FORGOT MORE THAN YOU'LL EVER KNOW 

CARL A. NULL 

i 

I'M GONNA WALK & TALK WITH MY LORD 

CHARLES ORR 

f 

IT'S BEEN SO LONG 

FUZZY OWEN 

t 

LET ME KNOW 

LEWIS TALLEY 

| 

MEXICAN JOE 

HANK THOMPSON 

1 

MIDNIGHT 

TERRY TIEFER 

Y 

Y 

NO HELP WANTED 

MITCHELL TOROK 

Y 

Y 

RAMBLIN' MAN 

BILLY WALLACE 


RUB-A-DUB-DUB 

SLIM WILLET 


SATISFIED 

HANK WILLIAMS 

•• 

Y 

THAT'S ME WITHOUT YOU 

FARON YOUNG 

Y 

YOUR CHEATIN' HEART 


NEW YORK 


BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 

• CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO 


MONTREAL 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 3 


November 28, 1953 


Grand Ole Opry: 

Ho tv It All Began 


In the last generation, folk music 
has grown to such proportions, that 
it is now probably the most important 
influence in our current popular music. 
Parallel with this rise has been the 
tremendous growth of WSM’s Grand 
Ole Opry. 

Country music has made WSM 
what it is. And in turn it can truth- 
fully be said that the Grand Ole Opry 
has done more for the international 
acceptance of folk music than almost 
any other factor. 

Folk music for ages has been per- 
sonal music, in the sense that the 
singer sang for his own enjoyment. 
It’s always been a type of entertain- 
ment in which people have taken an 
active rather than passive part. It was 
the hoedown, the community sing. 
Folk songs were part of the peoples’ 
daily lives. Youngsters wanted to play 
an instrument as much as they wanted 
to eat. Sitting around in a group and 
strumming on a guitar or banjo, or 
crying with the violin was a means of 
enjoyment. 

Larger gatherings of this type were 
held in barns. Because of the tremen- 
dous appeal that this music and dance 
has for the public, huge barns were 
needed for dances. Where there was 
no available space for the large-scale 
affairs, small rural hoedowns were 
always taking place. And from one of 
these rural hoedowns in Mammoth 
Spring, Arkansas, held shortly after 
the first world war, developed one of 
the seeds that has grown into the 
flower known today as WSM’s Grand 
Ole Opry. 

In 1919 George D. Hay, who later 
came to be known as the Solemn Old 
Judge, was a reporter for the Mem- 
phis “Commercial Appeal”. His news- 
paper sent him to cover the funeral 
of a war hero. After covering the 
event, Hay spent the day in town. He 
stopped to chat with a truck farmer 
and was invited by the gent to attend 
a hoedown that the neighbors were 
putting on that night in a log cabin 
in Mammoth Springs. The farmer and 
two other old-time musicians supplied 
the music while twenty people turned 
out to whoop it up. With an oil lamp 
in one corner of the cabin, the group 
danced and sang till dawn. Judge Hay 
said that no one had more fun than 
those Ozark mountaineers did that 
night. And the memory of that night 
of fun stuck with him until several 
years later it became the Grand Ole 
Opry. 

When radio broadcasting began 
several years later. Hay entered the 
new field. At this time, live program- 
ming was the order of the day. For 
talent, radio stations depended upon 
musicians available in their own 
localities, some of whom were pro- 
fessionals. 

The National Life and Accident In- 
surance Company employed him as the 
first director of their new radio sta- 
tion WSM in Nashville. He had al- 
ready had a good deal of experience 
in the folk music field, having only a 
few months earlier originated the 
WLS Barn Dance in Chicago. This is 
the program that later became known 
as the National Barn Dance. 

When Hay came to Nashville, he 
recognized at once the great wealth 
of folk music material and talent 
available in the farms and hills of 
Tennessee. Calling himself the Solemn 
Old Judge, he launched the WSM 
Barn Dance at eight o’clock, Saturday 
night, November 28, 1925. 

The first performer was Uncle 
Jimmy Thompson of Nashville. He 
was past eighty years old, so he was 
given a comfortable chair in front of 


an old carbon mike. And with his 
niece accompanying him at the piano, 
the old-timer announced that he would 
be glad to answer requests for old 
time tunes. Telegrams started pour- 
ing in to WSM immediately. And 
Uncle Jimmy continued playing for 
hours. 

For the first few programs, Uncle 
Jimmy, his niece and Judge Hay were 
the only talent on the WSM Barn 
Dance. Then came the deluge. Other 
fiddlers, banjo pickers, guitar players 
and a lady who played an old zither 
wanted to appear. This was the real 
beginning of country music as an im- 
portant element of radio program- 
ming. Saturday night barn dances 
shot up at other radio stations 
throughout the county. 


accepted by all that the first instru- 
ment of folk music is the human voice 
and instruments only increased the 
effect of the presentation. Thus it was 
time for the Opry to have its first 
singing star. 

The first singing star was Uncle 
Dave Macon who billed himself as 
Dixie Dewdrop. He came to WSM in 
1926, early in the year, after having 
already been in show business for a 
number of years. His earthy tunes 
and musical wit brought him imme- 
diate popularity. During the show’s 
first fifteen years on the aii% Uncle 
Dave was the biggest single attrac- 
tion. 

As the cast of the show grew to 
about 25 persons, when Uncle Dave 
joined the Opry, WSM felt that its 



In those early days country music 
on the radio was instrumental music 
mainly. Uncle Jimmy fiddled for an 
hour each Saturday night. Then ban- 
joists and guitarists went on. These 
were followed by larger groups of 
folk artists. The first of these old- 
time bands was a group led by Dr. 
Humphrey Bate. He played the har- 
monica and brought along five or six 
neighbors who played other instru- 
ments. Bate and Hay named the group 
the Possum Hunters. 

Within a few weeks, three similar 
groups joined the regular Saturday 
night cast. They became known as the 
Crook Brothers, the Gully Jumpers 
and the Fruit Jar Drinkers. All four 
of these groups still appear on the 
Grand Ole Opry every Saturday night, 
although Dr. Bate and a few other 
charter members have since died. 

During all of this time that the 
WSM show was in existence, all the 
folk music on the air was instru- 
mental music. And it is interesting to 
note why. Folk songs were personal 
in nature. They were the songs that 
a mother sang to her child, that a man 
sang as he plowed, that a boy hummed 
as he walked down the road. Such 
people were not accustomed to sing- 
ing for an audience, either live or not. 
In addition, people are more likely to 
be self-conscious of their vocal de- 
ficiencies than they are of the lack 
of instrumental perfection. On the 
other hand, fiddlers and pickers were 
accustomed to playing for family, 
community and social events. They 
were no longer timid. However, it is 


studio had become inadequate. As a 
result, Studio B, much larger than the 
original one was added. Hoards of 
people turned up at the station to 
watch the artists perform. The execs 
of the station decided to let 50 or 60 
of them come into the studio itself. 
This, incidentally was one of the earli- 
est live audiences actually admitted 
to a radio studio. Their presence, 
which gave the show a homey atmos- 
phere, and their applause, added more 
life to the performance. 

When Uncle Dave joined the show 
it was still known as the WSM Barn 
Dance. It kept that name for the first 
two years and then received its new 
name rather inadvertently. By that 
time network radio was inaugurated 
with the formation of NBC. 

The Barn Dance, which had now 
grown to a three-hour affair, kept its 
original starting time, 8 P.M., and in 
that spot it followed NBC’s Musical 
Appreciation Hour conducted by com- 
poser, conductor Dr. Walter Dam- 
rosch. He had much to do with the 
renaming of the Barn Dance. For one 
Saturday night, when Damrosch was 
concluding his hour of classical music, 
Judge Hay was listening in, readying 
himself for the “On The Air” signal. 
Being in the best of moods and get- 
ting the signal, the judge said, some- 
thing like this, “Friends, the program 
which just came to a close was de- 
voted to the classics. But from here 
on out, for the next three hours we 
will present nothing but realism. It 
will be down to earth for the ‘earthy’. 
For the past hour we have been lis- 


tening to music taken from grand 
opera, but from now on we will pre- 
sent ‘The Grand Ole Opry’ 

The name made a favorable impres- 
sion on the audience and since then 
has become the title of the show. 

More and more listeners wanted to 
see the show, but the studio was al- 
ready overcrowded and the big hall 
was filled to capacity. It was then 
that WSM decided to build its audi- 
torium studio with a seating capacity 
of about 500. 

The Opry fans filled the new studio 
and hundreds that couldn’t get in de- 
cided to go home early. This demon- 
stration of the show’s popularity 
pleased the station execs and the per- 
formers, but it lead to an incident that 
endangered the show itself. 

One Saturday night, two officials of 
the National Life and Accident In- 
surance Company, owners of the sta- 
tion, tried to get to their offices inside 
the building. The eager Opry fans 
were wise to the ways of “line buck- 
ing” and refused to allow the execs 
into their own building thinking that 
they were phonies trying to move up 
on the line. 

The officials finally got into the 
building through the rear entrance, 
but the behavior of the crowd that 
night resulted in orders to stop ad- 
mitting live audiences to the show. 

The Opry continued on the air, but 
the performers and listeners missed 
the spark that was added by the live 
audience. In recognition of the studio 
audience’s importance, and with the 
possibility of the show dying for lack 
of an audience, the company heads 
rented the Hillsboro Theater. 

In its new quarters, the Grand Ole 
Opry regained its previous warmth 
and color. The crowds again filled the 
house and many had again to be turned 
away. To remedy this condition, the 
show was moved to a large tabernacle, 
The Gospel Church, across the Cum- 
berland River in East Nashville. The 
tabernacle had wooden benches and 
sawdust aisles, and accommodated 
three thousand fans. But it didn’t have 
the proper facilities for handling such 
a large crowd in orderly fashion. 

The Opry was then moved to the 
state owned War Memorial Audi- 
torium just across the street from the 
National Life Building and the WSM 
studios. The auditorium seated 800 
fewer people than the tabernacle, but 
what it lacked in capacity it made up 
in betterment of the program’s pro- 
duction and in the management of 
the crowd. 

Up to this time, tickets to the Grand 
Ole Opry had been given out free. 
But as a measure of gaining more 
control over the live audience, it was 
decided that an admission fee of 
twenty-five cents would be charged. 

At the beginning of the Second 
World War, the U.S. Army took over 
the War Memorial Auditorium. The 
Opry then moved to the huge Ryman 
Auditorium. 

Admission to the Ryman Audi- 
torium today is basically the same as 
in the past. Only the federal tax has 
increased the price to thirty cents. 

For the convenience of the live 
audience, nearly half of the seats in 
the 3,574 seat auditorium are reserved 
and a charge of 60 cents including 
the tax is made for the reserved seats. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 


Page 4 


The Cash Box 


November 28, 1953 







The Cash Box, Music 


Page 5 


November 28, 1958 


Country Music: 

It Grew And Grew And Grew 


Although Grand Ole Opry has 
promoted folk music from way hack 
in 1925, the last thirteen years, begin- 
ning with 1940, have been one of the 
most significant periods in the his- 
tory of country music in America and 
throughout the world. During that 
time, country music reached profes- 
sional maturity and achieved wide- 
spread popularity. Among the most 
important factors that figured in this 
mass acceptance was the development 
of the singing star, a development 
that did not come to full realization 
until the 1940’s. 

Uncle Dave Macon was the Opry’s 
first singing star and remained its 
greatest single attraction until the 
early forties. But the basic talent unit 
was the old-time band. These hands 
made use of singers but the singer 
was a part of the band and subor- 
dinated to it. He occupied the same 
position with the hand as the vocalist 
with a present dance orchestra. 

The story of the development of the 
modern country singer is part of the 
story of Roy Acuff, one of the all-time 
great singers of country music. Acuff 
actually represented the connecting 
link between the band’s featuring a 
singer and the singer’s being backed 
by the band. 

Acuff ’s crew came to WSM in ’38 
and made the grade as a band at a 
tryout for the show. But only after a 
number of years and some reorgani- 
zation of the band and the kind of 
show that it put on did it make a 
really big hit. That reorganization 
gave more prominence to Acuff and 
his singing. And one of the songs 
which he brought with him was “The 
Wabash Cannon Ball”. 

Various members of Roy’s band 
were featured as much as himself. 
Each member played an important 
part in the show. Other bands at the 
same time operated in the same way. 
Pee Wee King and his Golden West 
Cowboys and Bill Monroe and his Blue 
Grass Boys were among those. 

But about this time there was an- 
other development that contributed to 
the growth of the western vocalist. 
Up to this point, most of the music 
played and sung was taken from the 
great mass of folk classics. Singers 
and instrumentalists selected numbers 
that fit their individual style best. 
However, now these artists and others 
began writing their own songs or be- 
gan writing songs directed for a par- 
ticular style of an artist. Roy Acuff 
was soon writing songs. Soon these 
tailor made songs, songs written with 
particular artists in mind, began mak- 
ing stars of the artists. Every artist’s 
rise to fame was associated with a 
particular tune. Eddy Arnold, a gui- 
tarist with Pee Wee King’s band 
found success with a song called 


“Mommy, Please Stay Home With 
Me”. This tune made him so popular 
that it removed him from his sub- 
ordinate position with the band and 
made him an individual star. He then 
formed a band to support him. This 
gave the band the position of support- 
ing the artist. A transition which has 
taken place many times since. 

Red Foley hit with “Smoke On The 
Water”. Ernest Tubb starred with 
“I’m Walking The Floor Over You”. 
Cowboy Copas brought out “My Fili- 
pino Baby”; George Morgan, “Candy 
Kisses”; Little Jimmy Dickens, “Old 
Cole Tater.” Hank Williams followed 
“Love Sick Blues” into a miraculously 
successful career of songwriting and 
singing that was at its peak when he 
died on New Year’s Day of this year. 
Hank Snow, a Canadian, hit the top 
with “I’m Moving On” and Carl Smith, 
one of the Opry’s newer finds bowed 
with “Let’s Live A Little”. 

The development of the singing star 
brought on a new phase of country 
music, but this transition was only 
partly responsible for the tremendous 
spread in the popularity of country 
music. 

The second factor was increased 
listenership. 

After the Opry had been operating 
for several years, the FCC designated 
certain frequencies as clear channels. 
And WSM became one of the clear 
channel stations. This meant that the 
station could be received without in- 
terference as far as its signal would 
reach. 

A few years later the station built 


what was then the nation’s tallest 
radio tower, 871 feet high and in- 
creased its power to 50,000 watts, bill- 
ing itself as the “Air Castle of the 
South”. This increased power per- 
mitted the station to be heard at many 
points all over the nation and in 
Canada as well. This brought country 
music to people who were unfamiliar 
with it before. 

Although 50,000 watts is the highest 
power permitted in the U.S., many 
areas remotely situated from the 
transmitter did not receive high 
quality reception. Network radio 
helped solve that problem. 

On October 14 of 1939, the Prince 
Albert portion of the Opry was placed 
on the NBC Red Network of 26 sta- 
tions. Transcriptions of that same seg- 
ment also went out to five other sta- 
tions. 

Soon it was recognized that the show 
should be given still wider circula- 
tion. So the program went coast-to- 
coast on NBC on July 20, 1940 with 
thirty-five stations receiving the sig- 
nal and five others getting the pro- 
gram via transcription. More stations 
were added as the network grew until 
now when the Prince Albert portion is 
carried on 176 stations with a listen- 
ing audience of over 10,000,000. This 
move contributed greatly to the rise in 
popularity of folk music. 

Shifting populations have also been 
an important element in the spread 
of country music. At the beginning of 
World War II, this type of music was 
most popular in the southern regions 
and in spots throughout the mid west. 


But during the next few years many 
war workers moved south to the gov- 
ernment war plants where they came 
in contact with country music. The 
armed forces took men and women 
from every part of the country and 
mixed them in military units. Soldiers 
from the mid west and south were 
spread throughout the many areas 
where country music was not pre- 
viously known. Anyone in the Armed 
Services will remember how many 
servicemen brought their guitars 
along and sang country music in the 
barracks. 

Another factor in the trend toward 
folk music was the commerciality of 
other types of music. During the war, 
low down blues and old-time New 
Orleans jazz started to sweep the 
country. This jazz, presented by an 
amateur group, was another form of 
folk music. But this music spread 
throughout the nation so quickly, and 
became so commercial that it lost its 
homey and warm appeal. It became 
professional. Songwriters had to turn 
out tunes according to specifications 
as if they were turning out frank- 
furters. The music industry, radio, 
motion picture companies and record 
manufacturers demanded a tre- 
mendous abundance of jazz music for 
their enterprises. So the songs be- 
came repetitious and lost their sincere 
meaning. Pretty tunes jumped up to 
the top of hit parades and died a 
few months later, never to be heard 
again. The main indication that the 
public suspected the deterioration of 
pop music was to be found in their 
critical remarks about silly lyrics. 

But as the folk songs, both old and 
new, from the Grand Ole Opry and 
other sources reached increasingly 
greater numbers, many devotees of 
pop music found themselves capti- 
vated by the country singer whose 
songs told, in simple, honest terms, a 
sincere story. Listeners found warmth 
in the untrained voice of most of the 
country artists. And more and more 
they began to favor this music. Now, 
of course, many of the country songs 
have become number one popular 
songs. 

Of course, in the last thirteen years 
since 1940, the disk jockey, who dur- 
ing this period, grew tremendously in 
importance, has had much to do with 
the promotion of country music. His 
promotion of folk music on small sta- 
tions and large ones throughout every 
corner of the country has made this 
music still more popular. In almost 
every city there is a dee jay who spins 
country music as part of his program. 
And many stations have a disk jockey 
devoted solely to country music. 

With all of these factors working 
for country music, it is no wonder 
that it is still spreading over the na- 
tion and to many foreign countries. 



Lonzo And Oscar (right) perform at Grand Ole Opry 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 6 


November 28, 1953 


AUDIE ANDREWS 
EDDY ARNOLD 
CHARLINE ARTHUR 
CHET ATKINS 
ELTON BRITT 
BETTY CODY 
THE DAVIS SISTERS 
RED GARRETT 
JERRY GLENN 
CURTIS GORDON 
HAWKSHAW HAWKINS 
HOMER & JETHRO 
JOHNNIE & JACK 
GRANDPA JONES 
PEE WEE KING 
KENNY LEE 
HAL "LONE PINE" 
LONESOME PINE FIDDLERS 
KEN MARVIN 
JOYCE MOORE 
MINNIE PEARL 
WADE RAY 
ROY ROGERS and DALE EVANS 
TOMMY SANDS 
HANK SNOW 
SUNSHINE RUBY 
PORTER WAGONER 
BOBBY WILLIAMSON 




. RCA VICTOR'S 

COUNTRY AND WESTERN ARTISTS 

AND SACRED ARTISTS 


BLACKWOOD BROTHERS QUARTET GEORGE BEVERLY SHEA 

salute 


GRAND OLE OPRY «d WSM 


on its 28th Anniversary and send greetings 
and best wishes to the show business personalities 
who will be present at the celebration. 


RCA V I( ^ T<) K 


1 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 7 


November 28, 1953 


WSM 


Executives 



John H. DeWitt 

President — WSM 


George Reynolds 

V.P. & Technical Director 


Irving Waugh 

Commercial Manager & 
Executive Asst, to Pres. 


James R. Denny 

Mgr. Artists Service Bureau 


Jack Stapp 

Program Director 


William R. McDaniel Harold Baker 

Director of Public Relations Director of News & Special Events 


Vito Pellettieri 

Music Librarian 







Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 













Page 8 


November 28, 1953 



The Cash Box, Music 


GRAND OLE OPRY STARS ARE CONSISTENT HONEY 
MAKERS ON MUSIC MACHINES.... AND ON OUR 28th 
ANNIVERSARY WE WISH TO THANK THE COIN 
MACHINE INDUSTRY FOR ITS PART IN OUR SUCCESS. 



Greetings On Your 
28th Anniversary 

and Thanks For Everything 

Martha Carson 

Hear Her New Hits 

I’ve Got A Better Place To Go 
“Singin’ On The Other Side" 

X. Cosse, Exec. Mgt. 


Happy 

28th Anniversary 


It's A Pleasure To Be 


Hank Snow 


Our Best Wishes 
On Your 
28th Anniversary 
Cowboy Copas — 

Hot Gilliam, Mgr. 


On Your 
28th Anniversary 
Marty Robbins 


My Sincere Best Wishes 
On Your 
28th Anniversary 


Hearty Congratulations 
On Your 
28th Anniversary 


Gratefully, Eddie Hill 


Sincerely, Grandpa Jones 


Warmest Congratulations 

28th Anniversary 
LONZO & OSCAR 


Best Wishes On Your 
28th Anniversary 

Tommy Warren 


Frosty, The Defrosted Snowman 
“Jangle Bells” 

Decca 

"It's A Christmas Riot!" 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 





The Cash Box, Music 


November 28, 1953 


Page 9 




Grand Ole Opry Announcers 




Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 





The Cash Box, Music 


Page 10 


November 28, 1953 



Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 


Exclusive Management : 

FRANKIE MORE 

631 Murfreesboro Rd., 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Phone 6-2215 


(^onffrcitufationd 


WSM & GRAND OLE OPRY 

28tli ~y4n n i uerS ctr 




AMERICA’S TOP COUNTRY ARTISTS 


MUSIC OPERATORS • DISK JOCKEYS • DEALERS 

For your wonderful acceptance and plays 
We know you’ll like our latest 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 11 


November 28, 1953 




CAPITOL RECORDS and 
our Country Artists 



WSM 

& 

GRAND OLE OPRY 

on their occasion of their 

28 th ANNIVERSARY 

ROY ACUFF 
JIMMIE BRYANT 
JINKS CARMAN 
MARTHA CARSON 
FRED CHAPMAN 
TOMMY COLLINS 
DUB DICKERSON 
JIMMIE DOLAN 
BILL DUDLEY 
TENNESSEE ERNIE 
REDD HARPER 
FREDDIE HART 
JIMMIE HEAP 
COUSIN HERB HENSON 
ROY HOGSED 
JACK HUNT 
FERLIN HUSKEY 
SONNY JAMES 

JIM & JESSEE, THE LOUVIN BROTHERS 
BILL LOWERY 
SKEETS MCDONALD 
MERRILL MOORE 
RODNEY MORRIS 
GENE O'QUIN 
YVONNE O'DAY 
OWEN PERRY 
TERRY PRESTON 
TEX RITTER 
JEAN SHEPARD 
THE SMITH BROTHERS 
CLIFFIE STONE 
BILLY STRANGE 
HANK THOMPSON 
MERLE TRAVIS 
WESLEY TUTTLE 
JIMMY WAKELY 
SPEEDY WEST 
BOOTS WOODALL 
FARON YOUNG 




FOLK and WESTERS ROUSDUP) 




NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, Thursday, November 19th. . . . Music City 
U.S.A. is already taking on the signs of a convention city, and most certainly 
a scene of familiarity for those in show business. The country’s leading disc 
jockeys and recording artists, are trickin’ into town, preparing to help celebrate 
the 28th Anniversary of their favorite Country Music Show, Grand Ole Opry! 
Hotel reservations have been sold out. An overflow crowd representing the 
various Music Publishers, Recording Companies, trade papers and magazines 
will no doubt go to all efforts to help make the celebration one of the ‘key 
events’ of this year! Among those who have already 
arrived for the occasion, which will be highlighted by 
many shows, luncheons, and special events, include 
Thurston and Georgianna Moore, Nelson King, WCKY 
Cincinnati, Jack Comer, Valley Records, Big Jim Hess, 
WIVK Knoxville, Dub Allbritten, Jackson, Ohio, Bob 
Neal, WMPS, Memphis, and at this writing the list is 
growing rapidly. Webb Pierce (Decca) is booked on 
the road for this week-end and his manager, Hubert 
Long reports that they regret they cannot be present 
for the celebration. Carl Smith (Columbia) who is 
scheduled for personal appearances this week-end 
will make a special flight into Nashville to give his 
regards to the visiting deejays and welcome them to 
Nashville. Just received word that Jack Tucker and 
his Oklahoma Playboys were among the featured 
performers at the star-studded show in Los Angeles 
Shrine Auditorium the past week for the benefit of 
Exceptional Children’s Foundation. Tucker and his Playboys are under contract 
to Debut Records, and now their new release is “Too Blue To Cry” and “Too 
Quick To Condemn”. The tune, was first written by Chuck Mills and later by 
Tucker himself. The Playboys were organized in 1948 by the singing guitarist 
from Oklahoma and his men include Chuck Mills, Tom McKenzie, Don Evans, 
Jerry Hamm and Sid Bruzier. Ferlin Huskey’s latest release is out and doing 
alright it seems . . . titles being, “Walkin’ and Hummin’ ” and “I Wouldn’t 
Treat A Dog Like You’re Treating Me.” Huskey has just returned from a 
personal appearance tour in the Northwest and Canada. 



WEBB PIERCE 


Frankie More, manager of Johnnie and Jack (RCA Victor) and Kitty Wells 
(Decca) reports that his group has been doing some very successful personal 
appearance dates, having just completed some promotional dates with Bob Neal 
at WMPS, Memphis, and working now thi’ough North and South Carolina. 
Johnnie and Jack’s latest Victor release . . . “Pig Latin Serenade” is taking off 
big according to Frankie More, who has done some very good promotion on 
the tune. Elton Britt has a new release that shows his true style of yodeling . . , 
title is “That’s How The Yodel Was Born”. Elton is now working at WCOP in 
Boston with a live show broadcast five days a week. Just received word that 
Curtis Gordon, Mobile, Alabama, has just finished a 
very successful tour of North Florida, and just re- 
cently did an engagement in East Point, Georgia. 

Aaron Durham, WKGN, Knoxville, Tennessee, is now 
doing a C&W deejay spot with records twice a week 
on the station, which has started the trend for Country 
Music once again on the station. For a time WKGN 
did not feature Country Music. Kenny Lee the new, 

18-year old RCA Victor artist has a new release out 
titled “I Saw Cupid In Your Eyes”. Homer and Jethro 
are all set for a happy Christmas, with their rendition 
of “(All I Want For Christmas Is) My Upper Plate” 
and “I Saw Mommy Smoochin’ Santa Claus”. Lonzo 
and Oscar’s Christmas offering sounds very good, too. 

Their release is “Frosty, The Defrosted Snowman” 
and “Jangle Bells.” Ginny Wright is now making her 
debut with Fabor Robison’s new Fabor label, is the 
country girl singer to keep your eye one, it is reported. 

Introduced in a duet with Jim Reeves, Ginny comes through like a veteran on 
“I Love You” and then does a single on “I Want You, Yes (You Want Me No.)” 
A native of South Georgia, Ginny toured that state singing at square dances 
and small radio stations for her basic experience. Fabor Robison ignored the 
fact that she studied opera and ballet for a year, and says that her voice, style 
and feeling can shoot her to the top quickly. Carl Smith (Columbia) did the 
P.A. NBC’er Saturday, November 14th and had as his guest Tex Ritter (Capi- 
tol). Bob & Wanda Wolfe, KGFL, Rosewell, N. Mex., would like to hear from 
hillbilly disk jockeys who would like to have a free copy of their new record, 
“I Would Never Grow Tired Of Loving You”. 



FERLIN HUSKEY 


Jim Denny, head of WSM’s Artist Service Bureau along with Roy Acuff 
(Capitol) and his boys, Moon Mullican (King), Eddie Hill, George Morgan, Ken 
Marvin, recently completed five days of bear hunting down in Newborn, North 
Carolina! Mell Allen, just signed by Sunshine Records, Hollywood, had a quick 
first session with release set for November 25th. Allen, a native of Tennessee, 
is vocally headed right down the middle of the road. He is introduced on the 
Sunshine label with what is reported to be one of the greatest western novelties 
since “Riders In The Sky,” “Mule Train” or “Wild Goose.” Mel’s offering is “The 
Old Mad Witch”, and Allen belts out the number tell- 
ing an interest-holding story marked by excitement. 
Flip side of the release is “Your Love, It Lingers.” 
C. E. Tebbetts has a new feather in his cap these days 
for his song “Divorce Granted” selling platters fast 
for Ernest Tubb on Decca and Jack Loyd on Eastman 
label. Negotiations have just been completed by 
Harold Rothrock, manager of WTSK-TV and Guy 
Smith, Knoxville, Tennessee, for the establishment of 
an Artist Service Bureau at the new TV outlet in 
this city. Already, talent is streaming into the station 
and a roster of Country talent comparable to other 
TV stations in the area have already been given shows, 
the first, “Tennessee Jubilee” which began last week. 
Format calls for strictly country music, and the Artist 
Service Bureau will operate in like fashion to other 
stations where Artist Service Bureaus handle talent. 
Veteran production man, Jay Miller and director, 
Pete Finnelly will work with the station talent. I’d like to take this opportunity 
to personally congratulate WSM and Grand Ole Opry on its 28th Anniversary, 
and express my sincere thanks to the staff of WSM and its entire personnel for 
their loyal cooperation. It was a real pleasure working with Jim Denny, Jack 
Stapp, Bill McDaniels, and Mary Claire Rhodes and their staff in getting out 
this special anniversary issue! 



Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 






The Cash Box , Music 


Page 12 


November 28, 1953 



TENNESSEE TIE-UP 

All eyes and ears are turned to Nashville this week. The celebrations 
surrounding the 28th anniversary of WSM’s “Grand Ole Opry” are heartily 
joined in by the Canadian music fraternity. 

Sentimentally and musically there is a close entente between the folks 
who make music here and in the southern city. 

There has been a large Canadian listenership to the Grand Ole Opry since 
its first programs and the loyalty of the Canadian listeners has been constant. 
Indeed a second generation, and even a third, regularly listen to this weekly 
Saturday program in this country. Since money restrictions have been removed, 
a growing traffic of Canadian visitors has been attending the Opry programs 
in person and many Canadian families build their vacations around a trip 
to Nashville. 

Canadian talent too recognizes Grand Ole Opry and Nashville as the heart 
of much of today’s music activity. 

The recording and publishing center that Nashville has become has further 
cemented the Canadian-Nashville ties. As probably nowhere else, Canadian 
music and talent has enjoyed foreign hospitality in the Tennessee city and its 
activities. Our Hank Snow, from Nova Scotia has become one of the brightest 
stars shining on the Grand Ole Opry. Wilf Carter (Montana Slim), who also 
comes from our Atlantic Provinces, has taken the music of Canada to the folk 
capital of the world and has brought the folk music of the United States to 
his Canadian followings. The same holds true for Ottawa’s Orval (Rex) Prophet 
who records Canadian and American songs in Nashville, although confining 
his radio and personal appearances to his native land. Over the years the 
list has been a long one and many performers could be used as examples but 
this column would be too small to hold all of their names. 

The Nashville performers have always found large and attentive audiences 
for their appearances, which are many, in Canada. As a matter of fact, many 
of their best paying engagements are those that take place in Canada. 

Canadian radio programs, too, reflect the bond of friendships that have 
developed over the years. Country and Western shows of this country have 
lavished their time on the records and songs originating in the southern city. 
The live folk programs of Canada have developed a kinship with Jack Stapp, 
Jim Denny and their talent of WSM which has resulted in Opry stars being 
able to guest star on the Canadian home & country shows and almost without 
exception these Nashville performers have endeared themselves to Canadians 
who have been happy to welcome them to this land. Canadian music publishers 
contact and cover the Nashville music makers as they do Canadians and have 
recently further widened the international associations by publishing music 
placed with them while the Nashville stars are in Canada. 

Nothing that this column could say would top the congratulations that will 
be heaped on the deserving folks in Nashville on this historic occasion, so we 
won’t even try. We would like to add one little observation of our own and 
and it is this: when all of the score is added up and all of the forces appraised, 
we sincerely believe that nothing will surpass the friendly fellowship of 
Canada and Nashville in cementing the close understanding and bond that 
exists between these two North American countries. The folks of Canada, 
and this is a country of folks, are pretty proud of the folks in Nashville, and 
the wonderful kinship that they have created with their folk music activities. 
Our best wishes and congratulations to everyone who has shared in bringing 
this about. 


AIRMAIL 

SUBSCRIPTION 


to THE CASH BOX s 30. 



"(Elfriatmaa 





b/w 


(i 


Reindeer Boogie 

with The Rainbow Ranch Boys 

20/47-5340 




Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 13 


November 28 , 1953 



The Most Loyal of A II Is 

Grand Ole Opry’s 
Audience 


An audience is an odd group. There are fickle audiences and loyal audiences. 
There are hundreds of people that brag about never having missed a New 
York Yankee home game during the past season. There are folks who claim 
that they have never missed a Metropolitan opera presentation with such 
and such an artist in it. But probably the most loyal audience in the entire 
country is the Grand Ole Opry’s audience. 

Although it may sound impossible, up to 7,500 people see the Grand Ole 
Opry in a single week. And the Ryman Auditorium seats only 3,574. It works 
something like this. 

The show runs from 7 :30 ’till midnight and many of the fans sit through 
the entire program. Others leave about ten, after they have seen most of 
the performers. As a rule, the entertainers appear at least once before ten and 
once again after ten. This makes room for many of the throng who wait 
outside the auditorium in the hope of getting a seat for the last portion 
of the show. This turnover in audience permits the show to play to an average 
audience of 5,000. 

Demand for tickets is greater during the summer months when streams 
of motorists pour into Nashville from all parts of the country. Tickets are 
sold out many weeks in advance and fans holding general admission tickets 
begin to line up in front of the auditorium by the middle of Saturday after- 
noon to assure themselves choice seats when the doors are opened at six 
o’clock. By the time the doors are opened, the crowds are usually lined up 
eight abreast for a distance of two blocks. After they are admitted to the 
auditorium and select the best seats available, they must sit and fan them- 
selves for another hour and a half before the show begins. 

Audience turnover is higher in the summer months, mainly because it 
gets steaming hot in the auditorium despite exhaust fans, personal cardboard 
fans, and shirtsleeves. For this reason, summer audiences usually number 
7,500 with about 10,000 others still being turned away. 

There is one woman who keeps a standing order for a ticket insisting on 
the same fourth row seat every time. She has attended regulary for nearly 
27 years. 

Some of the regular customers come from as far away as South Central 
Kentucky. Those from more distant points can’t get there so frequently, but 
many of them do make repeated trips to see the show. A Mr. McGuffin from 
Anderson, South Carolina has made more than forty-one trips to the opry. 

A recent survey conducted among the audience by WSM pointed up the 
phenomenal attraction of the Opry. The survey revealed that more than 88% 
of all those who visited the show came to Nashville for that specific purpose. 
In other words, anything else they did in Nashville was merely incidental. 
They came to see the Opry and they travelled an average of 485 miles to 
get there. 

Approximately 97 percent of the live audience at the Opry are regular 
listeners to the program, either directly from WSM or through their NBC 
station. More than 87% of them have been regular listeners for many years. 

One of the interesting facts about the live audience at the Grand Ole Opry 
is that Tennesseans rank third in number. The survey revealed that the largest 
number come from Alabama, the second largest from Illinois and the fourth 
largest from Indiana. Next in order are Missouri, Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Texas and South Carolina. 

