Skip to main content

Full text of "Quiver (2015)"

See other formats























EVERY 


ACADEMICS 


Homework 

12 

Hands-on 

16 

Preparation/Testing 

18 

Future 

24 

Matrix 

28 

STUDENT LIFE 


Friends 

30 

Hanging Out 

32 

Stress 

38 

Relationships 

40 

Interacting with Teachers 

42 

Technology 

44 

Free Time 

48 

Getting to LC 

50 

Construction 

52 

Lunch 

54 

High School Survival 

56 

SOME 


SPORTS 


Fall 

60 

Winter 

82 

Spring 

108 

STUDENT LIFE 


Outside of School 

124 

College 

128 

Parking 

130 

Dances 

134 

Graduation 

142 

Performing Arts 

146 

ACADEMICS AND CLUBS 


Hands-on/Projects 

156 

Clubs 

170 

ONE 


PEOPLE 


Faculty 

182 

Students 

186 


EVERY NE 


SOME 


ONE 


REFERENCE 


Baby Ads/Ads 

250 

Sports Index 

280 

Clubs 

294 

Colophon 

302 

Index 

304 

Senior Awards 

320 


















EVERY 

SOME 


LAKE CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 


8400 WICKER AVENUE 
ST. JOHN, INDIANA, 46373 
PHONE: 219.365.8551 
FAX: 219.365.7156 


VOLUME 49 
QUIVER 2015 
3,151 STUDENTS 
130 FACULTY 


LAKECENTRALNEWS.COM 81 STAFF 

TWITTER: LCHSnews INSTAGRAM: lakecentralnews 

LCSC.US AURASMA.COM/QUIVER2015 


1. ONE MAN CAN CHANGE THE WORLD Kyle Hayes (12) stands out in the crowd 
during the homecoming game that was held on Friday, Oct. 3. Hayes cheered after 
kicker Jillian Doan (12) scored a field goal. Photo by: Shannon Hearne 
Page by: Jennifer Mohamed and Hannah Reed 



































High school is a crazy adventure in 
itself, but Lake Central makes it scarier 
with the number of students who can 
make high school overwhelming. 

| ^ |\lf Lake Central student has those 
Py P IIY “LC moments” that define their 
!■ * til I experience here. 

Climbing the stairs to make it to the third floor, 
checking Twitter every minute to see if Dr. Larry 
Verraco called for a snow day, 
getting confused by the new 2nd hour Matrix 
activities, and 

being reminded by Mr. Tobias to “keep it real and 
do some good out there.” 

a a wm students experienced changes 
VII lyl k with the first full year in the new 
W w III L academic wing 
Using cell phones during lunch, 
figuring out how to navigate the new parking lot 
in the morning with Officer Sidenbender direct¬ 
ing traffic, 

realizing that running from the third floor to the 
freshman center in six minutes is worse than the 
trek from the old pool to the freshman center, and 
seeing that Mr. Clark had no trouble reassembling 
his old classroom in the new building. 



AllF thing remains the same for every 
M k student in this school: no matter 
w 11 L how different all of the students at 
LC are, we are all united in this insane journey 
called high school. 


1. STATE OF THE ART Brittany Dunbar (11) and the rest of Mrs. Rachel Gray's. Art. 
Ceramics II class shapes their clay on the throwing wheel on Wednesday. Nov. 19. The 
class was practicing on the wheel to prepare for further projects. Photo by: Sofia Hay 
Page by: Jennifer Mohamed and Hannah Reed 


OPENING 3 





































EVERY 


PAGE BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED 



Four years of high school seems like a long 
time, but time passes more quickly than one 
may think. 

vs ■ vvwyear Qi ves the opportunity to 
L If t I# V make new memories and try 
L V Lit I different paths in high school. 
Despite the differences that everyone has within 
the school, the similarities that tie us together are 
actually quite numerous. 

student in this school has 
faced various struggles and 
asked the same questions. 

Is this a fire drill or is the popcorn machine on 
fire again? 

How much time is left in passing period because 
there isn’t any music? 

How long will it take to get out of the parking lot 
today? 

mb ■ h # day, regardless of how different 
L If L 1J V each of LC’s 3,151 students 
L V Li 11 I are, we come to the same 
building and become one student body. This 
school is the giant string that ties all of us together 
for this high school journey. 


1. WHO’S LAUGHING NOW Zachary Hansen (10) and Aaron Cappello (9) review a 
song for the musical, “Forbidden Broadway." The musical had its first rehearsal on Oc 
3, 2015. Photo by: Cathryn Cearing. 


OPENING 5 





















With all of the options that Lake Central offers, it can 
be overwhelming to consider the choices. One thing 
is true though: Everyone finds some place to fit into. 


SOME 


examples are 


33 clubs, 

47 athletic teams, 

6 band classes, 

4 choir classes, and 
4 theater classes 

given for students to add into their busy schedules. 


High school in itself is a journey, but one must decide 
how to arrive to this building in order to partake in 
the adventure 

Bus 

Walking 

School parking lot 

Zig-E’s or Fagen Miller Funeral Home 
But really, all of the choices to get to school in the 
winter were pretty dismal. 


Then there is the decision of which diploma you 
want to receive: CORE 40, Academic Honors or 
Technical Honors. 


^ II F choices that students make during 

■ IIIVI ■ h '9 h sch ° o1 may seem difficult, 
^ V If I t but the reality is that high school 
is only the end of the beginning. More choices and 
decisions will continue to come, but the options that 
Lake Central gives allows everyone to begin the path 
to the many destinations to come. 






1. POUR SOME WATER ON ME The girls basketball team waits in anticipation for 
the water to be dumped on their head. The girls were nominated by East Central lady 
Cardinals. Photo by: Hannah Bryner 


A 

SOME 

PAGE BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED AND HANNAH REED 


6 










































PAGE BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED AND HANNAH REED 

of the things that separates Lake Central 
from the rest of the region is the size of 
the student body. LC is the sixth largest 
high school in the state of Indiana, but that does not 
take away every student’s ability to become whoever 
one wishes to become. 

student always has to break the silence 
in class when a difficult question is 
asked. 

One, or more, freshman will get lost 
every day during the first week of 
school. 

One senior gets chosen every year to 
be the Indian for the student section. 
One day, the day will come, and you 
will walk across the stage to graduate. 

Of the experiences that high school offers, whether 
embarrassing or favorable, the memories will last. 
Lake Central may be a huge school with thousands 
of students, but you have the opportunity to stand 
out in this crowd.These high school chapters of your 
book decide the next adventure of your life, so make 
it a worthwhile read. 


1. STILL THE ONE Craig Bronson (11) paints the face of a participant at the Lake 
Hills Haunted Hills. Bronson used a myriad of makeup to transform his subject into a 
zombie. Photo by: Joseph Pavell 


OPENING 9 













1. AIN’T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH Students walk up and 
down the stairs in the new academic wing. From the main floor 
in the wedge to the third floor, there are 56 stairs for students to 



















































1. Jacob Jakubowicz (12). Emil Govani (12) and Benjamin Guzek (12) Photo by: Kristina Plaskett 2 Josh 
Clark’s 4th hour Government class Photo by: Sofia Hay 3. Dominic Foushi (12) Photo by: Sofia Hay 4. 
Jocelyn Cheesebourough (11) Photo by: Kristina Plaskett 


ENGAGING IN EDUCATION 

Students take hard work to new level 

Homework is a sensitive subject for many students. 

It does not just pertain to the one or two hour sessions 
spent at home. With time in class combined with time at 
home, homework is now a 24-hour duty for the majority 
of students. 

“Study hall is really helpful. Even though it has no 
credit, it helps a lot in the long run,” Inna Ramos (10) 
said. 

Some teachers provide class time for students to work 
on completing homework assignments and studying for 
tests. This can lighten the homework load for students. 



Classroom attendance pays off for students after high school 

PAGE BY: VERONICA DAVIS, SOFIA HAY AND ANNABELLA PIUNTI 


tudents often complain about the long hours they 
have to spend sitting in required classes each 
week such as English, math or government. In 
the long run, taking these courses can work in 
their benefit. 

“I used to not think that [required courses] were important 
until we started a new section [about banking] in [Precal¬ 
culus] the other day,” Emily Baginski (12) said. 

In a world that seems to be growing with technology, it 
is hard to imagine a world without math. 

“This section we are working on deals with interest for 
the bank, so I think that will be beneficial for us in the 
future,” Baginski said. 

Other students choose to devote a lot of their time and 
effort to English classes. 

“[English] will be beneficial [in the future]. For example, 
if you go into science, and you discover something, and 
you’re really bad at publishing and getting your word out, 
English will help. Nobody is going to take you seriously 
if you don’t know how to write,” Breanna Zeller (11) said. 

Government courses can also provide beneficial informa¬ 


tion for students to apply to in the real world. 

“I think, [government] just overall, gave a sense of how 
the government system works, and how we choose repre¬ 
sentatives and senators and what their jobs are. This may 
change your views on how you want to vote or don’t want 
to vote,” Navneet Kaur (12) said. 

Some topics that are discussed in government classes 
help students understand the importance of being an 
involved member in society. 

“Basically we are going to be voting the rest of our lives, 
so you want to know which parties you support. In gov¬ 
ernment you really learn that. It’s not only that, you also 
learn about political issues like minimum wage,” Nikola 
Tepsic (12) said. 

Others think their government classes will give them 
the knowledge they need to work with money and other 
everyday things in the real world. 

“You get a better understanding of how everything works, 
like how the market works, how everything flows and how 
you can make money in the market,” Bryan Vanderlee 
(12) said. 



THREE STEPS THAT PAVE THE WAV TO AH "A 


1 

2 

3 


Refresh. Open up notes from class and 
review the material that has been taught 
in previous classes. 

Practice. Work on solving the examples 
from the book or notes and different 
practice problems. Practicing different 
problems over and over again will only 
benefit in the end. 