Canada is always represented in the audience. In fact, a few Canadians 
have settled in Nashville to be near the Opry and the capital of country music. 

Some fans come from places far more distant than Canada. One summer 
a letter, 28 days in transit, came from Saudi Arabia asking for ticket 
reservations. 

To many of the people who listen regularly to the Opry, it is more than 
just a good radio program. It is an experience that gives them a spiritual 
satisfaction. Many people have written in for tickets saying that they were 
going to celebrate their honeymoon at the Opry and in Nashville. One party 
has written in asking for seat reservations so that she and her husband, who 
had been separated for some time, could meet at the opry and make a go of 
it again. 

Letters containing personal outpourings such as these are treated with 
strictest confidence. 

All of these human stories and human people make up the fabulous Grand 
Ole Opry Audience. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 


The Cash Box , Music Page 14 November 28, 1953 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 15 


November 28, 1953 


C ongr atulations 

to 

WSM 

and 

THE GRAND OLE OPRY 

for 

28 YEARS 

of service in 
behalf of 
Country Music 


m 


ercury 



P.S. "Tain't Nice" to brag — but promoters who 
book WSM talent feather their "Byrd's Nest" 
and fly "High, Wide and Handsome" with such 
WSM stars as The Carlisles, Jerry Boyd and 
Eddie Hill. 


■\ 





“PUT CHRIST BACK INTO CHRISTMAS” (2:54) 

[M. Witmark & Sons ASCAP — E. E. Unger] 

“THE GENTLE CARPENTER OF BETHLEHEM” (2:37) 
[Leo Talent ASCAP — E. M. Drake, J. Shirl] 

RED FOLEY 
(Decca 28940) 


Red Foley, smooth voiced coun- 
try chanter, makes his bid for a 
Yuletide hit with a beautiful tune 
that conveys the real meaning of 
Christmas. “Put Christ Back Into 
Christmas” is a tune designed to 
restore the religious aspect of the 


Holy Day to its full dignity. Red’s 
interpretation is grade “A” as the 
Anita Kerr Singers capably assist. 
Lower end, “The Gentle Carpenter 
Of Bethlehem” is another lovely 
seasonal piece gracefully presented 
by Red and the chorus. 



“CHRISTMAS ROSES (3:02) 

[Arch Music ASCAP — P. Frances, N. A. Catsos] 

“THE REINDEER BOOGIE (2:20) 

[Ernest Tubb BMI — P. Faircloth, C. Volkmar] 

HANK SNOW 
(RCA Victor 20-5340) 

Hank Snow comes up with his big bouquet of roses for the holi- 
Christmas gifts to the ops as well day, although he may not be around 
as to his vast legion of fans, at that time. “The Reindeer Boogie” 
“Christmas Roses” is a tender bal- j s a delightful rhythmic Christmas 

L a y d S d iVS SMS ditty io^ly fashioned by Hanb 
tale about a thoughtful lad who an< ^ the Rainbow Ranch Boys. Two 
sees to it that his gal shall have a solid money makers. 



“I’M TRIMMING MY CHRISTMAS TREE WITH TEARDROPS” (2:28) 
[Hill & Range BMI — F. Team, E. Tubb] 

“WE NEED GOD FOR CHRISTMAS” (2:49) 

[Ernest ^Tubb BMI — A. F. Donaldson, E. Tubb] 

ERNEST TUBB 
(Decca 28946) 

The mellow voice of Ernest Tubb romantic lament treated to a potent 
is a treat to the ear during any reading by Tubb. On the lower 
season and the artist proves the deck, “We Need God For Christ- 
point as he comes up with a pair mas”, Tubb tells of the importance 
of top drawer Yuletide items. “I’m of the Lord’s protection during 
Trimming My Christmas Tree Christmas and the coming years. A 
With Teardrops” is a slow beat double barreled hit. 



“I’M GONNA TELL SANTA CLAUS ON YOU” (2:12) 
[Beechwood Music BMI — T. Blackman] 

“YOU’RE THE ANGEL ON MY CHRISTMAS TREE” (2:27) 
[Central BMI — F. Young, B. Ballard] 

FARON YOUNG 
(Capitol 2629) 

It looks as though Faron Young by the soft and polished chords of 
has a pair of contenders for the Young. Under lid, “You’re The 
charts as he comes up with a two- Angel On My Christmas Tree” is 
sided holiday juke box natural. h f , h t 

“I’m Gonna Tell Santa Claus On f change ot pace, slow beat item, 

You” is a middle tempo romantic treated to another masterful read- 
tune etched in distinctive fashion ing by the artist. 



“WHERE DID MY SNOWMAN GO?” (2:04) 

[Leeds Music BMI — F. Poser, G. Vennis, S. Mann] 

“WHY, DADDY?” (2:25) 

[Alamo ASCAP — S. Tepper, R. C. Bennett] 

REX ALLEN 
(Decca 28933) 

Rex Allen’s latest offering com- “Where Did My Snowman Go?” 

bines a pair of items that look like On the under side Janice Klein 

winners and it’s heads or tails. plays the part of the little girl as 
With the sound of sleighbells and h asks her fath Rex AU the 

a children’s chorus happily lending . ’ ’ 

their support, Allen comes up with inevitable question, Why Daddy, 
a catchy Yuletide item titled, Two charming decks. 




“IT’S CHRISTMAS” (2:02) 

[Riverside Music ASCAP — B. Pepper, I. James] 

“THANKS” (2:30) 

Vanguard Songs [BMI — J. DeSylva, J. Wakely] 

JIMMY WAKELY 
(Capitol 2644) 

Jimmy Wakely dishes up a pair ditty in keeping with the Christ- 
of likely looking etchings that mas spirit. Flip, “Thanks”, is a 
should mean money in the till for so ft and inviting item on which 
the op, and over the counter. It s ar ti s t expresses his gratitude 

Christmas” is a happy-go-lucky, ^ T j if 

light-hearted lilt engagingly per- for everything the Lord has given 

formed by Wakely. A real cute him. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 


The Cash Box, Music 


Page 1 6 


November 28, 1953 



TOE CASH BO X 

jiiQp^i? 


“HOOTCHY KOOTCHY HENRY 
(From Hawaii)” (2:37) 
[American BMI — M. Torok] 

“GIGOLO” (2:53) 
[American BMI — M. Torok] 
MITCHELL TOROK 
(Abbott 150) 

• Mitchell Torok, pens and vocals 
another pair of tunes in winning 
style and that should mean com- 
pany for his “Caribbean,” which 
is now riding high on the charts. 
“Hootchy Kootchy Henry (From 
Hawaii)” is a delicious platter 
etched in quick beat fashion and 
enticingly vocaled by Torok. En- 
tertaining lyrics tell of a carefree 
lad whose playground is the island 
of the swaying palms. The Louisi- 
ana Hayride band supplies a top 
deck musical backdrop. On thfe 
lower half, Torok tells the inside 
story of “Gigolo.” Two outstanding 
sides with the nod going to 
“Hootchy.” 


TIBBY EDWARDS 
(Mercury 70236) 

® “IF YOU LOVE ME LET ME 
KNOW IT” (2:00) [Acuff-Rose 
BMI — Edwards, Tassin] Tibby Ed- 
wards etches a middle tempo romantic 
tune in distinctive style. Adequate 
strings back the artist. 

© “WALKIN’ AND CRYIN’ WITH 
THE BLUES” (2:15) [Acuff- 
Rose BMI — Miller, Theriot] The 
warbler puts over this moderate beat 
piece with telling effect. Tune and 
lyrics blend in feelingful fashion. 

ELTON BRITT 
(RCA Victor 20-5509) 

“THAT’S HOW THE YODEL 
WAS BORN” (3:10) [Trinity 
BMI- — Grean, Javits, Anthony] Elton 
Britt delivers a top notch yodel effort 
on a lovely slow beat tale of a roamin’ 
cowboy. An enchanting item relating 
the origin of the yodel. 

0 “MY HEART WAS MADE FOR 
YOU” (2:42) [Frank BMI — M. 
Banks, F. Huddleston] The soft and 
polished chords of the artist are fit- 
tingly applied to a slow moving, pretty 
ballad. 

MARTY ROBBINS 
(Columbia 21176) 

© “DON’T MAKE ME ASHAMED” 
(2:45) [Acuff-Rose BMI— M. Rob- 
bins] Marty Robbins sings softly and 
tenderly as he turns in a pleasing 
rendition on a pretty, middle tempo 
romantic ballad. 

© “IT’S A LONG, LONG, LONG 
RIDE” (1:54) [Acuff-Rose BMI 
— M. Robbins] The bottom side is a 
fast rhythmic beat piece that has the 
earmarks of a hit. The artist receives 
a flavorful string backdrop as he 
tells how no trip can compare with 
the ride his gal took him for. 

SONNY JAMES 
(Capitol 2641) 

© “MY GREATEST THRILL” 
(2:34) [Hill & Range BMI— W. 
Woodward, J. Hicks] Sonny James’ 
voice has a richness to it as he waxes 
a slow, romantic tale in stirring 
fashion. A mellow reading of expres- 
sive lyrics on a tune that should lure 
the coin. 

© “WON’T SOMEBODY TELL ME” 
(2:37) [Acuff-Rose BMI — S. 
James, B. Harville] James comes up 
with a heart warming performance 
on a (middle) tempo lover’s lament. 
The chanter is wise in many ways 
but has no idea why he’s losing his 
sweetheart. 


“CHANGING PARTNERS” (2:45) 
[Porgie BMI — J. Darion, 

L. Coleman] 

“BIMBO” (2:42) 

[Fairway BMI — R. Morris] 

PEE WEE KING AND HIS BAND 
(RCA Victor 20-5537) 

# Whenever Pee Wee King and 
his band wax a tune, the public 
can be assured of some mighty 
fine listening. This time, Pee Wee 
and the boys are supplied with a 
beautiful ditty, titled, “Changing 
Partners” and the results are extra 
special. The tune, a slow tempo 
waltz ballad, is breaking in the 
pop marjket and Pee Wee’s rendi- 
tion should make it a big country 
item. Flip, “Bimbo” is a delectable 
novelty with charming lyrics. Redd 
Stewart’s applies a standout vocal 
job on two decks that will draw 
in any type location. 


SKEETER WEBB 
(King 1278) 

© “YOUR SECRET’S NOT A SE- 
CRET ANYMORE” (2:31) [Mar- 
Kay BMI — S. Webb] Skeeter Webb 
etches a sprite item in impressive 
fashion. The secret is out now that 
Skeeter has learned that his love finds 
more pleasure with another fellow. 

® “WAS IT A BAD DREAM” 
(2:32) [Mar-Kay BMI— S. Webb] 
On the lower end the warbler delivers 
a polished vocal on a middle tempo 
sentimental piece. Effective string 
support. 

WADE RAY 
(RCA Victor 20-5518) 

“SATURDAY NIGHT” (2:07) 
[Hill & Range BMI — A. Dinning, 
D. Robertson] Wade Ray lends his 
distinctive vocal talent to a solid piece 
of material that should appeal to one 
and all. Wade belts out the fetching 
lyrics in socko fashion. Captivating 
string support. 

© “FIRST, LAST AND ALWAYS” 
(2:12) [Hill & Range BMI— J. L. 
Carson] The artist dishes up another 
top-drawer vocal job on a soft coun- 
try love ballad. Ray’s relaxing treat- 
ment should attract a heap of coin. 

JIMMY SIMPSON 
(Republic 7064) 

© “OILFIELD BLUES” (2:39) 
[Babb Music BMI — Simpson] 
Jimmy Simpson comes up with an 
infectious light yodel on a middle 
tempo sentimental tune. Melody and 
lyrics blend warmly as subdued string 
backing colors the deck. 

® “I HOPE SOMEDAY YOU”LL 
THINK OF ME” (2:41) [Babb 
Music BMI — Simpson] Flip is a 
moderate beat romantic item sung 
with tender emotion by Jimmy. Tune 
has a sincere quality and the artist 
handles it in appealing fashion. 

BOB WILLS 
(MGM 11635) 

® “AS I SIT BROKEN HEARTED” 
(3:20) [Mesa Music BMI— Wills] 
Bob Wills delivers a soft, moving 
vocal on a slow, tender item and the 
combination makes for a fetching 
etching. 

© “BOTTLE BABY BOOGIE” 
(2:37) [Mesa Music BMI — Mc- 
Kinney] Reverse deck is a zesty no- 
velty belted out by Bob and his 
Texas Playboys. Billy Jack Wills 
comes up with a potent vocal effort 
as the chorus blends in happy fashion 
on a real exciting deck. 




WSM Will Never Forget 
The Great Hank Williams 


ARTHUR "GUITAR BOOGIE" SMITH 
BOB WILLS 
BILL LEE 

JOE "CANNON BALL" LEWIS 
ERNIE LEE 
CLAUDE CASEY 
JOE FRANKLIN 
BUD & BETTY BRYANT 
GEORGE McCORMICK 
HARDROCK GUNTER 
BOBBY LEE 
TOM ANDERSON 
THE DRIFTING COWBOYS 
"TEXAS JIM" ROBERTSON 
SHEB WOOLEY 
RED SOVINE 
SALTY & MATTIE 
LITTLE RITA FAYE 
AL BRITT 
NORMAN PERRY 
TED WEST 
LES STROUD 
DON KIDWELL 
SAM NICHOLS 
ZEKE CLEMENTS 
ROME JOHNSON 
"SHEETS" YANEY 
CARSON ROBISON 
MR. SUNSHINE 
JIMMY SWAN 
JESSE ROGERS 
BUD HOBBS 
LOUVIN BROS. 
RUSTY GABBARD 


MGM RECORDS 


THE GREATEST NAME 


IN ENTERTAINMENT 


701 SEVENTH AVE N< W YORK 36. N Y 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 17 


November 28, 1953 



SMASHING FOR THE TOP 


Louisiana Hay ride Artist 

Jim Reeves 


MWi “ 6 * 

PSEY HEART 

Abbott # 148 

Louisiana Hayride Artist 


Rudy Grayzell 


BONITA CHIQUITA” 


b/w 


“I’M GONE AGAIN” 

Abbott # 147 



A GREAT INSTRUMENTAL 
Floyd Cramer 

Louisiana. Hayride Artist 

“FANCY PANTS” 

b/w 

“FIVE FOOT TWO EYES 
OF BLUE” 

Abbott # 146 


HIS NEWEST RELEASE 
Mitchell Torok 
Louisiana Hayride Artist 

HOOTCHY KOOTCHY 
HENRY” 

“GIGOLO” 

Abbott # 150 


HER LATEST! 
Carolyn Bradshaw 
Louisiana Hayride Artist 

SAY NO, NO, NO 

b/w 

‘IT’S STILL THE SAME’ 

Abbott # 151 


A TOP SPIRITUAL 
Willie Caston's 

a 

Ever Ready Gospel Singers 

WHEN THE MOON GOES DOWN" 


b/w 

“I CLAIM JESUS” 

Abbott # 149 


ABBOTT RECORD 

COMPANY 

6636 Hollywood Bird. 

L i 

Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Distributed In Canada By Quality Records, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario 



Earl 'Grandpappy' Davis 

WFHG— Bristol, Va. 

1. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

2. Shake A Hand (Red Foley) % 

3. Hey Joe! (Carl Smith) 

4. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

5. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

6. Yesterday's Girl (Thompson) 

7. Two Faced (Howington Bros.) 

8. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

9. I'm Looking At The Moon 

(Skeets McDonald) 
10. Who Stole That Train (Price) 


"Albuquerque" 

Al Hallaman 

WBVP — Beaver Falls, Pa. 

1. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

2. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

3. If They Should Ask Me (Ray) 

4. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

5. Tennessee Wig-Walk (B. Lou) 

6. You're Gone (Davis Sisters) 

7. Let Me Go, Devil (Tex Ritter) 

8. Hey Joe! (Carl Smith) 

9. To Be Alone (Rex Allen) 

10. For Now And Always (Snow) 


Carl J. Swanson 

WRUN— Utica, N. Y. 

1. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 

2. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

3. She Taught Me How To Yodel 

(Kenny Rober) 

4. Hey Joe! (Carl Smith) 

5. Let Me Go, Devil (Wade Ray) 

6. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

7. Castaway (Rosalie Allen) 

8. Remembering (Mac Wiseman) 

9. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 
10. Dear Mr. Godfrey (R. Wallis) 


Billy "The Kid" Stanley 

WNOE — New Orleans, La. 

1. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

2. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

3. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

4. Hey Joe! (Carl Smith) 

5. Forgive Me John 

(Shepard & Huskey) 

6. That's What I'd Do For You 

(Faron Pierce) 

7. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

8. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

9. Release Me (Jimmy Heap) 

10. I Wouldn't Treat A Dog The 

Way You Treat Me (Huskey) 


Paul Kallinger 

XERF— Del Rio, Tex. 

1. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

2. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

3. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

4. Yesterday's Girl (Goldie Hill) 

5. It's Been So Long (Pierce) 

6. I'm Looking At The Moon 

(Rudy Grayzell) 

7. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

8. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

9. My Greatest Thrill (James) 
10. Bimbo (Jim Reeves) 


Bill Webb 

Tulsa, Okla. 

1. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

2. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

3. Rub 'Em Off (L. McAulifFe) 

4. Little Boy Blue 

(Mattie & Salty Holmes) 

5. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

6. Don't Add Ex To Your Name 

(George McCormick) 

7. Little Red Caboose (Maddox) 

8. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

9. Too Young To Cut The 

Mustard (Jerry Glenn) 

10. Let Me Be The One (Hill) 


Don Larkin 

WAAT— Newark, N. J. 

1. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

2. Hey Joe! (Carl Smith) 

3. Sorrow And Pain (Davis Sis.) 

4. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

5. A Dear John Letter 

(Shepard & Huskey) 

6. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

7. It's Been So Long (W. Pierce) 

8. Kiss Me Big (Tennessee Ernie) 

9. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

10. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 


Cliff Rodgers 

WHKK— Akron, Ohio 

1. Let Me Be The One (G. Hill) 

2. Tennessee Wig-Walk (B. Lou) 

3. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 

4. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

5. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

6. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

7. Pig Latin Serenade 

(Johnny & Jack) 

8. When Mexican Joe Met Jolie 

Blon (Hank Snow) 

9. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 
10. That's What I'd Do For You 

(Faron Young) 


Jimmy Hutsell 

WLAR — Athens, Tenn. 

1. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

2. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 

3. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

4. Sorrow And Pain (Davis Sis.) 

5. Ricochet (Pee Wee King) 

6. Hey Joe (Carl Smith) 

7. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

8. Caribbean (Eddie Kirk) 

9. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

10. John Henry (Hank Thompson) 


"Potato" Pete Hunter 

KRCT — Baytown, Tex. 

1. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

2. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

3. God Was So Good (Al Terry) 

4. It's Been So Long (W. Pierce) 

5. Two Friends Of Mine 

(Lefty Frizzell) 

6. You Gotta Have A License 

(Tommy Collins) 

7. I Know In My Heart (Hunter) 

8. I Dess I Dotta Doe 

(Billie Jo Moore) 

9. Little Boy Blue 

(Salty & Mattie Holmes) 
10. Wishing Ring (Al Britt) 


Charlie Walker 

KMAC — San Antonio, Tex. 

1. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

2. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

3. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

4. I'm Looking At The Moon 

(Rudy Grayzell) 

5. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

6. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

7. There Stand The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

8. Hey Joe (Carl Smith) 

9. Divorce Granted (E. Tubb) 
10. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 


Ramblin' Lou 

WHLD— Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

1. There's A Rainbow In Every 

Teardrop (Slim Whitman) 

2. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

3. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 

4. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

5. I Found Out More (Cody) 

6. Pig Latin Serenade 

(Johnny & Jack) 

7. Idle Gossip, Idle Words 

(Lee & Cooper) 

8. Hey Joe (Kitty Wells) 

9. Weary Blues From Waiting 

(Hank Williams) 
10. No LongerA Prisoner (Snow) 


Pop's Country Store 

WXGI — Richmond, Va. 

1. Leave Her Alone (R. Price) 

2. Remembering (Mac Wiseman) 

3. Pa-Paya Mama (J. Logsdon) 

4. Idle Gossip, Idle Words 

(Lee & Cooper) 

5. Run 'Em Off (Onie Wheeler) 

6. True Love Moved Out 

(Margie Collie) 

7. Bimbo (Jim Reeves) 

8. A Million Tears (Anderson) 

9. Sorrow And Pain (Davis Sis.) 
10. Pig Latin Serenade 

(Johnny & Jack) 


Dal Stallard 

KCMO — Kansas City, Mo. 

1. I'm Walking The Dog 

(Webb Pierce) 

2. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

3. Let Me Be The One (Hill) 

4. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

5. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

6. Shake A Hand (Red Foley) 

7. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

8. When God Comes And 

Gathers His Jewels 

(Hank Williams) 

9. When Mexican Joe Met Jole 

Blon (Hank Snow) 

10. There's A Rainbow In Every 
Teardrop (Slim Whitman) 


Cousin Johnny 

WNLC — New London, Conn. 

1. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

2. Idle Gossip, Idle Words 

(Lee & Cooper) 

3. Seven Days In Heaven 

(Tex Williams) 

4. Sorrow And Pain (Davis Sis.) 

5. Sittin' In The Saddle 

(Yodelin' Slim Clarke) 

6. Counterfeit Kisses (E. Tubb) 

7. The Roosters Are Crowing 

(Wayne Raney) 

8. Hey Joe! (Kitty Wells) 

9. Is it True (Jim Jesse) 

10. No Regrets (Ed Camp) 


Chuck Thompson 
& Elmer 

WFOR — Hattiesburg, Miss. 

1. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

2. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

3. Nine Little Kisses (S. Long) 

4. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

5. Only A Pastime (D. Glenn) 

6. Bimbo (Jim Reeves) 

7. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

8. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

(Carl Smith) 

9. Weary Blues From Waiting 

(Hank Williams) 

10. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 


Gabe Tucker 

KATL — Houston, Tex. 

1. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

2. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

3. Release Me (Jimmie Heap) 

4. Bimbo (Jim Reeves) 

5. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

6. No Longer A Prisoner (Snow) 

7. Tain't Nice (Carlisles) 

8. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

9. Whirlpool (Owen Perry) 

10. A Heap Of Lovin' (Hawkins) 


Lillie Anne 

WIRC — Hickory, N. C. 

1. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

2. Hey Joe (Carl Smith) 

3. Caribbean (Mitchell Torok) 

4. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

5. Forgive Me John 

(Shepard & Huskey) 

6. I Have But One Goal 

(Bill Lowery & Smith Bros.) 

7. North Wind (Slim Whitman) 

8. Walkin' And Hummin' 

(Ferlin Huskey) 

9. I'm Looking A The Moon 

(Skeets McDonald) 
10. Let Me Be The One 

(Billy Strange) 


Randy Blake 

WJJD — Chicago, III. 

1. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 

2. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

3. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

4. Kiss Me Like Crazy (Maddox) 

5. Satisfaction Guraanteed 

(Carl Smith) 

6. Mama, Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

7. Unpucker (Carlisles) 

8. For Now And Always (Snow) 

9. 50-50 Honky Tonkin' 

(George McCormick) 
10. Who Stole That Train (Price) 


Jolly Joe Nixon & 
Tom Brennen 
KXLA — Pasadena, Calif. 

1. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

2. Walkin' And Hummin ' 1 

(Ferlin Huskey) 

3. Talk Of The Town 

Don Reno & Red Smiley) 

4. One By One (Ken Marvin) 

5. Let Me Be The One (Strange) 

6. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

7. Remembering (Mac Wiseman) 

8. Is It True (Jim & Jesse) 

9. Bimbo (Jim Reeves) 

10. A Dear John Letter 

(Shepard & Huskey) 


Joe Morris 

WKDK — Newberry, S. C. 

1. I Forgot More (Davis Sisters) 

2. I'm Walking The Dog (Pierce) 

3. Hey Joe (Carl Smith) 

4. Mama Come Get Your Baby 

Boy (Eddy Arnold) 

5. There Stands The Glass 

(Webb Pierce) 

6. Santa Got Stuck In The 

Chimney (Jimmy Boyd) 

7. Jealous Love (Davis Sisters) 

8. Unpucker (Carlisles) 

9. Preach The Gospel 

(Louvin Bros.) 
10. Let Me Be The One (Locklin) 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 







imiaiaiaiaitl 


The Cash Box, Music 


Page 1 8 


November 28, 1953 


i 







28 th 

Anniversary 

Greetings 


From 


CHET ATKINS | 


I May You Enjoy Many, 
jg Many More 


Sincere 
Good Wishes 
On Your 

28 th 

Anniversary 

Gratefully, ^ 
ROD BRASSFIELD 


Del Wood 

("The Down Yonder" Girl) 

Extends 

HAPPY 28TH 
ANNIVERSARY 
GREETINGS 

to her many loyal friends 
at 

GRAND OLE OPRY 

• 

Republic Records 
Keyboard Artist 

• 

Thanks Operators and 
Deejays Everywhere 


1 



Welcome Dee Jays! 

GRANT TURNER 

of 

WSM'S "MR DEEJAY" SHOW 

Announcer 

PRINCE ALBERT'S "GRAND OLE OPRY" 
NBC Coast-to-Coast 

Congratulations 
on your 

2 8th Anniversary 


I # 1 

1 Congratulations 1 

1 x-. a 

y to ® 

8 WSM, GRAND OLE OPRY, AND STAFF I 


H 


On Their 28th Anniversary 

Watch for our latest release. Greatest 
novelty since "Riders In The Sky" s ' 


MEL ALLEN'S 
THE OLE MAD WITCH 


(Critics say it's terrific) 
b/w 


"YOUR LOVE, IT LINGERS" 


(An equally terrific number) 

SUNSHINE # 1001 


Contact: Red (Chuck) Matthews 


SUNSHINE RECORDS 

5205 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. HOLLYWOOD 27, CALIF. 


I 


Grand Ole Opry’s Stage: 

Ryman Auditorium 


The Ryman Auditorium is to coun- 
try music what the Metropolitan 
Opera House is to opera. To perform 
in this vast auditorium is the goal 
of every country artist. 

The building itself has a history 
that goes back to the 1800’s. 

Captain Tom Ryman was the owner 
and operator of a line of pleasure 
boats on the Cumberland River dur- 
ing the latter half of the 19th cen- 
tury. His boats had luxurious gam- 
bling rooms and fine teakwood bars. 
They were looked upon with disfavor 
by a revivalist named Sam Jones who 
dared Ryman to come to his tent 
revival. 

Ryman, together with some of his 
river boat ruffians, decided to accept 
the dare. They sat in the back row 
and were prepared to heckle the 
preacher. But the preacher chose 
“Mother” as his subject and this hit 
the Captain in a soft spot. He was 
converted that very night. 

After destroying his bars and gam- 
bling tables he built a tremendous 
tabernacle in which Sam Jones should 
preach. In 1895 a balcony was added 
for the benefit of the Confederate 
Veterans’ Reunion. Later a stage was 
added and the tabernacle was con- 
verted to an auditorium. And the seats 
are still the same hard church 
benches. 

In this vast hall people from 38 
states and Canada come to watch the 
country talent. It began in 1925 and 
has not missed a Saturday night 
since. Each show is four and a half 
hours long and at least part of it is 
heard by more than ten million 
listeners. In addition, an average of 
5000 people attend the show each 
week. Since its beginning, nearly 
5,000,000 people have come to Nash- 
ville to see the show. 

The house is always sold out and 
tickets for reserved seats are ex- 
hausted six to ten weeks in advance. 
During the winter of 1951, Tennessee 
and much of the Central South was 
paralyzed by a disastrous ice storm. 
All public transportation was halted 
for several days. Electric power and 
telephone service were badly dis- 
rupted. Most of the roads to Nash- 
ville were closed. Nevertheless, 2000 
ardent fans showed up at the Ryman 
Auditorium to see the Opry. That’s 
more than half a house of the 3,574 
seat auditorium. 

During the four and a half hour 
course of the show, more than 125 art- 
ists and their side men perform before 
the microphones. The show is split 
up into thirty and fifteen minute seg- 
ments and sold to individual sponsors. 
Only the Prince Albert segment which 
is carried by the full NBC network is 
rehearsed, and this is mainly for 
timing. It is also the only portion 
that uses a script. Yet, the other 4 
hours which are not rehearsed work 
smoothly and without a flaw. Mainly 
responsible for this thorough but un- 
noticeable coordination is Vito Pellit- 
tieri, WSM’s music librarian and sta- 
tion contractor with talent. He spends 
most of Saturday night wandering 
about the Opry stage checking his 
cast lists and cuing performers. Since 
he is usually the only one on the 
stage in ordinary street clothes, he 
is often referred to as WSM’s “plain- 
clothesman.” 

Although the show plays to a large 
live ‘ audience, it is presented as a 
radio program with a live audience, 
rather than a stage show that is being 
broadcast. That is, the artists play 
first to the microphone and second to 
the audience. In this lies much of the 
success of the great Grand Ole Opry. 


THE CASE BSE 



o 


I FORGOT MORE 
THAN YOU'LL 
EVER KNOW 

Davis Sisters 

(RCA Victor 20-5345; 

47-5345) 


e 


A DEAR JOHN LETTER 

Jean Shepard & Ferlin 
Huskey 

(Capitol 2502; F-2502) 


e 


HEY JOE! 

Carl Smith 

(Columbia 21129; 4-21129) 


O THERE STANDS 
THE GLASS 

Webb Pierce 
(Decca 28834; 9-28834) 


CARIBBEAN 

Mitchell Torok 
(Abbott 140; 45-140) 


© LET ME BE THE ONE 

Hank Locklin 
(Four Star 1641) 


FORGIVE ME JOHN 

© Jean Shepard & 

Ferlin Huskey 

(Capitol 2586; F-2586) 


NORTH WIND 

Slim Whitman 
(Imperial 8208) 




® IT'S BEEN SO LONG 

Webb Pierce 
(Decca 28725; 9-28725) 



I'M WALKING 
THE DOG 

Webb Pierce 
(Decca 28834; 9-28834) 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 






The Cash Box , Music 


Page 1 9 


November 28 , 1953 





JIMMY DAVIS 



JOHNNY BOND 


LOS ANGELES— Looks like Jim Reeves is out with a hit for the winter 
season with his Abbott release of “Bimbo” The flip side is “Gypsy Heart,” 
which is completely different, but with a strong and haunting appeal. At the 
same time Ginny Wright, who is now making her debut on Fabor Robison’s 
new Fabor label, is the country girl singer to keep your eyes on. Introduced 
in a duet with Jim Reeves, Ginny comes through like 
a veteran on “I Love You,” then does a single on “I Want 
You Yes” (You Want Me No.) She was visiting in So. 
California recently and made several personal appear- 
ances and visited with many deejays. She and Fabor left 
last week for Shreveport, La., where she will be featured 
on Louisiana Hayride. Fabor plans new recording ses- 
sions while he is there. He reports that he has no trouble 
signing new distributors for his Fabor label. He already 
has 20 distributors and more coming in daily. Must add 
that Del Roy, formerly of Ridgeway Music and Pee Wee 
King Enterprises, has joined Abbott Records as assistant 
to Fabor Robison. . . . Mel Allen, recently signed by Sun- 
shine Records, Hollywood, is just out with a rush release. 
Title is “The Old Mad Witch,” and Allen belts out the 
number telling an interest-holding story marked by ex- 
citement. He does a good job on the flip side, a ballad titled “Your Love, It 
Lingers.” Allen is introduced on Sunshine with one of the greatest western 
novelties since “Riders In The Sky” and “Wild Goose.” . . . Audie Andrews, 
the fast-rising young Texas vocalist, has just been 
released by Debut Records singing Buck Ram’s 
“Friends And Neighbors,” a folksy-type number first 
introduced successfully in the pop field. It is backed 
with a promising seasonal recording “I’ll Be Home 
For Christmas.” Music on both sides is by Jack Tucker 
and his Oklahoma Playboys. Big things are predicted 
for Audie and it is reported that he will have a major 
label contract within a matter of days. . . . Rex Allen, 

Republic Pictures and Decca Recording Star’s newest 
Decca release “Where Did Snow Man Go” has been 
praised highly. Could be another hit record for Rex 
following his “Crying In The Chapel.” Rex will ride 
in the tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena on 
New Years Day. This will make the third year he has 
participated in the national event. . . . Jimmie Davis 
is just out with another new Decca release, “You 

Took” and “I Can’t Stand The Pain.” His current Decca release “Suppertime,” 
shows every indication of being one of his all time greats. He is now back at 
his home in Shreveport after a highly successful tour. His Christmas platter 
is “Christmas Choo Choo,” and “I’d Love To Ride With Santa Claus.” . . . 
Johnny Bond’s new Columbia release, “Put A Little Sweetnin’ In Your Love” 
and “Sweet Mama, Tree Top Tall” is going over big. This platter followed 
closely behind “Let Me Go Devil,” and “Wildcat Boogie,” which are selling 
good in all areas. During November and December Johnny is working dates 

in both Los Angeles and San Francisco and at loca- 
tions between. . . . Columbia artist, Lefty Frizzell, 
is now on tour in Oklahoma and Texas. He will be 
in So. California over the holidays. . . . Jerry Jericho, 
formerly with 4 Star Records has switched to Star- 
day and has signed an exclusive contract. First 
sessions were cut in Beaumont, Texas and the re- 
lease on Starday will be “Lets Call It Off” and 
“Moaning in the Morning.” Jerry had some big 
records with 4 Star and has a substantial following 
through Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. . . . “You 
All Come” by Arlie Duff on Starday has clicked off 
very big and is being well covered by the majors. 
The song has been cut by Capitol, Columbia and 
King and a pop waxing is in the works. . . . Every- 
one connected with the Country and Western field 
are looking forward to the Grand Ole Opry 28th 
Anniversary celebration. Fred Stryker of Fairway Music Corp. left November 
15th for an Eastern business trip and to attent the gala event in Nashville. . . . 
Cousin Herb Henson, the Bakersfield, Calif., country and western star of daily 
radio and TV shows, has presented scores of stars in recent weeks on his 
shows and included were Spade Cooley, Careless Love, Joe Maphis and Rose 
Rose Lee, Tommy Duncans, Skeets McDonald, Ferlin 
Huskey and many others. Cousin Herb’s current 
Capitol release is Arley Duff’s “You-All Come,” and 
Herb’s own composition “I Wrote My Heart A Letter.” 

. . . Walkin’ Charlie Aldrich was very busy recently 
escorting Goldie Hill on a visit to the country and 
western deejays in the Los Angeles area. The beautiful 
and talented Decca vocalist has been an instant hit 
on the West Coast. It was her first visit to Hollywood, 
where she is gaining a great new following. Aldrich 
at the same time was getting a lot of compliments 
on his curi-ent release “Kinsey’s Book” and “Some- 
body Goofed” on Intro. Both artists are handled on 
the coast by Phil Tuminello and Bobbie Bennett of 
RPM Enterprises. . . . Claude Gordon, America’s 
Newest Trumpet Star and His Orchestra, are being 
released on Alma Records doing “Old Trail,” theme 
of the CBS radio production “Gunsmoke,” and “Carnival Of Venice.” On the 
latter number trumpeter Gordon is said to play lower notes than anyone has 
ever recorded on the trumpet. A native of Helena, Montana, Gordon has re- 
sided in Hollywood for several years and his talents have been utilized in 
radio, television and motion pictures. Always striving for perfection he is 
widely popular among fellow artists as well as his fans. 



LEFTY FRIZZELL 



TOMMY DUNCAN 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 20 


November 28, 1953 


Grand Ole Opry Artists 


ROY ACUFF 



Roy Acuff, WSM Grand Ole Opry 
star from the hills of East Tennessee, 
doesn’t describe himself as a hillbilly. 

“I sing country style,” Roy says. 
“I’m the old harp singing style . . . 
the breed that started singing before 
there were such things as micro- 
phones.” 

What Roy means is that when he 
started out with a medicine show, as 
a boy tenor, the medicine show didn’t 
have a mike or public address system. 
But he’s come a long way since those 
early days in Union County and later 
in Knox County, Tennessee, in the 
Smoky Mountains. 

Roy, as a high-school boy was a 
pretty good athlete. He wanted to be 
a big-league baseball player, but a 
sunstroke put him on the sidelines. 
He was being scouted for a New York 
Yankee contract when he suffered the 
stroke. 

While recovering he learned how 
to play a $12 fiddle. Since then he has 
gained his great fame on the WSM 
Grand Ole Opry, in the movies and 
through the sale of more than 25 
million records. 


Annie Lou & Danny 



Tennessee-born Annie Lou and 
Danny, are one of the most popular 
vocal and instrumental duets in the 
folk music field today. 

Danny began his musical career 
several years ago as a single, singing 
and playing guitar over southern 
radio stations. In 1944 his big break 
came in the person of the “The Duke 
of Paducah” who signed him up for 
a year’s road work with his famous 
troupe. It was during this period that 
Annie Lou joined forces with her 
husband to make it the well-known 
team it is today. 

Annie Lou and Danny record for 
RCA Victor and keep busy with their 
regular WSM schedule plus several 
weekly radio programs of their own, 
television spots and personal appear- 
ances. 


CHESTER ATKINS 


ROD BRASFIELD 



Chester Atkins was born in Luttrell, 
Tennessee 26 years ago, and though 
he hasn’t come a great distance from 
Luttrell in mileage, he has come a 
long way in the field of guitar playing. 

Chet Atkins acquired a knowledge 
of music from his father who taught 
piano and voice lessons. 

Station WRBL in Columbus had a 
religious program and Chet got his 
first radio job singing and playing 
hymns on the show. In 1942 he moved 
to Knoxville and joined KNOX as 
staff guitarist. There he played with 
several hillbilly bands. The next stop 
for Chet was station WLW in Cin- 
cinnati, Nashville & WSM with Red 
Foley. 

Chet appears with the Carter Sisters 
on the GRAND OLD OPRY every 
Saturday night and also in personal 
appearances. He goes to New York 
every three or four weeks to record 
and has recently made several solo 
appearances on WSM television and 
radio. 



They call Rod Brasfield the “Teller 
of Tall Tales from Hohenwald, Ten- 
nessee.” They also call him one of 
the cleverest comedians to hit the 
network in recent years. 

But what most people don’t know 
is that lean, slack-jawed, simple ap- 
pearing Rod Brasfield is a reformed 
tragedy actor who became a comedian 
by the merest of accidents. 

Rod is a veteran of show business 
generally. His first job as a boy was 
sweeping out chautauqua tents and 
laying the sawdust on the ground. 
Later on he played in everything from 
high class stock companies to burles- 
que. In 1944, he came to WSM in 
Nashville where he was given a spot 
on the 22 year old favorite, the Grand 
Ole Opry. 

Reversing the adage. Rod’s last 
love is the best — radio. And a full 
bag of fan mail every week is evidence 
that his coast-to-coast audience 
agrees. 



10 YEARS ON GRAND OLE OPRY 

1937 — 1947 

1st To make a Western Movie "GOLDMINE IN THE SKY" with GENE AUTRY 
1st To play GOVERNOR'S CAMPAIGN (Florida) 

1st To go overseas to entertain servicemen with GRAND OLE OPRY CAMEL CARAVAN 
1st NBC GRAND OLE OPRY Broadcast 

Turning back the pages of time and remembering such great artists and friends in 
the PEE WEE KING Unit: EDDY ARNOLD— ERNEST TUBB— MINNIE PEARL— ROY 
ACUFF— MILTON ESTES— COWBOY COPAS— CINDY WALKER— RAY WHITLEY and 
many more country favorites. 


Riding High on RCA Victor 

“CHANGING PARTNERS” 

b/w 

“BIMBO” 

RCA Victor 20-5537 


NOW APPEARING 


TV 

The Pee Wee King Show 
WEWS-TV Cleveland 
We d. 11-12 PM C ST 
WAVE-TV Louisville, Ky. 
Thurs. 7:30-8 PM CST 


RADIO 

WAVE Louisville, Ky. 

Sat. 8-8:30 PM CST (local) 
Sat. Radio NBC 9:30-10 PM CST 
Coast to Coast 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 21 


November 28, 1953 


DARREL l GLENN 
HITS AGAIN / 


<0 


darling of the TfEN-A ®** 5 




DARRELL GLENN 


“Only a Pastime” 

fijl/l/h BOUDELEAUX BRYANT 

I Think I’m Falling in Love 


With You” 


FLOYD WILSON 


V-109 





I 

I CONGRATULATIONS WSM 1 


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♦ 

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m 


§ 



BEST WISHES 

from 

KING RECORDS • FEDERAL RECORDS • DELUXE RECORDS 
LOIS PUBLISHING COMPANY and AFFILIATES 


8 

| 

| 


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I 


; For The Disk Jox 
" It’s The Cash Box 


Grand Ole Opry Artists 


JERRY BYRD 



Jerry Byrd is considered by many 
the number one guitar player in the 
country. Jerry, who has been a mu- 
sician longer than he sometimes likes 
to remember, started in radio in 1938. 
In 1947 he came to the Grand Ole 
Opry as “steel” Guitarist, playing for 
Ernest Tubb and later Red Foley. 

In 1948 Jerry returned to Cincinnati 
for a period of three years, where he 
made a hit on both radio and TV. 
Jerry is now back at WSM and the 
Grand Ole Opry where he does both 
radio and TV. Jerry, at the present 
is a featured act with the George 
Morgan show. The Jerry Byrd family 
includes wife, Thelma Marie, and 
daughter Lani Jo, age 3 years. Jerry 
is an ardent fisherman, and fishing 
occupies all his spare time. 


MARTHA CARSON 



Martha Carson started picking out 
folk tunes and spiritual numbers on 
her mail order guitar when she was 
in grammar school, began composing 
songs of her own before she was ten 
years old, and was a favorite enter- 
tainer in the Kentucky rural sections 
while in her early teens. She entered 
the professional music field as 
featured artist on radio station WSB 
in Atlanta, Georgia, where she was 
retained by popular demand, for more 
than four years. J'rom there, Martha 
Carson headed her own programs on 
various stations in Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee, Birminghan, Alabama, and 
others. Recently, a Birmingham sta- 
tion celebrated “Martha Carson Day” 
during which they played all her 
numbers, starred this attractive song- 
stress throughout the entire day and 
hailed Martha as one of the most 
popular and beloved folk music stars 
of the country. 

Martha Carson joined the cast of 
the WSM Grand Ole Opry in the 
Spring of 1952. 


CARTER SISTERS 



One of the most versatile groups in 
radio today is the Carter Sisters 
group, consisting of Mother Maybelle 
and her three daughters. Mother May- 
belle is one of the original Carter 
Family, an earlier group of country 
style entertainers. She plays a guitar 
and sings. 

June Carter acts as mistress of 
ceremonies and has her own specialty 
acts. 

Anita plays the bass fiddle, and 
sings solo numbers in a beautifully 
tenous voice with a hauntingly un- 
usual quality. Helen plays the ac- 
cordion and sings with the group. 

The Carters are from Virginia, 
where they own a prosperous farm. 
The father was a railway postal clerk, 
but he has now given up his postal 
work to act as their manager. Since 
they have joined the Grand Ole Opry, 
several years ago, the entire family 
has made Nashville its home. Helen 
and Anita are married and June re- 
cently married Carl Smith. 


LEW CHILDRE 



Lew Childre has appeared on tran- 
scribed radio programs all over the 
country for more than ten years. He 
has also made personal appearances 
all over the United States, working 
tent shows, auditoriums and clubs. 
He is considered one of radio’s out- 
standing personalities. From the mo- 
ment he starts his theme song, to 
his own guitar accompaniment, the 
audience knows he’s going to present 
a good show. Lew has been in show 
business all his life. He performs in 
no particular costume but merely 
wears informal clothes that might be 
worn by any Alabama resident 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 22 


November 28, 1953 


Grand Ole Opry Artists 


COWBOY COPAS 




Cowboy Copas, whose fame is 
getting greater and greater every day 
all over the nation, is a veteran in 
the entertainment world. His success 
at WSM, his network appearances and 
his many King recordings combine to 
make him one of the top ranking- 
stars in all popularity polls. 

At eleven, the Cowboy entered a 
kid’s contest program conducted by 
a radio station at Tulsa, sang “Red 
River Valley,” and won second place 
in a post-card-letter poll. At the age 
of fourteen, he began to make one- 
night appearances at fairs and over 
radio stations. Since then, Cowboy 
Copas has established an amazing- 
record — performances on more than 
two hundred radio stations in the 
United States, Canada and Mexico. 

In January of 1946, he came to 
WSM and is now one of the top stars 
on the WSM Grand Ole Opry. 


JIMMY DICKENS 



“Little Jimmy Dickens, diminutive 
singing star of the GRAND OLE 
OPRY probably has the loudest voice 
of any man his size anywhere. A 
mere four feet eleven inches tall, 
Jimmy is today one of Columbia’s ace 
recording artists. 

Born in Bolt, Raleigh County, West 
Virginia, Jimmy was raised on a farm. 
When he was only 17 he took his 
guitar, big voice and familiar smile 
into radio in Beckley, West Virginia. 
He did his first commercial radio 
series there, and has been a busy man 
in radio ever since. He joined WSM 
and the GRAND OLE OPRY in the 
fall of 1948, he had been heard on 
stations in Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, 
and Cincinnati. In his personal ap- 
pearances he has broken house re- 
cords all over the Eastern United 
States. 


WHITEY FORD 


GRANDPA JONES 



“I’m goin’ back to the wagon, boys, 
these shoes are killin’ me!” 

That famous line signifies the clos- 
ing of a “Duke of Paducah” mo- 
nologue. As such, it has become one 
of the favorite expressions of millions 
of Whitey Ford’s radio fans. The one 
brief phrase: “He always leaves ’em 
laughing,” describes the personality 
of the WSM-NBC Grand Ole Opry 
comedian. 

The “Duke of Paducah” is an out- 
standing example of the typical 
American humorist. His inimitable 
style of timing and delivering laugh 
lines in his soft, southern drawl has 
endeared him to both the sophisticate 
and the hillbilly. His original wittic- 
isms are clean, fast and clever; in- 
sults, sarcasm or the unkind thrusts 
used by many comedians have no 
place in the scripts of the “duke.” 

Whitey is currently the featured 
comedian with WSM “Grand Ole 
Opry.” 



Known as “Grandpa” to his thou- 
sands of fans because of his old-man 
get-up, Louis M. Jones is nevertheless 
only 40. He was born in Niagra, Ken- 
tucky, on October 20, and you have 
only to listen to his RCA Victor re- 
cording of “Retreat” to be convinced 
that he’s no grandfather. 

Grandpa considers the turning point 
of his career to have been the chance 
to go on “Lum and Abner’s Social” 
and since then he has been busy con- 
tinually with radio work. His broad- 
casts included shows on WLW in Cin- 
cinnati, on WRVA in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, and while in the Army in Ger- 
many, he broadcast over the Armed 
Forces Network. He has also made 
many personal appearances, and in 
April of 1951, he entertained near the 
front lines in Korea. At present, 
Grandpa is broadcasting over WSM 
in Nashville, where he is back on the 
“Grand Ole Opry,” and his home is 
currently in Nashville. 



STAR OF WSM’S GRAND OLE OPRY RADIO AND TV 


It's a privilege and a pleasure to be 
a part of such a great organization 

New Releases 

“THERE STANDS THE GLASS” 

b/w 

“WALKIN’ THE DOG” 


Exclusive Management 

HUBERT LONG 

1537 McGavock Pike 
(Phone 2-6635) 
Nashville, Tenn. 



Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 23 


November 28, 1953 


Sincere f~elicitationS to the 
past 28 years and the 
areat future of 

WSM’s 

Grand Ole Opry 


and 


fo fill fhe flrtists 
and S throughout 

the 3oA Wusic WoM 


VILLAGE MUSIC CO. 
HOMETOWN MUSIC CO. 

SIDNEY PROSEN, Gen. Mgr. 

1619 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 


A 

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RPM 

Enterprises 


| 

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BOBBIE BENNETT — PHIL TUMINELLO I 

| 

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And Their Clients 
Wish To Congratulate 


WSM's 

GRAND OLE OPRY 


on their 


28th Anniversary 


| 

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Representatives on the West Coast for 
all Western, Country and Hillbilly Artists. 

763 GOWER, HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 


o 


Grand Ole Opry Artists 


JOHNNY & JACK 



Johnnie and Jack grew up with 
folk music in their families, so it 
was natural that one day they would 
choose that field for their profession. 

Johnnie Wright’s father played a 
five-string banjo, and his grandfather 
was the champion of the old-time 
fiddlers in their part of Tennessee. 

Jack Anglin’s father was also an 
old-time fiddler, and he taught jack 
and his brothers to pick a guitar. 

Then Jack and his brothers formed 
a quartet and began a radio career 
in Nashville in 1936. It was there 
that they met Johnnie. They joined 
forces and formed the Tennessee 
Mountain Boys. 

For several years after the forma- 
tion of their partnership, Johnnie and 
Jack appeared on the Grand Ole Opry, 
and they made personal appearances 
throughout the country. They left the 
Opry for several years and returned 
in 1951. The duo record for RCA 
Victor. 


GEORGE MORGAN 



One of the youngest and most 
versatile of the Grand Ole Opry stars, 
George Morgan, is noted for the 
warmth, sincerity, and feeling with 
which he sings a song. 

George was born in Waverly, Ten- 
nessee, June 28, 1924. His family 
moved to Barberton, Ohio, where he 
finished high school and began play- 
ing the guitar and singing over a local 
radio station. From there he went to 
WWST in Wooster, Ohio, and WWVA 
in Wheeling, West Virginia. He joined 
the Grand Ole Opry cast in 1948. 

During his first few months on the 
Opry, his own song “Candy Kisses” 
made him one of the most promising 
stars in country music. Columbia Re- 
cords signed him to a long term con- 
tract. Twenty-six different records of 
the songs were made, including his 
own recording, and more than 2,000,- 
000 copies of it have been sold. Among 
the other records he made were 
Over The Hilltop,” and his recent big 
hit “Almost.” 



Bill Monroe, a top drawing card of 
the WSM Grand Ole Opry, was born 
in Rosine, Kentucky, one of eight 
brothers and sisters of the Monroe 
family. 

Starting in radio back in the early 
’30’s, Bill joined the Opry in 1939 and 
achieved almost instantaneous success. 

Monroe began as a singer in church 
work, when he was a boy, and as a 
result, many of his most popular 
melodies today are hymns and songs 
of a religious nature. However, he is 
also famous for such things as “Mule 
Skinner’s Blues” and similar tunes, 
and the boys can whip up some fine 
comedy. Bill’s “Kentucky” tunes, 
usually written by him, always go 
over big on the air and at personal 
appearances. Bill now records for 
Decca. 


MOON MULLIGAN 



A talented young Negro farm 
worker taught Moon Mullican to play 
the piano when he was only a boy, 
and he has been active in the enter- 
tainment field ever since. 

Moon is a big man, red-faced and 
good-natured. His hands dart across 
the keyboard almost faster than the 
eye, and they bring forth his own 
style of hot country music. He also 
sings in a strong, untrained voice. The 
combination of his singing and play- 
ing make him one of the fastest one- 
man shows on the air. 

Because of his versatility, Moon has 
made hundreds of phonograph records, 
some as a member of a band, others 
featuring his playing and singing 
as a soloist. 

Moon joined the Grand Ole Opry 
early in the year 1951 and thus ex- 
tended the popularity he had already 
won in the Southwest. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 












The Cash Box , Music 


Page 24 


November 28, 1953 


Grand Ole Opry Artists 


MINNIE PEARL 



Minnie Pearl (born Ophelia Colley 
in 1912) is the homespun comedienne 
of the WSM Grand Ole Opry who 
brings down the house every Saturday 
night with her homey patter and 
songs. 

In 1934 Ophelia joined the Wayne 
P. Sewell Producing Company of At- 
lanta, travelling all over the South 
giving dramatic readings and coach- 
ing home talent for their own pro- 
duction. 

Little by little she picked up bits 
of wit and humor from the natives 
which she incorporated in the char- 
acter she began building . . . building 
with one idea in mind — presenting it 
on the Grand Ole Opry. 

And although Minnie is pretty 
dumb, no one has complained, for 
Minnie is too real and very lovable. 
Nobody could dislike her or take ex- 
ception to what she says. All agree 
that Minnie Pearl has added glory . . . 
if not glamour ... to the Grand Ole 
Opry. 


RAY PRICE 



When Ray Price was 9 years old, he 
began singing, using his older broth- 
er’s guitar. From that time on, music 
became an important part of his life. 
He attended high school in Dallas, 
singing in the high school choir. Ray 
went to North Texas Agricultural 
College, where he studied Veterinary 
medicine for 3% years. 

In 1943, during World War II, Ray 
enlisted in the Marine Corps where 
he served 2% years. 

For about 3 years he played the 
rodeo circuits as a rider, doing trick 
riding, roping, etc. 

Ray has been a professional singer 
of both pop and folk music for over 5 
years. 

He formed his own band and trav- 
elled in Texas and Louisiana. His first 
radio job was at WSM where he joined 
the Opry in January, 1952. He has 
made several road tours with Hank 
Williams. 


WEBB PIERCE 



After his discharge from the Army, 
Webb Pierce sang with different bands 
in the Arkansas-Louisiana-Texas area 
until he decided to branch out on his 
own, and form his own Southern Val- 
ley Boys. He got his own daily radio 
show on KWKH in Shreveport and 
achieved much popularity in the area. 

Webb was accepted by the WSM 
Grand Ole Opry in September of 1952. 
He records for Decca. His first disk 
was his now famous “Wonderin’.” A 
short time after the record hit the 
market, it sky-rocketed to the top of 
the Country Folk Hit Parade. Webb 
is also an outstanding song writer 
having written such hits of his own 
as “New Silver Bells,” “That Heart 
Belongs To Me,” “So Used To Lovin’ 
You,” “I Haven’t Got The Heart,” 
“The Last Waltz,” “It’s Been So 
Long,” and others. 


MARTY ROBBINS 



When Marty Robbins’ Navy days 
were over Marty began singing and 
playing his guitar on radio station 
KTYL in Mesa, Arizona. His quarter 
hour show of country and western 
music eventually led to bigger things 
and a bigger station in Phoenix. 

At KPHO in Phoenix Marty was 
given a half hour show in the morn- 
ing, five days a week called “Chuck 
Wagon Time.” He organized his own 
band, the K-Bar Cowboys, and after 
gaining a large following was re- 
warded with a quarter hour television 
show on KPHO-TV four days a week. 

Marty later was guest on the Prince 
Albert segment of the Grand Ole 
Opry, and made several record hits 
on Columbia. 

He started at WSM on January 19, 
1953, and since then has appeared on 
the Grand Ole Opry every Saturday 
and been a guest artist on other WSM 
country music shows. 

Marty and wife Marizona have one 
child, a three-year-old boy named 
Ronnie. 



-224 


Congratulations ! 

RADIO STATION WSM 


AND 


THE GRAND OLE OPRY 

ON YOUR 28tll ANNIVERSARY 


ALSO 

OUR SINCERE THANKS TO THE 

• ARTISTS 

• A Cr R MEN 

• JUKE BOX OPERATORS 

• DISC JOCKEYS 

FOR MAKING THESE HITS POSSIBLE IN 53 


HEY JOE 

SORROW AND PAIN 

HOW'S THE WORLD TREATING YOU 

JUST WAIT TILL I GET YOU ALONE 

MIDNIGHT 

IT'S A LOVELY, LOVELY WORLD 
CANNON BALL YODEL 
YOU'RE GONE 
ONLY A PASTIME 
DON'T PLAY THAT SONG 





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TANNEN MUSIC, INC. 

146 West 54th Street New York 19, N. Y. 


Nat Tannen 
New York 


Boudleaux Bryant 
Nashville, Tenn. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 





The Cash Box , Music 


Page 25 


November 28 , 1953 



I a CITATION and GREETINGS to the | 

| Nation’s Folk & Western DJ’s who are helping | 

I WSM-GRAND OLE OPRY 1 

IS S 

celebrate their 28th Birthday I 


s 




Here's Your Next HITS 

I TOLD A LIE 

by 

THE VAN CLEAF SISTERS 


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on 


BENIDA RECORD # 5005 


In Preparation for Top Recordings 

“A LETTER INSTEAD OF A ROSE” 


Next Big Easter Song 

“CROWES’ EASTER RUNNY 




" So*? a * 

4* 1619 BROADWAY, 

8 NEW YORK 19, N.Y. 




Cable Address: 
CITAMUSIC NEWYORK 


S .... 

jSj Telephone 

| Circle 6-7039 

SjfffllSlIglHimJSFgiigia'iK.Sg a a « a a s « «««««« «.« 


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Grand Ole Opry Artists 


CARL SMITH 



Carl Smith was born on a farm in 
Maynardsville, Tennessee, on March 
15, 1927. His first radio work was at 
the age of 13 on an amateur show. 

After being discharged from the 
Navy, Carl returned to WROL, Knox- 
ville to the old group he sang with 
while in school. Later he moved to 
WGAC, Augusta, and from there to 
WWNC, Asheville, N. C. In 1949 he 
returned to Knoxville to join the 
Molly O’Day Show. While on station 
WROL, Knoxville, as a featured 
singer, Carl made his first Columbia 
record which was “Guilty Conscience” 
and “Washing My Dreams In Tears.” 
A few weeks later he moved to WSM 
and the Grand Ole Opry. At the pres- 
ent time, Carl has six morning shows 
each week on WSM (5:15 a. m. Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday) (6:15 a. m. 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday CST) 
also his Grand Ole Opry appearance 
at various times during the four hour 
show. 


HANK SNOW 



Hank Snow was born in Canada. He 
began his musical career at the age of 
thirteen, when he shipped to sea as a 
cabin boy with his guitar and began 
entertaining his shipmates with songs, 
dances, and guitar interludes. 

After three years at sea, Hank de- 
cided to become a professional enter- 
tainer. He worked his way to Halifax 
to audition for a radio job. He made 
the grade, and from then on radio was 
his career. 

He later organized a five-piece coun- 
try band and played and sang regu- 
larly for the Canadian Broadcasting 
Company. 

Hank joined WSM in 1950, and it 
was later that year that his recording 
of his song, “I’m Movin’ On,” hit the 
top of the country song popularity 
charts. Most of the time since then, 
he has been represented on the top ten 
list by at least one song, the latest of 
which is “Honeymoon On A Rocket- 
ship.” 


ERNEST TUBB 



Ernest Tubb, the Texas troubadour, 
is one of the enduring stars of the 
Grand Ole Opry. 

When he was a boy his guiding star 
was the late Jimmy Rodgers, the 
Singing Brakeman, an early folk sing- 
ing star in Texas. When Jimmy Rod- 
gers died, his widow gave his guitar 
to Ernest, who proudly uses it in his 
radio and personal appearances. 

He made personal appearances all 
over Texas and then was accepted on 
the Grand Ole Opry in 1942. 

He made his first recording in 1940, 
but his first big hit was a song called 
“I’m Walking The Floor Over You,” 
which he still uses as a theme song. 
Since that time he has sold more than 
15,000,000 Decca records in the past 
ten years. 


KITTY WELLS 



Kitty Wells has a natural, sweet 
voice, which has grown into one of 
beauty and warmth with experience. 
On the stage of the Grand Ole Opry, 
Kitty Wells commands attention for 
two reasons: first, she is a grand per- 
former and second, she is a very beau- 
tiful girl with dark hair and eyes 
that twinkle as she gives out with a 
heart song or a comedy number. 

Muriel Deason, now known to mil- 
lions as Kitty Wells, is in private life, 
Mrs. Johnny Wright, wife of the 
senior partner in the team known as 
Johnny and Jack, also stars of the 
Grand Ole Opry. They have three 
children, Ruby Jean, 13; Johnny, Jr., 
called Bobby, 10, and Carol Sue, 7. 

Kitty Wells’ recording of “It Wasn’t 
God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” 
on Decca Records brought her over- 
night success. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 





ANITA 


^AtOTHGR 

mm 


A BOUQUET ON YOUR 
28th ANNIVERSARY 


The Cash Box, Music 


Page 26 


November 28, 1953 


^llg|Rllgllgl|glHII51lgll51BIKII5ll5ll5ll51lg|RIBlKllHllg|l5IRII»lgl 


Fondest Wishes 

on your 

28 th 

Anniversary 


It Brings Many 
Pleasant Memories 


14 years on the 
Grand Ole Opry 


Hear H is Latest 

1 

Decca Release 


ggUgHUi® 


COUNTRY 

WALTZ" 


'CABIN 
OF LOVE 

Decca 28749 


jl rosi iaaiKiiaisp star of 

| WSM’S 8 
" GRAND OLE OPRY I 

[X| 

Radio and TV. | 

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m 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 


This year American music suffered one of its severest 
blows. It lost Hank Williams at the age of 29. 

In a very realistic sense, Hank was one of America’s 
truly great songwriters. Though he wrote in the folk idiom, 
his melodies and lyrics were universal. 

A great artist besides being a great songwriter — for 
three years in a row he won The Cash Box award in the 
folk field — with the passing of time, Hank would have 
undoubtedly become one of the most revered figures in 
the entertainment world. 


For his appeal was a basic one. He wrote and sang sim- 
ply, saying beautifully the things which the ordinary person 
thought and felt but couldn’t say. 

What hurts most ahout the death of Hank Williams is 
that he was just at the beginning of his career. It’s hard to 
think of a man who had a dozen or more smash hits as 
being just a beginner, but at 29 Hank hadn’t been at song- 
writing and recording for very long. The main body of his 
work lay ahead of him. And it is that which the American 
public will be deprived of. 


The loss, of course, can never be fully evaluated but 
every indication is that there would have been the same pro- 
lific number of songs coming from his pen in the future as 
there had been in the past. 


If one were to ask what was Hank’s greatest achievement 
during his lifetime, the answer would have to be the fact that 
he opened up and revealed to the American public an entire 
new field of music. For more than anyone else, Hank helped 
to bridge the gap between folk music and popular music. 


It isn’t more than a few years ago that folk music was 
thought of by the general public as backward music, lacking 
in meaning to people outside of hill country areas and 
certainly lacking in the basic ability to appeal to a large 
diversified audience. Hank helped to show how wrong that 
attitude was. 


One after another — writing for a folk audience — he 
turned out songs which the American people en masse took 
over as its own. He demonstrated by the only way possible — 
the producing of hits — that great material can come from 
any area of the country, not only the large cities or the east 
coast or the west coast. He showed that a song being sung 
to the accompaniment of a single guitar could get its message 
across the same as one being done with a thirty piece orches- 
tra. And he showed moreover that a song written for a single 
guitar could also sound great with a thirty piece orchestra. 


It was Hank Williams’ finest achievement that he played 
such a tremendous part in demonstrating these things. More 
than his great songs — which will live on and be sung for 
generations to come — Hank Williams’ place in the history 
of music will be secured by this accomplishment: that he 
widened the horizons of American music by opening up the 
entire folk field for popular enjoyment. 




The Cash Box , Music 


Page 27 


November 28, 1953 


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♦ 


MANAGER’S 

DIRECTORY 

These Men Guide 
The Stars Of 


♦ 

♦ 


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1 

♦ 

♦ 

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♦ Grand Ole Opry ♦ 




♦ • X. COSSE 


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MARTHA CARSON 


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hi 


♦ • TILLMAN FRANKS ♦ 


hi 


^ THE (BILL) CARLISLES ^ 


♦ • HOT GILLIAM 


♦ 

♦ 

; 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

i 


COWBOY COPAS 

HUBERT LONG 

WEBB PIERCE 

FRANKIE MORE 

JOHNNIE & JACK 
KITTY WELLS 


1 

1 

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1 • DEWEY MOUSSON 1 

1 


$ LITTLE JIMMIE DICKENS ♦ 


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NORM RILEY 

GOLDIE HILL 

BOB ROSS 

GEORGE MORGAN 

FORD RUSH 

ROY ACUFF 

Under The 
Supervision Of 


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I JAMES DENNY i 

WSM ARTIST 


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SERVICE BUREAU 


♦ 

♦ 


A Tribute To WSM & Grand Ole Opry 

by Pee Wee King 

(Dedicated to the memory of the late J. L. Frank.) 


When we auditioned at the Grand 
Ole Opry in June 1937 we were im- 
mediately signed to a one year con- 
tract which stretched out into a ten 
year stay. What memories I have 
of the many fine people and artists 
who were part of the Pee Wee King 
Golden West Cowboy Unit! 

In 1937 we consisted of Abner 
Simms, Lost John Miller, Cowboy 
Jack Skaggs, Milton Estes, Curley 
Rose and his sister Texas Daisy. 
Solemn Ole Judge Hay was our an- 
nouncer and on many Saturday 
nights, during our performance, he 
would praise us as the greatest unit 
to ever appear on that stage. 

About that time, our former boss- 
man, Gene Autry, called us to Holly- 
wood where we made our first west- 
ern movie. This was 1938 and the 
movie was titled, “Gold Mine In The 
Sky.” It was also our first associa- 
tion with Fred Rose (the Irving Ber- 
lin of the Hillbillies). Fred wrote a 
couple of songs for the movie. 

Upon our return to Nashville, Sarie 
and Sally became part of our unit. 
We broke and established many new 
house records and as time went on 
we added the Delmore Brothers as 
well as new band members. The latter 
included Whitey Carson, Johnny 
Arizona, Speedy McNatt and the 
great Eddy Arnold who came to us 
as Smiling Eddy Arnold. Of course, 
everyone knows the story of how 
Eddy came to me the night of his 
wedding, after five years with our 
band, and asked me for a weekly 
raise of $10. I was unable to comply 
and so he gave me six months notice 
(thank goodness). Eddy, as you all 
know, went on to become America’s 
No. 1 Folk Singer. 

As time went on there were many 
changes. Redd Stewart re-joined the 
band. Then there were Ford Rush, 
Jr., Jimmy Widner and Joe Zinkins. 
In 1941 the one and only Minnie 
Pearl became one of our aggregation. 
There will never be another like her. 
About this time we got a new girl 
singer named Becky Barfield and an- 
other violinist from Ohio named Slim 
Luse. 

When the second World War came 
the Grand Ole Opry Camel Caravan 
made history with its 19 month ex- 
tended tour of 41 states and 4 for- 
eign countries. The first unit of en- 
tertainers to appear overseas during 
this war. We were proud of our re- 
cord. During this time San Antonio 
Rose became a permanent member 
and Charlie Wiggins joined our band. 

After the Caravan days we settled 
down as regular features each Satur- 
day night on the NBC portion of the 
Grand Ole Opry. We presented many 
celebrated radio, record and movie 
stars, including the first appearance, 
and the only one, of Gene Autry. We 
were also the first unit on the Grand 
Ole Opry to perform for a Governor’s 
campaign. 

Then came a tall Texas Troubador, 
Ernest Tubb. Shortly thereafter, dur- 
ing a Sunday performance at Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, I introduced as a 


part of our Grand Ole Opry unit, 
which J. L. Frank was showing, a 
young lad named Hank Williams. 
What followed is history. 

We then revamped the Golden West 
Cowboys with such new members as 
Tex (Cuzzin Jody) Summey, Jimmy 
Wilson, A1 Smith, Lonnie Hall, George 
Havens and Norman Nettles. What 
a line-up this was. We later added 
Buddy Harold and then “Boots.” 
“Boots” was a trick horse I used on 
personal appearances. I hired trainer, 
Bill Carr, to care for and travel with 
her. As Minnie Pearl often remarked, 
“Pee Wee, I’d rather have another 
spot on the show as it’s tough to 
follow that horse.” 

We then began to spread out into 
new territory. The Warner houses 
took us into Pennsylvania, New York 
State and the way into New England. 
About this time J. L. brought Curley 
Fox and Ruby, Duke of Paducah 
(Whitey Ford) and Lew Childre, as 
well as Grandpa Jones and Cowboy 
Copas to the Grand Old Opry as part 
time members of the Pee Wee King 
Grand Ole Opry Show. Of course, 
there were others. Cindy Walker, Ray 
Whitley, Merle Travis, Dick Tracy 
(Ralph Byrd) and Jimmy Wakely. I 
recall the parking lot next door to 
WSM’s Studios and the little pie 
wagon where J. L. Frank made the 
deal after Roy Acuff appeared on the 
Pee Wee King Show for a Saturday 
night Grand Ole Opry show to leave 
Knoxville. Roy was to leave the Crazy 
Tennesseans and join the Grand Ole 
Opry, and as the future was to reveal, 
he became the famous Smokey Moun- 
tain Boy, King of the Hillbillies. 

Many happy days and many memo- 
rable ones. Even the Texas Drifter 
was amazed when he joined our unit. 
As general manager of WSM Harry 
Stone had plenty to be proud of when 
he left his post. He can look back 
with a great deal of pride at the 
many famous names he worked with 
to make country music the success 
it is today. 

Shortly after Shorty Boyd and Gene 
Stewart joined our band I hired a 
drummer to add rhythm to our Coun- 
try-Western styled music. I formed 
the band with me today and decided 
to leave the Grand Ole Opry. I had 
an eye toward television which 
seemed to be the thing of the future. 
The same band has the enviable re- 
cord of four consecutive years of be- 
ing voted the Nation’s No. 1 Western 
Band. 

In my haste to write this tribute 
I may have omitted some names. 
Should this be the case, I hasten to 
assure you it was not intentional. 

I’m sure J. L. Frank still smiles 
at the many tricks he played on the 
members of the Pee Wee King unit 
while playing schools, auditoriums, 
fairs, ballrooms, theatres, hotels, 
barns, boats, truck beds and portable 
stages, picnics and any social or civic 
event that called for entertainment. 

Congratulations and best wishes to 
all my friends at WSM and the Grand 
Ole Opry. 