Test. The best way to prepare for the 
test is to end with solving new practice 
problems. See how many problems can 
be solved to track how much progress 
has been made from practicing. 



Gurleen Khatra (12) Photo by: Veronica Davis 


12 EVERY ACADEMICS HOMEWORK 




























































































































































































1. RAISING GRADES Eric Mender (9) works hard to finish his homework. Mender pushed himself to complete homework 
assignments to maintain and raise his grades. “We have a lot of time to work on [homework] in class, and it helps me. I 
try to get my homework done in class, so I can [have free time] at home," Mender said. Photo By: Sofia Hay 2. FOCUS IS 
KEY Lauren Stockman (12) focuses on her homework that was assigned in class. Stockman kept her focus to complete the 
assignments to the best of her ability. "I think that homework should be given in school because outside school, it should be 
our time," Rebecca Todd (9) said. Photo By: Annabella Piunti 3. CHROME TIME Lauren Wisniewski (9) and Tara Rosenwinkel 
(9) work diligently on the new Chromebooks. The Chromebooks were convenient resources for students working on in-class 
research projects. “The Chromebooks are really helpful because we get to use the Internet and Microsoft Word for things 
we do in class," Samantha Copeland (12) said. Photo By: Sofia Hay 4. STUDYING HARD Marko Suvocesmakovic (10) reads 
from his Earth Science text book. Suvocesmakovic used his time in study hall to study for a quiz that he had the next day. “I 
took a study hall for my grades. I think it’s starting to help me more with my grades, like getting my homework done. [I get 
done] one or two classes worth of homework done each study hall," Suvocesmakovic said. Photo By: Sofia Hay 


STUDENT PREFERENCE OF CORE CLASSROOM COURSES 

43 % 


poll out 330 students 


57 % 


MATH 

57% of students prefer their 
math courses over English 
courses. 


ENGLISH 

43% of students prefer their 
English courses over their 
math courses. 


“We like doing group activities in English class 
because it gives us a chance to combine every¬ 
one’s ideas into one,” Emily Segovia (11) said. 





















«.iL 




1. EXPERIENCING THE FEELING Mrs. Caryn O’Hara’s. Physical Education, health class participates in a sobriety test 
while wearing drunk goggles to see what it is like to be drunk. The students had to read a chapter in the book about drunk 
driving for homework. “(I learned] that when being drunk, you can’t see anything. You could run into a wall, so that’s not fun. 
I think the test was effective, but a lot of kids thought of it to goof off," GiannoulaTjortjis (10) said. Photo by: Kayla Hallowell 

2. BACK IN TIME Brian West (11) and Kara Newell (11) work together on their U.S. History project. Mr. Brian Tomson’s, 
Social Studies, third hour U.S. History class had to create and draw a fictional story about a family trying to travel west 
while encountering many obstacles. “I learned the daily struggles that early pioneers had while crossing America, such 
as how it was a six month journey [and] many of them died from disease and starvation. There was the Donner Party that 
everyone knows about where cannibalism [occurred]. So, I just learned a lot of interesting things I wouldn’t of without the 
project,’’ West said. Photo by: Kayla Hallowell 3. LEARNING OTHER SPECIES Hannah Scherer (12), Ryan Delis (12) and 
Connor Scott (11) dissect a frog in Mrs. Lisa Mareno’s, Science, Zoology class. They had to complete a worksheet about 
learning the anatomy of animals. “The reason why science homework is important is because a lot of people really don’t 
truthfully understand animals until you truthfully get up close and personal. I always found it interesting. I never really found 
science as interesting as it is now until I took this class to actually learn from personal preference,’’ Scherer said. Photo by: 
Kayla Hallowell 4. UPS AND DOWNS OF ECONOMICS Chase Lowden (12) works on Mrs. Rachel Underwood’s, Social 
Studies, Economics homework. The class recently took the Unit 4 test about U.S. money, banking and finance. “The ben¬ 
efits from taking an economics class are that you get to learn about different markets, companies and personal finance,’’ 
Lowden said. Photo by: Elizabeth Bustamante 


WORDS OF THE WISE: GETTING WORK DONE 



1 

2 

3 


“The first way [to work 
efficiently] is find your study 
method and zone in on it. By 
that I mean if you’re a procras¬ 
tinator, then I guess procrasti¬ 
nate because you work the best 
under pressure.” 

“The second way of doing your 
homework is if you get stuck 
with a problem, don’t just make 
up answers. [You should] either 
email the teacher right away, 
email a friend or go on Twitter 
and find your teacher.” 

“The third way to get your 
homework done is to do it 
during class time. When the 
teacher gives you work time, 
actually use it.” 

MRS. KATELIN ELLIS. SCIENCE 



Mrs. Katelin Ellis. Science, and Ryan Kilinski (10) Photo by: Eliza¬ 
beth Bustamante 


14 
































“[Biology class is important to every student] 
because it is the basics of everything you’re 
going to learn in any other science class,” 
Elaine Janucholwski (10) said. 



SCIENTIFIC SCHOLARS OR HOMEWORK HISTORIANS? 

poll out of 330 students 


71 % 


SCIENCE 

71 percent of stu¬ 
dents favor science 
homework over history 
homework. 


HISTORY 

29 percent of students fa¬ 
vor history homework over 
science homework. 


29 % 


STUDENTS STUDY WHICH CORE CLASSES DEMAND DEDICATION 



“My science homework 
[is a priority] because it 
makes me think critically.” 


RAYMOND POLLALIS (12) 



“I think science homework 
is a priority because it is 
more appliable to different 
careers than history.” 


ERIN DIVINEY (10) 


“I think economics 

j j j j j j [homework is a priority] 

/1; j j because you need to know 
: the information for your 

V GUADALUPE ALVARADO (12) 



“Science class’s home¬ 
work is a priority because 
the homework makes me 
understand the lesson and 
do better on the test.” 

LAUREN GRONEK (11) 



“Science homework [is a 
priority] because generally 
it’s the most useful later 
in life.” 

KEVIN CALDERONE (12) 



“Science homework is 
a priority because the 
homework is easy.” 


GUNNAR RICHARDSON (10) 




Students take on homework for required courses 


PAGE BY: KAYLA HALLOWELL AND ELIZABETH BUSTAMANTE 


ost students share similar homework experiences 
in science, history, health and economics classes, 
yet some students still struggle with the amounts 
of homework these classes demand. 

“Since we don’t do lectures in [iChem], we have to watch 
them all at home. It takes a lot of time because some nights 
you spend about an hour just watching the lectures, not even 
finishing the homework. After you watch the lectures, you still 
have to do worksheets and take notes,” Ana Zanza (10) said. 

Because the homework for these classes can be demand¬ 
ing, lack of time on weekday evenings may become an issue. 

“I work over 20 hours a week, so it’s hard to get school 
work done. The homework that I don’t get done in study 
hall is usually rushed through the class before. It’s hard to 
balance school and work because school is like a full-time 
job,” Jacob Zak (10) said. 

With a lack of time may come a widely shared complication 
among students: procrastination. 

“[I procrastinate mostly with] economics. It’s just so long, 
and I don’t want to do it,” Jessica Ladowski (12) said. 


Homework may be tedious in the required courses, but 
for classes such as Biology, it may prove to be beneficial. 
Teachers try to assign homework which will help equip the 
students with the information they need to pass the courses. 

“[All the homework] we do [in Biology class] is to help pre¬ 
pare you for your test and understanding the material better. 
Your study guides, for the most part, are the concepts on 
the test. If you do that, you will do better when it comes to 
that point,” Mrs. Julie Shupryt, Science, said. 

Although some teachers may try to base the homework 
on knowledge important in the units, a handful of students 
still believe some homework has no benefit. 

“For some subjects, like history, I find homework helpful. 
[For] other subjects, I feel like it is just a waste of time,” 
Claire Gronek (9) said. 

Every student has a different take on homework and 
whether the homework for required courses is helpful or not. 

“Homework doesn’t really impact me. It’s something I’ve 
always done, so I am used to working around it,” Joseph 
Grzybek (10) said. 


EVERY ACADEMICS HOMEWORK 15 




























































































































































































































1. SLICING INTO SCIENCE John Dosen (11) and Nicholas Garcia (11) cut open a shark in Mrs. Lisa Moreno’s, Science. Zool¬ 
ogy class. The class dissected the stomach in search of half-eaten fish or any other crushed up food. “(Working with labs] is 
fun because you get to work with a partner,” Dosen said. Photo by: Amber Stedt 2. OH RATS Samantha Lane (11) slices into 
her rat. Lane and other Anatomy and Physiology students followed the instructions of their lab guides to examine the rat’s 
organs. “The smell was the worst part. Everything else you get used to. except for the smell, but [the rat dissection] wasn’t 
as bad as I thought,’’ Marina Vasquez (11) said. Photo by: Jovana Dodevska 3. DYING THE DISH Rachel Kozel (10) writes 
down results after sticking a toothpick with dishwasher detergent on it in the petri dish in her chemistry . The milk and dish¬ 
washer detergent formed a chemical reaction. “It’s the fact that you’re not looking at a Powerpoint and taking notes. You’re 
actually doing hands on stuff and learning how scientists would have learned,” Kozel said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 




::::::::::::::: 





1. Naseem Shatat (10) 2. Students in O'Hara's health class 3. Brett Morris (10) 4. Naseem Shatat (10) 
Photos by: Emma DiPasquo 


DUPLICATING DRUNK DISASTERS 

Goggles imitate feeling intoxicated 

In Mrs. Caryn O’Hara’s, Physical Education, 
health classes, students wore drunk goggles to 
simulate the feeling of being drunk and to learn the 
repercussions of underage drinking from Officer 
Brett Sidenbender 

“It was cool to do [the drunk google simulation] 
because I got to see the feeling of being drunk. 

It was really hard to throw the balls and actually 
get them to the other person,” Conner McCoy (10) 
said. 