A 

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Congratulations 
on your 

28th 

ANNIVERSARY 

Cjraclij 

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# Congratulations | 

I WSM ? 

f. and £ 


Ta una va 

| Grand Ole Opry { 

on your 5 

28th 

Anniversary 


and Thanks For Letting Us 
Photograph 
The Great Stars Of 


i GRAND OLE OPRY { 

5 • f 

f GORDON GILLINGHAM ^ 

j JEANNE & GORDON PHOTOGRAPHERS j 




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Best Wishes 

on your 

28th 
1 ANNIVERSARY 


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MAR-KAY MUSIC 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 


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Many More 
Successful Years 
To 

GRAND OLE OPRY 

On Your 

28 th 

Anniversary 

JERRY BYRD 

Mercury Records 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



The Cash Box , Music 


Page 28 


November 28, 1953 


Advertising On Grand Ole Opry 
Pays Off; Sponsors Wait In Line 


Stapp Knows How 
To Pick ’Em 

To get a place on the Grand Ole 
Opry is the ultimate aim of the coun- 
try musician, for that means he has 
arrived at the top of big time country 
music. The best way to get that spot is 
for the aspirant to get the attention of 
WSM’s program director Jack Stapp, 
whom “Time” Magazine called the 
Rudolph Bing of Grand Ole Opry, and 
convince him that he has the poten- 
tialities of developing into a finished 
country performer. 

The simplest way to do this is to 
attend the regular weekly auditions 
held at WSM. Stapp’s attention is 
sometimes called to promising per- 
formers by some of the Grand Ole 
Opry Stars and by visiting song plug- 
gers. This often results in a special 
audition for the recommended per- 
former. 

Regardless of how a potential star 
comes to the attention of WSM, if he 
has a distinctive style, seems sincere 
and forceful, Stapp often will give 
him some guest spots on regular 
shows and perhaps his own early 
morning show -in order to give Rim an 
opportunity to develop. In the course 
of a year, he should have gained in 
popularity and improved sufficienty in 
style and performance to prove his 
worth. If he has not, he probably 
will have shown conclusively that he 
is lacking in some necessary quality 
and that he will never find his way 
to the top. 

After director Stapp satisfies him- 
self with the singing style and instru- 
mental ability of the new talent, he 
also checks into his ability to talk and 
read effectively. The informal nature 
of country music makes it desirable 
for the entertainer to act as master 
of ceremonies very often, and he must 
be able to read effectively so that he 
may help to deliver the commercial 
announcements for his sponsors’ prod- 
ucts. 


The original purpose of the Grand 
Ole Opry was not commercial, but 
the show’s large audience and its 
sales impact upon the listeners made 
it a busy market place for all man- 
ner of products. For years now, 
prospective sponsors have been 
lined up four or five deep, waiting 
for commercial time to become avail- 
able on the Opry. Since the show is 
so successful as a sales medium, 
there is little turnover in sponsors 
of the various segments of the pro- 
gram. 

This condition resulted, several 
years ago, in repeated requests from 
the prospective sponsors that the 
show be started earlier in the day to 
make more time avalable. WSM man- 
agement did not want to expand the 
Opry itself beyond its four-and-one- 
half hour span. Instead, a group of 
individual “pre-Opry” shows were 
begun in the station’s auditorium 
studio, which accommodates a live 
audience of about 500 persons. These 
shows, featuring Opry artists, begin 
at 5:15 and run until the start of the 
opry at 7:30. 

The pre-Opry shows were still not 
sufficient to satisfy the sponsorship 
demand, and WSM found it necessary 
to spot a few country type shows on 
Friday night, featuring the Opry’s 
stars. 

In the fall of 1951, the individual 
Friday night shows were unified as 
separate segments of a big country 
show known as The Friday Night 
Frolic. This show originates in the 
WSM studio auditorium from 7:00 to 
9:30 and plays to a live audience 
limited to the studio’s capacity of 500. 

Some of the sponsors on these ex- 
tra-shows are waiting for an oppor- 
tunity for time on the Opry tiself. 
Others already have time on the Opry 
and are using the other shows for 
added effect. 

The results achieved by some of 
the sponsors on both the Opry and 
the Pre-Opry shows make fabulous 
success stories. 


The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- 
pany has used the Opry to sell Prince 
Albert for better than 14 years. Royal 
Crown Cola is now in its 12th year 
of sponsorship. When Royal-Barry 
Carter Mills began advertising Martha 
White Flour on WSM in 1946, it was 
a small company with fairly local 
distribution. Now the product has 
good distribution in 18 states. In mer- 
chandising their product, the company 
uses the slogan, “Early to bed and 
early to rise, work like hell, and ad- 
vertise — on the Grand Ole Opry.” 

To test WSM audience interest at 
a different hour from that of their 
regular program, Jefferson Island 
Salt Company bought a one minute 
commercial spot announcement for 
one time only at 7:00 P.M. in Septem- 
ber of 1951, and offered a free picture 
of Little Jimmy Dickens, who stars on 
their portion of the Opry. They got 
24,984 replies. 

Because of WSM’s broad coverage, 
most of the sponsors are manufac- 
turers and wholesale distributors. 
But the station has one retail adver- 
tiser. That’s Harvey’s department 
store that was established in Nash- 
ville in 1941. He used WSM as an 
advertising medium. In ten years, his 
'store expanded from the original 35 
foot front to four buildings with a 
frontage of about 300 feet, and his 
business volume from $500,000 to 
more than $11,000,000. 

The station also has one large mail- 
order account. Mr. Otis Carter has 
been selling baby chicks by mail over 
WSM for 15 years. Carter has a half 
hour pre-Opry show. In the fall of 
1951, he sold all the chicks he had. 
Running out of his stock, he put up 
his cattle for sale and two programs 
did the trick. He sold every head of 
cattle for a total of $51,592. Mr. Car- 
ter’s words sum up the effect of 
WSM’s ability to sell. 

“Anyone can sell a farmer any- 
thing he needs over WSM”. 


The Original Hit! 

“CARIBBEAN” 

MITCHELL TOROK 

on Abbott #140 

ABBOTT RECORD CO. 

6636 Hollywood Boulevard 
Hollywood 28, Calif. 



The stories on Grand Ole Opry 
in this issue of “The Cash Box” 
have been based on the book 

“Grand Ole Opry” 

written by William R. McDaniel 
together with Harold Seligman 
and published by Greenberg. 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



1. I FORGOT MORE THAN YOU'LL 

EVER KNOW 

The Davis Sisters 

(RCA Victor 20-5345; 47-5345) 

2. THERE STANDS THE GLASS 

Webb Pierce 

(Decca 28834; 9-28834) 

3. HEY JOE! 

Carl Smith 

(Columbia 21129; 4-21129) 

4. A DEAR JOHN LETTER 
Jean Shepard & Ferlin Huskey 
(Capitol 2502; F-2502) 

5. LET ME BE THE ONE 

Hank Locklin 

(4 Star 1641; 45-1641) 

6. CARIBBEAN 

Mitchell Torok 
(Abbott 140; 50-140) 

7. FORGIVE ME, JOHN 

Jean Shepard & Ferlin Huskey 
(Capitol 2586; F-2586) 

8. I'M WALKING THE DOG 

Webb Pierce 

(Decco 28834; 9-28834) 

9. SHAKE A HAND 

Red Foley 

(Decca 28839; 9-28839) 

10. IT'S BEEN SO LONG 
Webb Pierce 
(Decca 28725; 9-28725) 


S|g)|gllg]lll§][Kl!llg)lK)(g]g]lglg)!g][g![§!gll§]|§![g!lgl|g)lg!ljg 

Congratulations 
js On Your 

1 28th 

i ANNIVERSARY 

0 

1 From 

1 COUSIN JODY 

and his 

“Country Cousins” 


Wl SHIP ANYWHERE 

Buckley’s 


1707 CHURCH 


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ONE STOP 
NASHVILLE 
TENN. 


5 * 


40'* e«4 71 s 8^ ? Regular 

Wholesale 
WE STOCK ALL LABELS 
ORDER FROM CASH BOX CHARTS 


|Big Operator & DJ Reactio 

On The 

-SONG FROM BATON ROUGE 

entitled 

33 


rrr 


GET A MOVE 
ON, BABY' 

recorded by 

LEON TASSIN 


Pelican 105 


(BMI) 


BUCKEYE PUBLISHING CO. 

204 W. 8th STREET CINCINNATI 



The Cash Box, Music 


Page 29 


November 28, 1953 



at his best! 


george 


MORGAN 




NO ONE KNOWS IT 
BETTER THAN ME 

by Joachim Millien, Boudleaux Bryant and Vic McAlpin 


on COLUMBIA RECORDS 



GOOD BETS 

FABOR RECORD CO’S NEW RELEASES! 


Ginny Wright 

Louisiana Haynde Artist 

with Jim Reeves Reciting 


(You Want Me No.) 
Fabor # 101 


Tom Bearden — 

Louisiana Hayride Artist 


FABOR RECORDS 


6636 Hollywood Blvd., Suite # 207 


Hollywood 28, Calif. 


Country 

Instruments 


In auditioning new performers for 
the Opry, equal consideration is given 
to the authenticity of the instrument 
the artist plays as well as his vocal 
talent. For accompaniment must be 
restricted to folk instruments. 

Folk instruments for country music 
are those that are often found in rural 
homes, that can be played for accom- 
paniment to singing without the re- 
quirement of much formal training. 
These are mainly stringed instruments 
such as the banjo, the fiddle, the zither 
or similar small harps, the guitar, the 
bass fiddle, the mandolin and other 
such instruments. 

In early years of the Grand Ole 
Oprv, the banjo was quite widely used 
by folk artists, but it has gradually 
been supplanted bv the guitar. Uncle 
Dave Macon, the first vocalist on the 
Opry, accompanied his singing with 
a banjo for 26 years. Stringbean, 
one of the featured artists on the 
Prince Albert portion of the Opry, 
plays a banjo, as do several of the 
musicians in the four original old time 
bands. But just about all the ton 
singers accompany themselves with a 
guitar. 

The Spanish guitar, otherwise 
known as the “take-off” guitar by the 
country musicians, came into use from 
Mexico by way of the cowboy singing 
stars. As the western and hillbilly 
singers mixed, the guitar was adopted 
by the hillbillies, along with the west- 
ern costumes, for it was somewhat 
more versatile and easier to play. Jt 
was more appropriate for the senti- 
mental songs than was the banjo. 

When electronic developments pro- 
duced the electric guitar, the Oprv 
and similar programs permitted its 
use. The electric guitar added volume 
and versatility needed in personal 
appearances. 

Nevertheless, some folk artists be- 
lieve that the instrumentation should 
be restricted to the instruments in 
use years ago. For that reason Roy 
Acuff will not permit an electric 
guitar to be used in his troupe. 

Likewise, drums are never used in 
authentic country bands and are 
never permitted on Grand Ole Opry. 
In place of drums, the bass fiddle is 
used as a percussion instrument. 

No brasses or woodwinds are per- 
mitted. The nearest thing to a wood- 
wind is the harmonica which was 
played in the early days of the Opry 
by some of the original crew and is 
still used by some groups. The accor- 
dion is also used often. And the piano 
is used because it is an instrument for 
home use. 


Jim Denny— the 
Artist’s Friend 



Twenty-five years with WSM, nine- 
teen years with Grand Ole Opry and 
we find James Denny, head of the 
Artists Service Bureau, at the ripe 
and tottering age of a young forty- 
two. 

Denny, one of the most respected 
and most important men in the Nash- 
ville music picture started with WSM 
when but seventeen years of age as 
a switchboard operator. Nineteen 
years ago he became associated with 
Grand Ole Opry and hasn’t missed a 
Saturdav night show during that 
period. Denny followed the Opry from 
the Studio which is today WSM thru 
the Hillboro Theatre, the Dixie Thea- 
tre, the Memorial Building and to the 
Ryman Auditorium, where today the 
Grand Ole Opry still puts on its show 
each Saturday evening. 

Denny watched all the current stars 
on the Opry come into the picture and 
has guided many of their careers. 
Some of the stars who became na- 
tional figures while Denny has been 
head of WSM’s Artist Service Bureau 
include Red Foley. Hank Williams, 
Carl Smith, Webb Pierce, Marty Rob- 
bins, and many others. 

Grand Ole Opry has 128 artists and 
Denny has talked to as many as 20 
states in one day with reference to 
bookings. He has also had as many 
as 28 long distance calls backed up as 
he plods through the endless maze of 
details and time consuming tasks that 
weigh so heavily on his shoulders. 
Denny has booked shows in every 
state in the Union and all the prov- 
inces of Canada. He was responsible 
for setting up the Grand Ole Opry 
show at New York’s Hotel Astor Roof 
in 1952. 

Jim Denny is father confessor to all 
the boys on the Opry. As host to visi- 
tors, he has done much to encourage 
business and music trade interest in 
the hationally famous show. 


Congratulations & Best Wishes 

GRAND OLE OPRY-WSM 


CURRENT RELEASE 


'GOODBYE BOBBY BOY, GOODBYE' 

recorded by 

RED FOLEY Decca 


FORREST MUSIC CORP. 


x 


ELMO WHITE, prof. mgr. 

9 East 40th Street 


New York 


* t 


THE TEN FOLK AND WESTERN RECORDS 

DISK JOCKEYS PLAYED 

MOST THIS WEEK 

1. 

1 FORGOT MORE THAN YOU'LL 



EVER KNOW 

Davis Sisters (RCA Victor) 

2. 

LET ME BE THE ONE 

Hank Locklin (4 Star) 

3. 

THERE STANDS THE GLASS 

Webb Pierce (Decca) 

4. 

HEY JOE! 

. . Carl Smith (Columbia) 

5. 

MAMA, COME GET YOUR BABY BOY Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor) 

6. 

I'M WALKING THE DOG 

Webb Pierce (Decca) 

7. 

IT'S BEEN SO LONG 

Webb Pierce (Decca) 

8. 

CARIBBEAN 

. . Mitchell Torok (Abbott) 

9. 

TAIN'T NICE 

The Carlisles (Mercury) 

10. 

NORTH WIND 

Slim Whitman (Imperial) 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 





The Cash Box , Music 


Page 30 


November 28, 1953 



(No. 1 in CASH BOX and BILLBOARD) 

"I FORGOT MORE 
THAN YOU'LL EVER KNOW 


(and the answer) 

"I FOUND OUT MORE 
THAN YOU EVER KNEW 

(Also picked in all charts) 

"NORTH WIND" 

AND NOW 


(Bullseye in Cash Box and Record 
of the week in Billboard) 



; ^Tniiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiu 

(FAIRWAY MUSIC CORP 1 

6365 Selma Ave., Hollywood, Calif. | 

Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiir 


• =iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiir 


NEWS that’s UP-TO-THE-MINUTE 
HEVIEWS of the LATEST RECORDS 
CHARTS compiled EVERY WEEK 
ADS from LEADING RECORD FIRMS, 
ARTISTS and PURLISHERS 

Every Week In 

THE CASH BOX 
*15. PER YEAR 

(52 ISSUES) 

I 

J THE CASH BOX 
J 26 Wtrt 47th Street 
jj New York 19, N. Y. 

i Please enter our subscription for 1 year (52 issues) at $15. Enclosed Our 

i Check □ Please Send Us A Bill □ 

i 

J FIRM NAME 

i 

j ADDRESS 

| CITY ZONE STATE 

j Individual's Nam 

L. ...... 


BMI AWARDS “CITATION 
OF ACHIEVEMENT” TO TOP 
FOLK COMPOSERS AND PUB- 
LISHERS AT GRAND OLE OPRY 


NEW YORK — Writers and publishers of 24 of the outstanding folk tune 
leaders of 1952 will be honored by BMI during the program of events commem- 
orating the 28th Anniversary of Grand Ole Opry in Nashville Nov. 21. 

“Citation of Achievement” certificates will be presented by Carl Haverlin, 
president of BMI, to the 22 composers and 16 publishers whose songs reached 
the top brackets in popularity and sales during the past year. 

Participating with Haverlin in making the presentation are Robert J. Bur- 
ton, BMI’s vice-president in charge of publisher relations; Glenn Dolber, vice- 
president in charge of station relations; Robert Sour, assistant vice-president, 
and Russell Sanjek, director of special projects. 

BMI “Citations of Achievement” were scheduled to be presented to the 
following list of composers and publishers in recognition of the great popu- 
larity attained by their folk song leaders during 1952: 


DON’T LET THE STARS 

GET IN YOUR EYES Four Star Sales Company, Inc. ..Slim Willet 

YOUR CHEATIN’ HEART ..Acuff-Rose Publications Hank Williams 

CRYING IN THE CHAPEL ..Valley Publishers, Inc Artie Glenn 

GAMBLER’S GUITAR .Frederick Music Publishing Co— Jim Lowe 

HEY JOE Tannen. Music Incorporated JBoudleaux Bryant 

A DEAR JOHN LETTER ....American Music Incorporated Lewis Talley 

Fuzzy Owen 

CARIBBEAN American Music Incorporated ....Mitchell Torok 

MEXICAN JOE American Music Incorporated ....Mitchell Torok 

BUMMING AROUND Four Star Sales Company, Inc. ..Pete Graves 

NO HELP WANTED Acuff-Rose Publications Bill Carlisk 

BIG MAMOU Peer International Corporation ..Link Davis 

I FORGOT MORE THAN | 

YOU’LL EVER KNOW Fairway Music Company Carl A. Null 

RUB-A-DUB-DUB Brazos Valley Music Co. Hank Thompson 

FULL TIME JOB Acuff-Rose Publications Terry Tiefer 

I’M GONNA WALK & v 

TALK WITH MY LORD Acuff-Rose Publications Martha Carson 


GUY WHO INVENTED 
KISSIN’ 


THAT’S ME WITHOUT 
YOU 

LET ME KNOW 

GOING STEADY 

RAMBLIN’ MAN 

SATISFIED 


Hill & Range Songs, Inc. Charles Orr 

Earl Griswold 

Old Charter Publishing Co., Inc.-J. D. Miller 

Four Star Sales Company, Inc. ..Slim Wellet 


.Central Songs, Incorporated Faron Young 

.Acuff-Rose Publications Hank Williams 

.Acuff-Rose Publications Martha Carson 


BACK STREET AFFAIR ....Forrest Music Corporation Billy Wallace 


MIDNIGHT Tannen Music, Incorporated Boudleaux Bryant 

Chet Atkins 


IT’S BEEN SO LONG Cedarwood Publishing Co., Inc. ..Autry Grisham 


For the Disk Jox 
it's the 

CASH BOX 


Congratulations WSM and Grand Ole Opry 



NOW THE MOST COMPLETE MUSIC SYSTEM IS 









Page 61 


(EDITORIAL) 


November 28, 1953 




ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.— The mat- 
ter of licensing cigarette vendors is 
now confronting the legislators of the 
City of Chicago. One of the reasons 
advanced why these machines haven’t 
been in operation in this great city 
(only one in the country) is that 
“minors could purchase cigarettes”. 
Coinmen who intend to open cigar- 
ette operation, if the city licenses the 
machines, have promised to do every- 
thing in their power to forbid minors 
to buy cigarettes. However, we find 
a parallel in the problem faced by 
tavern owners. In a convention of the 
National Licensed Beverage Associa- 
tion at the Traymore Hotel, Atlantic 
City, this past week, Rocco B. Bunino, 
president, made this statement: “It’s 
about time the responsibility for pur- 
chases by minors is placed where it 
belongs — on the parents. The home is 
the place for minors to learn obedi- 
ence to law, personal responsibility 
and good citizenship.” 


Based on Nationwide Reports from Both Large and Small 
Operators, in Just 2 Years, 1 951 to 1 953, Operating Costs 
and Expense of Doing Business Have Increased 23.5% 


These are approximate aver- 
age increases. They have been 
verified by a noted Certified 
Public Accountant who 
analyzes the books of many 
Chicago operators as in keep- 
ing with the increases these 
operators have undergone 
since 1951. 


| Overhead Expense, Up 25% 

\ License Fees and Taxes, Up 15% 

General Costs, Up 20% 

/ Miscellaneous Expenses, Up 20% 

\ Equipment Costs, Up 30% 



WASHINGTON, D.C.— The Small 
Business Administration, which had 
ruled out wholesale and retail busi- 
nesses as borrowers, changed its rules 
this week to allow any business ex- 
cept those specifically excluded by law 
to get money if they were reasonable 
risks. SBA’s requirement that remains 
unchanged is that the applicant must 
prove he cannot obtain funds from 
private lenders, and that repayment 
of the loan must be “reasonably” as- 
sured. It is reported that the interest 
policy remains unchanged; 6 per cent 
on all direct loans. 



NEW YORK— The Cash Box has 
long advocated a sensible and definite 
method of depreciating equipment. It 
has reported, from time to time, ef- 
forts being made by Congress and 
Governmental agencies. Altho several 
plans have been presented, they are 
all in the process of being “studied”. 
This week, the Journal Of Commerce 
says editorially: “More flexible depre- 
ciation deductions for industry should 
be placed at the very top of the list 
of tax relief provisions that Congress 
will be asked to adopt at the next 
session.” . . . “any loss of revenue 
due to more flexible depreciation sche- 
dules for industry will be only tem- 
porary at worst. Larger deductions 
from taxable income in the early 
years of the life of a new facility will 
be offset by correspondingly smaller 
deductions in the later years.” . . . 
“Business should be authorized to 
adopt any depreciation schedule that 
management regards as suitable to 
the special conditions of the enter- 
prise.” 



PARIS, FRANCE— There is a 
rumor making the rounds here, which 
mny believe true, that there will be 
a ban by the French Government put 
on the import into France on coin op- 
erated machines, effective December 1. 


THE ANSWER REMAINS 10c PLAY 

FOR MUSIC: 10c Play Plus Front Money. FOR AMUSEMENT: Straight 10c Play. 


Many inquiries have been received by The Cash Box 
from operators large and small about the nation as to, 
“What’s happened to profits?” 

These operators, like most others, now find that they 
“must have more income” to enjoy the same profit they 
had in 1951. 

In short, as they state, and as is verified by a noted 
Chicago Certified Public Accountant who handles and 
analyzes the books of many operators in that city: 

“There must be at least 23.5% more intake today to 
equal the same profits we enjoyed in 1951.” 

This C.P.A. agrees with this figure. In fact, he claims: 

“Actually, in the case of the operating companies our 
firm handles, there is approximately 27% more income 
needed today, to equal the same profit enjoyed in 1951.” 

There seems to be only one answer to this problem. 
The Cash Box has, for over eleven years, been bringing 
this “answer” to the attention of the entire industry, time 
and time again: 10c Play. 

With more income needed to offset the constantly 
growing, inflationary overhead expense and cost of doing 
business, operators must take in more coin than they did, 
even two years ago, to enjoy the same sort of profitwise 
business they enjoyed in 1951. 

There are just so many peak hours of playtime on any 
location, anywhere in the nation. On 5c play, only so 
much intake is assured. The operators already know this 
amount of intake. 

They are suffering because, while their intake remains 
more or less the same in 1953 as it did in 1951, costs and 
expenses have continued to rise — to about 23.5% more 
in 1953 than in 1951. 

The amusement operators must adopt straight 10c 
play. This brought the shuffle games to great prominence 
everywhere. The shuffle game operators continue on 10c 
play. 

It is now up to the five-ball operators to do the same. 
The manufacturers of the five-ball games are all for 10c 
play. They leave this entirely up to the operators. 


As far as music is concerned, the automatic music 
operators must also change to 1 play 10c, 3 plays 25c 
and, at the same time, assure themselves of some profit 
income by obtaining front money guarantees from their 
locations. 

The vending machine operators have kept pace with 
all cost and expense increases. As cigarettes go up in 
price, because of additional city, county and state taxes, 
the operators of cigarette vendors raise their price ac- 
cordingly, to maintain their profit income level. 

As prices of soft drinks, coffee, foods, candies, nuts, 
and all other vended items go up in price, the vending 
machine operator instantly changes his coin chute to 
continue to bring in the same profit margin he formerly 
enjoyed. Otherwise, the vending machine operators would 
long, long ago have been pushed out of business. 

Industries and utilities all over the nation have raised 
their prices to match their increased costs. They haven’t 
hesitated a second to do so. Even the corner bootblack 
is now getting 3 and 4 times as much per shoe shine as 
he formerly did. Double what he got in ’51. 

But, for some unknown reason, the coin machine op- 
erators continue to flounder along, trying to maintain a 
profitwise income level on the impossible coinage they 
featured 20 years ago. 

Now the complaints are becoming more vociferous and 
the industry suffers. The fact remains that every manu- 
facturer in the field is for whatever method the operator 
can use which will assure the operator profit. 

The manufacturer realizes that financially healthy op- 
erators mean better customers for him and for his prod- 
ucts. He wants the operator to earn profit. 

The manufacturer tries with every bit of his intelli- 
gence and ingenuity to build products which will be more 
attractive to the public and will, therefore, bring the 
operators more playing customers. 

But the peak hours of play remain, more or less, the 
same. Therefore, it is up to the operator himself. 

It is up to the operator to check his own books, against 
the above increased costs, and then decide for himself 
whether or not “dime play is the answer.” 



The Cash Box 


Page 62 


November 28, 1953 


BATTLE FOR BETTER BIZ 


Believe Trade Must Make Many Changes to Assure Con- 
tinued Better Business for ’54. Foresee Change to 10c 
Play Imperative in Many Territories to Meet Higher Prices 
of New Games and Greatly Increased Overhead Expense 


Some Recommend Leaders Meet to Offer 
Solid and Logical Suggestions to Trade 
on How to Assure Better Business. 


MOA CONVENTION WILL 
BE BIGGEST EVER HELD 


e 

CHICAGO — The battle to assure continued better business in ’54 is now 


under way thruout the entire industry. 

Operators are discussing ways and 
means as to how they can assure 
themselves of such continued better 
business in the months to come. 

Jobbers and distributors are also 
discussing methods which they can 
adopt and which will assure them of 
continuing right ahead with as fine 
business as enjoyed in 1953. 

Manufacturers, of course, are well 
ahead with plans for ’54 production. 
But they, too, are working on ways 
and means to cover the trade more 
intensively. 

The manufacturers just simply 
cannot cut down their present prices. 
They are faced with the highest labor 
cost in their history, because of the 
tremendous free benefits, bonuses, and 
other inducements as well as general 
labor wages they are now paying. 

It is, therefore, the general belief 
of a great many in the trade, that it 
will be up to the operators, themselves, 


to better their path for themselves in 
’54. 

Many claim that operators will have 
to swing over to dime play in certain 
areas where such play hasn’t yet been 
tried on any large volume basis. 

These men feel that the operators, 
because of present high prices of 
equipment, plus the greatest over- 
head expense yet known to the field, 
simply must change from the 5c coin 
play action of 30 and even 40 years 
ago, to 10c play so as to assure them- 
selves being able to continue on ahead. 

Some have even recommended that 
the industry’s leaders arrange for a 
meeting whereby discussion will be 
on ways and means to help all con- 
tinue to enjoy better business for ’54. 

These men feel that someone at such 
a meet will come up with logical and 
solid suggestions which will meet with 
the majority approval and which will, 
therefore, help all concerned. 


Manufacturers Of Coin Operated 
Equip To Exhibit At NAAPPB Show 


Operators, As Well As Distribs And 
Arcade Owners Expected To Attend 


CHICAGO — As the manufacturers 
of coin operated amusement ma- 
chines haven’t displayed any equip- 
ment at their own convention for sev- 
eral years, and have expressed their 
intention of exhibiting at the forth- 
coming NAAPPB Convention at the 
Sherman Hotel, this city, on Novem- 
ber 29 to December 3, many opera- 
tors, as well as distributors and arcade 
owners are expected to be in the 
Windy City on that date. 

Several of the coin firms will en- 
tertain the visitors in private suites 
in the Sherman, following this prac- 
tice established during coin machine 
conventions in the past. 

Following is a list of firms who 
will exhibit coin operated machines: 

A.B.T. MANUFACTURING CORP. 
Chicago, I1L 


AUTO-PHOTO COMPANY 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

BALLY MANUFACTURING CO. 
Chicago, 111. 

CAPITOL PROJECTOR CORP. 

New York, N. Y. 

CHICAGO COIN MACHINE CO. 
Chicago, 111. 

DODGEM CORP. 

Exeter, N. H. 

EXHIBIT SUPPLY 
Chicago, 111. 

GENCO MFG. & SALES CO. 

Chicago, 111. 

INTERNATIONAL MUTOSCOPE 
CORP. 

Long Island City, N. Y. 

KING AMUSEMENT CO. 

Mount Clemens, Mich. 

THE BERT LANE COMPANY, INC. 
Miami, Fla. 


George A. Miller Advises Plans For 
Meeting At Palmer House, Chicago, 
March 8, 9 and 10, 1954, Nearing 
Completion. Exhibitors Seek Space. 



GEORGE A. MILLER 


President and General Manager, MOA 


OAKLAND, CALIF. — George A. 
Miller, president and general manager 
of M.O.A. (Music Operators of Am- 
erica) advised this past week that 
plans for what he terms, “The biggest 
convention ever held by M.O.A. ”, are 
now nearing completion. 

As yet Miller hasn’t advised just 


LEE MANUFACTURING CO. 

New York, N. Y. 

METEOR MACHINE CORP. 

New York, N. Y. 

MIKE MUNVES CORPORATION 
New York, N. Y. 

PHILADELPHIA TOBOGGAN CO. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

RENDOLOK MFG. CORP. 

New York, N. Y. 

RITEWAY SALES & MFG. CO. 

New York, N. Y. 

SCIENTIFIC MACHINE CORP. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SUN DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Waco, Texas 

WILLIAMS MANUFACTURING CO. 
Chicago, I1L 


who the exhibitors at this convention 
will be. 

He did state, “The list is very im- ; 
pressive and, what’s more”, he com- | 
mented happily, “is growing bigger 
each day. 

“More and more firms are anxious 
to display their wares at the forth- P 
coming M.O.A. Convention”, he said. 

It is understood that many of the 
vending machine manufacturers have 
already approached Miller for space 
to be allotted to them at the M.O.A. 
Convention. 

The convention will be held in Chi- 
cago at the Palmer House, March 8, i 
9 and 10, 1954. 

“It’s surprising”, Miller reported, 
“that already many have arranged 
for reservations at the Palmer House 
to make certain that they will have 
all the rooms they will need.” 

Miller is very enthusiastic over this 
forthcoming convention of Music Op- 
erators of America. He pointed out: 

“The automatic music industry has 
gone thru many problems these past 
few years. The Bryson-Kefauver Bill 
in 1952. The McCarran Bill in 1953. 

“We have had our hands full and 
we have worked hard to present our 
viewpoint to the nation’s legislators 
thru their committees. 

“We believe that in the future, we 
should be much better prepared than 
we have been in the past. The battles 
yet to come are the toughest. We have 
to win. 

“This”, he stated, “is one of the 
biggest reasons for this forthcoming 
convention. We want every single juke 
box operator in the nation to be 
present to hear what we have to say 
on how he can best prepare himself 
for any future legislative battles and 
what he can do to assure his winning 
these battles.” 

According to Miller, “This forth- 
coming convention, therefore, has a 
two-fold purpose. First, to present the 
manufacturers and exhibitors to the 
neonle who will attend. Second, for 
business discussions and a look into 
the future which is mighty important 
to everyone in the music business at 
this time.” 



The Cash Box 


Page 63 


November 28, 1953 


LIGHTNING SPEED OF TRAP HOLES . . . FLASHING ACTION OF 4 FLIPPERS!! 






HERE'S THE PLAY: 

★ Any 3 balls in line or 4 balls in 
center square trap holes awards 
Replays. 

★ Double Rotation sequence lights 
up corresponding Roll-Overs for 
Super-High Score and Super-Point 
Score. 


EXCITING AS A 
THREE 
RING 


CIRCUS! 


1140-50 N. KOSTNER AVE. 
CHICAGO 51, ILLINOIS 
‘ There is no substitute for Quality I” 


★ 4 POP BUMPERS ★ 4 FLIPPERS 

★ 2 CYCLONIC KICKERS ★ HIGH 

SCORE to 6 MILLION ★ 

★ New Hinged Front Door 


k Completing both Red and Blue 
Sequence lights up center Roll- 
Over for Replays. 


WurlitzerLineDisplayedAtSeattleCon- 
vention Of Licensed Beverage Assn. 



SEATTLE, WASH. — Northwest 
Sales Company, this city, Wurlitzer 
distributor for the Northwest terri- 
tory and Alaska, showed the Wurlit- 
zer line of phonographs and boxes at 
the convention of the Washington 
State Licensed Beverage Association 
held in this city. 

Ron Peeple, president of the dis- 
tributing organization, reported that 
the display was a tremendous success 
and a great deal of interest was 
shown in the equipment displayed. He 
stated that a selected program of 
popular music was put on continuous 


play and that the Model “1500” of- 
fered entertainment during the entire 
convention. 

On duty during the display were 
Sam Keys, a Northwest salesman, 
pictured above, standing between the 
phonographs, and 0. A. “Putt” Kin- 
caid, partner in Northwest Sales, 
standing at the extreme right. 

“Putt” Kincaid, who recently 
joined the firm as a partner, is well 
known to the trade in the northwest, 
and has a tremendous following 
among the operators. 


Liquor Tax 
Called Threat 
To Taverns 

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.— Of great 
interest to the coin trade is the state- 
ment made by Thomas J. Donovan of 
New York City, vice-president of the 
Licensed Beverage Industries, Inc., 
who said “The 144,000 tavern owners 
of the nation face a very real danger 
of extinction from the country’s busi- 
ness scene”, in charging that the tax- 
inflated prices are forcing the average 
American citizen out of the legal 
liquor market. 

Donovan addressed nearly 1,500 
delegates at the closing session of the 
National Licensed Beverage Associa- 
tion’s fourth annual convention at the 
Traymore Hotel, this city. He em- 
phasized that the tavern owner de- 
pends for his livelihood on the average 
person who is among the 88 per cent 
of city wage earners making less than 
$5,000 a year. 

Of further interest, are the resolu- 
tions approved by the delegates. For 
top consideration is that which de- 
mands a readjustment of the Federal 
excise tax on distilled spirits from 
$10.50 a gallon to $6. Also the elimina- 
tion of the present cabaret tax. In an- 
other resolution, the delegates noted 
that the industry, particularly the 
tavern branch, is depicted by certain 
TV and radio productions in an un- 
favorable, and in some instances un- 
savory light. 


/CLOSE-OUT!* 

25 

AMI 

Model 

"A" 

W rite - W ire— Phone 
FOR REAL LOW PRICE! 


RUNYON 

SALES COMPANY 

Factory Representatives for: 

AMI, Inc., Bally Manufacturing Co., 

J. H. Keeney & Co., Permo, Inc. 

593 10th Ave., New York 18, N. Y„ LO 4-1880 
221 Frelinghuysen Ave., Nework 8, N. J., Bl 3-8777 


CLEANED-CHECKED 
READY TO GO! 