“I think that doing labs in science is beneficial 
because it introduces me to different aspects 
of life, and it’s fun to set stuff on fire,” Matthew 
Mirales (10) said. 




















































Hands-on learning helps students grasp classroom topics 


PAGE BY: EMMA DEGROOT AND ASHLEY KRALIK 

ands-on learning can influence students in many 
different ways from helping them boost their grades 
to influencing an entertaining atmosphere in the 
classroom. Teachers use many different ways to get 
students involved, such as applying labs, group projects, 
sports and presentations to their teaching. 

“[Doing labs] is fun. I wish wed do more dissections. [The 
labs] are worth a lot of points. If you have a really low grade, 
it’ll make it come up,” John Dosen (11) said. 

Although students in Zoology and Anatomy work with 
dissections, Chemistry students have had their fair share of 
labs this year as well. 

“I think [the labs] help [you] understand what you’re learn¬ 
ing, and it’s hands-on, so it helps,” Breanna Zeller (11) said. 

Hands-on projects are not restricted to required science 
classes. Mrs. Rachel Thomas’s, Science, Forensic Science 
class worked on replicating their own faces in the same way 
that professionals would identify suspects. 

“Mrs.Thomas wanted to show us how hard it was to recreate 
a person because we are talking about eye witnesses and 
how someone would describe the criminal to the police,” 
Olivia Middleton (11) said. 

Science classes may seem like the only way to bring in 


hands-on projects, but Mr. Joe Fox, Math, incorporates candy 
into classroom lessons to spark interest among his students. 
These teachers let their students do what they want with the 
candy used. 

“I went through and grabbed random bags of candy, and 
they can go in and do some type of discussion about the 
distribution. It goes through and shows them that you can 
pick up a bag of candy, and we can use that to make stats 
play there,” Mr. Fox said. 

Hands-on activities in classrooms give students the oppor¬ 
tunity to not just sit in a desk and be taught a topic, but also 
learn in an exciting environment. 

“It shows you more experience. When you experience 
something, it’s easier to apply it,” Rachel Kozel (10) said. 

Chemistry classes usually do the same labs and projects, 
but not every student will grasp the concepts in the same 
way. It is possible that one student gains a different aspect 
of the concepts than his or her lab partner. 

“I love doing labs. [I like] the whole process and the results, 
especially examining things," Dianne Cometa (10) said. 

Hands-on learning can be applied to several different sub¬ 
jects in classrooms.Teachers often try to incorporate exercises 
that they think will interest their students. 




GETTING THEIR HANDS DIRTY 

Labs help students learn new information 

Multiple classes have labs to help students to learn 
more information and boost their grades. 

Anatomy, Zoology, Forensics and Chemistry have 
many different outlets of hands-on practice to give the 
students a better understanding of the class’s lessons 
and prepare them for a test. 

“Just being able to see [the results] for yourself is cool 
because you can read about it and believe it, but seeing 
it is really cool,” Breanna Zeller (11) said. 



1. Breanna Zeller (11) Photo by: Samantha Bernardy 2. Paulina Gallegos (11) 
Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 3. Craig Bronson (11) and Elizabeth Daly (11) Photo by: 
Jodie Hodges 


DO STUDENTS PREFER GYM OR SWIM? 


“I was used to doing gym 
in middle school, so it 
wasn’t hard.” 


LOAN LE (10) 


“I hated both. In pool, it’s 
hard to learn because the 
the teacher isn’t there with 
you. In gym you just play 
games.” 

RADIANT SYKES (10) 


“My favorite part about 
pool is sometimes you get 
free time at the end.” 


DENISE CASTANEDA (10) 





EVERY ACADEMICS HANDS-ON 17 




































































































































































































“Studying for finals is very important to me, and 
I always try to pass them. I aim to achieve good 
grades in order to succeed in life and get into a 
good college," Cecelia Desiderio (11) said. 


THREE R’S TO PREPARING FOR ENGLISH EXAMS 


1 Reread. “Go back through the material 
that will be on the test and read the 
important passages," Mr. Christopher 
Engel, English said. 


2 Review. “Go back through notes or 
presentations and make sure to review 
the major topics," Mr. Engel said. 


3 Relax. “Over stressing about a test will 
make it more difficult to focus on the 
questions and make it more difficult to 
make good decisions,” Mr. Engel said. 



Mr. Christopher Engel, English. Photo by: Joseph Pavell 




JUST THE FACTS 


Students brave difficult subjects while studying for finals 

PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL 


is each semester comes to a close, students are expected 
wiV} to begin studying for their final exams. Some finals 
require students to merely memorize information, while 
others, such as science, require more than remember¬ 
ing facts. 

“I prefer [studying for] science over everything because it is 
my best subject. It can be hard because some of the equations 
are very long. There is so much to remember, such as the equa¬ 
tions and elements. Everything put together is just so much to 
memorize," Brendan Demantes (10) said. 

Students tend to take longer studying for their science finals, 
ensuring that they understand the content given to them and 
memorize equations. Without grasping key concepts, it is very 
hard to achieve a passing grade on the final. 

“I always study the week beforehand in preparation. I look at 
the old notes from previous chapters to make sure I understand 
everything. I am currently in [Anatomy and Physiology Honors], 
so it requires a lot of studying and preparation," Elise Classen 
(11) said. 

While comparing all of the core classes and their finals, science 
seems to be seen as one of the more difficult. There are numerous 


equations that students must memorize for these finals. 

“With Chemistry for instance there are so many things to under¬ 
stand, but with English you can become completely immersed in 
what you are studying," Lidia Alvarez (12) said. 

The difficulty of certain subjects differs for some students. 
Though many students view science as difficult, there are others 
who feel that it is easier. 

“I tend to study less [for science]. I like science and don’t have 
to study for it as much as subjects I don’t really enjoy. It’s really 
easy for me to memorize equations and elements. I really do not 
like classes that deal with English because it is hard to have a 
set answer. With science, it is clear exactly what the answer is 
as long as you know the material well enough to recognize it,” 
Alexis Orseske (11) said. 

Though one subject may be more difficult than the other, all 
core classes are essential for graduation. 

“It is very important to get a good grade on my science finals if 
not more important because of the profession I am looking into. I 
do study for all of my classes equally. Studying and giving myself 
preparation now will help me comprehend the work I will get in 
college and in the general future,” Katherine Freeman (11) said. 











































































































































































1. PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER Austin Chekaluk (11) examines bones during his Honors Anatomy and Physi 
ology class. Chekaluk was able to use what he learned while looking at these bones on his final exam. “[Examining 
bones] helps me with my final because it allows me to classify bones, know what kinds of bones they are and what 
they do to help our body." Chekaluk said. 2. ALL FUN AND GAMES Rachel Kozel (10) and Nicole Geer (10) laugh 
as they perform a lab for their Honors Chemistry class. The labs performed each semester prepared students for 
the lab final they were required to take. “Doing a lab in class really prepares me for my final exams. Instead of doing 
problems over and over again, I am able to visualize what I am doing, which in turn helps me with my final,” Geer 
said. Photos by: Ruth Chen 


THE PERFECT EQUATION FOR AN A 

First-year teacher gives advice on math finals 



“With practice comes memoriza¬ 
tion. The more you do a problem over 
and over and over, the better you will 
become at that skill. Then, you will be 
able to memorize the steps to an equa¬ 
tion. In preparation for the exam, if you 
are confused on any of the material, I 
would say that weeks leading up to the 
final exam [students] should sit down 
with teachers and go over old tests, 
quizzes and homework with them. With 
math finals, what I always did and what 
always helped me, I would make little 
study groups. I would get together with 
my best friend, we would go get coffee, 
and we would sit there for an hour or 
two and study our packets ” 


MS. JACLYN ALESSANDRI, MATH 


SUPREME STUDY TOOLS 


“Studying for science is 
: j; j j difficult because there are 
iij a lot of things to remem- 

jKL ::: ber. but I usually use 
flashcards [to study].” 

EVAN LEATHERMAN (10) 



“Studying [for math¬ 
ematics] is easy for me 
because all I have to do is 
review past worksheets," 


MEGAN SERRATORE (10) 



H l ensure that I ask the 
teacher questions and read 
things we were given through¬ 
out the year [for English],” 


REETAM MANDER (10) 




EVERY ACADEMIC FINALS 19 






























































































DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO HITTING THE BOOKS 

CLASSROOM CONFIDENCE STUDY HARD AND GAIN RESULTS 


“[I don’t study because] I know 
all the information all ready. I 
pay attention when the teacher 
teaches. I haven’t studied all of 
high school, but I still have a 
good GPA. I review the notes 
right before I take the test. I 
studied for the ACT. I’m naturally 
kind of smart. I have two sisters 
who study all the time, but I 
don’t. We get the same grades 
and our GPAs are similar.’’ 


“To prepare for tests or finals 
beforehand I’ll have all the dates 
in my agenda. I make sure that I 
have all the study guides done. 
Sometimes, maybe two days or 
a day before the test, I’ll sit in 
my room or somewhere quiet, 
and then I’ll just study. I’ll zone 
out everyone else and all the 
background noise. [I try to] just 
stay focused on what I have to 
get done.” 


IAN MCGRATH (12) 


KRISTINA PLASKETT (11) 




1. GOAL REACHING Students from Mr. Joe Fox's. Math, fourth hour AP Statistics class work on an activity. They 
were able to get into groups to complete their work. “Studying is important because it helps you retain informa¬ 
tion and reminds you of things you might have pushed to the back of your mind," Samantha Copeland (12) said. 
Photo by: Kristina Plaskett 2. AP CHALLENGE Niji Shah (11) sets aside time to study for her AP classes. Shah 
challenged herself by taking several difficult classes during her junior year. “The importance of studying is to inter¬ 
nalize the concepts discussed in class to further the knowledge I have pertained to make connections with the rea 
world.” Shah said. Photos by: Gianna Mills 



20 EVERY ACADEMICS FINALS 
































FINAL PREPARATION 



“I think doing the study 
guides really helps and 
practice tests will help 
you” 


KAYLEE RODELL (11) 



“I study at night before I 
go to bed, and then I look 
over it at least once over 
again before a test." 


MIA ZUBECK (12) 



“I usually read through the 
book the night before and 
look over the study guide 
before the test the day of” 

MICHAEL SHANKS (10) 


1 

2 
3 


AP TESTS: A GUIDE TO REACH SUCCESS 

“You should definitely sleep the night 
before. Don’t stay up all night studying 
because otherwise you’ll be too tired 
for the test, and you may actually fall 
asleep and get a 1,” Clayton Goldman 
(11) said. 

“You should probably study a lot 
beforehand. Start studying weeks in 
advance. That way you’ll be ready and 
know the material,” Goldman said. 

“Make sure to take all the notes that 
your teacher gives you and use all the 
resources possible because they’re 
there to make sure that you will suc¬ 
ceed,” Goldman said. 



Clayton Goldman (11) Photo by: Gianna Mills 



Different studying strategies and techniques guide students in every subject 


PAGE BY: MICHAEL CLARK, JENNA CRAWFORD AND GIANNA MILLS 


athematics, science and English courses are required 
for graduation, but the ways to go about studying 
for these classes differ between each student. Study 
strategies can range from reviewing in groups to finding time 
for studying alone. 

“When I get home, I go into my room and sit down at my 
desk. I make sure I’m in a quiet area, and I would have my 
pencils ready and my book on my desk. I make sure I’m 
concentrating, and I take a five to 10 minute break in-between 
each assignment,” John Damarjian (11) said. 

Teachers provide as many studying tools as possible to 
guide students to success. 

“As a whole, I use all the review packets I’m given and I 
make sure I do them to my fullest. I make sure I have the right 
answers and that I study them. I always have a cup of coffee 
with me because it’s just needed,” Erica Keleman (11) said. 

If students are having difficulty with the material, there is 
always a way to grasp the concept. 

“For math, I usually highlight anything that’s important 
and try to remember. If I’m having trouble with a concept, 


I talk to the teacher the next day and get some help on it,” 
Damarjian said. 

For each subject, there are strategies for every learning style. 

“For English, I like to make note cards because it helps me 
visually study," Keleman said. 

English has branches of assignments that can be 
approached differently. 

“If I’m writing an essay, I review what I’m writing and make 
sure it’s organized and sounds correct,” Damarjian said. 

Students have different resources available to them that are 
appropriate for certain subjects. 

“For science, I look over the guide and my notes, and I 
read the book. Also, I take the practice tests,” Keleman said. 

There are always ways to approach problems, but going 
to a teacher allows students to tackle any questions they 
have directly. 

“Always make sure if you’re confused on anything, you can 
email your teachers. You could also ask them lots of questions 
on the topic if you’re confused because teachers are here to 
help you,” Damarjian said. 



“Studying makes you more prepared for the 
things to come,” 
Helana Zakher (10) said 






























































































































































































1. IN FOCUS Alex Kaye (10) begins his chemistry test during Mrs. Jacki Ruiz’s. 
Science, class. Mrs. Ruiz passed out different forms of the test to her students. “If 
you have any questions [Mrs. Ruiz] answers them and if you didn’t understand she 
makes sure you do before you leave," Jacob Dobias (10) said. Photo by: Emma 
Ritchie 2. FINAL MOMENT Mrs. Ruiz discusses a test with her chemistry class. 

The class reviewed stoichiometry and other chemistry principles. "We have usu¬ 
ally a study guide and practice problems and then we can go into tutoring during 
any day of the week usually. The tests usually have multiple choice and a couple 
short answers.” Macey Anderson (10) said. Photo by: Emma Ritchie. 3. SECONDS 
BEFORE Mrs. Ruiz explains bonus essay questions to her chemistry class. Many 
teachers give their students extra credit problems to help their scores. “To prepare 
for a test we do lots of samples in our notes. We do lots of problems and practice 
problems in the packets. Many of our quiz and tests come from the packets and the 
homework and our lecture notes, so I know those who have been paying attention 
and those who haven’t. Depending on the chapter, [students] come in for [tutoring] if 
they feel it is intense.” Mrs. Ruiz said. Photo By: Abigail Hines 


STUDENTS SHARE STUDYING TIPS AND TRICKS DURING CORE-CLASS CRUNCH TIME 



“I usually study the night 
before or a few days 
before so that I retain the 
information better.” 

KATHERINE FREEMAN (11) 



“For finals my friends and I 
go to the Dyer/Schererville 
library to study for about 
an hour” 

CAROLINE HADDAD (11) 



“I get together with my 
friend and we sit in my 
basement and study all 
night long,until we’ve 
covered everything.” 

RACHEL GROSS (11) 



“I make sure I don’t miss 
class before a big test, 
and I take ACT prep 
classes outside of school 
once a week.” 

PAIGE CARTER (11) 



“I just go over note pack¬ 
ets the days before and 
every night leading up to 
the test.” 

JACOB STEFANIAK (9) 



“I start studying little by 
little so that by the time 
that the test roles around, 
it is just a mini review.” 


JULIA GRUVER (11) 



“I study to better myself and get good grades 
so that I can get into a nice college and be suc¬ 
cessful.” Isabella Diaz (10) said. 




















































































Making time for studying, balancing school and social life 

PAGE BY: ABIGAIL HINES AND EMMA RITCHIE 


trategizing time for studying involves time management and 
patience. Procrastination can prove to be a large distraction 
along with jobs, friends and family. Balancing a social life 
along with academics can be stressful. 

“If I have a big meet coming up, I normally study before [the test] 
in school, and when I get home, I study before bed to make sure I 
know the material before the test,” Maya Tobin (10) said. 

With balancing school and sports, it can be hard for one to find 
time or a place to study for upcoming tests or quizzes. Some stu¬ 
dents find that studying on and off in-between breaks at practices 
can be effective. 

“During wresting season I used to have my vocab sheet on the side 
of the wall by me and so if I wasn’t doing something like push-ups 
or abs excercises I could look at it and memorize,” Edward Halbe 
(11) said. 

Teachers use notes and study guides to lead up to the preparation 
for tests and finals, making sure that each student completes the 
required work and fully understands the material. Some teachers 
may have the students participate in educational games that helps 
the students be more aware of the material. Knowing the material 
can help improve grades on tests and finals. 

“We do a lot of usage in class and practice during the Matrix period, 
and daily we talk about grammar issues that can come up on future 
tests. We do anything from just making sure we talk about things 


in class thoroughly to things like playing games and [completing] 
the typical review guides and note packets,” Mr. Darrell Wierzal, 
English, said. 

Students may feel overwhelmed when finals and tests come around 
the corner. Different studying techniques can allow each individual 
student to benefit differently. The moment after a test is turned in 
can create a mixture of feelings while waiting in anticipation for the 
final test grade. 

“After a test I usually feel very excited or very scared based on if I 
studied or not before the test and if I felt I did well,” AnhTran (10) said. 

Study techniques vary from scrutinizing the study guides and notes, 
to note cards or not studying at all. The outcome of a test score can 
reflect if or if not a student reviewed before the test. 

“For finals I just review all the notes, I do the study guide and if I don’t 
remember anything, I will do the note packet,” Jay Chopra (11) said. 

Each student copes with the stress of balancing school, work and 
their social lives differently. Teachers provide tips and tricks that can 
make the process of studying easier for students. After all the time 
and effort put into cramming for tests can leave a student feeling a 
weight lifted off their shoulders. The amount of studying can reflect 
the outcome of ones test good or bad. 

“Studying gives you more knowledge and then you will be able 
to talk to people about stuff, you will have a wider knowledge base 
so you won’t be only knowledgeable in one subject,” Chopra said. 



::::::::::: 

::::::::::: 

::::::::::: 

::::::::::: 

i!iisi!!!s! : 

::::::::::: 





:::: 


::::::::::::::: 


:::: 


SATURDAY NIGHT STUDY TRADITIONS 

Students take to learning materials together 

“Whenever [Rachel Gross and I] have 
either a big test coming or finals coming 
up we get together and we both just go 
into Rachel’s basement and cram. So 
we take it subject by subject, figure out 
exactly what we need to do because 
we’re in the same classes together and 
then we will have a white board so we do 
either math or most of the time chemis¬ 
try and write down the problems on the 
white board. It’s a no phone zone, we 
call it. So we put our phones off to the 
side and everything. We just go through 
it, through all the material we have for 
that, the entire study guide is done. 

Every hour or so we’ll take a small break 
and get some caffeine and get re-caf- 
feinated and will stay up really late in the 
night just cramming it all in. Then will go 
to sleep for a while and do it all again.” 

LAUREN GRANSKOG (11) 


STUDYING SPLIT BETWEEN STUDENTS 

poll out of 335 

r~ Q 0/ DECIDE TO STUDY 

^ C\ 53 P ercent of students 
reported that they study. 

DECIDE NOT TO STUDY 

47 percent of students said 
that they do little to no study¬ 
ing during the school year. 




SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO EVERY ACADEMICS TESTING 23 


:::::::: 


































































































The scoop on standardized assessments and what they mean to students 

PAGE BY: EMILY BADGER, ELENA GORNEY AND STEPHANIE O’DROBINAK 



hroughout the school year, freshmen, sophomores 
| and juniors participate in taking ECAs and the PSAT. 
“I think if you are an active learner throughout the 
whole year, you will do well on [the ECAs and PSAT],” 
Hannah Souronis (10) said. 

These tests are used as data to determine how students 
are performing in school. They show what classes a student 
is eligible for in the following year, whether they are college- 
ready and if the student is able to graduate. 

“The ECA is a qualifying exam for graduation in the state of 
Indiana. You take three ECAs. You have to pass two of them 
to graduate. Biology does not count towards graduation, 
but the English and math do,” Mr. Sean Begley, Assistant 
Principal, said. 

Freshmen and sophomores take the ECAs, which are admin¬ 
istered in May. During this time, there is testing for English, 
Algebra and Biology.The results from these tests are available 
to students and parents toward the end of the school year. 