Wur. 1015 .. $125. Rock-Ola 1422$ 95. 
Wur. 1080.. 125. Rock-Ola 1426 125. 

See. 100-A AMI A 225. 

78 rpm ... 495. AMI B 295. 

See. 146 .... 95. AMI C 325. 

Wur. 5/10/25c 3020 Wall Boxes, ea. $12.50 


DAVID ROSEN 

Exclude AM i Dist. Ea. Pa. 

855 N. BROAD STREET, PHILA. 23, PA 
PHONE: STEVENSON 2-2903 


“It> 8 WhaVa in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 




The Cash Box 


SPECIAL SALE! 

STATLER rebuilt 8 ^ ^ 

Column CIGARETTE JjO.jU 
—and 9 Column ~ 

COOKIE Machines EM* 

Supreme Distributors, Inc. 

416 S. W. 8th AVE., MIAMI 37, FLA. 


Page 64 


Wurlitzer- Frankie Laine Contest Winner Soon 


NEW YORK— A. D. Palmer, Jr., 
advertising and sales promotion man- 
ager for The Rudolph Wurlitzer Com- 
pany, North Tonawanda, N.Y., spent 
most of the week here putting the fin- 
ishing touches to the Wurlitzer- 
Frankie Laine contest. 


Palmer attended the meeting on 
Wednesday and Thursday, November 
18 and 19, when a gathering of Colum- 
bia record executives and trade press 
experts listened to the dubs submitted 
by sectional winners. Top winner will 
be announced shortly. 


November 28, 1953 


TO SEE GENCO'S 


the game with 

ENDLESS COMBINATIONS OF 
STRAIGHT and BANK SHOTS! 


1815 Quest Notre Dame, W. 
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA 


TriasohTw hy 

($cMf . KIODY-RIMS 

earn biggest profits year after year 

1 Flashiest Eye-Appeal 3. Simplest Mechanism 
2. SingeJ Action 4. Sturdiest Construct^ 




Start a steady-income route of Bally Kiddy-Rides now. 
Finance-Plan available through leading Bally Distributors. 


f MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

0 DIVISION OF NON MANUFACTURING CORPORATION 

2640 BELMONT AVENUE, CHICAGO 18, ILLINOIS 


BOOTHS 95, 96, 111, 112 

OUTDOOR AMUSEMENTS EXPOSITION 
SHERMAN HOTEL 

NOVEMBER 29, 30, DECEMBER 1, 2. 


Jess Henderson, 
Dallas Coinman 
Dies 

Coin machine operators in 
Dallas this week were saddened 
by news of the death of Jess 
Henderson, who for the past 
twenty years has held many jobs 
in the coin machine business. 
His death came as the result of 
an injury suffered many months 
ago when he was hit by an 
automobile. He has been in a 
semi-conscious state ever since. 

At the time of his accident, 
Jess was working for Leonard 
Coleman. He started his juke 
box career in 1933 with Electra 
Ball Company. During the years 
he had operated his own route, 
worked for Commercial Music 
and S. H. Lynch. He was one of 
the best mechanics in the busi- 
ness. 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 





The Cqsh Box 


Page 65 


November 28, 1953 


j 


I 







SCORt 


GLANCE 


high 

SCORE* 


CREATORS OF DEPENDABLE PLAY APPEAL 
4242 W. FILLMORE ST. CHICAGO 24, ILL. 


they 
Shoo/ 

♦he 
Works 
on 

this One. 1 

OnM 

See Your Distributor Now! 


Numbers 1 to 6 each life a 
letter to spell G-U-N C-L-U-B 
on backglass! 

/JV Spelling G-U-N C-L-U-B Scores 1 
free play and lites bottom center 
rollover and 2 top side rollovers 
for replays! Thereafter, 1 to 6 
scores 1 replay. 

© Hitting 2 stand-up targets after 
spelling G-U-N C-L-U-B lites up 4 
additional side rollovers for 1 re- 
play. A "SURE SHOT" feature! 

Ball over either of the 2 bottom 
side rollovers, when lit, lites up 
the next consecutive letter in 
G-U-N C-L-U-B! 

Available with 5c or 10 c 
Coin Chutes . . . 

We Recommend 10c PLAY! 

^UlievmA 

GUN CLUB 

RAPID-FIRE ACTION!!! 

0TWO BULLET-SPEED 
THUMPER BUMPERS! 

0THREE KICKOUTS! 

02 FLIPPERS! 

0TWO REBOUND KICKERS 
AT BOTH BOTTOM SIDES I 


Ac I Coo It 

fid I Ovv II AL SCHLESINGER 



A nickel Mills Dewey Bell operating in his 
dad’s saloon on a commission basis gave Ed Mapes 
his first idea about the coin machine business. 

The late Jack Keeney was the operator and since 
.Tack would not sell the machine when Ed wanted 
to buy it, he went out and purchased his first 
machine for his dad’s location. That was over 
forty years ago. 

Today, Ed Mapes owns the largest irrigated 
ranch in California. It consists of 10,000 acres of 
land and 2,600 head of cattle in the rich San Joa- 
quin Valley. He spends from eight to ten hours a 
day riding this ranch. As he sits in the saddle 
riding along, his mind must go back to the days 
when he headed a coin machine empire along the 
west coast. He can recall the branch offices at San 
Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Tacoma 
and Stockton. At one time there were 3500 slot machines in operation. Hundreds 


of employees travelled the highways and byways of the west coast handling the 
business of this coin machine empire. When the slots went out of fashion, Ed 
can recall the time he originated the free play on the Mills “Official” pin game 
and operated thousands of this type game along with a thousand phonographs. 
When he retired in 1950 everything was sold to his employees who had been with 
him for twenty years or more. Ed is very proud of his boys, most of whom have 


done exceedingly well. 


When he comes into San Francisco once a week Ed always contacts his 
friends. Old timers always know they can go to Ed with their problems and get 
help if they need it. When I had lunch with him, he seemed momentarily to 
forget his ranching empire to reminisce about the lifetime he spent in the coin 
machine business. His eyes sparkled. He was full of enthusiasm as he recalled 
various incidents. He still loves the coin machine business and since phono- 
graphs in this vicinity are operated on dime play, I asked him what the oppor- 
tunities were for new blood entering this business today as against the past. 
He replied: “I don’t think there is a better business than the phonograph busi- 
ness. I believe there are far more opportunities today for good live wire opera- 
tors than there were in my day”. 

As I see it, there are many who should be grateful for the men who 
pioneered the coin machine business. These men worked hard, had foresight and 
vision. While their methods would be questioned today, they were responsible 
for keeping many factories running. They set the pattern for what we know as 
the coin machine industry of today. 


Taran 
Rejoices ! 



SAM TARAN 


MIAMI, FLA. — Sam Taran, head 
of the distributing firm in this city 
bearing his name, received news of 
a personal nature on Monday, Nov- 
ember 16, which, he states: “Is the 
best news I’ve ever had in my life.” 


N. Y. Polio Fund Drive 
Committee Meets Nov. 23 

NEW YORK — Sam Kresberg will 
head a group of coin machine leaders 
in the music and games division who 
meet at Bob Olin’s Restaurant, this 
city, on Monday, November 23 for 
luncheon, to discuss organizing an 
industry Polio Fund Drive in this 
area. 


CLEANING I 

house! 

LOOK AT THE BARGAINS! 

UNITED DELUXE 
6-Player BOWLER $85.00 
UNITED SUPER 
6-Player BOWLER 175.00 
UNITED 10th 

FRAME BOWLER 265.00 

5G0 ASSORTED PIN GAMES 

With Flippers And Power Bumpers 

G r ,«" eUp $15. each 
s T 9? 2 m< " ui " $25. each 

THIS IS IT! 
UNITED’S 

RIO 

Going Great Guns ! 

The Best Yet! 


NOW DELIVERING! 
WILLIAMS’ 

GUN CLUB 


DEI HTTA distributing 

IS i Lull A COMPANY 

(Exclusive Wurlitzer Distributor) 

NEWARK NEW YORK 

(WAYNE COUNTY) 

(Phone: 598) 


“/!’* What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 




The Cash Box 


Page 66 


November 28, 1953 



GENCO'S 


the game with 

ENDLESS COMBINATIONS OF 
STRAIGHT and BANK SHOTS! 


S. L. LONDON MUSIC 
COMPANY 


3130 W. Losbon Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 


HOLIDAY 

SPECIALS! 

PALM BEACH 

$269.50 

SPOT LITE 

124.50 

FROLIC 

269.50 

BRIGHT SPOT 

139.50 

UNITED 5 WAY 

94.50 

BRIGHT LITE 

112.50 

RODEO 

242.25 

CONEY ISLAND 

147.25 

WRITE — WIRE — 

PHONE TODAY! 

We are exclusive factory distributors for: 

BALLY- WILLIAMS - ROCK-OLA 

1 AKE CITY 

AMUSE. CO. 

. 4533 PAYNE AVE., CLEVELAND, 0. 

(Tel.: 

HE 1-7577) 


AIR MAIL SUBSCRIPTION 

To The Cash box s 30 


ATTENTION!! 

MUSIC OPERATORS! 

This Is Your Last Chance 
To Cast Your Vote In The 

8th Annual 
MUSIC POLL 
of 

THE CASH BOX 

Fill Out The Ballot Below And Rush It 

To: THE CASH BOX, 26 W. 47th ST., N.Y.C. 


MY BEST MONEY-MAKING RECORD FOR 1953 WAS 

(Name of Record Here) (Artist Here) 

NOTICE: Be sure to include Name of Artist On All Records Listed 
BEST: 

Orchestra 

Female Vocalist 

Male Vocalist 

Vocal Combination 

Small Instrumental Group 

Western Record 

Western Artist 

Folk Record 

Folk Artist 

Rhythm 'N Blues Record 

Rhythm 'N Blues Artist 

MOST PROMISING NEW: 

Orchestra 

Female Vocalist 

Male Vocalist 

Vocal Combination 

Small Instrumental Group 

Western Artist 

Folk Artist 

Rhythm 'N Blues Artist 

IMPORTANT! 

EACH JUKE BOX YOU OWN COUNTS FOR ONE VOTE. EACH WALL OR BAR BOX 
YOU OWN COUNTS FOR ONE VOTE. EACH WIRED TELEPHONE MUSIC SHELL OR 
MIRRORED CABINET YOU OWN COUNTS FOR ONE VOTE. BE SURE TO LIST THE 
COMPLETE NUMBER OF UNITS YOU OWN INDIVIDUALLY ON THE BOTTOM TO 
GIVE THE RECORDS AND ARTISTS YOU SELECT FULL CREDIT. THESE BALLOTS 
ARE CONFIDENTIAL. INDIVIDUAL FIGURES ARE NOT REVEALED! 

NAME 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 

LIST YOUR VOTES HERE 

I operate the following number of Juke Boxes , 

Wall and Bar Boxes , Wired Telephone Music Shells , 

TOTAL NUMBER ARE YOUR VOTES! 



AMOA Of Baltimore 
Plans 6th Annual 
Banquet For Feb. ’54 

BALTIMORE, MD. — The Amuse- 
ment Machine Operators Association 
of Greater Baltimore is now planning 
to present its 6th Annual Dinner- 
Dance. While no date has been an- 
nounced, it is understood it will be 
held some Saturday or Sunday night 
in February. 

Irv Goldner, president for the past 
number of years, together with his 
many able associates have always 
come up with outstanding banquets, 
and it is expected the 1954 Dinner- 
Dance will outshine previous affairs. 

Once again, it is hoped that Mayor 
of Baltimore and other officials will 
participate, as they have in the past. 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 


The Cash Box 


Page 67 


November 28, 1953 



H SUS “>**"’* 


The “Gun-Ride” featuring a 
shooting beam of light, g 
by pilot to pass through the 
lighted buttons on backboard 
showing 20 world capitals, tests 
his skill as he attempts to go 
’Round The World in 60 seconds. 


LOOK AT 


THESE 


'Hatteud /tttvxctio* 

' for ALL LOCATIONS! 

725 West Diversey Blvd., Chicago 14, III. 


FEATURES! 

• Simulates actual Flight Actions! 

• Pilot Controls Desired Speed! 

• Specifically designed as an Adult 
Attraction! 

• No Gears or Belts to go out of Order! 

• Weather-proofed Throughout for Indoor 
or Outdoor Locations! 


LOOK FOR US AT THE 

OUTDOOR SHOW! 


■ 



“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 


More Factory Roadmen In 1954 


Manufacturers Reported Planning To Cover 
Nation More Intensively In Coming Year 


CHICAGO — All larger manufac- 
turers in this area are reported to be 
planning a more intense coverage of 
the nation than what has been seen 
since prior to the Korean war. 

When the Korean war came on 
along with the resultant buying scare 
as more defense production was or- 
dered, many called in their roadmen, 
and fewer of these salesmen have been 
seen about the country. 

But recently there has been more 
or less a rebirth of roadmen who have 
started to cover the country for lead- 
ing manufacturers of coin operated 
equipment of all kinds. 

The fact remains, as one noted 
manufacturer here advised, that the 
one best way to assure any factory of 
conditions in the country, as well as 
be able to better gauge production 
schedules, and understand the type of 
equipment the trade wants, is to cover 
the country with roadmen who meet 
directly with the trade and report 
back to their headquarters with the 
necessary information. 

It is also expected that the coin 
machines industry, like almost all 
other fields, will be faced with sharper 
competition in 1954. 

The belief is that, for the large fac- 
tories here to better schedule their 
production runs, and to also be able 
to look far enough ahead, they will 
require salesmen on the road who will 
have close contact with the buyers of 
equipment. 

The large manufactories are in po- 


sition to turn out new machines at a I need for more intensive coverage of 
speedy production rate. This causes | the market. 


NE^W YORK — When Frank Chacksfield, the “Ebb Tide” recording artist 
for London records was visiting in this city, he attended the Wurlitzer cocktail 
party. Here we see him (second from left) with (1 to r) : Les Boyd, Miss Jenia 
Glenor, Joe Young and A. D. Palmer, Jr. 


London Recording Artist At N. Y. Party 



Buy the besT 

IN MUSIC 

Reconditioned — Refinished 

SEEBURG 1-46 $135 

SEEBURG 1-47 165 

SEEBURG 1-48 BLOND 195 

WURLITZER 1015 150 

WURLITZER 1100 275 

WURLITZER 1400 495 

WURLITZER WOM Model 2140 25 

A.M.I. MODEL A 275 

A.M.I. MODEL B 325 

A.M.I. MODEL C 350 

A.M.I. MODEL D40 475 

A.M.I. MODEL D80 595 

A.M.I. WOM (5/10) 20 

NEWCHICOIN HITPARADE SI 32.50 


f XCLUSIVE SEEBURG DISTRIB- 
UTORS I hi ILLINOIS AND IOWA 


ATLAS 


MUSIC 

COMPANY 


2200 NORTH WESTERN AVE. 
CHICAGO 47, ILLINOIS 

(Phone. ARmitogc 6-5C05) 


F.A.B., Atlanta Office, 
Moves To New Quarters 

ATLANTA, GA.— Robert P. Tan- 
ner, manager of F. A. B. Distributing 
Company, Inc., Atlanta branch, ad- 
vises that effective Monday, Novem- 
ber 23, the firm will be located at its 
new address, 361 Parkway Drive, N.E. 

Tanner has issued invitations to 
operators in his territory to visit him 
at the new address. 





The Cash Box 


Page 68 


November 28, 1953 


English Singer & Op At Atlantic -N. Y. 




MIAMI MURMURS 


Mr. and Mrs. Willie Blatt and Mr. and Mrs. Bert Lane spent a week-end 
of three days at the Keys — and it rained every day. So, they played cards, 
rested, and sneaked in some fishing- in between drops. . . . Harry Pearl, from 
Newark, N. J., in town again. Harry’s practically commuting these days. . . . 
Eddie Lane vacationing here, but combines some business matters at the same 
time. . . . Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Parkoff, Atlantic-New York Corp., taking a well 
earned vacation. ... Eli Ross reports operators are very enthusiastic over the 
new Rock-Ola “Comet” phono, and he has orders on hand from practically 
every juke box op here. . . . Cy Wolfe, Seeburg distrib., in town, and apologizes 
for not visiting all the ops in town. He explains he is able to fill all the orders 
he has on hand for the new Seeburg Hi-Fi that he took at the last showing. 
. . . Ron Rood here busy getting his new showrooms ready for a showing of the 
new AMI phonos. He drops in to see his friend of a quarter of a century, Willie 
(Little Napoleon) Blatt, and winds up selling him 5 new 120 “E” phonos. 




NEW YORK — While visiting this country, Dorothy Squires, London Records 

recording artist, dropped into At- 
lantic-New York Corporation. Meyer 
Parkoff, Atlantic head, used his 
camera to take the above pic showing 
Dominic Ambrose, Suffolk - Nassau 
Music, Patchogue, L. I. and Miss 
Squires as they listen to her latest 
recording “Thin°s Go Wrong” and 
“If You Love Me.” 


Runyon Donates Phono 

NEWARK, N. J. — Ed Burg advises 
that the Runyon Operating Division, 
this city, has donated another juke 
box, this time to the South Orange 
American Legion Post No. 220. “As 
always, we are happy to make a do- 
nation for a worthy cause”, says Burg. 


TO SEE GENCO'S 

M 


the game with 

ENDLESS COMBINATIONS OF 
STRAIGHT and BANK SHOTS! 


CARL J. SPEIS 


316 W. Columbia Ave. 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 


FOREIGN 

buyers: 

It's smart to do business 
with THE firm that does 
the most for YOU. 

At International Amusement and Scott- 
Crosse foreign buyers receive the 
world's most complete coin machine 
service. We understand how to solve 
your problems from personal experi- 
ence . . . know what equipment you 
need to meet your particular require- 
ments and know how to get it to you 
on time in perfect working condition. 
This is why we have satisfied customers 
everywhere. 

Write for FREE Price List. 

Parts and Service Manual available. 

INTERNATIONAL 

AMUSEMENT COMPANY 

1423 SPRING GARDEN STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 30, PA. (Tel.: Rl 6-7712) 


ASK THE OPERATOR ...He Knows! 

The Fabulous , New 

ROCK-OLA 

COMET 

120 SELECTIONS 

MODERN, COMPACT, EFFICIENT 
DESIGN . . . LOADED WITH TIME- 
TESTED PERFORMANCE FEATURES! 

LOCATION PROVED! 

Highest Trade-ins! 

WORLD WIDE DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

2330 N. Western Ave., Chicago 47, III. Phone EVerglade 4-2300 


CLOSE OUT 
SPECIAL 


YOU 

NAME 

THE 

PRICE! 


Seeburg 

Model* 

146 

147 

148 


DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 


DAVIS 


SEEBURG FACTORY DISTRIBUTORS 

725 WATER STREET 
SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 
(Phone: 75-5194) 

Tolophono collect tor volume doah e 



YOUR PROFITS 



“It 5 * W hat’d in THE CASH BOX That Count •»* 



The Cash Box 


Page 69 


November 28, 1953 


Jubilee Singer Visits Runyon Sales 



I NEW YORK — Lauri Layton. Jubilee 
recording artist, paid a visit to Run- 
yon Sales Company, this week, and 
the staff sat her on top of an AMI 
“E” phono and took her picture. In 
the photo (1. to r.) are: Barney 
Sugerman, owner; Morris Rood, office 
manager; Layton; Jack Mitnick, 
AMI regional representative and Irv 
Kempner, road salesman for Runyon. 

Miami’s Third 
Annual Banquet 
in Final Stages 
Of Preparation 


MIAMI, FLA.— Willie (Little Na- 
poleon Blatt) re-elected to serve an- 
other term as president of the Amuse- 
ment Machine Operators Association, 
this city, and his associates are in the 
final preparations for their third an- 
nual dinner and dance, which will be 
held at the Saxony Hotel, Miami 
Beach, on Saturday night, Decem- 
ber 12. 

As the cigarette operators in this 
area have joined the organization 
since last year, attendance is expected 
to be away beyond that of the 1952 
party. In addition, Blatt reports a 
larger number of coinmen from out of 
town are expected. 

Wurlitzer and Ted Bush will once 
again hold a cocktail party prior to 
the banquet, at which Ted’s staff and 
officials from the Wurlitzer Company 
will be on hand to greet the operators. 



W. M. BLATT 



plNS 

SIZE OF FORMER _ 



READY WITH IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 

* ACCLAIMED , 

' EVERYWHERE 1 
1 Rock-Ola COMET i 


< The Original 120 Selettion Phonograph 



* ROCK-OLA MANUFACTURING CORPORATION jj 

U 800 NORTH KEDZIE AVENUE, CHICAGO 51, ILLINOIS 

120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 


“It's What ’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 







The Cash Box 


Page 70 


November 28, 1953 




GENCO'S NEW 


the game with 
SENSATIONAL MOVING 
REFLECTED-LIGHT BALLS! 
SEE IT AT 

H. B. BRINCK 

827 E. Front St. 
BUTTE, MONT. 






DALLAS DOINGS 


Clark Richardson of Borger says that business is good. He is stocking up 
on Lmted Shuffle Alleys. . . . Paul McCarty of Dumas is increasing his route. 
• • • Hugo Joeris of Amarillo says that his boy is ill. We are hoping for a 
speedy recovery. . . . Rudy Kimbell of Amarillo is increasing his route. . . . 
Carl Casperson, credit manager of Commercial Music, is recovering from a 
siege of peumonia. . . . Jack Eskew’s dog, a greyhound had six new pups. . . . 
Frank Mencuri, sales manager of Chicago Coin, has been in Dallas this week 
visiting the folks at S. H. Lynch. . . . Speedy Walker of Waco was in town this 
week bemoaning the loss of Baylor to the University of Houston. . . . Benny 
McDonald of Forth M orth says that his business is good and his farm out of 
Forth orth is doing well. . . . Boyd Dixon of Shawnee, Okla., a former cus- 
tomer of Lynch, was in town visiting this week. ... A. C. Hughes, Walter Wig- 
gins of McKinney, and E. L. Certain, Jr., are back from Washington where they 
attended the McCarran Bill hearings. . . . Mr. and Mrs. Wiggins came home by 
way of New York where they had a wonderful vacation. . . . Coinmen offering 
condolences to the family of Jess Henderson, who died this past week. 



LOS ANGELES 


Much interest has been created by the Amusement Park Show which will 
be held in Chicago starting Nov. 29. Many local boys will be in the windy city 
for the show. Bryant Herren, General Manager of Auto-Photo Company an- 
nounces that they will be on hand to display their newest Auto Photo machines. 
Van Natten, sales manager for the firm, recently returned from his Eastern 
business trip and is also getting ready for the event. . . . Bob Bever, local Dan 
Stewart Company manager, is the happiest guy in town over the fact that 
they have been reappointed Rock-Ola distributors for Southern California. He 
says they are anxiously awaiting first shipments to fill the many orders they 
have already taken for the new “Comet Fireball.” . . . Coinrow suffered a great 
loss recently when Ray Price died from cancer. Ray was well known in the 
area. He was employed by A1 Cohn and had also worked for Frank Robinson 
of R & H Amusement Company. . . . Lou Wolcher of Advance Automatic Sales, 
San Francisco was in town this past week. Lou and Charley Robinson of C. A. 
Robinson and Co. were seen taking in the night spots during his visit. Charley 
now has United’s new “Rio” in-line, fast action game, displayed on his show- 
room floor. He says that all the ops are particularly impressed with the extra 
scores, extra balls and attractive ball return features. . . . Heinz Heddergott, 
western representative for National Rejectors, Inc., spent a few days in his 
office after returning from his Canadian hunting trip then dashed off again on 
a business trip to the Rocky Mountain territory. He plans to cover Colorado, 
Idaho and Montana before returning to California. 

A1 Mason, service engineer for the AMI factory, came in from the Grand 
Rapids plant to conduct a service school at Badger Sales Company on Nov. 12. 
A large gathering turned out for the classes which included many ops from 
surrounding Southern California communities. The Badger crew report that 
Genco’s new four-player “Shuffle Pool” game has been well accepted by the 
local ops. . . . Jean and Dolores Minthorne are back from Palm Springs after 
their opening of new showrooms there. The Seeburg 200 Select-O-Matic home 
line will be featured exclusively. Bob Bennett has been named general man- 
ager of the new office while Bob Tiernan heads the sales department. At Min- 
thorne Music Company, Los Angeles, things are humming along at a fast pace. 
Bob Webber is back at his desk after returning from the Palm Springs opening. 
Hank Tronick reports that they just got in a shipment of the new Williams 
“Gun Club” and are awaiting operator reaction. The game has many new-eye- 
appealing features that should win wide praise from ops and locations alike. 
. . . Phil Robinson, Jack Simon, Lyn Brown and Atsie Stein are all getting 
ready to leave for the Amusement Park Show in Chicago. Phil says he’s also 
going to take a trip through the Florida area to look over the situation down 
there. . . . California Music Company has become a great Saturday afternoon 
rendezvous for the operators. If you walk in on Saturday you’ll almost always 
see several ops watching football games on television. Meanwhile you will see 
Sam Ricklin, Gabe Orland and Jack Lewis rushing around trying to catch brief 
glimpsesmf the games. 

Sorry to hear that Phil Bowen from the Edwards Air Base will be going to 
the hospital for a lung operation but hope he recovers soon. . . . Out-of-town 
visitors came in from far and near this past week to visit along coinrow and 
take care of business. Lela Smith came in again from Barstow. She is becom- 
ing a regular visitor along coinrow. . . . Mel Teixira drove down from Santa 
Maria. . . . Dave Payne dropped in from Santa Barbara. . . . I. B. Gayer from 
San Bernardino was seen visiting here and there. . . . Also seen along West 
Pico was Dale Cooper who drove down from Riverside. . . . Other out-of-towners 
included: Lloyd Dindinger from Carlsbad; Tommy Workman from El Monte and 
Noble Carver from San Diego. . . . Mary and Kay Solle greeted Ross Bagda- 
sarian at Leuenhagen’s Record Bar recently. Ross was telling the gals all 
about his latest release “Let’s Have A Merry Christmas.” He not only wrote 
the tune but also recorded it himself. ... At the Paul A. Laymon Company, 
Gary Sinclair, western field representative for Wurlitzer, has been touring 
through the Southern California area with Jimmy Wilkens calling on the oper- 
ators. Charley Daniels states that the new Bally “Palm Springs” is hot as a 
pistol. He stated further that they can’t keep them on the floor. Ed Wilkes 
recently celebrated his sixteenth wedding anniversary. 

After talking to many of the operators yours truly is convinced that they 
are a group of businessmen that are in a class all by themselves. They are 
complete individualists and no one operator operates the same way. Each has 
a different system of securing locations, making collections and taking care 
of the business in general. Every person who has been successful in the oper- 
ating field has carried out his own plans and ideas to make the business a 
success. From Maine to California, wherever there are men connected with 
the coin machine industry, there is a definite need for an organized association 
where these ops can get together and exchange these ideas in order to benefit 
the entire industry. Los Angeles has long recognized the need for such an 
association. Several different groups have tried to organize in the past but 
had failed to develop a program that would interest the average operator 
enough to attend the meetings. Now Lee Walker is heading a group of the 
larger ops who are working hard to organize an association that will have a 
firm foundation which will be of interest to everyone in the coin machine field. 
We suggest that all interested parties contact Lee Walker. 


‘/t’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 



The Cash Box 


Page 71 


November 28, 1953 


The Coin Machine Industry 

COES TO THE NAAPPB CONVENTION 

So They've Asked 

The Cash Box 

TO RUN A SPECIAL SECTION 

In The DECEMBER 5 Issue 

Parkmen, as well as Arcade Owners, 
Distributors and Operators of Amusement 
Machines and Kiddie Rides will read your 
ad — which means added sales and profits. 

DISTRIBUTED AT THE NAAPPB SHOW 
STARTING SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29 


ADVERTISING DEADLINE 
Wednesday 

NOVEMBER 25 


RUSH YOUR AD NOW! 

THE CASH BOX 


CHICAGO OFFICE 

32 WEST RANDOLPH STREET 

(PHONE: DEARBORN 2-0045) 


(PUBLICATION OFFICE) 

26 WEST 47th STREET, NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 

(PHONE: JUDSON 6-2640) 


LOS ANGELES OFFICE 

6363 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD 

(PHONE: WEBSTER 1-1121) 




The Cash Box 


Page 72 


November 28, 1953 




Nebraska Music Guild To Hold 
2 Day Meet December 5 & 6 


OMAHA, NEB. — Howard N. Ellis, 
secretary and treasurer of the Music 
Guild of Nebraska, announced that 
its next meeting will take place at 
the Hotel Evans, Columbus, Neb., on 
December 5 and 6. 

Hosts for the meeting are Joe 
Zweiner and F. J. Holys. 

“These boys will leave no stones 
unturned to show us what Columbus 
hospitality is”, stated Ellis. “We 
should have a good turnout for this 
meeting. The public relations com- 
mittee will present a program which 
they want to get rolling. The com- 
mittee has some good ideas, but want 


to present it to the entire group and 
get their opinion.” 

The Guild has extended an invita- 
tion to all distributors to attend and 
display any of their machines. 

The program set will be similar to 
other meetings of this organizat'on. 
First gathering will be Saturday, 
December 5 at 6 P.M. The Board of 
Directors will meet at 8:30 P.M., Sat- 
urday, to take care of a number of 
items. Regular meeting will be held 
on Sunday, December 6, at 2 P.M. 

Members are invited to bring their 
wives and families. 



In our travels thru coinrow this week we were happy to note the optimistic 
feelings of the many operators to whom we spoke. Seems that collections 
have started on the up-sweep, and greater returns expected every week from 
now in for the rest of the year. Many reasons were advanced, but we like the 
one given us by one of the city’s leading operators — “The many banks have 
sent out their Christmas Fund Savings Accounts to their depositors, and we 
find that some of it’s going into our machines.” Reports from the wholesalers 
are along similar lines, with both new and used equipment going out as 
rapidly as they can be handled. 

* * * * * 

All of the local games manufacturers will be exhibiting at the forthcoming 
convention of the NAAPPB (outdoor show), as will Mike Munves, the “Arcade 
King.” Many games distributors, operators and arcade men also advise they’re 
going to attend. Will make this the largest assemblage of members of the 
games division of the coin machine industry since it ran its own show some 
years back. ... We entered the showrooms of A1 Simon, Alfred Simon, Inc., 
this week, and it looked shockingly empty. A1 smilingly told us that he just 
had to send out his floor samples on Genco’s “Shuffle Pool”; and ChiCoin’s 
“ ’Round The World Trainer” and “Advance Bowler.” However, deliveries 
coming along, and A1 expected to be able to put samples out on the floor 
again. ... Nat Cohn, Riteway Mfg. & Sales, displayed his “3-D Theatre” 
machines on the floor. They’re simply breathtaking in beauty and design. 
Also sneaked a look at some of those bathing beauties — mmmmmmmm. Kiddie 
“3-D Theatre” same type cabinet, but one foot lower to allow the moppets 
to view pics. Has a cut-out of a clown on top. . . . Harry Rosenberg, Double-U 
Sales, Baltimore, Md., in town for a few days with the missus. Ostensibly 
for a short vacation, but, naturally, Harry had to visit his coin friends along 
coinrow. . . . Hymie Koeppel, Koeppel Distributing, out again with the truck, 
picking up music machines. On the way thru Washington, D. C., Hymie 
stopped off to visit with the family of Ted Keve, who died last week, and 
offer his condolences. 

* * * * * 

The winner in the local Wurlitzer-Frankie Laine contest is a 17 year old 
girl, Patty Bross. Paul Brenner, local dj presented the miss on his TV pro- 
gram, Friday, November 20. Joe Young and Abe Lipsky, Young Distributing, 
appeared on the program and presented the girl with a check for $100 (sec- 
tional prize). Sectional winners have submitted their record dubs, and the 
business of picking the winner is now underway. . . . The trade offering its 
condolences to Lester Klein, one of the industry’s old-time ops, on the death 
of his wife, Thursday, Nov. 12. . . . Sam Goldsmith and Leo Willens, Capitol 
Projector, in confab with Ed Ravreby of Boston, Mass. Ed has become one 
of the leading figures in the kiddie ride biz, acting as consultant to operators. 
Goldsmith tells us of the fantastic success being enjoyed by Charlie Rubinstein 
in his new arcade on 8th Ave. and 42nd St., with his 16 or 17 Capitol movie 
machines, both regular and 3-D. . . . Meyer Parkoff (Atlantic-New York Corp.) 
and his wife, relaxing in Miami Beach for a fast 10 day holiday. Harry Rosen, 
who would like to spend the winter in Miami Beach, just can’t get away. 
Maybe for the Xmas holiday week, Harry? . . . Barney (Shugy) Sugerman 
(Runyon Sales Co.) and wife, Mollie, still talking about the wonderful time 
they had on their recent trip to the west coast, and the most gracious people 
they met there. . . . The peppy and ever-smiling “Senator” A1 Bodkin breezes 
thru coinrow, prior to attending the board of directors meeting of the music 
operators association, leaving all with whom he comes in contact, in a happy 
relaxed mood. “The good-will ambassador of the coin machine industry” 
should get an annual retainer — he’s worth any amount. . . . George Ponser, 
business manager for the Associated Amusement Machine Operators of N. Y., 
advises more than 400 tickets have already been sold for its 4th Annual Ban- 
quet being held at the Latin Quarters on Sunday night, Dec. 20. Looks like 
about 500 will go before show time. . . . Dave Stern and Bob Slifer, Seacoast 
Distributors, settling down to some fast action now that orders piling up for 
Rock-Ola’s new “Comet” phono. 



Gil Roenhild, serviceman for Anchor Amusement Co. of Minneapolis, hob- 
bling into the locations now making his service calls. The reason is that Gil 
broke his leg playing football. ... In the Twin Cities doing some public rela- 
tions work was Dave Miller prexy of Essex records. . . . Hank Vangen of Min- 
neapolis made a trip into North Dakota after ducks and he and his party had 
no trouble bagging their limit. . . . Herman Fisher of Aberdeen, S. D., is 
recuperating at home from an operation which was performed some time ago 
at the Vets Hospital in Sioux Falls, S. D. Making the trip in the same plane 
to the Minnesota-Iowa football game were Charles Webber, Webber Music 
Company; Sol Nash, Twin City Novelty Company; and Harold Liebehman and 
Lew Rubin of the Lieberman Music Company all of Minneapolis. 