“[I’m] not very stressed out about [ECAs]. I seem to do 
pretty well on standardized tests. The test is for the average 
student, and I’m in all honors classes, so it is easy for me,” 
Connor Fox (9) said. 


ECA scores determine whether or not a student can gradu¬ 
ate high school. PSAT scores, on the other hand, provide 
information on the student’s academic skills and allow them 
to compare their scores to other students both in their school 
and nationwide. 

“I think [the PSAT] is a good way to gauge how you will do 
on the real [SAT] because a lot of the time you don’t know 
how things are going to phrased on the test,” Souronis said. 

The PSAT is given in October, and results are distributed 
to students in school in December. Everyone is required to 
take the PSAT their sophomore year, though juniors have the 
option of taking it again for a fee of $15. 

“It’s very important for students to take [the PSAT] sopho¬ 
more year for practice, and then junior year to see what 
percentage of our students qualify for the National Merit 
Scholarship,” Mrs. Laurel Bankroff, Guidance, said. 

Even though studying for and taking standardized tests 
may be stressful, it is something every student had to do to 
determine their academic skill and be able to walk across the 
stage on their graduation day. 

“We are tested on what we have learned, and we need to 
remember it for the rest of our lives,” Anthony Carter (9) said. 



iiiiiiiililllll 



24 


ALARMING ASSESSMENTS 

poll out of 320 freshmen and sophomores 

ARE SCARED 

“Standardized tests scare 
me because colleges look at 
them, and they can basically 
determine your whole future. If you’re not a good 
test-taker, you may do badly,” AshleeTurnbough (10) 
said. 

ARE NOT SCARED 

“I’m not afraid of standardized tests. I don’t think 
they’re anything to get worked up about. I consider 
myself to be a good test- 
taker, so I really don’t see 
a reason to be scared,” 

Zachary Hansen (10) said. 




STANDARDIZED OPINIONS 



“[ECAs] aren’t really 
accurate because you 
can’t remember everything 
you have learned since the 
beginning of the year.” 

ELLY GROSS (9) 



“I like the PSAT because 
I’m competitive with my 
score. I like comparing 
myself to everyone else.” 


GAVIN BAISA (10) 



“I don't think of [the PLAN 
test] as much of a big deal 
because I’m just a fresh¬ 
man.” 


EMMA HUTCHINGS (9) 























































































































































































































“Yes, [standardized tests] are important 
because they will affect my future," Dasia Lock¬ 
ett (10) said. 



TIPS TO TRY OUT DURING TEST WEEK 


1 


“Study in chunks instead of 
taking the information in at 
once. Doing this helps with 
memorizing the content better,” 
Frances Kornelik (10) said. 


2 


“You should definitely go to 
sleep at a decent time. If you’re 
tired and zombie-like, there’s 
no way you can focus on tests,” 
Jacob Gorman (10) said. 


3 


“Make sure you’re listening to 
music and are in a quiet room 
[while studying]. Make sure 
no one else is in the room so 
you’re not distracted," Lucas 
Lucka (9) said. 



Lucas Lucka (9) Photo by: Etena Gorney 


1. LOST AND FOUND On the morning of Wednesday, Oct. 15, Jade Rosario (10) searches for the 
classroom in which she will be taking the PSAT. The students were assigned testing classrooms 
based on alphabetical order of their last names. “I think everyone taking the PSAT is a wonderful idea, 
and it proves the strength of our students at Lake Central,” Mrs. Laurel Bankroff. Guidance, said. 2. 
IDENTITY CHECK Alexis Griffin (10) gets assistance in finding out what classroom she was assigned 
to for the PSAT. Mrs. Laurel Bankroff, Guidance, and Mrs. Brynn Denton, Guidance, were in the hallway 
to assist students. “We had to check the IDs of the students and see what rooms they were in.” Mrs. 
Bankroff said. Photos by: Jessica McCullough 


■ 


































1. MAKING OF A BOILERMAKER Morgan Shoemaker (12) sees 
how the Purdue campus sizes up. She attended a walking tour with 
her mom, and she was not disappointed. “Purdue is one of my top 
choices, and I was really impressed by the campus,” Shoemaker 
said. Photo submitted by: Morgan Shoemaker 2. TUTORING 
TO THE TOP Toni Cribari (12) helps Summer Merriman (12) with 
homework. Cribari wanted to go to Purdue Calumet for second¬ 
ary education. “I want to be a math teacher because it’s actually a 
subject that I’m really strong in. I’ve always loved it and I tutor people 
in Algebra II all the time,” Cribari said. Photo by: Darian Smith 3. 
DISTINGUISHED ARTISTIC MERIT Sarah Pramuk (12) sits on the 
floor of Mrs.Maureen Yaeger’s. Art, room to finish a recent project. 
Pramuk was offered a $84,000 scholarship through The Art Institute 
of Chicago. “I draw because it’s self-expression. I don’t really do it 
as another means besides that. I know that sounds cliche and stupid 
but that’s why I draw. All my images are images of my own frustra¬ 
tion,” Pramuk said. Photo by: Darian Smith 



SHARING ASPIRATIONS ABOUT THE ROAD AHEAD 



“I want to go to Columbia 
College and graduate. 
Then, I’m going to start my 
career by directing short 
films and music videos.” 

ADAM KHARCHAF (10) 



“I want to work with 
people. I want to help 
people by being a psy¬ 
chologist.” 


SARAH SPIVAK (10) 



“I want to travel and enjoy 
new experiences. Live life 
to the fullest and enjoy the 
beauties of it.” 


MAXIM MAXIMTSEV (10) 



“I’m going to get my high 
school diploma. Then I 
want to attend a trade 
school, so I can make 
money and focus on my 
art.” 

MICHAEL SALAZAR (10) 



“I want to help people 
physically. Maybe a neo¬ 
natal nurse, so I can work 
with kids.” 


MORGAN ROACH (10) 



“I want to go to college at 
Purdue University. Then I 
want to to be a nurse at 
Planned Parenthood.” 


HANNAH AULINSKIS (11) 



“I’m planning on going to Indiana University for 
computer sciences. I’ve wanted to go to Indiana 
University since I was little,” Anthony Tugman 
(11) said. 





















































































STUDENT TEACHING EXPLORATION 


SPECIAL EDUCATION 

“I go to Kolling Elementary, and I 
help out. It’s mainly third graders, 
but it’s all different grades, and it’s 
just kids that need a little bit more 
help. Last year I did peer mentor¬ 
ing, and it’s a lot different. It’s 
nice this year to see what it’s like 
to be with the littler kids. I really 
like special education, and I’d like 
to become a special education 
teacher.” 

JESSICA SWATOSH (12) 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

M l get to go to a grade school. 
I chose Watson, so I go over 
there, and I stay till the end 
of their school day. I help out 
wherever they need me to. I’m 
going to college for elementary 
education, so this program will 
really help me.” 


SARAH DINGMAN (12) 




Students prepare for the future by stacking up scholarships 


PAGE BY: JODIE HODGES AND DARIAN SMITH 

or many seniors, the idea of college can be a fright¬ 
ening thought. This thought tends to bring about 
several questions, including which university to 
choose, whether or not to stay close to home and what will 
happen to friendships. However, one question that seems to 
be on every student’s mind is the cost of education. 

Applying to scholarships can be a tedious process, but the 
benefits help alleviate the financial stress of college. Mrs. 
Brynn Denton, Guidance, receives a lot of questions regarding 
scholarships and is always available to help students in need. 

“The majority of scholarships that are offered are going to 
be for seniors only; however, there are some that are avail¬ 
able for underclassmen. The best way to get information is 
to go on our Twitter account, follow us on Twitter and that 
links to our Guidance blog. Every scholarship that we have 
is listed on there. [Students] can also look on Naviance,” 
Mrs. Denton said. 

Many of the scholarships that offer greater monetary awards 
require essays to be submitted with the application form. It is 
important for students to showcase their best writing in this 
part of the application process. 

“If you have to write an essay for a scholarship, make it as 


impassioned as possible because, with some scholarships, 
they don’t know your name or anything about you - they just 
read your essay. Also if you need teacher recommendations, 
make sure you pick good teachers,” Morgan Shoemaker 
(12) said. 

Some scholarships require a minimum GPA range from 2.5 
to 3.5. Grade Point Averages can be a deal breaker, so doing 
everything possible to keep it up can make all the difference. 

“My tips for people trying to get scholarships would be to 
not blow off class and always do your homework because 
homework points add up, and they’re easy points to earn. 
I would definitely suggest doing classes over the summer 
because if I would have done that, I would have less stress 
this year,” Noelle Matasovsky (12) said. 

However, not all scholarships are given out by schools and 
educational foundations. Some students have found money 
in unexpected places. 

“I’ve applied to the Burger King scholarship. I haven’t heard 
back from them yet. I also plan to apply to the Braces of All 
Ages scholarship. You need to write an essay on how braces 
changed your life, and they choose the best one to give a 
Macbook Pro too,” Jacob Taylor (12) said. 



WHICH UNIVERSITY DO YOU PREFER? 


poll out of 330 students 

A A n / PUR0UE UNIVERSITY 

f \ /\ “I like Purdue better 

f vJ t> ecause they have majors 
better suited to my inter¬ 
ests. They have better engineering and science 
programs, while IU has better business and literary 
arts programs,” Kyle Massa (11) said. 


INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

“[I prefer Indiana University 
because] they have a good 
educational program, a lot of 
sports teams that offer more opportunities and I 
know a lot of people that go there,” Collin Keylor 
(11) said. 



EVERY ACADEMIC FUTURE 27 















































































































STUDENTS’ MATRIX MINDSET 


poll out of 330 


17 % 


LIKE 

Few students like the Matrix 
2 presentations. 


DON’T LIKE 

The majority of students do 
not like Matrix 2 presenta¬ 
tions. 


83 % 


REASONING BEHIND REFLECTIONS 

CRISS training certifies, unites school as whole 



“[The reflections] center on our school 
improvement process. Part of that pro¬ 
cess is to ensure that we are providing 
teachers with professional development 
activities that they can readily use and 
engage their students with in the class¬ 
room. One of our school improvement 
routines is CRISS. [CRISS] has to do 
with instructional strategies and teachers 
working collectively and collaboratively. 
One of our areas of weakness was, even 
though we [have] great teachers and 
students, we weren’t providing a strong 
professional development opportunity 
that was effective for all teachers in 
something that works toward students. 
We were just offering opportunities that 
only a few teachers engaged in, but now 
we have the whole school being certified 
through this CRISS training.” 


MR. ROBIN TOBIAS, PRINCIPAL 





Teachers and students participate in positive reflection presentations 


[e1 


PAGE BY: COLLEEN QUINN AND AMBER STEDT 

very time Matrix 2 comes around, the administration 
| asks every class to participate in a reflection. This 
is a school wide activity that was introduced at the 
beginning of the school year by Mr. Robin Tobias, Principal. 

“We weren’t really doing any school wide activity that 
would enhance our critical thinking or reading comprehen¬ 
sion skills. The primary result is that we have some more 
academic success, and students are more prepared for 
[standardized testing],” Mr. Tobias said. 

Other members of the administration have shown their 
interest in improving the school. Mr. Sean Begley, Assis¬ 
tant Principal, feels as though the Matrix reflections could 
improve the student body on a more personal level. 

“The purpose of the [it] is to come together as a school 
and reflect on a positive message, write about it [and] try to 
affect everyone’s lives in a positive [way],” Mr. Begley said. 

The reflections help the students think about what they 
would do if they were tested. Whether it is a standardized 
test or a real life situation, the students will be prepared 
to handle it. 

“[They] really help with your critical thinking skills because 


you have to look inside yourself and realize that everything 
isn’t what it seems,” Emily Stafford (12) said. 

Mr. Begley hopes the best for the students and wants 
them to succeed. By utilizing the this time in Matrix, the 
administration hopes to influence students to make the 
best choices in the future. 

“I hope [the students] recognize that the administration 
and the teachers here care and want to see the students 
do well,” Mr. Begley said. 

The purpose of this activity reaches further than educa¬ 
tional improvement. The idea is for the students to truly 
challenge themselves and change for the better. 

“We are starting out with identifying something that 
will help us with a school improvement process and help 
improve how students prepare for tests and exams. Hope¬ 
fully, the result is something that’s meaningful. We could 
have easily titled it ‘Student Engagement Activity,” but 
it’s titled ‘Reflection’ because, beyond the simple writing, 
reading and discussion skills, we want people to reflect,” 
Mr. Tobias said. 


28 EVERY ACADEMIC MATRIX 2 REFELCTIONS 












































































































































































UONE< ' 

state bound 




1. LEADING THE LESSON Mr. Sean Begley, Assistant Principal, 
talks over the intercom during Matrix 2. Mr. Begley talked about 
the story, “Message to Garcia." “I remember things in my life 
that have stuck out, and [that story was] one of the things I was 
taught when I was a little younger,” Mr. Begley said. Photo by: 
Colleen Quinn 2. INVOLVED CLASSROOMS Mrs. Katelin Ellis. 
Science, discusses the reflection with her class. Ellis believed 
the reflection was beneficial to the students and staff. “I think it 
allows students to take a second from our day and think about 
the big picture as in things that are larger than school," Mrs. 

Ellis said. Photo by: Colleen Quinn 3. TURNING THE GEARS 
Isaac Nash (10) writes down his thoughts and opinions about 
the story, “Message for Garcia.” Nash and other students were 
asked to reflect on that Matrix’s theme. “[The reflection impacts 
students] depending on the individual’s willingness to partici¬ 
pate in the reflection,” Nash said. Photo by: Erin Dosen 


STUDENTS AND TEACHERS SHARE OPINIONS ABOUT CLASSROOM REFLECTIONS 



“I think the problem is that 
[students] aren’t willing to 
open their minds to [par¬ 
ticipating in reflections].” 


NATHANIEL DADO (12) 



“Most [students] don’t 
take [reflections] seriously, 
but I think they are pretty 
important.” 


ANDREA JIMENEZ (10) 



“I honestly don’t like [doing 
the reflections]. I think it’s 
a waste of time.” 


JOHN KISH (10) 



“My students need discus¬ 
sions like this because 
these conversations don’t 
come up in their social life.” 

MR. ADAM PIETERS, 
WEST LAKE 



“[Self-reflection] helps you 
recognize what you’ve 
accomplished, both good 
and bad.” 

MR. JEFFREY SHERMAN, 
MATH 



“I think that [true] self¬ 
reflection doesn’t usually 
take place until [students] 
are in [their] mid-twenties.” 


MR. JEFF RHODY, SCIENCE 




“My favorite part [about reflections] is learning 
about other people and being able to express 
myself and not [be] judged,” MakaylaVanVIeet (9) 

said. 














































































STAYING CLOSE TOGETHER OR MOVING ON 


STILL CLOSE 

“[My good friend] is my neighbor, and 
we went to day care [together]. We used 
to hang out like everyday, but now we’re 
in sports, [so] we don’t get to hang out 
that much. We are still as close [as we 
were in middle school,] but we don’t get 
to hang out [a lot].” 


GREW APART 

“I kind of saw it coming because 
once high school comes you 
change friendships and you grow 
in new friendships. It’s a new 
atmosphere, like something you’ve 
never seen before. You’ve been 
with people in middle school for 
so long." 


NICHOLAS BANDURA (10) 


JOCELYN BATHURST (12) 



FRIENDSHIP SURVIVAL THROUGH YEARS 


:::::::::: 


::: 

••••iiii'ii. 

::::::::::: 
:::: ::::: : 


Students go through phases with aquaintances and assess long believed legends 

PAGE BY: ANNABELLA PIUNTI. JESSICA MCCULLOUGH AND HANNAH BRYNER 


oing into high school, one of the biggest rumored subjects 
is friendships. Some students worry they won’t keep up with 
making new friends, while others worry about keeping their 
old ones. 

“[I heard] you won’t really see any of your friends. [My friendships 
failed] because we don’t have that many classes together,” Ryan 
Mathews (9) said. 

Freshmen hear modern-day myths from friends and relatives that 
have attended high school before them. Do these friendships crum¬ 
ble due to changes in classes? Personalities? Loss of connection? 

“I really expected [friendships] to fall apart because, you’re mixed 
in with a bunch of other kids, and everybody I thought was my friend, 
was actually not. They’re just people you know. I used to have all my 
friends in my classes, [but] now I have a large mixture of other kids 
that I don’t know in my classes,” Angelo Frigo (9) said. 

When one enters high school as a freshman, he or she will prob¬ 


ably not know a majority of their classmates, but it is just a matter of 
time before he or she makes new friends in classes, sports or clubs. 

“I think that friendships change the first few years of high school 
the most. Personalities change, and students become more aware 
of their likes, dislikes and values. Sometimes, they will find that the 
friends they have in eighth grade may not have the same views 
on life, and as they enter high school, students can drift apart. An 
additional factor in this is that they are going from a smaller middle 
school to one of the biggest schools in the state. There are thousands 
of students here, and often times a student will make many new 
friends in class, athletics or a club. By their senior year, students 
are typically more settled in their activities and have probably met 
many more of the student body in their class,” Mrs. Brynn Denton, 
Guidance, said. 

Whether going in with a big group of friends or with a fresh start, 
students constantly find new ways to build their bonds. 



TRUTH OR MYTH: DO FRIENDSHIPS CRUMBLE IN HIGH SCHOOL? 



“[Friendships] do [change] 
because everybody is 
getting their own interests 
and kind of changing.” 


TIMOTHY BAKAS (9) 



“[The myth is] real. I’ve 
lost friends because 
they changed, or 
they go into different 
groups.” 

LAUREN LUTES (11) 



“I think that people change 
their morals and their goals in 
life. In high school, they differ 
from their friends a lot of the 
time.” 

TAYLOR MCKELLER (12) 


30 
































































































































































































































































“Friendships fail mostly from loss of com¬ 
munication, and the fact that most people 
make new friends anyways,” 
Elizabeth Delis (10) said. 



THREE STEPS TO MAINTAIN A FRIENDSHIP: TEACHER EDITION 


1 “[The first step of maintaining a 
friendship is] communication,” Mrs. 
Angela Ohlenkamp, Math, said. 

2 “[The next step is] not getting annoyed 
with the miniscule things,” Mrs. Jen¬ 
nifer Fandl, Math, said. 

3 “We are definitely good at sharing stuff 
between the two classrooms, since 
we teach the two same, exact classes. 

I think that’s when we became two 
peas in a pod. We dress alike some¬ 
times,” Mrs. Fandl said. 



Mrs. Jennifer Fandl. Math, and Mrs. Angela Ohlenkamp. Math Photo by: Annabella Piunti 






1. LUNCHTIME LAUGHTER Jessica Hearne (10) and Morgan Clap- 
man (10) spend their lunch talking. The girls have sat with each other 
since the beginning of this year. “Your friends protect you and keep 
you sane," Lisette Barajas (9) said. Photo by: Jessica McCullough 

2. FRIENDS MAKE SECRETS Trinity Rhyne (9). Ariana Desiderio 
(9) and Skyler Sell (9) laugh in the Main Street hallway to enjoy their 
passing period after lunch. The three girls have been friends since 
middle school. “No matter how hard life is. your friends are always 
going be there." Ashley Chess (9) said. Photo by: Olivia Oster 



EVERY STUDENT LIFE CHANGING FRIENDSHIPS 31 






























































































































































































































M l love the fall time because I absolutely love the 
fall fashions. I love wearing flannels, scarves, 
sweatshirts, all of that stuff,” Elena Eickleberry 
(12) said. 