Don Thraen of New Ulm, Minn., is managing a route in and around New 
Ulm, Minn. Don had been associated for several years with his father Ray 
Thraen of Tracy, Minn., in the Tracy Sales Company. . . . Clayton Norberg 
of the C & N Sales company of Mankato, Minn., reports that when he went 
out duck hunting that the ducks were too elusive for him and that he was 
not able to bag any. . . . Newell Benson, manager of the Omaha office of the 
Atlas Music Company was fatally injured in a plane crash Saturday, Nov. 
14th. Newell, was returning from a football game when the crash occurred. 
. . . Recent visitors to the Twin Cities were Jerry Hardwig of St. Cloud, Minn.; 
Frank Mager of Grand Rapids, Minn.; A. A. Cluseau of Grand Rapids, Minn.; 
Joe Totzke of the Totzke Music Company, Fairmont, Minn.; L. P. Wilbur of 
Duluth, Minn.; Hugh May, National Specialty Company of Eau Claire, Wis.; 
Frank Coubal of Bloomer, Wis.; Elgin McDaniel of Wadena, Minn.; Pete 
Wornson of Mankato, Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Harvey of Mitchell, S. D.; 
Harry Galep of Menomonie, Wis.; Pete Vanderhyde of Dodge Center, Minn.; 
and Amos Miller of Spooner, Wis. 


What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 


The Cash Box 


Page 73 


November 28 , 1953 


CHICAGO CHATTER 



Starting with Thanksgiving, this week, the holiday season gets under way. 
The year races to its end. The time has come when all should pause and look 
back. Reminisce. Recount the events of the past months of ’53. There’s so 
much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving. This was a great year. A boom 
year. A year of real progress. A year of greater growth. A year when many 
new faces appeared in the trade. And many also faded away. Yet all should 
give thanks. Sincerely. Fervently. That the Thanksgivings yet to come will 
never be worse. That the years, which seem to be rushing down on all in the 
field with such breakneck speed, will be just as kind and fruitful as was this 
year. That the few weeks yet left to this year will be pleasureful. The entire 
industry .should bow its collective head in silent prayer, for all the good things 
that it has enjoyed, and for all the good things that have come into being, this 
Thanksgiving of 1953. 

Our selection for the best marathon dancing couple, Don and Nancy Mo- 
loney. With the very pretty and charming Nancy wearing Jimmy Tatler’s key 
and chain on the dance floor of the Pump Room, in the arms of Donald Moloney. 
A sight that caused us to grieve for our long lost youth. . . . This week, Nate 
Gottlieb had a joke told to him, instead of telling one. And Nate liked it. So, 
if you can catch him between those long distance phone calls, ask him to tell 
it to you. . . . Operators from almost everywhere reported to be waiting for 
“the cold weather” which always crowds the locations. Seems between the 
opening of the hunting season and the mild weather, many have lost much play. 
Not to mention, of course, the start of the holiday season. . . . Bill De Seim 
celebrated his birthday this past week by shooting a round of golf in the low 
90’s. Which is grand golf for Billy — who has been consistently in the high 
(hut we mean HIGH) 90’s. . . . Herb Oettinger won the double championship 
over at United this year. Champ golf player. Champ gin player. To celebrate 
his winning the golf championship, Herb bought a set of “pro” Wilson woods. 
Claims he now never drives under 300. (What everyone wants to know is: 
“300 what?”) 

Ray Riehl gets younger looking every time we see him. . . . Sol Gottlieb 
getting ready to attend the amusement ops affair in Noo Yawk. Sol always 
likes to meet the boys at these dinners. . . . George Jenkins, after seeing the 
statement he made here last week, said: “I’m learning to embroider. So I 
can make that into a motto for my bedroom wall.” . . . Thanks to Max Hurvich 
of Birmingham who said over the long distance phone, “ ‘The Cash Box’ is the 
real operators’ magazine.” . . . Bill FitzGerald of AMI came up with a lulu of 
a story this past week. Ask him to tell you what happened to the big game 
hunter when they served him peanuts at a party. . . . Les Rieck of Evans fore- 
sees a better year than ever ahead for all the music biz. . . . Paul Golden of 
La Ru Novelty having his men show the ‘Front Money Guarantee’ which ap- 
pears in the ‘End-Of-Month Inventory Issue’ of The Cash Box. (It’s in this 
issue.) . . . Art and Kay Weinand two very worried and anxious parents all this 
past week when their son, Georgie Weinand, who’s the little boy you see riding 
the Exhibit Kiddie Rides in Exhibit’s ads, started hemorrhaging a few days 
after a tonsilectomy. But so badly that the doctors were called while Art and 
Kay packed Georgie in ice. Georgie’s alright now. And both Art and Kay 
very much relaxed. 

Art Weinand advises that Exhibit will show Roy Rogers’ $18,000.00 saddle 
(the one he used for the “Tournament of Roses”) at Exhibit’s booths at the 
NAAPPB show. . . . Ralph Sheffield out on the road talking things over with 
Genco distribs. And rushing in those orders for more of the “Shuffle Pool” 
games to Avron Gensburg and Sam Lewis, who report, “We’re getting back- 
logged.” . . . George Kozy of ABT a very busy man getting all set for the Park 
Show at the Sherman Hotel. . . . With Mrs. Paul Huebsch very ill, Paul was 
forced to stay home, and help take care of their three children. But Paul 
reported this past week that Mrs. Huebsch feeling much better. He’s back 
at the Keeney factory working twice as hard to try and catch up. . . . There’ll 
be more factory roadmen visiting ’round the nation in ’54. Maybe something 
like the old days all over again. As business gets ever more competitive. . . . 
Charles (Little Jimmy) Johnson of Globe Distributing agrees, “ ‘It’s what’s in 
“The Cash Box” that counts’. And that,” Jimmy says, “goes for everything.” 

Charley Kagel phones us from St. Loo to locate someone 2,000 miles away. 
Says he, “I knew The Cash Box’ would know.” . . . Occupying a ringside table 
at the Chez: Herb Oettinger, Bill De Seim, Ray Riehl, Mort Weinberger, Gil 
Kitt and Bob Shaeffer. . . . Johnny Ruggiero of “The Jones Boys” writes to 
advise that the firm all back of “The Jones Boys” song which is published by 
George Pincus’ music firm. “That’s our song,” is the way John puts it. . . . 
A1 Tholke, Ken Sheldon and Johnny Casola phone the United factory from 
Noo Ohleans to tell about the big attendance at their Service School. . . . Jack 
Nelson on his way to Miami to grab that big order quick. Jack never let’s any 
grass grow under his feet. . . . Ray F. Jones and Bill Erskine pass thru Our 
Town after quail hunting down in southern Illinois. And form the “Ale & Quail 
Club.” To join the club you’ve got to be a good shooter and a hardy drinker. 

. . . Love to read that South Dakota Phono Ops’ Bulletin which is sent to all 
members by Harold Scott. It’s homey. 

Seems like Mike Imig of Yankton, S. D. is making like Eddie Cantor. Mrs. 
Imig just gave birth to a girl. That makes five girls for the Imig menage. . . . 
Archie La Beau has gone on TV with the Rock-Ola “Comet” phono and is creat- 
ing quite an amount of attention in the Twin Cities. Phono looks very fine on 
the TV screen. . . . Ralph Nicholson, Bally roadman, named to handle Harold 
Lieberman’s territory: Minn., Ia., Neb., North and South Dak., in addition to 
Indiana. . . . Williams’ new Kiddie Ride will be seen at the Park Show. In the 
meantime, Sam Stern of Williams, very much thrilled that more ops switching 
to 10c pinball play. . . . Bill O’Donnell returned from Jake Dobkin’s Alan Sales 
Co. showing of new building in Wheeling, W. Va. with a stack of orders this 
high. In addition, he reported, the Bally Service School held during the show- 
ing had the largest attendance ever yet. Over 85 operators were present to 
hear Bally’s engineers. . . . The “Co-Op Club,” of which Lou Casola of Rockford 
is Chairman, is getting lots of nice comment from well known ops ’round the 
state. . . . Lyn Durant busier than ever at United’s experimental factory. (Can 
this mean something new?) . . . Story of Dave Russell and J. W. (Patty) Conk- 
lin re: Canadian Nat’l Exhibit and Bally kiddie rides is something to read. 
(Should give one weekly tabloid lots of food for tho’t). 



NOW i» the 4th YEAR 5 

of Continuous Production 


Steadiest prof it-maker in the industry! 

EXHIBIT SUPPLY • 


, WANTED TO BUY 


SEEBURG 100-A 
WURLITZER 1400 
WURLITZER 1100 


EVANS CONSTELLATION 
ROCK-OLA 1428 
LATE GOTTLIEB GAMES 
LATE WILLIAMS GAMES 


SEEBURG BEAR GUN 
GENCO SKY GUNNER 
STANDARD METAL TYPERS 


State Quantity and Quote Lowest Prices In First Letter. 

BADGER SALES COMPANY 


2251 W. PICO BLVD. 


LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 


CHICAGO CHATTER 


Scores were lower than ever at the Chicago Phono Bowling League this 
past week. But you can’t blame the bowler. Blame Selman Schultz, Clarence 
Goldberg and Margaret Kraft of Decca. Who came into the Fireside Bowl with 
their newest sexsational singer, Pat Morrissey. And had Pat taking pics with 
all the boys present. No wonder they were weak. And scores were low. Any- 
way, it seems this visit helped the Decca-Coral team, who took two games from 
Melody Music, with Frank Tutomase scoring a 507 series and Leo Sochacki 481, 
while the best Melody could do was A1 Hofeler’s score of 437. . . . Bill Nyland 
returned, after five weeks in the hospital, and came thru with a 468 series. 
This plus Mabel Mankins’ 469 (HIGH for the Women) and Jerry Mankins’ 454 
for Western Automatic was enough to chop down the Coven team for two 
games, even tho Frank Lantz of Coven scored a 441. ... It took B&B to cool off 
the hot Mercury team. With Warren Paradee better known as “Fireball 
Bunk”) scoring a 465 and Marino Pieroni getting hot with a 495 Mercury bowed 
for two games, even tho Irv Cairo scored a 482 and Fred Sipiora a 489. . . . 
Ray Gallet zoomed in with a 497 and Paschke took Gillette to the cleaners for 
all three games. . . . Julius Mohill figured “this is the night.” And came thru 
with a 453. So Star took ABC for three games. Friend Bob Gnarro still in a 
rut, only scoring a 449 series. . . . Biggest upset of the night: Atlas Music took 
Oomens for two games! Jack (“I took my pills tonight”) Madigan came thru 
with 466 and 1‘Marvelous” Morrie Minkus a 445. And even tho Carl Latino was 
hot with a 554, HIGH for the Men, Johnny Oomens with 534 and Isabel Oomens 
low with 404, Atlas was just too, too much for the Oomens! . . . It’s getting 
closer to the end ... so if you want to see some great bowlers in action . . . 
better get out this Monday nite and visit the 12-team Chicago Automatic Pho- 
nograph Bowling League. 


“/!’* What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts ” 



The Cash Box 


Page 74 


November 28, 1953 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE 
10 CENTS PER WORD 

Count every word including all words 
in firm name. Numbers in address count 
as one word. Minimum ad accepted SI. 00. 
CASH OR CHECK MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
ORDERS FOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. 
If cash or check is not enclosed with order 
your classified ad will be held for follow- 
ing issue pending receipt of your check 
or cash. 


Notice to holders of "Special ($48) 
Subscription": You are entitled to a free 
classified ad in each week's issue con- 
taining no more than 40 words, which 
includes your firm name, address and tele- 
phone number. All words over 40 will be 
charged to you at the regular rate of 10c 
per word. Please count words carefully. 


ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 
CLOSES WEDNESDAY NOON AT 
The Cash Box, 26 W. 47th St., New 
York 36, N. Y. 


WANT 


WANT — Latest model cigarette ma- 
chines. Give quantity, model num- 
bers, condition, and price wanted in 
first letter. Send full details to BOX 
NO. 1128 c/o THE CASH BOX, 
26 WEST 47th STREET, NEW 
YORK 19, N. Y. 


WANT — New and used records. High- 
est prices paid for 78’s and 45’s. No 
quantity too large or too small. We 
buy brand new LP’s (33 1/3 RPM) 
in quantity. Write or phone. 
FIDELITY DISTRIBUTORS, 666 
10th AVE., NEW YORK 36. Tel.: 
JUdson 6-4568. 


WANT — Your used or surplus records 
all speeds. 45’s our specialty. We 
buy all year round and pay top 
prices. No lot too large or too small. 
No more than 10% blues. We pay 
freight. BEACON SHOPS, 821 NO. 
MAIN STREET, PROVIDENCE, 
R. I. Tel.: UNion 1-7500. 


WANT — Late 1952 and 1953 Pin 
Games, Seeburg 100 A & B, AMI 
D’s, Wurlitzer 1500’s, Scales, Ar- 
cade Equipment, lc and 5c Vendors, 
AMI YV. B., Seeburg 100 W. B., 
Wurlitzer 48 sel. Boxes. Write stat- 
ing condition, number, model, and 

prices. ST. THOMAS COIN SALES, 
ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO, CANADA. 
Tel.: 2648. 


WANT — 45 RPM Records, new or 
used. No quantity too large or small. 
Highest prices paid. Write stating 
quantity on hand. TONY GALGANO. 
GALGANO DIST. CO., 4142 W. 
ARMITAGE, CHICAGO 39, ILL. 
Tel.: Dickens 2-7060. 


WANT — Bright Spots, United Show- 
boat, United Circus, late Gottlieb 5 
Ball free play games, Seeburg Model 
B & C’s 45’s. State quantity, price, 
and condition in first letter. NOBRO 
NOVELTY CO., 538 BRYANT ST., 
SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIF. 


WANT — New and used records. Pay- 
ing 10c for 78’s and 15c for 45’s. 
Can be up to 6 months old. No 
quantity too large or small. We 
pay freight. DIXIE RECORD SHOP, 
259 WEST 42nd ST., NEW YORK 
36, N. Y. Tel.: Wisconsin 7-0830. 

WANT — We pay top price for used 
records from 3 to 6 months old. 
Pop, Race, Calypsos, Sprituals, 
Ruth Wallis, Mickey Katz, 45 r.p.m., 
78 r.p.m. We pav freight. C & L 
MUSIC CO., 11 BAYBERRY RD., 
FRANKLIN SQ., L. I., N. Y. Tei.: 
Tllden 4-9040. 


WANT — Advance 21F vendors also 72- 
74 Coan U-Select-It or Stoner’s 
candy vendors. P. O. Box 152, PON- 
TIAC. ILLINOIS. 


WANT — Phonograph records made be- 
fore 1940; any quantity or dealer 
stock; $150 to $300 per thonsand; 
will inspect if required. Some 
labels wanted are Brunswick; Vic- 
tor; Vocalion; Paramount; Gennett; 
Bluebird; Champion. JACOB S. 
SCHNEIDER, 128W. 66th STREET, 
N. Y. C. 


WANT— Tubes: 2051; 2050; 70L7; 
2A4; 2A3; 5V4; 6L6; 6N7; 6L7; 
6V6 metal; 6X5 metal. Will pay 
$40 hundred. Must have minimum 
quantity 50 of a type. Have you 
other types in quantity? LEWIS 
ELECTRONICS, 3449 NO. ELAINE 
PL., CHICAGO, ILL. 


WANT — Wurlitzer 1015’s, 1100’s, 

1250’s, and 1400’s for export or- 
ders. YOUNG DISTRIBUTING, 
INC., 599 TENTH AVENUE, NEW 
YORK, N. Y. 


WANT — For resale, good clean Bingos, 
United, and Chicago Coin 6 player 
Bowling games. Rockola or Stand- 
ard 22 feet Shuffleboards, Wall 
Electric Scoreboards. Quote your 
best price, condition first letter. 
STANLEY AMUSEMENT CO., 1523 
BROADWAY, TACOMA, WASHING- 
TON. Tel.: BRoadway 3663. 


WANT — All types of post-war flipper 
five ball games in any quantity. 
Give names, condition they are in, 
price wanted, and when ready to 
ship. INTERNATIONAL AMUSE- 
MENT CO., 1423 SPRING GARDEN 
STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


WANT — Show Boats, Circuses, and 
Seeburg 45. GOLDEN GATE NOV- 
ELTY CO., 701 GOLDEN GATE 
AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 2, CAL. 
Tel.: MArket 1-3967. 


WANT — Latest model cigarette ma- 
chines. Can also use Cole, Super- 
Vend and other drink dispensers, 
also want hot coffee vendors. Please 
give quantity, model numbers, con- 
dition and price wanted in first 
letter. Write full details to: BOX 
NO. 1010, c/o THE CASH BOX, 
32 W. RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO 
1, ILL. 


WANT — Williams’ DeLuxe Baseball, 
late; Grandmothers, Exhibit Guns, 
Seeburg Bears, Mutoscope Voice-O- 
Graphs, ChiCoin Basketballs, and 
any other late arcade machines. Give 
price and condition in first letter. 
ECONOMY SUPPLY CO., 579 
TENTH AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Tel.: CHickering 4-8628. 


WANT — From all over the world! 
Literature on any machine that 
takes coins and sells anything — 
merchandise, service, amusement, 
shoe strings, socks, drinks, use of 
typewriter, Sal Hepatica, Bromos, 
fortunes, Pocket Books, phono- 
graph records, water at lc per glass, 
cigarettes at 2c each, bread, aspirin 
at 5c each, massage, oxygen, single 
band-aids, newspapers, and more 
Republican votes. WITH AM EN- 
TERPRISES & ASSOCIATES, 20-22 
CUNNINGHAM AVENUE, GLENS 
I FALLS, NEW YORK. 


WANT — In Quantity — All Post-war 
Wurlitzer, AMI, Rock-Ola, and See- 
burgs. Quote lowest cash prices and 
quantities, or will allow liberal 
trades. CLEVELAND COIN MA- 
CHINE EXCHANGE, INC., 2021- 
2029 PROSPECT AVE., CLEVE- 
LAND, OHIO. 


WANT — For Export — Wurlitzer 
101 5’s, 1400’s, 1450’s. Mills Con- 
stellations, Evans Constellations. 
Seeburg Factory Distributors. Tele- 
phone collect DAVIS DISTRIBUT- 
ING CORP., 725 WATER STREET, 
SYRACUSE, NEW YORK. Tel.: 
75-5194. 


WANT — Any quantity post-war Wur- 
litzer Phonographs, Models 1100, 
1250, and 1400. Also Seeburg 
M100 — 78 and 45. Wire, write, or 
phone: BUSH DISTRIBUTING 

COMPANY, 286 N. W. 29th ST., 
MIAMI, FLORIDA. 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — We Always Offer The 
Best Used Games In The South. 
Bright Lights $105; Coney Island 
$125; Beauty $290; Palm Beach 
$225; Yacht Clubs $265; Bolero 
$135; A.B.C. $75; Lite-A-Line $75; 
Bright Spot $125; Spot Lite $125; 
Frolics $225; Beach Clubs $350; 
Dude Ranch $435; Holiday $120; 
Atlantic City $190. All games are 
run through our shop. Look near 
new. One third deposit with each 
order. CROWN NOVELTY CO., 
INC., 920 HOWARD AVENUE, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. Tel.: CAnal 
7137. Nick Carbajal. 


FOR SALE — Spot Lites $100; Yacht 
Clubs and Beach Clubs. Wite or 
call: TOLEDO COIN MACHINE 

EXCHANGE, 814 SUMMIT ST., 
TOLEDO, OHIO. Tel.: ADams 

8624 and ADams 4005. 


FOR SALE — One Stop Record Service. 
Any record, any label, 5c over 
wholesale. Free title strips. New 
accounts 1/3 deposit with all orders. 
RAYMAR SALES CO., 170-21 JA- 
MAICA AVE., JAMAICA 32, N. Y. 
Tel.: OLympia 8-4012-4013. 


FOR SALE — United Deluxe $165; 
Supers $200 ; Stars $245 ; China- 
town & Happy Days $140; Minstrel 
Man $40. WANT : Cascades, Olym- 
pics. STARK NOVELTY CO., 2429 
7th N. W., CANTON, OHIO. 


FOR SALE — United Alleys — Clover 
$350; 10th Frame Star $275; Six 
Player Deluxe $125; Twin Rebound 
$35 (Formica Top, Jumbo Pins) ; 
Williams Super World Series $100; 
William Deluxe Baseball (late) 
$275. 1/3 deposit. MOHAWK 

SKILL GAMES CO., 67 SWAGGER- 
TOWN ROAD, SCOTIA, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — Seeburg Model A-78 
$525; Seeburg Model B-45 $695; 
AMI-A $225; AMI-C $375. HER- 
MAN DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 
615 TENTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, 
N. Y. 


FOR SALE — Reconditioned Wurlitz- 
ers: 1250’s $375; 1 100’s $250; 
1015’s $125; 1080’s $125; Seeburgs 
146M $115; 147M $135; 148M 
$250; Packard Manhattan’s $75; 
Packard Sevens $50; Wall Boxes 
3-W-2 L 56’s $10; W6L 56 — 5, 10, 
and 25c Boxes $22.50. O’CONNOR 
DISTRIBUTORS, INC’., 2320 W. 
MAIN ST., RICHMOND, VA. 


FOR SALE — 3 Spot Lites $90; 4 At- 
lantic Citys $195; Frolics $205; 
Palm Beach $230; 4 Yacht Clubs 
$345 ; Beautys $365 ; Beach Clubs 
$415; Dude Ranch $450; Bally Fu- 
turitys $120. MICKEY ANDERSON, 
314 EAST 11th STREET, ERIE, 
PENNSYLVANIA. Tel.: 2-2894. 


FOR SALE — 15 Show Boats, $300 
each; 1 Seeburg B.L. 45 rpm $750; 
1 Seeburg A 78 rpm $450; 2 Keeney 
Cigarette Machines, $100 each. 
CENTRAL DISTRIBUTORS, 2315 
OLIVE STREET, ST. LOUIS 3, 
MISSOURI. 


FOR SALE — Bally Atlantic Citys 
$179.50; Beach Clubs $369.50; 
Beautys $309.50; Bright Lights 
$89.50; Coney Islands $119.50; 
Frolics $199.50; United Cabanas 
$299.50; Leader $99.50. T & L 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 1663 
CENTRAL PARKWAY, CINCIN- 
NATI 14, OHIO. Tel.: MAin 8751. 


FOR SALE — We are distributors in 
Michigan for AMI, Chicago Coins, 
Exhibit, Keeney, Genco, Williams, 
& Victor Vending. We have the 
largest stock of used .games and 
parts in Michigan Shuflleboard wax 
and accessories. MILLER - NEW 
MARK DISTRIBUTING CO., 42 
FAIRBANKS ST., N. W. GRAND 
RAPIDS, MICH. Tel.: 9-8632 and 
5743 GRAND RIVER AVE., DE- 
TROIT 8, MICH. Tel: TYler 8-2230. 


FOR SALE — Coffe-Spa — Coffee Ma- 
chine like new. Model B-600 Serial 
#470 with $.10 slot and waste cup 
receptacle, used three (3) months. 
Make an offer to H. FELSING, c/o 
EMPIRE LANES, 36-42 FIRST 
STREET, HOBOKEN, N. J. 


FOR SALE — United Bowlers 5 Play 
Formica Top $200; Six Play $235; 
DeLuxe $300; Super $325; Official 
$300; Thunderbolt Horses $350; 
Edelco 2 Play Bowlers $175; 1100 
Wurlitzer $300; Genco 8 Player 
$145; United Slugger $60. MOUN- 
TAIN DISTRIBUTORS, 3630 
DOWNIN STREET, DENVER, 
COLO. Tel.: AComa 8518. 


FOR SALE — Exhibit Six Shooter 
$150; Dale Gun $50; Slug Fest 
$139; Spot Lites $245; ABC $95; 
Zingo $115; Stars $319; Used Turf 
Kings $75; Winners $50. WHEEL- 
ING COIN MACHINE EX., 2916 
EOFF ST., WHEELING, W. VA. 
Tel.: WHeeling 431. 


FOR SALE — Premium merchandise 
for coin machine prizes. Over 3,000 
articles carried in stock. Write for 
complete wholesale descriptive price 
list today. (Established 1932). 
HASTINGS DISTRIBUTING CO., 
6100 BLUEMOUND ROAD, MIL- 
WAUKEE 13, WISC. Tel.: BLue- 
mound 8-7600. 


FOR SALE — 200 or any part slightly 
used metermatics interchangeable 
gears for collection purposes on 
items sold payment plan. 5, $8.95; 
10 to 25, $7.50; 25 to 50, $6.50 
each. State gears size. F. O. B. 
Ladoga, Indiana. AUTOMATIC 
MUSIC CO., LADOGA, INDIANA. 
Tel.: 123. 


FOR SALE — The following phono- 
graphs — 18 Mills 904; 10-750’s; 
2 Mills Empress; 3 Colonial 780’s 
2-350’s, 3-800’s, and one Aireon. 
Make us an offer for the lot; no 
reasonable offer refused. MUSIC 
DISTRIBUTORS, INC., 213 
FRANKLIN STREET, FAYETTE- 
VILLE, N. C. Tel.: 2-3992. 





The Cash Box 


Page 75 


November 28 , 1953 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


FOR SALE — Special! Bally Yacht 
Clubs $265; Beach Clubs $385; 
Dude Ranches $455 ; Beautys 
$299.50; Futuritys, used 30 days, 
$95; Williams Fairway $129.50; 
Paratrooper $75; Hong Kong $75; 
Twenty Grand $119.50; Palisades 
$155; Gottlieb Poker Face $165; 
United Cabana $274.50. NEW OR- 
LEANS NOVELTY CO., 115 MAGA- 
ZINE ST., NEW ORLEANS, LOUI- 
SIANA. Tel.: CAnal 8318. 


FOR SALE — Genco Sky Gunner $325; 
Dale Guns $49.50; Six Shooter 
$149.50; Keeney 4 Player Conver- 
sions for Shuffleboard $125. UNI- 
VERSITY COIN MACHINE EX- 
CHANGE, 854 NORTH HIGH ST., 
COLUMBUS 8, OHIO. Tel.: UNi- 
-versity 6900. 


FOR SALE — Wurlitzer Bar and Wall 
Boxes— 3020’s $10; 3031’s $5; 

2140’s $5. Steppers and Master 
units; inquire. 1017’s $75 includ- 
ing stepper. HENRY C. KNOB- 
LAUCH & SONS, 51 WARREN ST., 
GLENS FALLS, NEW YORK. 


FOR SALE — 22 caliber Short K rum- 
ble shooting gallery ammunition. 
Great savings on 5, 10, or 25 case 
lots. Also Mutoscopes, deluxe phot- 
matics. Write, wire, or call MARLIN 
AMUSEMENT CO., 412 9th 
STREET, N. W., WASHINGTON, 
D. C. Tel.: District 7-1625. 


FOR SALE — New York and New Jer- 
sey Operators! Rock-Ola’s new 
Comet 120 selection phonograph is 
on display. Brand new Rock-Ola 
Fireballs 120 selection, in crates. 
Write. SEACOAST DISTRIBU- 
TORS, INC., 1200 NORTH AVE., 
ELIZABETH, N. J. (Tel.: Bigelow 

8- 3524) and 594 TENTH AVE., 
NEW YORK, N. Y. (Tel.: BRyant 

9- 4684). 


FOR SALE — America’s finest recon- 
ditioned phonographs and music 
accessories. Everyone of our re- 
conditioned machines guaranteed 
beautiful condition regardless of 
price. Tell us what you need. Get 
our prices before you buy. ANGOTT 
DISTRIBUTING CO., INC., 2616 
PURITAN AVENUE, DETROIT 21, 
MICH. Tel.: UNiversity 4-0773. 


FOR SALE — 25 Winners like new, 
cleaned and guaranteed, few new, 
$75 each or will trade. What have 
you? WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 
3126 ELLIOTT AVE., SEATTLE 1, 
WASHINGTON. 


FOR SALE — All machines 20% off 
high CASH BOX prices. Wurlitzers, 
1250, 1100, 1400. Spot Light, 

Bright Spot, Bright Light. Atlantic 
City, Stars, Coney Island, Zingo, 
Skee Rolls, Shuffle Alleys, Flipper 
Pin Games, Super World Series, 
Guns. V. YONTZ SALES CO., BYES- 
VILLE, OHIO. 


FOR SALE — Wurlitzer 1100, $195; 
Seebnrg 100C, $785; Seeburg 100B, 
$565; Seeburg 100A, $425; Wur- 
liter 1015, $90. UNITED DIS- 

TRIBUTORS, INC., P.O. BOX 1995, 
513 E. CENTRAL, WICHITA 2, 
KANSAS. Tel.: 4-6111. 


FOR SALE— 3020 Wallboxes $19.50; 
3W5-L-56 Wallboxes, $18.50; 146M 
or S $89.50; 147M or S $99.50; 
1422 Rockola $69.50; 1426 Rock- 
ola $89.50. Wl-L-56 5c Wallboxes 
and Packard Pla-mor $4.95. CEN- 
TURY DIST. INC'., 1221 MAIN 
STREET, BUFFALO 9, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — 35 Seeburg 100-B 45rpm, 
beautifully reconditioned, $685. ea. 
Export is our specialty. Satisfied 
customers all over the world. REDD 
DISTRIBUTING CO., INC., 298 
LINCOLN ST., ALLSTON 34, MASS. 
Tel.: AL 4-4040. 


FOR SALE — Contact us before you 
buy. We carry all types of coin ma- 
chines. Largest Central Pennsyl- 
vania distributor for United, Univer- 
sal, Chicago Coin, Keeney and 
Bally. WILLIAMSPORT ELEC- 
TRONIC & TELEVISION CO., 233 
W. 3rd STREET WILLIAMSPORT, 
PA. Tel.: 2-3326 or 2-1648. 


FOR SALE — Cigarette machines, Du- 
Grenier 9 col. $50.00, 25c coin 
chutes. Bingo games: Coney Island 
$225.00 Atlantic City $335.00; 
Frolic $335.00; Beach Clubs. Write, 
ALLIED DISTRIBUTING CO., 786 
MILWAUKEE AVE., CHICAGO, 
ILL. 


FOR SALE! — Ready For Location. Spot 
Lites $175; Coney Island $200; 
Atlantic City $300; Palm Beach 
$350; Frolic* $350. ALLAN SALES, 
INC., 928 MARKET STREET, 
WHEELING, W. VA. Tel.: WHeel- 
ing 5472. 


FOR SALE — $20,000.00 worth of 
brand new Wurlitzer Phonograph 
Parts. Below wholesale cost. Send 
for complete Parts Catalogue. 
LIEBERMAN MUSIC COMPANY, 
257 PLYMOUTH AVENUE NORTH, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. 


FOR SALE — Can yon afford 92c per 
week to get ahead and stay ahead 
of all competition? For only 92c 
per week you can have a 40 word 
ad in this section plus a free full 
year’s (52 weeks) subscription to 
The Cash Box. “The ‘Bible’ of the 
Coin Machine Industry.” Send your 
check for $48 to day plus your first 
40-word ad to: THE CASH BOX, 
26 W. 47th ST., NEW YORK 19, 
N. Y. (Phone: JU 6-2640). 


FOR SALE — ChiCoin Bowling Alleys 
$55; Seeburg Guns $75; Lite 
League $49.50; Deluxe Bowler 
$34.50; and many other values. 
COIN AMUSEMENT GAMES, 1144 
E. 55th ST., CHICAGO 15, ILL. 


FOR SALE! — All Amplifier Tubes less 
50% and 10%. Title Strips $2.50 
per 1,000. Fluorescent Tubes 1/3 
off. Bulbs 51’s and 55’s 45c per 
box, $3.75 per 100; 1129’s 10 for 
$1.50; 47’s 10 for 60c $5.25 per 
100. CaPeo Lusterize All-Purpose 
Cleaner for glass, plastic, chrome, 
etc., $3.95 per gallon. Trial bottle 
70c. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money beck. Cart Sled $38.50. 
COVEN DISTRIBUTING CO. 3181 
ELSTON AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 
TeL: INdependenee 3-2210. 


FOR SALE — New Astroscope $275; 
New le Camera Chief $10; New le 
Advance Peanut Machines $12; 120 
Wurlitzer Wall Boxes $3; Citations 
$55; Bally Rapid Fire $75; Bowlette 
$40. MAIHENY VENDING CO., 
INC, 564 W. DOUGLAS, WICHITA, 
KANSAS. 


FOR SALE— AMI “B’s” $300; AMI 
“C’s” $325; many others. Write. 
KOEPPEL DISTRIBUTING CO., 
629 TENTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 
19, N. Y. 


FOR SALE — 3 Packard Manhattans, 
1 Whiz Kids, 1 Four Horsemen, 1 
Shoo Shoo, 1 Tampico, 1 Hot Rods, 
1 Bowling Champ, 1 Freshie, 1 
South Pacific, 1 Bowlette, 1 Goalee. 
Total price for package deal, $425. 
One third deposit down with order, 
balance C.O.D. Write BOX 352, 
PAYETTE, IDAHO. 


FOR SALE — All types reconditioned 
Coin Operated Games available at 
lowest prices. Write, wire, phone 
C. A. ROBINSON & CO., 2301 W. 
PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES 6, 
CALIFORNIA. Tel.: DUnkirk 

3-1810. 


FOR SALE — 1 Williams Long Beach 
$95; 1 Universal Across The Board 
$150; 10 Packard Satin Finish Wall 
Boxes $25; 1 United Steeple Chase 
$115; 1 Chicago Coin Pistol Pete 
$65; 1 Williams Slugfest $75. 

AUTOMATIC AMUSEMENT CO., 
1000 PENNSYLVANIA ST., EVANS- 
VILLE 10, INDIANA. 


FOR SALE — Hook Bowler $69.50; 
Keeney League Bowler $129.50; 
Dale Gun $57.50; Williams Super 
World Series $174.50; Williams 
DeLuxe World Series $194.50; Sea 
Jockey $129.50; TriScore $59.50; 
South Pacific $49.50; Turf King 
$74.50. LAKE CITY AMUSEMENT 
COMPANY, 4533 PAYNE AVENUE, 
CLEVELAND 3. OHIO. Tel.: HEn- 
derson 1-7577. 


FOR SALE — Rock-Ola Fire-Ball 120 
records, slightly used, only $625. 
Disk Jockeys, like new, $145; 
Leader $145; Bright Lights $145; 
Saddle And Turfs F. S. $385; Evans 
Consolation $300; Chicago Coin 
Classic 2 PI. $60; Univ. Twin Bowler 
$45. REEL DISTRIBUTING CO., 
4910 NATURAL BRIDGE, ST. 
LOUIS 15, MISSOURI. 


FOR SALE — Reconditioned Like New! 
Spot Lites $120; Bright Lites $140; 
Yacht Clubs $410; Bright Spot 
$145;, Atlantic City $275; Bally 
Champion Horses ; Bally Space 
Ships. All guaranteed. Call, write, 
or wire: DONAN DISTRIBUTING 
CO., 5007 N. KEDZIE AVENUE, 
CHICAGO 25, ILL. Tel.: JUniper 
8-5211. 


FOR SALE — United Twin Rebound 
$39.50; United 4 Player $59.50; 
United 5 Player $69.50; United 6 
Player DeLuxe $129.50; Keeney 
10 Player Team Bowler $229.50. 
AMERICAN VENDING CO., 2684- 
92 CONEY ISLAND AVE., BROOK- 
LYN 23, N. Y. Tel.: ESplanade 
5-1256. 


FOR SALE — We distribute for all lead- 
ing manufacturers of pinballs, 
phonographs, cigarette machines. 
Used equipment reconditioned and 
guaranteed. Whatever your re- 
quirements, let us know. We can 
supply the best. A. P. SAUVE & 
SON, 7525 GRAND RIVER AVE- 
NUE, DETROIT 4, MICHIGAN. 
TeL: TYIer 4-3810— TYIer 7-6123. 


FOR SALE — The old reliable Massen- 
gill coin operated pool tables. Write 
for price list on used equipment. 
We will buy arcade, Bingo games, 
recent shuffle alleys. DARLINGTON 
MUSIC COMPANY, DARLINGTON, 
S. C‘. TeL: 500. 


FOR SALE — 2 Bally Dude Ranches, 
like new, only $475 each. 1/3 de- 
posit, balance sight draft on C.O.D. 
MAIN AMUSEMENT CO., 1004 
GARRISON AVE., FORT SMITH, 
ARK. TeL: 2-2126 or 2-0159. 


FOR SALE — Due To Change In Illi- 
nois State Law — 100-5 Balls $10 
and up; Arcade Equipment; Bowl- 
ers; 150 Turf Kings, ready for loca- 
tion, $50 each. Write or send tele- 
gram. TWIN CITY AMUSEMENT, 
EDISON COURT, WAUKEGAN, 
ILLINOIS. 


FOR SALE — Complete line of used 
phonographs, shuffle games, cigar- 
ette machines, all other equipment. 
Lowest prices. Best merchandise. 
One letter, wire, or phone call will 
convince you. Factory Representa- 
tives for United, Keeney, Bally. 
TARAN DISTRIBUTING, INC'., 3401 
N. W. 36th STREET, MIAMI 42, 
FLA. TeL: 64-4864. 


FOR SALE — United Snper Bowlers, 
drum scoring, converted to 3rd, 7th, 
and 10th Frame Doubles. Complete- 
ly reconditioned and crated, only 
$279.50. All the features of a new 
game at half the price. Wire orders 
and 1/3 deposit. Immediate de- 
livery. SHELDON SALES, INC., 
881 MAIN STREET, BUFFALO 3, 
NEW YORK. TeL: Lincoln 9106. 


FOR SALE — Hi-Speed Super Fast 
shuffle board wax. 24 one pound 
cans per case $8.50 f.o.b. Dallas, 
Texas. Sold on money back guar- 
antee. AMI distributor. STATE 
MUSIC DISTRIBUTORS, INC., 
3100 MAIN ST., DALLAS, TEXAS. 


FOR SALE — Reconditioned Like New 
— Bright Lights $139; Lite A Lines 
$65; Citations $35; Hot Rods $40; 
Genco 400’s $225. The Genco 400’s 
perfected and percentaged correctly 
by us. Return within 2 weeks if not 
satisfied for full refund. We buy 
4, 5, or 6 player United Shuffle 
Alleys. Quote your lowest price. 
W. E. KEENEY MFG. CO., 5231 
SO. KEDZIE AVE., CHICAGO 32, 
ILL. TeL: HEmlock 3844. 


FOR SALE — Empresses; Thrones, ’39 
and ’40 Standards and Deluxe* ; 
Classics; W1L56 Wall Boxes; 600’s; 
Counter Models; Watling HiBoy 
Scales; Arcade Equipment; Misc. 
Pinballs. SOUTHSIDE VENDING, 
308 N. SYCAMORE ST., PETERS- 
BURG, VA. TeL: 349. 


FOR SALE — We have a large stock of 
reconditioned Five Balls. One Balls, 
Bingo and Phonos. Write for list. 
WESTERHAUS CORPORATION, 
3726 KESSEN AVENUE, CINCIN- 
NATI, O. TeL: MOntana 5000-1-2. 


FOR SALE — The finest reconditioned 
phonographs and games in the coun- 
try. Every single one guaranteed 
regardless of price. Before you buy 
get our quotation first. COMMER- 
CIAL MUSIC CO., 1501 DRAGON 
ST., DALLAS, TEX. TeL: Riverside 
4131. 


FOR SALE — The finest used phono- 
graphs in all our history now avail- 
able for immediate sale. Get our 
price on any phonograph you want 
before you buy. UNITED, INC., 
4227 WEST VLIET ST., MILWAU- 
KEE, WIS. TeL: WEst 3-3224. 




The Cash Box 


Page 76 


November 28, 1953 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 

\ 


MINIMUM FRONT 
MONEY REQUIRED BY 
JUKE BOX OPERATORS 


Minimum Front Money Required by 
Juke Box Operators Each Week 
From Their Locations on All Types 
of Automatic Phonographs to 
Assure Complete Amortization 
is Based on The Cash Box’ 
“Confidential Price Lists” 


FOR SALE — One Stop Record Serv- 
ice. Large stock of major, inde- 
pendent 45’s, 78’s. Popular, 

Rhythm, Blues. We ship anywhere 
at cost plus 5c per record. LOM- 
BARDI RECORD SHOP, 2827 W. 
MADISON ST., CROWN RECORD 
SHOP, 3747 W. CHICAGO AYE., 
CHICAGO, ILL. Tel.: SAcramento 
2-5050. 


FOR SALE — 1217 Wurlitzer and 
seven model 4820 Wurlitzer wall 
boxes, excellent condition, $495. 20 
Seeburg C’s, like new, $775. COPE- 
LAND DISTRIBUTORS, INC., 900 
NORTH WESTERN, OKLAHOMA 
CITY, OKLA. Tel.: FOrest 5-3456. 


FOR SALE — All machines 20% off 
high CASH BOX prices. Wurlitzers 
1015, 1100, 1250. Rockolas 1422, 
1426. AMI Model C. Seeburgs 146, 
147, 100A. Phone STerling 87515 
or Write: DIXON DISTRIBUTING 
COUP., 3808 SOUTHERN BLVD., 
YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO. 


FOR SALE — Priced Right! Sunshine 
Parks, Futuritys, Turf Kings, Across- 
the-Board, and Winners or will swap 
for United or Chicago Coin 6 player 
alleys. Write, wire, or phone: J. 

ROSENFELD COMPANY, 3220 OL- 
IVE ST., ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. 
Tel.: OLive 2800. 


FOR SALE — Wall Box Bargains! Wur- 
litzer Model 5204 (104 selections) 
$75; AMI (40 selections) $12.50; 
Rock-Ola (20 selections) $5; Pack- 
ard (24 selections) $5; Seeburg 
(5-10-25c) $25; Seeburg (5c) Post- 
war, $7.50. Authorized Seeburg Dis- 
tributors. W. B. DISTRIBUTORS, 
INC., 1012 MARKET ST., ST. 
LOUIS, MISSOURI. 


FOR SALE — Distributor’s stock of 
new Wurlitzer Phonograph parts 
for Model 1100 and older. Distribu- 
tor’s cost $3300. Will sacrifice en- 
tire lot for $750. Detailed inventory 
sent on request. CAIN-CAILLOU- 
ETTE, INC., 1500 BROADWAY, 
NASHVILLE, TENN. Tel.: 5-5635. 


FOR SALE— 5 AMI c Model B, $310 
each ; 2 Genco Sky Gunners, $250 
each ; 4 for 25c semi-automatic 

camera, $195. All equipment in A-l 
condition. RELIABLE COIN MA- 
CHINE CO., 184-188 WINDSOR 
ST., HARTFORD, CONN. 


Notice! 

TOD CAN SAFELY SEND DEPOSITS TO 
ADVERTISERS IN "THE CASH BOX" 

Your Deposit is 
GUABANTEED 

IS LONG as you art a pail op tabtcrihar 
** to Tho Cash Box', at tba tima you anrver 
any aOrortisemont that appears In Tho Cash 
Box', vharo the advertiser requires that you 
mast send a deposit to obtain tho merchan- 
dise advertised, your deposit ap to $100.00 is 
gacrantoad by The Cash Box'. This is “The 
Cash Box' Free Deposit insurance Plan". An 
exclusive and original foaturo of Tho Cash 
Bax' only. Should yea loot your deposit in 
fraudulent manner immediately suite: 


THE CASH BOX 

2* West 47th Straat, New York 19, N. Y 


j FOR SALE — Silver Chest, like new, 
$275; Golden Nugget $125; Jump- 
ing Jax $90; Genco 400, $80; Dale 
Gun $60 ; Chicago Coin Pistol $95 ; 
Mutoscope Sky Fighters $125; Chi- 
cago Coin 4 Piaver Derby $225 ; Big 
Bronco, very clean, $495 ; Evans 
Horse Race Wheel, write; Chicago 
Coin Super Jet, used, $495; Metal 
Typer, very clean, $345; Pop Corn 
Sez $49.50 ; Funny House Mirrors, 
write; Jungle Joe $150; Genco Sky 
Gunner, like new, $285 ; Chicago 
Coin Band Box (New) $225. Shuffle 
Alleys — United 4 Player Formica 
Top $85; United 5 Player Formica 
Top $100; United 6 Player Formica 
Top $115; United 6 Player DeLuxe 
$135; United 6 Player Super $195; 
United 10th Frame $285; United 
10th Frame (Matched) $300; 
United Cascade $325. Bingos — 
Bally Spot Lite $135; Bally Bright 
Spot $150; Bally Frolics $225; 
Bally Atlantic City $250; Bally Palm 
Beach $275; Bally Beauty $360; 
Keeney Lite-A-Line $65 ; Williams 
Long Beach $139.50; United ABC 
$50; Universal 5 Stars $49.50. 
MONROE COIN MACHINE EX- 
CHANGE, INC., 2423 PAYNE AVE., 
CLEVELAND 14, OHIO. Tel.: 
SUperior 1-4600. 


FOR SALE — Bingo Games — Music 
Boxes — 6 Player Bowlers — One-Five 
Ball Games — Cigarette Machines — 
Vending Machines. All equipment 
reconditioned and refinished and 
readv for location. Call — write for 
your needs. PARKWAY MACHINE 
CORP., 715 ENSOR ST., BALTI- 
MORE 2, MD. Tel.: EAstem 7-1021. 


MISCELLANEOUS 

NOTICE — Phonograph Motors Re- 
wound — Any make of split-phase 
Juke Box Motor rewound $4.00. No 
Extras. $4.00 is all you pay. Mail- 
ing list 4,000 Juke Box Operators 
$35. CAROLINA ELECTRIC CO., 
P. O. BOX 125, MATTHEWS, 
NORTH CAROLINA. Tel.: 2711. 


NOTICE — These 3 telephone numbers 
are important to you: The Cash 
Box, New York City, JUdson 
6-2640; The Cash Box, Chicago, 
III., DEarborn 2-0045; The Cash 
Box, Los Angeles, Calif., WEbster 
1 - 1121 . 


NOTICE — 10c Seeburg AMI Ops — 
Don’t Pass Up Nickels! General’s 
Conversion Kit fits late model 
phonographs and wall boxes. Takes 
2 nickels, 10c and 25c. Samples 
$3.50. Lots of 10, $2.95 each. 
Complete with decal and instruc- 
tions. GENERAL DISTRIBUTING 
CO., 3574 HARDING, CARLSBAD, 
CALIFORNIA. 


NOTICE — Louisiana & Mississippi 
Operators — your authorized AMI 
phonograph distributor is DIXIE 
COIN MACH. CO. 122 NO. BROAD 
ST., NEW ORLEANS, LA. Tel.: 
MAgnolia 3931. 


NOTICE — Christmas Gift — Executive 
Sportster simulated Alligator with 
smart 52 x 68 Wool O’ The West 
Robe. Write for circular. WESTERN 
DISTRIBUTORS, 1226 SOUTH- 
WEST 16th AVE., PORTLAND 5, 
OREGON. 


NOTICE — Want service mechanic for 
Pin Games, Music, and Cigarette 
machines ; now employ six me- 
chanics. PENNSYLVANIA VEND- 
ING CO., 1822 CARSON ST., 
PITTSBURGH 3, PA. Tel.: HEm- 
lock 1-9900. 


NOTICE — Outdoor Barbeque G’ook-N- 
Wagon — see Miller’s High Life ad. 
To Operators and Distributors de- 
livered anv place in United States 
for $89.50. BUDGE WRIGHT’S 
WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS, 1226 
S.W. 16th AVE., PORTLAND, ORE- 
GON. 


AIREON 

Fiesta $ 5.00 Per Week 

'48 Coronet 5.00 " " 

'49 Coronet 5.00 " " 


AMI 


Model 

A 

. $ 6.00 Per Week 

Model 

B 

. ... 7.50 " 

a 

Model 

C 

8.50 " 

n 

Model 

D-40 

12.00 " 

// 

Model 

D-80 

14.00 " 

// 

Model 

E-40 

15.90 " 

// 

Model 

E-80 

18.50 " 

// 

Model 

E-120 

21.00 " 

// 


EVANS 

Jubilee $16.50 Per Week 

Century 21.00 " " 

MILLS 

Throne Of Music $ 5.00 Per Week 

Empress 5.00 

Constellation 5.00 " 

PACKARD 

Manhattan $ 5.00 Per Week 

ROCK-OLA 

1422 $5.00 Per Week 

1426 5.00 " " 

1428 (Magic-Glo) 5.00 " " 

1432 (Rocket) 6.00 " " 

1434 8.00 " " 

1436 (Fire-Ball) 16.50 " " 

1438 (Comet) 21.00 " " 


SEEBURG 




9800 Hi-Tone 

$ 5.00 Per Week 

8800 Hi-Tone 

5.00 

n 

n 

8200 Hi-Tone 

5.00 

u 

it 

146 

5.00 

// 

n 

147 

5.00 

// 

a 

148 

5.00 

n 

n 

M100A 

11.00 

// 

n 

M100B 

13.90 

ii 

n 

M100C 

16.50 

// 

// 

HF-100-G 

21.00 

// 

// 


WURLITZER 


750 $ 5.00 Per Week 

780 5.00 " " 

800 5.00 " " 

850 5.00 " " 

950 5.00 " " 

1015 5.00 " " 

1080 5.00 " " 

1100 6.00 " " 

1250 7.00 " " 

1400 11.50 " " 

1600 19.00 " " 

1500 21.00 " " 


For Each Wall and/or Bar Box, Add To Above $2.00 Per Week 

For Each Additional Auxiliary Speaker, Add To Above 1.00 Per Week 


NntlPP ■ All minimum front money requirements are based on The 
Prices' That Appear in each month's "End-Of -Month Inven- 
tory Issue “ in " The Confidential Price Lists" of "The Cash Box." 




The Cash Box 


Page 77 


November 28, 1953 



THE PUBLIC GETS: 120 Perfect Selections, Eye Level Program, One Button Play, 

Thrilling Tone and Virtuosity. 

THE LOCATION GETS: A Beautiful Showpiece, Choice of Placing it Anywhere, 

Customer Inspiration and Satisfaction. 

THE OPERATOR GETS: Instant Jump in Take, Uninterrupted Performance, 

Ability to Interest Top Spots. 



GENERAL OFFICES AND FACTORY: 1500 UNION AVENUE, S. E., GRAND RAPIDS 2, MICHIGAN 


“It’s What’s in THE CASH BOX That Counts” 




“ THE CONFIDENTIAL PRICE LISTS’ ’ 


The Cash Box, Page 78 



CONFIDENTIAL PRICE LIST 















fa 










1 

i 

s 









1 







s 





7 










> 

jmmj J-n 


* 

V. 

i 

r 



N 


A | 



A 


* 

* 










/ 





\ 

l 










f 

G 

.iiuimuMuaa 












NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE — 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


AIREON 




25.00 

35.00 


4. ’47 Hideaway 

40.00 

49.50 



4. ’48 Coronet 400 

25.00 

35.00 



4. ’49 Coronet 100 

25.00 

39.50 



AMI 





4. WM Wall Box 

14.50 

20.00 



2* Model A ’46 

169.00 

250.00 



2* Model B ’48 

269.50 

310.00 



4* Model C 

289.00 

375.00 



2. Model D-40 

425.00 

550.00 



8. Model D-80 

550.00 

650.0Q 



BUCKLEY 



6. Wall & Bar Box O.S. . . 

3.00 

5.00 



6. Wall Bar Box N.S 

6.00 

12.50 



MILLS 





6. Throne of Music 

25.00 

35.00 



4. Empress 

25.00 

35.00 

. 


6. Constellation . 

39.50 

59.50 

| 


PACKARD 




4. Pla Mor Wall 





Bar Box 

3.95 

7.50 



4. Manhattan 

39.50 

79.50 



’4. Model 7 Phono 

35.00 

50.00 



ROCK-OLA 





4. Playmaster ’46 

35.00 

49.50 



4* 1422 Phono (’46) . 

60.00 

95.00 



4. 1424 Phono (Hideaway) 

49.50 

69.50 



4. 1426 Phono (’47) 

89.50 

150.00 



2. 1428 Magic Glo 

199.50 

269.50 



4. 1432 Rocket (’51) 

239.50 

295.00 



4. 1434 

329.50 

395.00 



2. Fireball . . 

585.00 

650.00 



6. 1501 Wall Box 

3.00 

4.50 


. 

6. 1502 Bar Box 

5.00 

7.50 . 



6. 1503 Wall Box 

12.50 

15.00 



6. 1504 Bar Box 

8.50 

17.50 . 



6. 1510 Bar Box 

15.00 

20.00 . 



6. 1525 Wall Box 

5.00 

15.00 . 



6. 1526 Bar Box 

15.00 

19.50 



6. 1530 Wall Box 

15.00 

25.00 


— 

6. 1805 Organ Speaker . . . 

24.50 

29.00 



SEEBURG 




6. Hi-Tone 9800 ... 

29.50 

49.50 



6. Hi-Tone 9800 RC 

29.50 

49.50 



6. Hi-Tone 8800 

29.50 

49.50 

» 


6. Hi-Tone 8800 RC ... 

29.50 

49.50 



6. Hi-Tone 8200 

29.50 

49.50 ' 



6. Hi-Tone 8200 RC 

29.50 

49.50 



4. 146S 

75.00 

89.50 



4* 146M 

89.50 

115.00 



4. 147S 

90.00 

135.00 



4* 147M 

99.50 

135.00 



4. 148S 

135.00 

175.00 



4. 148M 

145.00 

185.00 



4* 148ML 

159.50 

215.00 



4* M-100A 

425.00 

549.50 



4* M-100B 

565.00 

695.00 



4. M-100C 

785.00 

825.00 



4. W1-L56 Wall Box 5c . 

4.95 

9.95 

. . 


4. 3W2 Wall-a-Matic . . 

6.95 

10.00 



4. W4L-56 

20.00 

35.00 



4. 3W5-L56 Wall Box 





5, 10, 25c 

18.50 

24.50 



4. W6L-56-5/10/25 





Wireless 

22.50 

29.50 



4. 3W7-L-56 

25.00 

34.50 


— 

6. Tear Drop Speaker 

12.50 

17.50 



—TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE— 



END OF MONTH INVENTORY ISSUE 


THIS WEEK’S USED 
MACHINE QUOTATIONS 


15th Year of Publication 
738th Consecutive Week’s Issue 


How To Use “The 
Confidential Price Lists” 

[Also Known As the “C. M. I. (Coin Machine 
Industry) BLUE BOOK”] 

FOREWARD: Many times, wide differences ap- 
pear in the quotation of high and low prices of 
certain equipment. Like any true reporter “The 
Confidential Price Lists” can only feature the 
market prices as they are quoted. “The Confiden- 
tial Price Lists” acts exactly the same as the 
market quotation board at the Stock Exchange — 
posting the prices as they are quoted for the past 
week, regardless of how much they may seem to be 
out of line. Some prices do not change for months. 
“The Confidential Price Lists,” rather than show 
no price, retain the last known quotations for 
such equipment so that the subscriber at least 
has the last known prices as a basis to work with. 
Prices may be very widely divergent. Someone 
on the West Coast may feel a certain machine 
worth $150.00 whereas someone on the East Coast 
may think it worth but $75.00. Of oourse, serial, 
appearance, demand, territory, quantity, and con- 
dition of equipment must be taken into considera- 
tion. (Some equipment offered by outstanding 
firms, having a reputation for shipping com- 
pletely reconditioned machines, will be offered 
at higher prices than others, due to the added 
costs of reconditioning. “The Confidential Price 
Lists” reports each quotation exactly as it is made 
and depends on the subscriber to make average 
price adjustments to fit the peculiarities of his 
territory. 

METHOD: The Confidential Price Lists” should 
be read as follows: First price listed is lowest 
price quoted for the week; Second price listed is 
highest price quoted. 

EXPLANATION 

1. Prices UP 

2. Prices DOWN 

3. Prices UP and DOWN 

4. No change from Last Week 

5. No quotations Last 2 to 4 Weeks 

6. No quotations 4 Weeks or Longer 

7. Machines Just Added 

* Great Activity 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


PHONOGRAPHS (Cont.) 
WURLITZER 


6. 750E 

29.50 

49.50 

6. 780M Colonial 

29.50 

49.50 

6. 780E 

29.50 

49.50 

4. 800 

29.50 

69.00 

4. 850 

29.50 

69.50 

4. 950 

29.50 

79.50 

4* 1015 

90.00 

165.00 

4. 1017 Hideaway . 

75.00 

110.00 

1* 1100 

195.00 

275.00 

1* 1080 

99.50 

175.00 

2. 1250 

. 265.00 

325.00 

4. 1400 

495.00 

575.00 

4. 2140 Wall Box 

5.00 

25.00 

4* 3020 Wall Box 

. . . . 10.00 

19.50 

4. 3025 

5.95 

6.00 

4. 3031 Wall Box 

4.00 

9.95 

4. 3045 Wall Box 

5.00 

20.00 

4. 3048 

29.50 

32.50 

4. 4820 

32.50 

35.00 

4. 219 Stepper . . . . 

7.50 

19.50 

—TOTAL NO. 

TOTAL VALUE— 


November 28, 1953 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE ■ 

IFOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


PHONOGRAPHS (Cont.) 
MISCELLANEOUS 

4. ChiCoin Band Box . . . 75.00 100.00 

4. Chicago Coin Hit 

Parade 45.00 59.50 

4. Ristaucrat 29.50 39.50 

4. Williams Music Mite . . 35.00 100.00 

4. Evans Constellation . . . 169.50 189.50 

7. Evans Century-100 .... 585.00 625.00 

♦-TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE— 





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Manufacturers and date of game's release listed 
Code: (B) Bally; (CC) Chicago Coin; (Ex) Exhibit: 
(Ge) Genco; (Got) Gottlieb; (Ke) Keeney; (Uni 
United; (Wm) Williams. 



4. ABC (Un 3/51) 

50.00 

90.00 


2. Across the Board 




(Un 9/52) 

95.00 

150.00 


4. Ali Baba (Got 6/48) . . 

20.00 

34.50 


4. Alice (Got 8/48) 

19.50 

29.50 


1. All Star Basketball 




(Got 1/52) 

99.50 

115.00 


4. Aquacade (UN 4/49) . . 

20.00 

39.50 


4. Arcade (Wm 11/51) . . 

99.50 

135.00 


4. Arizona (Un 4/50) . . . 

24.50 

45.00 


4* Atlantic City (B 5/52) 

199.50 

335.00 


4. Baby Face (Un 12/48) . 

20.00 

39.00 


6. Ballerina (B 48) .... 

10.00 

24.50 


4. Banjo (Ex 3/48) 

10.00 

45.00 


4. Bank-A-Ball (Got 5/50) 

29.50 

35.00 


4. Barnacle Bill (Got8/48) 

25.00 

34.50 


2. Basketball (Got 10/49) 

40.00 

49.50 


1* Beach Club (B 2/53) . . 

395.00 

475.00 


1* Beauty (B 11/53) 

325.00 

395.00 


4. Be Bop (Ex 3/50) ... 

49.50 

65.00 


4. Bermuda (CC 11/47) . . 

20.00 

45.00 


4. Big Hit (CC 7/52) . . . 

139.00 

159.00 


4. Big Top (Ge 2/49) 

45.00 

64.50 


4. Black Gold (Ge 3/49) . 

29.50 

59.50 


6. Blue Skies (Un 11/48) . 

19.50 

24.50 


2. Bolero (Un 12/51) 

105.00 

125.00 


4. Bomber (CC 3/51) . . . 

29.50 

40.00 


6. Bonanza (Wm 11/47) . 

12.50 

29.50 


6. Bone Head (Ge 11/48) 

25.00 

34.50 


4. Boston (Wm 5/49) . . . 

25.00 

39.50 


4. Bowling Champ 




(Got 2/49) 

20.00 

45.00 



4. Bowl. League (Got 8/47) 

10.00 

29.50 


2* Bright Lights (B5/51) . 

99.50 

145.00 



4* Bright Spot (B 11/51) . . 

125.00 

220.00 


6. Broadway (B 6/51) 

89.50 

99.50 


4. Buffalo Bill (Got 5/50) 

27.50 

37.50 


4. Buccaneer (Got 10/48) . 

20.00 

34.50 


6. Build Up (Ex 2/48) 

15.00 

25.00 


4. Buttons & Bows 




(Got 3/49) 

20.00 

32.50 


2* Cabana (Un 3/53) .... 

295.00 

475.00 


4. Camel Caravan (Ge 6/49) 

47.50 

69.50 


4. Caravan (Wm 6/52) 

79.50 

105.00 


4. Campus (Ex 2/50) 

29.50 

37.50 


4. Canasta ( Ge 7/50) ... 

25.00 

40.00 


4. Carnival (B 7/48) .... 

10.00 

49.50 


4. Carolina (Un 3/49) 

22.00 

39.00 


6. Caribbean (Un 3/48) . . 

15.00 

25.00 


4. Catalina (CC 2/48) . . 

10.00 

35.00 


4. Champion (B 12/49) . . 

29.00 

49.50 


2. Champion (CC 6/49) .. 

20.00 

29.50 


1. Chinatown (Got 10/52) 

135.00 

165.00 


4. Cinderella (Got 3/47) . 

10.00 

29.50 



19.50 

39.50 


2 * Circus (Un 8/52) 

175.00 

295.00 


4. Citation (B 10/48) 

19.50 

42.50 


4. College Daze (Got 8/49) 

29.50 

45.00 


3* Coney Island (B 9/51) 

134.50 

225.00 


4. Contact (Ex 10/48) 

19.50 

45.00 


2. Control Tower 




(Wm 3/51) 

40.00 

69.50 


—TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE— 









The Cash Box, Page 79 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE — ■■■ 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


PINBALL GAMES (Cont.) 


1. Coronation (Got 11/52) 135.00 155.00 


4. County Fair (Un 9/51) 

59.50 

79.50 

4. Crazy Ball (CC 7/48) . 

20.00 

45.00 

4. Crossroads (Got 5/52) . . 

110.00 

135.00 

2. Cyclone (Got 5/51) . . . 

105.00 

120.00 

2. Dallas (Wm 2/49) . . . . 

35.00 

44.50 

6. De leer (Wm 11/49) . . 

49.50 

59.50 

2. Dew Wa Ditty 

(Wm 6/48) 

20.00 

30.00 

2. Domino (Wm 5/52) . . . 

95.00 

135.00 

4. Double Action (Ge 1/52) 

25.00 

45.00 

2. Dbl. Feature 

(Got 12/50) 

40.00 

89.00 

2. Dbl. Shuffle (Got 6/49) 

45.00 

65.00 

4. Disk Jockey 

(Wm 11/52) 

145.00 

165.00 

4. Dreamy (Wm 2/50) . . . . 

29.50 

40.00 

7. Dude Ranch (B 9/53) . . 

459.50 

495.00 

4. Eight Ball (Wm 1/52) 

100.00 

125.00 

6. Entry (B ’47) 

19.50 

29.50 

4. El Paso (Wm 11/48) . . 

29.50 

39.50 

4. Fairway (Wm 6/53) 

175.00 

185.00 

4. Fighting Irish 

(CC 11/50) 

45.00 

75.00 

4* Five Star Univ. (5/51) 

49.00 

79.00 

4. Floating Power 

(Ge 12/48) 

29.50 

44.50 

2. Flying High (Got 2/53) 

145.00 

175.00 

4. Flying Saucers 

(Ge 12/50) 

35.00 

45.00 

4. Football (CC 8/49) . . 

39.50 

65.00 

4. Four Corners 

(Wm 12/52) 

125.00 

150.00 

4. Four Horsemen 

(Got 9/50) 

49.50 

69.50 

2. Four Hundred (Ge 5/52) 

80.00 

225.00 

4. Four Stars (Got 6/52) . 

99.50 

135.00 

4. Freshie (Wm 9/49) . . . 

30.00 

45.00 

4* Frolics (B 10/52) 

225.00 

335.00 

2* Futurity (B 3/51) .... 

50.00 

140.00 

2. Georgia (Wm 7/50) . . . 

30.00 

45.00 

4. Gin Rummy 

(Got 2/49) 

29.50 

42.50 

4. Gizmo (Wm 8/48) . . . 

19.50 

35.00 

4. Glamour (Got 7/51) 

20.00 

30.00 

6. Glider (Ge 8/49) 

29.50 

39.50 

4. Globe Trotter (Gotll/51) 119.50 

135.00 

4. Gold Cup (B 4/48) 

29.50 

55.00 

4. Golden Gloves (CC7/49) 

25.00 

39.50 

4* Golden Nugget 

(Ge 2/53) 

99.50 

175.00 

6. Gondola (Ex 5/49) .... 

19.50 

25.00 

4. Grand Award 

(CC 1/49) 

35.00 

45.00 

4. Grand Slam (Got 4/53) 

137.50 

175.00 

6. Grand Stand (B ’50) . . 

39.50 

49.50 

4. Guys-Dolls (Got 5/53) 

164.00 

225.00 

4. Handicap (Wm 6/52) . . 

99.50 

129.50 

2. Happy Days (Got 7/52) 

125.00 

140.00 

4. Happy-Go-Lucky 

(Got 3/51) 

100.00 

125.00 

4. HarvestMoon(Gotl2/48) 

29.50 

39.50 

4. Harvest Time 

(Ge 9/50) 

35.00 

55.00 

4. Harvey (Wm 5/51) . . . 

65.00 

85.00 

4. Hawaii (Un 8/47) .... 

15.00 

45.00 

4. Hayburner (Wm 6/51) . 

69.50 

75.00 

4. Hit Parade (CC 2/51) 

27.50 

29.50 

2. Hit & Runs (Ge 3/51) . . 

30.00 

40.00 

4. Hit ’N’ Runs (Got 4/52) 

125.00 

145.00 

4. Holiday (CC 12/48) . . 

19.50 

45.00 

4. Holiday (Ke 12/51) 

125.00 

175.00 

2. Hong Kong 

(Wm 9/51) 

85.00 

110.00 

4. Horsefeathers(Wm 1/52) 

79.50 

99.50 

4. Horse Shoe (Wm 12/51) 

79.50 

109.50 

4. Hot Rods (B ’49) .... 

25.00 

40.00 

4. Humpty Dumpty 

(Got 10/47) 

10.00 

29.50 

4. Jack ’N’ Jill (Got 4/48) 

15.00 

20.00 

4- TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE-* 


END OF MONTH INVENTORY ISSUE 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE — — 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES' 


PINBALL GAMES (Cont.) 


4. Jalopy (Wm 8/51) . . 85.00 

2. Jamboree (Ex 5/48) . . 19.50 

4. Jeanie (Ex 6/50) 29.50 

4. Jockey Special 

(B 11/47) 15.00 

4. Joker (Got 11/50) .... 25.00 

4. Judy (Ex 7/50) 29.50 

4* Jumping Jacks 

(Ge 10/52) 90.00 

4. Just 21 (Got 1/50) .... 15.00 

4. K. C. Jones (Got 11/49) 39.50 
4. King Arthur (Got 10/49) 20.00 
4. King Cole (Got 5/48) . 20.00 

4. King Pin (CC 12/51) . . 50.00 

4. Knockout (Got 1/51) . . 45.00 

4. Lady Robin Hood 

(Got 1/48) 19.50 

4. Leaders (Un 10/51) . . 135.00 
4. Lite-A-Line (Ke 6/52) . . 65.00 

1. Long Beach (Wm 7/52) 99.50 

1. Lucky Inning (Wm5/50) 25.00 

4. Lucky Star (Got 5/47) 15.00 

2. Mad. Sq. Garden 


(Got 6/50) 65.00 

4. Magic (Ex 11/48) .... 19.50 

4. Majors ’49 (CC 2/49) . . 27.50 
4. Major League Basehall 

(Un 6/48) 20.00 

4. Manhattan (Un 2/48) . . 10.00 

4. Majorettes (Wm 4/52) 85.00 

4. Mardi Gras (Ge 5/48) 24.50 
4. Marjorie (Got 7/47) . . 14.50 

4. Maryland (Wm 4/49) . . 29.50 

4. Merry Widow 

(Ge 6/48) 24.50 

4. Melody (B 47) 15.00 

4. Mercuxy (Ge 3/50) . . 25.00 
4. Mermaid (Got 6/51) . . 69.00 

6. Mimi (Ex 2/48) 10.00 

1. Minstrel Man (Got 3/51) 40.00 

4. Monterey (Un 5/48) . . 10.00 

4. Moon Glow (Un 11/48) 20.00 

4. Morocco (Ex 10/48) . . 19.50 

4. Niagara (Got 12/51) . . 110.00 

2. Nifty (Wm 12/50) 50.00 

6. Nudgy (B 47) 15.00 

6. Oasis (Ex 10/50) .... 10.00 

4. Oklahoma (Un 5/49) . . 35.00 
6. Old Faithful 

(Got 12/49) 65.00 

4. Olympics (Wm 5/52) . 125.00 

4. One Two Three 

(Ge 10/48) 34.50 

2* Palm Beach (B 7/52) . 250.00 
4. Paradise (Un 7/48) . . . 12.50 

4. Paratrooper (Wm 8/52) 95.00 

4. Pin Bowler (CC 6/50) . 29.50 

4. Pinch Hitter (Un 5/49) 15.00 

4. Pinky (Wm 9/50) .... 25.00 

4. Play Ball (CC 1/51) . . . 25.00 
6. Play Boy (CC 5/47) . . . 19.50 

4. Playland (Ex 8/50) . . . 20.00 

4. Playtime (Ex 8/49) . . . 30.00 

4. Puddin Head 

(Ge 10/48) 25.00 39.50 

4. Punchy (CC 12/50) . . . 25.00 40.00 

4. Quarterback (Wm 10/49) 19.50 29.50 

1. Quartet (Got 2/52) .... 140.00 165.00 
4. Queen of Hearts 

(Got 12/52) 175.00 200.00 

4. Quintet (Got 3/53) .... 175.00 190.00 
4. Rag Mop (Wm 10/50) . 35.00 45.00 

4. Rainbow (Wm 9/48) . . 19.50 22.50 

4. Ramona (Un 2/49) .... 20.00 39.00 

6. Rancho (B ’48) 10.00 17.50 

6. Rawhide (Ex 12/52) . . 49.50 55.00 


95.00 

30.00 

50.00 

45.00 

40.00 

45.00 

150.00 

35.00 

75.00 
29.50 
29.50 

115.00 

69.00 

29.50 | 

175.00 

79.50 

139.50 

45.00 

24.50 

75.00 

29.50 

45.00 

45.00 

17.50 

99.50 

29.50 

20.00 

49.00 

29.50 

25.00 

34.50 

125.00 

20.00 

65.00 

29.50 

29.50 

22.50 

145.00 

69.00 

22.50 

19.50 

64.50 

75.00 

150.00 

45.00 

350.00 

29.50 

125.00 

49.50 

29.50 

39.50 

35.00 

24.50 

49.50 

45.00 


-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 


3 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 


VALUE OF MACHINES HERE ■■■ 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES 


PINBALL GAMES (Cont.) 