FALLING FOR AUTUMN WEATHER 


Lake Central students take excursions to Northwest Indiana’s County Line Orchard 

PAGE BY: HANNAH SONNER AND JOSEPH PAVELL 



long with the change in leaves, weather and fashion, the 
) activities of students also drastically change in the fall. 
Instead of visiting the typical summer dwellings, students 
are beginning to find more weather-appropriate hangouts for the fall 
season, one of them being County Line Orchard in Hobart. 

“People have talked about [the apple orchard] a lot, and I haven’t 
been there since I was a little kid, but I’ve wanted [to go]. Then one 
day, my friend, who I’ve known since we were nine, texted me and 
invited me,” Chelsey Schmock (11) said. 

Those who visit the orchard have numerous opportunities when 
they arrive. Aside from the choice to pick apples from their many 
trees, visitors can go on hayrides, pet farm animals and find their 
way through corn mazes. Besides visiting attractions, visitors have 
the choice to purchase the orchard’s drinks and baked goods, such 
as apple cider, pies, cookies and the much-anticipated doughnuts. 

“I went to the orchard with Kristen Kaiser (12) because we really 
wanted the doughnuts. [My favorite parts of visiting the orchard] 


were the doughnuts and the fall colors. Fall is my favorite time of 
the year,” Lauren Behrens (12) said. 

The orchard is also a hotspot for spending time with family or 
significant others. 

“My boyfriend and I went on a date to the apple orchard because 
we absolutely love apples and apple pie,” Autumn Zendzian (11) said. 

Even with the the many festivities the orchard offers, apple picking 
is still the main focus for some. 

“I like going to the apple orchard because there are so many apples 
to pick from and they are always so fresh,” Anja Stanic (11) said. 

Near the start of the much colder winter, many of the orchard’s 
attractions close down until the coming of next autumn. Many stu¬ 
dents spend the time in between seasons waiting for the fall weather 
to come back around. 

M l only went once this year, but I anticipate going back next year 
because I love the food. It’s the type of food that you can only get 
[during the fall],” Behrens said. 



COMPARISON OF REGION’S COFFEEHOUSES 

THE SIP CAFE CRAZE GAGA FOR GRINOHOUSE 


“I discovered it over the summer. 

I always go to the Crown Point 
Square, and I just saw it, and I was 
like, ‘Oh my God this looks like 
Friends.’ I walked in there for the 
first time, and I loved the atmo¬ 
sphere. It was so eclectic. There 
were some really cool couches 
and stuff. I sat down, and I had 
some coffee, and I did some 
homework. Now, I just use it as my 
secret hideaway. It’s really nice to 
get some work done while being in 
a cool enviroment.” 

MARISA MENDOZA (12) 


“I just like it because the brew is 
really good, and I like the environ¬ 
ment. [The employees] are really 
nice. I probably go once or twice 
a week. I don’t really socialize 
there, I go there because if I do my 
homework at home, I can’t really 
focus and in [Grindhouse’s] envi¬ 
ronment [I can]. They change their 
specials a lot, and I notice there’s 
a new one every three weeks. I 
never get bored of it. With Star- 
bucks, they always have the same 
stuff all the time.” 

KYLIE MARTINO (12) 



“1 help my grandma decorate her 

“Fall is one of my favorite times 

“1 absolutely hate fall. 1 hate the cold 

“Fall is really fun because of all the 

house with fall decorations to get 

because 1 like carving pumpkins with 

and love wearing shorts.” 

changing colors, and 1 really like 

ready for Thanksgiving,'* 

my family," 

ELNORA STROUD (12) said. 

football season," 

KAYLA HARRIS (12) said. 

NICHOLAS JANICH (9) said. 


KATRINA LOZANOSKI (10) said. 


32 
























1. GOING GHOSTLY Brandon Haddon (11) gets his face spray painted white at the Lake Hills Haunted 
House. Hours were spent turning the volunteers into ghouls. “It was fun scaring all of the little kids. It is nice 
seeing all of their reactions.” Haddon said. Photo by: Joseph Pavell 2. CREATING A MONSTER Craig Bron¬ 
son (11) paints a crack onto Jenna Boiler-Smith’s (11) forehead. Boiler-Smith was a puppet in the haunted 
house. “My favorite part of (volunteering at Lake Hills] was propably meeting so many new people. They 
are very welcoming and are like a big family.” Boiler-Smith said. Photo by: Hannah Sonner 3. MALICIOUS 
MANIFESTATION Matthew Taylor (11) gets painted with fake blood at the Lake Hills Haunted House. Taylor 
has voluteered at the haunted house for a total of two years. “(My favorite part of working at the haunted 
house] is meeting new people (and] seeing new people. Working there is just fun," Taylor said. Photo by: 
Hannah Sonner 



























1. A WORK OF ART Cara Scott (10) and Joshua Drosos (10) spend their Valentine's Day 
at the Art Institute of Chicago. Scott and Drosos also walked around Chicago that day. 
“We went downtown on Valentine’s Day. and we went to the Art Institute. We just walked 
around and ate lunch. It was really cold," Scott said. Photo submitted by: Cara Scott 

(10) 2. THE MORE THE MERRIER Katarina Radoja (11) and friends visited Chicago 
for a night of fun. Radoja’s group included 15 people. “We just went up to Chicago, out 
for pizza and just walked around,” Radoja said. Photo Submitted by: Katarina Radoja 

(11) . 3. A LITTLE FISHY Sydney Halfeldt (11) and Timothy Matthews (11) spend a day 
visiting the Shedd Aquarium and eating at Giordano’s. They braved the cold for their day 
in the city. “It was freezing when we went, but it was a lot of fun,” Halfeldt said. Photo 
submitted by: Sydney Halfeldt (11). 4. SNOW MUCH FUN A group of senior friends sled 
at Hannah Keith’s (12) house on a snow day. The friends spent the day off sledding and 
having fun together. “It was really fun to be with all my friends [and] a lot better than 
being stuck at school all day. We all went sledding at Hannah ‘Banana’ Keith’s house." 
Ryan Dahlkamp (12) said. Photo Submitted by: Ryan Dahlkamp (12) 



“(My favorite part about winter is] 

“[During winter,] 1 travel. The last place 

“1 like the snow, hot chocolate and 

“1 don’t like anything about winter 


seeing the beauty of the snow and the 

1 traveled to was Germany to see 

blankets." 

because it’s too cold,” 


landscape." 

KAYLYNN WARD (10) said. 

my grandma. 1 also build igloos and 
snowboard," 

THOMAS HENTUSH (11) said. 

ANH TRAN (10) said. 

JAIME WINQUIST (10) said. 


34 








































“In the winter, I enjoy drinking hot cocoa and 
playing in the snow,” 
Darby McGrath (10) said 




1. Zachary Futch (10) Photo submitted by: Zachary Futch (10) 2. Cailee Mitch¬ 
ell (9) and Taylor Rae (9) Photo submitted by: Cailee Mitchell (9) 3. Morgan 
Dines (9) Photo submitted by:Morgan Dines (9) 

BOARD BUT NOT BORED 

Step into the cold for some winter fun 

Snowboarding and skiing are popular winter activities 
to do during a vacation or with friends. 

M [We went] in Wisconsin Dells. [I like] the experience 
of learning how to ski,” Taylor Rae (9) said. 

The fresh air can get a student’s mind off of school- 
work and focused on rush of the run. 

“I go all over Colorado. I just like being up in the 
mountains because of the fresh air,” Morgan Dines (9) 
said. 


GOODBYE 219, HELLO MEXICO 


1 

2 

3 


Taking a vacation to a warmer place during the 
wintertime can bring plenty of out-of-season 
opportunities. “We go to the beach, and I like to 
surfboard and swim there.” Rachel Front (10) said. 

Celebrate the time spent with family members who 
live far away. “My uncle always has a Christmas 
party, and we go to a lot of parties in general out 
there that are traditional in the Mexican culture,” 
Front said. 

Foods are an important aspect of the Mexican cul¬ 
ture and are generally homemade. “We actually eat 
traditional Mexican tacos and soups that my family 
makes,” Front said. 



THERE’S SNOW PLACE LIKE HOME 

Winter brings more than just stormy weather to Northwest Indiana 

PAGE BY: EMMA DEGROOT, TABITHA PAPPAS AND CATHRYN CEARING 


inters are what separate the population into “indoor people” 
and “outdoor people.” But whether their preference is for 
hibernation or recreation, students find ways to keep busy. 
“[In the winter, I like to] come here for swim practice and eat 
as much as possible,” Chantal Almazan (9) said. 

Regardless of snow or sunshine, school and its extracurricular 
activities remain constant in the winter months. Clubs like marching 
band still meet year-round. 

“I like to play in Winter Percussion, drink tea and watch movies,” 
Nadia Magnabosco (10) said. 

Others use the cold weather as an excuse to spend their free time 
cuddled up with Netflix and hot chocolate. They break out their 
sweaters for the first frost of the season and stay bundled up until 
springtime. 

“I wear my coat all the time, even in class,” Joseph Kane (9) said. 

One winter perk that many students can agree on is having snow 


days. When the snow starts, they sit by the phone waiting for Mr. 
Larry Veracco, Superintendent, to make the final call for the school 
district. This winter, students looked to social media to share the 
anticipation of possibly having a day off. 

“[My favorite thing about Winter is] snow days,” Hayley Edgcomb 
(12) said. 

Many snow days are called because of dangerous road conditions. 
Black ice, poor visibility and reckless drivers can make getting behind 
the wheel risky. Some students, though, find it just fine. 

“I like driving in the snow,” Aidan McCambridge (12) said. 

With chilly weather driving people indoors and holiday food piling 
up, winter can also bring on extra pounds. Some people wait for 
warmer weather to get back into shape, but others use the snow as 
a new setting for a workout. 

“[In the winter, I go] skiing [and] snowboarding. I go snowboarding 
in Wisconsin by my uncle’s house,” Spencer Wise (11) said. 



“I like snowboarding and [doing] 
donuts with my car," 

AARON SCOTT (11) said. 