4. Red Shoes (Un 11/50) . 
6. Rio (Un 12/46) . 

6. Rip Snorter (Ge 10/49) 
4. Rocket (Ge 5/50) . . 

2. Rockettes (Got 8/50) 

4. Rodeo (Un 2/53) 

4. Rondevoo (Un 5/48) 

1. Rose Bowl (Got 10/51) 
4. Round Up (Got 11/48) 

2. St. Louis (Wm 2/49) . 

7. Saddle and Turf 

(Ev 10/53) 

6. Sally (CC 10/48) .... 
4. Samba (Ex 5/48) .... 
4. Saratoga (Wm 10/48) 

4. Screwball (Ge 8/48) 

4. Sea Jockeys (Wm 11/51) 
6. Sea Isle (CC 11/47) . . 
4. Select-A-Card (Got 4/50) 
4. Serenade (Un 11/48) . 
4. Shanghai (CC 4/48) 

2. Shantytown (Ex 10/49) . 
2. Sharpshooter 

(Got 5/49) .... 

4. Shoo' Shoo (Wm 2/51) . 
6. Short Stop (Ex 7/48) . . 
2. Shoot the Moon 

(Wm 11/51) 

4. Show Boat (Un 1/49) . . 
4. Show Boat (Un 12/52) . 
2. Silver Skates 

(Wm 2/53) 

6. Silver Streak (B 47) 

4. Singapore (Un 11/47) . . 
4. Skill Pool (Got 8/52) . . 
2. Slugfest (Wm 3/52) . . 
6. Smarty (Wm 12/46) 

6. Smoky (Ex 1/47) 

6. Snooks (Wm 6/51) . . . 
2. South Pacific (Ge 2/50) 
4. Spark Plugs 

(Wm 9/51) 

4. Special Entry (B ’47) 

6. Speedway (Wm 9/48) . . 
4. Spinball (CC 5/48) . . . 
4. Spot Bowler (Got 10/50) 
2* Spot-Lite (B 1/52) ... 
2. Sportsman (Wm 2/52) . 
4. Sportsman (Wm 2/52) 
4. Springtime (Ge 3/52) . 
6. Stage Door Canteen 

(Got 11/45) 

4. Stardust (Un 5/48) ... 
4. Stars (Un 6/52) 

1. Starlight (Wm 3/53) 

2. Steeple Chase (Un 1/52) 
2. Stop & Go (Ge 3/51) 

6. Stormy (Wm 1/48) ... 
4. Summertime (Un 9/48) 
4. Sunny (Wm 12/47) ... 
2. Sunshine Park 

(B 12/52) 

4. Super Hockey 

(CC 4/49) 

6. Superliner (Got 7/46) . 
6. Superscore (CC 10/46) . 
6. Surf Queen (B ’46) ... 
6. Suspense (Wm 2/46) . . 
6. Swanee (Ex 1/49) .... 
4. Sweepstakes (Wm 1/52) 
4. Sweetheart (Wm 5/50) . 

4. Tahiti (CC 10/49) .... 

4. Tampico (Un 6/49) . . . 

4. Telecard (Got 1/49) 

6. Temptation (CC 11/48) 

4. Tennessee (Wm 2/48). 

4. Thing (CC 2/51) .... 

4. Three Feathers 

(Ge 5/49) 


39.50 60.00 


. 15.00 

20.00 

14.50 

22.50 

25.00 

39.50 

. 30.00 

85.00 

. 259.50 

275.00 

15.00 

24.50 

90.00 

135.00 

24.50 

39.50 

30.00 

44.50 

350.00 

385.00 

10.00 

20.00 

19.50 

29.50 

29.50 

39.50 

24.50 

35.00 

125.00 

150.00 

14.50 

19.50 

29.50 

55.00 

19.50 

34.50 

19.50 

27.50 

50.00 

85.00 

35.00 

45.00 

32.50 

95.00 

20.00 

29.50 

99.50 

120.00 

10.00 

20.00 

250.00 

325.00 

115.00 

145.00 

10.00 

20.00 

10.00 

29.50 

165.00 

185.00 

75.00 

139.00 

10.00 

17.50 

12.50 

19.50 

49.50 

79.00 

30.00 

69.00 

69.50 

99.50 

29.50 

35.00 

19.50 

29.50 

10.00 

19.50 

65.00 

95.00 

95.00 

195.00 

45.00 

59.50 

49.50 

59.50 

49.50 

59.50 

10.00 

25.00 

15.00 

39.00 

100.00 

185.00 

135.00 

145.00 

115.00 

135.00 

40.00 

59.50 

24.50 

35.00 

25.00 

34.50 

10.00 

29.50 

85.00 

135.00 

34.50 

59.00 

10.00 

17.50 

10.00 

24.50 

10.00 

19.50 

14.50 

20.00 

25.00 

35.00 

145.00 

195.00 

29.50 

39.50 

25.00 

35.00 

39.50 

64.50 

24.50 

49.00 

15.00 

24.50 

19.50 

29.50 

29.50 

45.00 

32.50 

64.50 


-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 




r m 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rrrmr — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n iitii mi n i n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 irm 


“ THE CONFIDENTIAL, PRICE LISTS 


The Cash Box, Page 80 


END OF MONTH INVENTORY ISSUE • November 28, 1953 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 


VALUE OF MACHINES HERE ■ ■ ■ ■ ■— 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


PINBALL GAMES (Cont.) 

4. Three Four Five 

(Un 6/51) 75.00 95.00 

4. Three Musketeers 

(Got 7/49) 59.50 64.50 

4. Thrill (CC 9/48) 29.50 35.00 

4. Times Square 

(fm 4/53) 165.00 190.00; 

6. Tornado (fm 4/47) .. 12.50 17.50 

4. Touchdown (Un 1/52) . 69.50 99.50 

4. Trade Winds (Ge 3/48) 25.00 29.50 

6. Treasure Chest 

(Ex 12/47) 14.50 30.00 

4. Trinidad (CC 3/48) . . . 15.00 35.00 

6. Triple Action (Ge 1/48) 25.00 35.00 

4 . Triplets (Got 7/50) . . . 50.00 75.00 

4 . TriScore (Ge 1/51) . . . 25.00 69.00 

6. Trophy (B 4/48) 39.50 69.50 

4 . Tropicana (Un 1/48) .. 10.00 29.50 

4 . Tropics (Un 7/53) . . . 369.50 400.00 
4. Tucson (fm 1/49) .... 22.50 45.00 

2. Tumbleweed (Ex 9/ 49) . 45.00 55.00 

2* Turf King (B 6/50) . 35.00 85.00 

2. Twenty Grand 

(Wm 12/52) 125.00 145.00 

4. Utah (Un 7/49) 29.50 59.00 

4. Vanities (Ex 2/47) ... 10.00 19.50 

6. Victory Special (B 46) . 19.50 39.50 

4. Virginia (Wm 3/48) . . 20.00 29.50 

4. Watch My Line 

(Got 9/51) 49.50 65.00 

4. Whizz Kids (CC 3/52) . 75.00 105.00 

4. Wild West (Got 8/51) . 125.00 135.00 

2. Winner (Univ.) 20.00 75.00 

4. Wisconsin (Un 3/48) 20.00 45.00 

2* Yacht Club (B 6/53) . . 269.50 410.00 
6. Yanks (Wm 4/48) ... 15.00 25.00 

4. Zingo (Un 10/51) .... 95.00 115.00 


-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 


1. Bally Shuffle-Line 35.00 

4. Bally Hook Bowler . . . 29.50 

4. Bally Baseball 35.00 

6. Bally Shuffle Champ . . . 35.00 

6. Bally Shuffle-Bowler . . 24.50 

4. Bally Speed Bowler . . . 34.50 

4. ChiCoin Bowl-A-Ball . . 165.00 
4. ChiCoin Bowling Twin. 35.00 
4. ChiCoin Bowling Alley. 29.50 
4. ChiCoin Alley w/con . . 30.00 

4. ChiCoin Ace Bowl .... 39.50 

4. ChiCoin Bowl Classic . . 35.00 

4. ChiCoin Horseshoes . . . 45.00 

6. ChiCoin Rebound 25.00 

4. ChiCoin Baseball 35.00 

4. ChiCoin Trophy 35.00 

4. ChiCoin 6 Player 95.00 

4. ChiCoin 6 Player Match 220.00 
4. ChiCoin 6 Play Hi Score 125.00 
4. ChiCoin 6 Player DeLuxe 195.00 
4. ChiCoin 6 Play 

5th Frame 425.00 

4. ChiCoin 10th Frame . . . 195.00 
4. ChiCoin 10th 

Frame Match 325.00 

2. ChiCoin Crown 345.00 

2. ChiCoin Name Bowler. 325.00 
4. ChiCoin Triple Score. . 395.00 
4. ChiCoin Double Score . 375.00 

4. Exhibit Strike 25.00 

4. Exhibit Twin Rotation 145.00 

4. Genco Shuffle Target . . 30.00 

6. Genco Bowling League. 24.50 

5. Genco Baseball 25.00 

4. Genco 8 Player Reb’d. . 60.00 

4. Genco Target Skill .... 30.00 

4. Gottlieb Bowlette 15.00 

4. Keeney ABC Bowler . . . 15.00 

4. Keeney Bowling Champ 10.00 
4. Keeney King Pin 29.50 

6. Keeney Pin Boy 24.50 

4. Keeney Ten Pins 15.00 

6. Keeney Lucky Strike 35.00 
4. Keeney Dbl Bowler . . 35.00 

4. Keeney League Bowl 75.00 
4. Keeney Duck Pins 15.00 

4. Keeney Super Deluxe 

League 

4. Keeney DeLuxe League 

Bowler 

4. Keeney Big League 

Bowl 


75.00 

69.50 

50.00 

39.00 

29.50 

49.50 
200.00 

49.50 

55;00 

45.00 

49.50 

60.00 

65.00 

45.00 

49.00 

59.50 

150.00 

295.00 

175.00 

299.50 

450.00 

285.00 

350.00 

400.00 

340.00 

405.00 

385.00 

39.50 

195.00 

49.50 

45.00 

39.50 

79.50 

50.00 

40.00 

25.00 

35.00 

39.50 

39.50 

24.50 

50.00 

79.50 

139.50 

65.00 


195.00 225.00 


145.00 

85.00 


175.00 

129.50 




NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 


SHUFFLE REBOUNDS (Cont.) 



H 

4. 

Keeney 4 Play League. 

75.00 

137.50 



4. 

Keeney 4-Way Bowl . . 

35.00 

40.00 


4. 

Keeney 6-Player 

125.00 

195.00 


4. 

Keeney 10 Play 

229.50 

335.00 

_ 

4. 

Keeney Club Bowler . . 

385.00 

400.00 


4. 

Keeney Super DeLuxe. . 

195.00 

225.00 


4. 

Keeney Team Blr 

225.00 

265.00 


4. 

Rock-OIa Shuffle Jungle 

24.50 

35.00 


4. 

Rock-Ola Shuffle-Lane . 

24.50 

35.00 


4. 

Un. Official Bowler . . . 

184.00 

250.00 


4. 

Un. Shuffle Alley 

15.00 

20.00 


4. 

Un. Shuffle w/con. .... 

29.50 

69.50 



4. 

Un. Shuffle Alley Exp. . . 

27.50 

39.50 


4. 

Un. 2-play Express .... 

29.50 

45.00 


4. 

Un. Sin Rebound 

30.00 

45.00 


4. 

Un. Twin Rebound .... 

35.00 

39.50 


4. 

Un. Slugger 

35.00 

55.00 


4. 

Un. Skee Alley 

50.00 

65.00 


4. 

Un. 4-Player Match .... 

190.00 

235.00 


4* 

Un. 4-Player 

50.00 

125.00 


4* Un. 5-Player 

169.50 

145.00 


4* Un. 6-Player 

115.00 

150.00 


4* Un. DeLuxe 6-Player . . 

125.00 

195.00 


1* 

Un. Super 6-Play 

195.00 

265.00 


4. 

Un. Clover 

350.00 

390.00 


4. 

Un. Liberty 

349.50 

375.00 


4. 

Un. Cascade 

325.00 

375.00 


4. 

LTn. Classic 

425.00 

450.00 


4. 

Un. Olympic 

395.00 

425.00 


4. 

Un. Manhattan 

395.00 

425.00 


4. 

Un. Manhat. 6 Play . . . 

245.00 

265.00 


4. Un. Star 6-Play 

245.00 

295.00 


4* 

Un. 10th Frame Star . . . 

245.00 

350.00 


4. 

Un. 10th Frame Super. . 

264.50 

300.00 


4. 

Un. Shuffle-Cade 

79.50 

95.00 


4. Un. Twin Shuffle Cade 

75.00 

85.00 


4. 

Univ. Dbl. Shuffle 

29.50 

40.00 


4 Univ Super Twin 

45.00 

55.00 


4. 

Univ. DeLuxe Twin . . . 

65.00 

85.00 


4. 

Univ. Twin Bowler .... 

35.00 

45.00 


4. 

Univ. HiScore Bowler . 

30.00 

55.00 


4. 

Williams DeLuxe 





Bowler 

30.00 

34.50 


6. 

Williams Twin Shuffle 

29.50 

45.00 


4. 

Williams Dbl Head . . . 

35.00 

60.00 


«-TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE-* 


CONFIDENTIAL! price list _ _L_ 


-CMEZlMQm 


-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 


4. ABT 6 Gun Rifle Range 
6. Allite Strike ’N Spares. 

4. Boomerang 

4. Bally Big Inning 

6. Bally Bowler 

6. Bally Convoy 

4. Bally Defender 

6. Bally Eagle Eye 

4. Bally Heavy Hitter .... 

6. Bally King Pin 

6. Bally Lucky Strike .... 

4. Bally Rapid Fire 

6. Bally Sky Battle 

6. Bally Torpedo 

4. Ballv Undersea Raider. 

6. Bank Ball 

4. Bing-A-Roll 

4. Champion Hockey .... 
4. ChiCoin Basketball 

Champ 

4* ChiCoin 4-Player Derby 

4. ChiCoin Goalee 

4. ChiCoin Hockey ... 

2. Chi Midget Skee 
2. ChiCoin Pistol 
6. ChiCoin Roll-A-Score 
4. Edelco Pool Table . . 

2. Evans Bat-A-Score 
6. Evans Ski Roll 
4. Evans Super Bomber 
4. Evans Play Ball 
4. Evans Ten Strike ’46. 

4. Evans Tommy Gun . . 

4* Exhibit Dale Gun . . 

4. Exhibit Gun Patrol . . 

4. Exhibit Jet Gun 

4. Exhibit Pony Express 
4. Exhibit Silver Bullets 
2. Exhibit Six Shooter 
4. Exhibit Vitalizer ... 

4. Genco Glider 

4. Genco Advance Rolls 
6. Genco Play Ball 
6. Groetchen Met. Typer 
2. Genco Sky Gunner . . 

4. Hi Roll 


450.00 

25.00 

40.00 

75.00 

49.50 

47.50 

59.50 

39.50 

35.00 
35.00 

35.00 

75.00 

49.50 

49.50 

75.00 

35.00 

25.00 

35.00 

125.00 

100.00 

85.00 

55.00 

65.00 

75.00 

39.50 

49.50 

115.00 

90.00 

45.00 

65.00 

40.00 
49.50 

49.50 

150.00 

185.00 

85.00 

79.50 

125.00 

45.00 

25.00 

39.50 

29.50 

79.50 

250.00 
25.00 


600.00 

50.00 

45.00 

150.00 

69.50 

79.50 

125.00 

49.50 

60.00 

45.00 

50.00 

95.00 

85.00 

85.00 

125.00 

45.00 

50.00 

55.00 

195.00 

225.00 

95.00 

75.00 

150.00 

95.00 

75.00 
75.00 

165.00 

125.00 

125.00 
75.00 

75.00 

95.00 

65.00 

175.00 

200.00 

135.00 

139.50 

150.00 

75.00 

45.00 

59.50 

40.00 

149.50 

285.00 
40.00 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 



ARCADE EQUIPMENT 

6. Irish Poker 50.00 

6. Jack Rabbit 50.00 


4. Jungle Joe 

4. Keeney Air Raider .... 
4. Keeney Anti Aircraft B1 

4. Keeney Sub Gun 

4. Keeney Texas Leaguer. 
4. Kirk Night Bomber . . . 

4. Lite League 

4. Mills Panoram Peek . . . 

4. Mills Panoram 

6. Mills Conv. for 

Panoram Peek 

4. Mutoscope Ace Bomber* 
4. Muto. Atomic Bomber. . 
4. Mutoscope Dr. Mobile. 
4. Mutos. Fly. Saucers . . . 
4. Mutos. Photo. (Pre-War) 
4. Mutos. Photomatic 

(late) 

4. Mutoscope Silver Gloves 
4. Mutoscope Sky Fighter 
2. Mutos Voice-O-Graph 

35c 

4. Periscope 

4. QT Pool Table .... 

4. Quizzer 

6. Rockola Ten Pins HD 
4. Rockola World Series 
4. Scientific Baseball 
4. Scientific Basketball . 

4. Scientific Batting Pr. 

4. Scientific Pitch ’Em . 

2* Seeburg Bear Gun . . . 

4. Seeburg Chicken Sam 

5. Seeburg Shoot the Chute 
4. Set Shot Basketball 

6. Skee Barrel Roll . . 

4. Spares & Strikes . . 

6. Skill Jump 

4. Supreme Bolascore 
6. Supreme Skee Roll 
6. Supreme Skill Roll 
4. Supreme Rocket Buster 
6. Tail Gunner 

4. Telequiz 

4. Un. Team Hockey . . 

6. Warner Voice Record 
4. Western Baseball ’39 
4. Western Baseball ’40 

6. Whizz 

4. Wilcox-Gay Recordio 
4. Williams All Stars . . 

6. Williams Box Score . 

4. Williams Star Series 
4* Williams Super World 

Series 

4. Williams Quarterback 
4. Wurlitzer Skeeball . . 


95.00 

75.00 

15.00 

75.00 

25.00 

49.50 

35.00 
159.50 

95.00 

10.00 
100.00 

125.00 

95.00 

100.00 

125.00 

395.00 

185.00 

65.00 

425.00 

95.00 

65.00 

75.00 

25.00 

35.00 

39.50 

39.50 

50.00 

135.00 

185.00 

75.00 

49.50 

200.00 

25.00 

75.00 

25.00 

40.00 

20.00 
20.00 

35.00 

39.50 
125.00 

40.00 

49.50 

35.00 

50.00 

15.00 

99.50 

35.00 

39.50 

59.50 

95.00 

65.00 

35.00 


65.00 

65.00 

150.00 

90.00 

35.00 

90.00 

45.00 

75.00 

49.50 

250.00 

225.00 

29.50 

145.00 
149.50 

145.00 

150.00 

250.00 

595.00 

245.00 

125.00 

495.00 

120.00 

85.00 

95.00 

49.50 

69.50 

65.00 

65.00 

95.00 

195.00 

225.00 

105.00 

75.00 

275.00 

49.50 

95.00 

39.50 

95.00 

35.00 

35.00 

50.00 

55.00 

165.00 

85.00 

69.50 
85.00 

85.00 

24.50 

125.00 

65.00 
65.00 

65.00 

195.00 

75.00 

65.00 


-TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE- 

CONUDtHTIALlfl PtlCE LIST 






-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 


fP 

CIGARETTE MACHINES 


4. Automatic “Smokeshop” 

(9 Col., 486 Cap.) . . 125.00- 239.50 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. A-7) 95.00- 125.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. A-9) 75.00- 135.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. AC-7) 85.00- 140.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. AC-9) 95.00- 145.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. E-7) 75.00- 150.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. ES-9) 85.00- 155.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. E-9) 85.00- 165.00 

4. Du Grenier (Mod. ES-11) 85.00- 165.00 

4. Du Grenier f ‘W” (9 col.) 20.00- 70.00 

4. Du Grenier “S” (7 col.) 20.00- 85.00 

4. Du Grenier “S” (9 col.) 20.00- 70.00 

4. Du Grenier Champion 

(9 col.) 20.00- 82.50 

4. Du Grenier Champion 

(11 col.) 40.00- 110.00 

4. Eastern Electric C-8 . . . 75.00- 125.00 

4. Electro (8-col.) 100.00- 215.00 

4. Electro (10 col.) 200.00- 250.00 

4. Lehigh PX (Elec. 8 col.) 50.00- 125.00 

4. Lehigh PX (10 col.) . 50.00- 135.00 

4. Lehigh King Size 65.00- 125.00 

4. National 750 45.00- 85.00 

4. National 950 45.00- 125.00 

4. National 930 45.00- 95.00 

4. National 9A (9 col.) . . 75.00- 110.00 

4. Nat. 9-ML Wheatwood . 125.00- 185.00 


-TOTAL NO. 


TOTAL VALUE- 




“THE CONFIDENTIAL PRICE LISTS ” 


Cash Box, Page 81 


END OF MONTH INVENTORY ISSUE 


November 28, 1953 


[ 


NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE : 

BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 



NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES): 



NUMBER OF EACH MACHINE OWNED 
VALUE OF MACHINES HERE 

(FOR INVENTORY PURPOSES ASCERTAIN VALUE 
BY FIGURE. BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH PRICES) 



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CIGARETTE MACHINES (Cont.) 


4. National Electric 40.00- 95.00 

4. Rowe Diplomat (10-col.) 65.00- 85.00 

4. Rowe Imperial (6 col.) 25.00- 30.00 
4. Rowe Imperial (8 col.) 25.00- 30.00 
4. Rowe Royal (6 col.) . . 25.00- 30.00 

4. Rowe Royal (8 col.) . . 25.00- 30.00 

4. Rowe Royal (10 col.) . 35.00- 40.00 

4. Rowe President (8 col.) 50.00- 65.00 
4. Rowe President 

(10 col.) 75.00- 135.00 

4. Rowe Crnsader (10 coL) 75.00- 155.00 
4. Rowe Electric (8 col.) . 65.00- 85.00 

4. Uneeda “A” (6 col.) . . 35.00- 87.50 

4. Uneeda “A” (8 col.) . . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda “A” (9 col.) . . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda “E” (6 col.) . . 35.00- 75.00 

4. Uneeda “E” (8 col.) . . 35.00- 85.00 

4. Uneeda “E” (9 col.) . . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda “E” (12 col.) . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda “E” (15 col.) . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda 500 (7 coL) . . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda 500 (9 col.) . . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda 500 (15 col.) . . 35.00- 65.00 

4. Uneeda Monarch 

(8 col.) 45.00- 55.00 

4. Uneeda Monarch 

(10 col.) 65.00- 85.00 

4. Uneeda Monarch 

(12 col.) 85.00- 115.00 


CANDY MACHINES 


4. Mills (5 col., 70 cap.) . 

10.00- 

39.50 

4 . Stoner (Mod. 102, 6 col., 
102 cap.) 

50.00- 

100.00 

4 . Stoner (Mod. 120, 6 col., 
120 cap.) 

75.00- 

125.00 

4. Stoner (Senior, 8 col., 
100 cap.) 

85.00- 

165.00 

4. Stoner (Mod. 80, 4 col, 
180 cap.) 

50.00- 

175.00 

4 . Stoner (Mod. 120, 5 col.) 

69.00- 

125.00 

4. Stoner (Mod. 120 Sn, 

7 col.) 

74.50- 

150.00 

4. Stoner DeLuxe Theatre 
(8 col., 160 cap.) . . . 

75.00- 

200.00 

4. Stoner DeLuxe Theatre 
(16 col., 320 cap.) . . . 

165.00- 

300.00 

4. Martin’s “Little Candy 
Store” (8 col., 160 cap.) 

79.50- 

89.50 

4. Coan “U-Select-It” 

(74 cap.) 

15.00- 

50.00 


HOT COFFEE 


4 . Andico Cafe Petit, 

200 caps 300.00 400.00 

4 . Bert Mills Coffee Bar, 

200 cups 150.00 200.00 

4. Bert Mills Coffee Bar, 

600 cups 200.00 300.00 

4. Bert Mills Coffee Bar, 

500 cups 300.00 450.00 

4. Chief-Way, Model 100, 

cap. 400-600 625.00 675.00 

4. Hot-O-Mat Comb. Hot 
Coffee-Choc., 

600 cups 250.00 300.00 

4. U-Select-It Hot Coffee, 

600 cups 350.00 425.00 


CARBONATED DRINK 


4. Drink-O-Mat, single 

flavor, 5c, 1000 cups 200.00 275.00 
4. Drink-O-Mat, 3 flavor, 

5c, 1000 cups 425.00 475.00 

•L Drink-O-Mat, 4 flavor, 

5c, 1000 cups 500.00 525.00 


^ TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE-* 


CARBONATED DRINK (Cont.) 


4. Lyons #1400, single 

flavor, 5c 425.00 450.00 

4. Lyons #1400-2F 450.00 550.00 

4. Lyons Model 500, 5c 

single 150.00 250.00 

4. Mills, Automatic Foun- 
tain, 400 cups 125.00 200.00 

4. Mills, Automatic Foun- 
tain, 400 cups, with- 
out changemaker . . . 100.00 110.00 

4. Soda Shoppe 1000.00 1100.00 


4. Spacarb single 5c, 1000 

cnps 175.00 250.00 

4. Spacarb 3 Unit 5c, 1000 

cups 400.00 550.00 

4. Spacarb 4 Unit 5c, 1000 

cups 600.00 650.00 

4. Super Vend 3 flavor, 600 

cup A-l 150.00 300.00 

4. Super Vend 3 flavor, 

600 Cup A-2 200.00 350.00 

t- TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE-* 


NON-CARBONATED 

DRINK 

4. American Simplex, 

single flavor, 5c, 200 

cups 100.00 125.00 

4. Refreshomat, 5c, 10c 

300 cups 100.00 300.00 


CAN DRINK 

4. Juice-Bar, 6 seL, 600 

cans 325.00 450.00 

4. Refresher, 3 sel., 300 

cap cap 400.00 500.00 


ICE CREAM VENDORS 

4. Vendo “Dairy-Vend” j |^j |y] 

203 Bar Capacity . . . 250.00- 350.00 . 

4. Rowe “Ice Cream Ven- 
dor” (Ice Cream 
Sandwiches or 

“Pops”), 200 cap. ... 350.00- 475.00 J 

<-TOTAL NO. TOTAL VALUE-* 


Manufacturers New Equipment 

Products listed here are currently in production. Prices are manufacturers’ list 
prices, F. O. B. factory. Where prices are not listed, manufacturers have not yet 
released list prices. 


A.B.T. MFG. CORP. 
Challenger (Counter Model 


Gun) $ 65.00 

Rifle Sport, 3 and more Guns, 
plus complete ranges of vari- 
ous types $1,408.25 

AMI, INCORPORATED 

AMI “E”-40 Phonograph $795.00 

AMI “E”-80 Phonograph 925.00 

AMI “E”-120 Phonograph . . .1,050.00 

W-8 5-10-2 5 c-Wall Box 89.50 

W-120 5-10-25c-Wall Box 99.00 

HS-80 Hideaway 775.00 

HS-120 Hideaway 885.00 

AMIVOX Speaker 27.50 

AUTO-PHOTO CO. 

Auto-Photo $2,545.00 

BALLY MFG. CO. 

The Champion (Mech. Horse) . $1,065.00 

Space Ship 1,165.00 

Speed Boat 995.00 

Palm Springs 699.50 

CHICAGO COIN 

Gold Cup $665.00 

Hi-Speed Crown Bowler 625.00 

Advance Bowler 615.00 

’Round the World Trainer . . . ,1185.00 

H. C. EVANS & CO. 

Century (Model 2045) $1,050.00 

Jubilee (Model 245) 825.00 

Jubilee (Model 278) 795.00 

EXHIBIT SUPPLY 

Big Bronco $ 997.50 

Roy Rogers’ Trigger 1,047.50 

Rudolph The Red Nosed 

Reindeer 725.00 

Pete The Rabbit 725.00 

Rawhide 725.00 

Space Gun 375.00 

Space Patrol 1,047.50 

Silent Salesman (Card 

Vendor) 79.50 

Sea Skate 1,047.50 

Western Gun 375.00 

GENCO MFG. & SALES CO. 

Shuffle Pool $675.00 

D. GOTTLIEB & CO. 

Pin Wheel $364.50 

INTERNATIONAL MUTO. CORP. 
Photomat ’53 $2,150.00 

J. H. KEENEY & CO., INC. 

Electric Ciaarette Vendor $284.50 

Coin Changer Model 304.50 

Pacemaker Bowler 600.00 


MARVEL MFG. CO. 

(New Model) Shuffle-Score 


Overhead Scoreboard $139.50 

Wall Type Scoreboards for 
Shuffleboards 95.00 

ROCK-OLA MFG. CORP. 


Model 1438 “Comet Fireball” 
Phono. 120 Selections, 45 

RPM Only 

Model 1440 “Comet Fireball” 
Playmaster 120 Selections 45 

RPM Only 

Model 1546 “Comet Fireball” 
Chrome Wall Box, 120 Selec- 
tions 

Model 1608 “Tone-O-Lier” 8" 

Chandelier Speaker 

Model 1611 “Tonette” 8" Wall 
Speaker wtih Vol. Control 
& Transformer Blonde or 

Mahog 

Model 1906, Remote Volume 
Control 

J. P. SEEBURG CORP. 

M100C (Select-O-Matic “100” 

phonograph) 

HM 100C (Select-O-Matic “100” 

R. C. Special) 

3W-1 Wall-O-Matic “100” 

MRVC-1 Master Remote 

Volume Control 

CVS4-8 — 8" Wall Speaker Ivory 

(Teardrop) 

CVS6-8 — 8" Recessed Speaker 
CVS7-12 — 12" Recessed Speaker 

PS6-1Z Power Supply 

ARA1-L6 Auxiliary Remote 


Amplifier 

AVC-1 Automatic Volume 
Compensator Unit 

UNITED MFG. CO. 

Imperial Shuffle Alley $675.00 

Royal Shuffle Alley 650.00 

Rio 725.00 

WICO CORP. 

Major Leaguer (Automatic 

Baseball Pitcher) $1,295.00 

WILLIAMS MFG. CO. 

Army-Navy $364.50 

Pennant Baseball 479.50 


THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER CO. 
Model “1500” Phonograph 
Model “1600” Phonograph . 

Model “1650” Phonograph 
Model 4851 5c-10c-25c Wall Box 

(48 Selections) 

Model 5204 5c-10c-25c-WaU Box 
(104 Selections) 

Model 5100 8" Speaker 
Model 5110 12" DeLuxe Speaker 






The Cash Box 


Page 82 


November 28, 1953 





4 PLAYER 


ggjgj 

$ [6|’l 




—.UL.iUJj 


The THRILLS of SHUFFLEBOARD 
The SPEED of BOWLING... g 
The SKILL of BILLIARDS... 


• 18 SHOTS PER PLAYER- 

3 Frames of 6 Shots Each 

• 50 SECOND PLAYING TIME 

Fast as a Bowler... 10c Play 

• ROLLOVER WIRE FORMS 

Control Scoring as in Bowling 
Game > 

• HUNDREDS OF Jm 

COMBINATIONS /jiM 

Straight or Bank Shots / 

• SPECIAL Xfl'jSBm 
BONUS 

SCORING / / ■BM11I 


• EASY SERVICING 
THROUGHOUT 


See us at Booth 141 
At The Outdoor Show 


AMERICA'S NEWEST 

ALL-LOCATION 
I Amusement Rage 


PLAYER UP SHUFFLE PLAYER UP 


HAVEBS HHU puwbs 


A 









with NEW SPELL-NAME Feature 


surP-c*» 




'SUKT^®* 


B-U»t 

At»-u»t 


TWO SPECIAL CARDS 


(FOR EXTRA IN-LINE SCORES) 


SPOT A NUMBER 
EXTRA BALL 

3 in Line Scores 4 in Line 
BOTH SUPER CARDS 
BOTH SPECIAL CARDS 


SELECT-EM FEATURES^ 


FOUR CORNERS SCORE 
\ EXTRA TIME FEATURE 
\\ UP TO 3 EXTRA BALLS PER GAME 
\\ NEW, EXTRA LARGE CASH BOX 


E-Z SERVICE FEATURES 


BACK GLASS SLIDES OUT 
EITHER SIDE 

BACK GLASS MECHANISM 
TILTS FORWARD FOR 
EASY ACCESS 

HINGED FRONT DOOR 
HINGED BACK DOOR 


ROYAL 

SHUFFLE 

ALLEYS 


Now at your 
^Distributor 


SCC YOUR DISTRIBUTOR 


STANDARD 

PINBALL 

CABINET 

SIZE 


AVAILABLE 
IN 2 SIZES 


(CAN ALSO SPOT NUMBERS 2-5-8) 


(CAN ALSO SPOT NUMBERS 2-5-8) 


ALL BALLS IN R-/-0 POCKETS - 
> RETURN FOR EXTRA PLAY ST 


SELECTOR 

KNOB 

















numbers you need to build up score, 
cancel-out numbers you’re “sorry” you hit... try again 
with BALLS RETURNED from cancelled numbers... 


HOLD ODD OR EVEH OR ML NUMBERS 


BY PRESSING ODD OR EVEN OR ALL BUTTON 


(w$t/ 


vP 


BALLS RETURN FROM NUMBERS NOT HELD 

SPOTTED NUMBERS ALWAYS HELD 


Give the players the opportunity to "second-guess" their skill-shots. 

Give them the right to wipe out their "mis-cues" while hanging on to 
the hits that count. Give them a free "try-again" ball for every number 
not held. Give them the biggest fun-value ever offered in pin-game 
history, by giving them palm springs by Bally. They’ll say "Thanks" 
with the biggest and steadiest repeat-play profits you’ve earned in a 
long, long time < 

PLUS SUPER- CARD SCORES 
PLUS CORNER SCORES 
PLUS SELECT-A-SPOT 


ADVANCING SCORES 
EXTRA BALLS 


Built into palm springs are all the 
profit-proved features of the greatest 
Bally. in-line games . . . plus the new 
hold idea, greatest innovation in 
pin-game design in years. Get your 
share of the palm springs profits. 
See your Bally Distributor today. 
Bally Manufacturing Company, 
2640 Belmont Ave., Chicago 18, 111. 


PALM SHU NGS