“[In the winter, I like to go] sledding, 
staying inside and watch movies," 
ERIK GEILE (9) said. 


“[In the winter I like] Christmas, 
holiday foods, staying inside and 
watching movies,” 

NYIA GUY (10) said. 


“I like the hot chocolate because on a 
cold day, it makes my soul warmer." 
KATHERINE VERONESI (10) said. 


EVERY STUDENT LIFE HANGOUTS 35 



















“This year [for spring break], I’m going to 
Florida. For the first part, I’ll be in Orlando at 
Universal and Disney World. The last half of my 
trip, I'm going to Daytona Beach, and I’m going 
to learn how to surf,” Francesca Pezzuto (10) 
said. 


SPRING CLEANING MADE EASY 

Student shares tips on tidying up for the season 



“First, I usually clean out my closet and 
then go through winter clothes [and] 
spring clothes. I usually try on [clothes 
and] see what fits me from last summer 
[and] what doesn’t fit me. I definitely 
color code [my clothes], and I organize 
[shirts] by sleeve-length. Since I don’t 
want sweaters to stretch out by the 
shoulders, I’ll fold them instead of put¬ 
ting them on hangers. Because I have 
five shelves, winter clothes usually just 
go on top, but sometimes I’ll even box 
stuff up. Usually, if it’s stuff that doesn’t 
fit me, I’ll give it to my sister, but if it 
doesn’t fit her either, then I’ll ask her 
friends. After I’ve cleaned out my closet 
and completely reorganized everything, 

I usually dust the drawers, and then I’ll 
clean the floors. It usually takes a while, 
so choose a day that you know you’re 
not going to have anything to do.” 

ANJA STANIC (11) 



Samantha Bredar (9) Photo by: Ruth Chen 


GARDENING YOUR WAY TO A HEALTHY DIET 


1 

2 

3 


“[Clear] out everything, so you have space to plant everything. 

I get all the weeds, and I have to take them out by the root and 
put them in a big bag and just throw them out,” Samantha 
Bredar (9) said. 

“[After you] clear a spot for [the plants or vegetables], put 
them in the ground. The vegetables taste better, and it’s 
probably better for you with less chemicals [rather than 
store-bought vegetables],” Bredar said. 

“Water [the plants] and keep watering them and make sure 
they get a lot of sunlight. [The amount of water] depends on 
how much rainfall there is outside and just how hot and dry 
it is. Typically, they only take a few months just to fully grow,” 
Bredar said. 


SPRINGING INTO THE NEW SEASON 

Students share insight on prepping for the upcoming marathons in the Windy City 



PAGE BY: RUTH CHEN, VICTORIA WILKES AND JESSICA WOJTON 

arm weather not only marks the beginning of spring, but 
I the beginning of training for students who participate in the 
various marathons of the region. 

“I think [the Blacklight Run] is good experience, and I think it’ll be 
really fun to run with a ton of people and just have a good time and 
exercise at the same time,” Madelyn Long (10) said. 

With the marathons not beginning until May and June, the runners 
are taking advantage of the long gap and preparing their bodies 
for the run ahead. 

“I run almost everyday. I do short two to three mile runs in the 
summer, [and then] I start slowly adding more and more miles on. 
So, I do three to four miles during the week, and then I’ll do a long 
run like six to eight [miles] on Saturdays. The training schedule that 
I have is for anyone. You could just get up off your couch one day 
and go for a run. By the end of the summer, you’ll be able to run a 
half marathon,” Samantha McCuaig (11) said. 

All the hard work the runners go through not only helps themselves, 
but others that are in need. The Chicago Half Marathon supports 
many different charities - a motivation for many runners. 


“The whole [Chicago Half] Marathon in general is normally for 
a cancer foundation, but my cause specifically is for Teen World 
Vision. [ForTeen World Vision], you raise money just by asking other 
people or people who support you, and they donate money to 
the cause. It gives water to people in Africa who don’t have clean 
water,” McCuaig said. 

Along with the benefits to helping a cause, some students are 
anticipating a way to reconnect with family and friends. 

“[I’m most looking forward to] just being with my sisters. We’re 
actually coming together because we rarely see each other anymore. 
So, it’s kind of exciting, and it’s going to be kind of nice out,”Taylor 
Jackson (11) said. 

The different marathons held in Chicago during the spring have 
many added perks that are sure to improve the participants’ mental 
and physical health. 

“[The Color Run] promotes happiness and health, and I think that’s 
really important. My health affects the way I do in school, so I think 
that’s really important for that. I’ve always wanted to do it because 
it looks really fun,” Dianne Cometa (10) said. 


“[In the spring], I go to my lake house, 
almost every weekend [with] my fam¬ 
ily. The lake house has been in our 
family for generations,” 

SARAH COMBIS (10) said. 


“Since [the] Hawks’ playoff season 
is [in the spring], we go to a lot of 
Hawks games, since we have season 
tickets,” 

TIFFANY POLYAK (12) said. 


“I like the warm weather, [and] I like 
the flowers blooming. It reminds me 
of life,” 

STEFAN KRAJISNIK (10) said. 


“[For spring break], I went to Orlando. 
Fla. We stayed at our resort, spent a 
day at Universal Studios and went to 
an Orlando Magic game,” 

ETHAN GARDENHIRE (11) said. 

















1. VENTURING ORLANDO Victoria Gardenhire (11), Samantha Anderson (11) and Mackenzie Evers (11) pose 
on a fake surfboard on a wave in Orlando, Fla. The girls spent the rest of their week-long voyage touring other 
parts of the Sunny State, including Daytona Beach. “My favorite place was Daytona because being on the 
beach is relaxing and fun [and] my favorite part was lying out in the warm weather all day," Evers said. Photo 
submitted by: MacKenzie Evers (11)2. COLORADO CHEER At the beginning of spring break, Sara Erwin (10) 
and Hailey Phelps (10) journeyed to the other side of the country to Breckenridge, Colo. Even though Phelps 
was a beginner at skiing, the two raced down the slopes together and kept each other company throughout the 
five-day trip. “Even if you don’t know how to ski or snowboard, it’s still a lot of fun, and you can learn because 
they have a lot of lessons and they have a lot of flatter runs that are easy,” Erwin said. Photo submitted by: Sara 
Erwin (10) 3. CAMPUS LIFE CHILLING Raquel Rembert (11) and other high school members of the organiza¬ 
tion Campus Life Northwest Indiana stop to take a picture in Panama City, Fla. for their spring break. Campus 
Life is a place for students of different schools to come together, hang out and talk about what’s going on their 
life. “I enjoyed it so much because it wasn’t just students from Lake Central. It was for other schools. You got to 
meet so many people, and I would highly suggest people to go next year because it is a life-changing experi¬ 
ence. You have tons of fun, and who wouldn’t want to spend their spring break in Florida?” Rembert said. Photo 
submitted by: Raquel Rembert (11) 


“[During spring break], I went on 
a nice vacation to my couch and 
enjoyed the snow while everyone else 
was in nice weather,” 

NATHAN DALIEGE (11) said. 


“[I like spring] flowers because they’re 
pretty. My favorite flower is a daffodil,” 
JILLIAN DAHLKAMP (9) said. 


“[My favorite part about spring is] the 
warm weather and being able to go 
outside and hangout with friends," 
ALEXIS KELLY (10) said. 


“[This spring], a couple of my friends 
helped my family and I move. That 
was pretty fun,” 

RILEY PARKS (11) said. 


EVERY STUDENT LIFE HANGOUTS 37 



























DON’T SWEAT 
ALL THE STRESS 


Students tackle tough times 

PAGE BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU AND EMMA 
RITCHIE 

hether it is school or relationship-related, the 
effects of stress can take a toll on students. Main- 
taining good grades and having a life outside of 
school can prove to be a challenge for anyone. 

“Being a teenager, I feel we have more stress than adults 
because we have to deal with working, grades, family 
issues and relationships,” Brittany Mori (11) said. 

Anything can trigger anxiety, and every student has his 
or her personal way of coping through stressful situations. 

“Exercise is really good to manage stress, [and so is] 
talking with a friend, there is all sorts of strategies that you 
can use. It is also really important to keep up with your diet 
and sleep. Take care of the basics. You need to really apply 
care in times of stress,” Mrs. Stacey Mills, Guidance, said. 

Stress can affect a student both physically and mentally. 
Physical stress can cause headaches, stomach aches, or 
even raise blood pressure. Mental stress can cause anxiety, 
forgetfulness, nervousness and may lead to a breakdown. 

“If you are under a lot of stress, it can affect you mentally 
and physically. You can be distracted, it can cause fatigue, 
can cause you to sleep too much or too little. It can really 
do a lot to damage to your mental and physical well being,” 
Mrs. Mills said. 

Lake Central offers many different ways to help deal 
with tension. 

“Every student has a guidance counselor and their guid¬ 
ance counselor can give them tips to balance the stress 
of their demands. If they’re having a hard time managing 
stress, then the guidance counselor can be your first person 
to talk to,” Mrs. Mills said. 

Stress normally has a negative connotation to it, but 
without stress, responsibilities would just be disregarded. 

“A little bit of stress is good because if you don’t have 
any stress, then you will not care if you get up and go to 
school. You’re not going to care to get your assignments 
in. A little bit is good for people [because] then it helps 
with deadlines and [responsibility]. If it starts to build up 
where it’s affecting you, then I would talk to somebody or 
there is different ways you can deal with it,” Mrs. Mills said. 



STUDENT HASSLES 



“My grades and me trying 
to do my best and trying 
to keep up an A-B average 
is what stresses me out.” 

KAYLYNN WARD (10) 



“My friends, homework, 
and sports stresses me 
out the most. There’s a lot 
drama, it is hard to bal¬ 
ance it all.” 

STEPHANIE SANDERS (11) 


“School stresses me out 
jiiiflHK::::: because I always have so 

much to do. and my grades 
stress me out because I have 
to keep a B-average ” 

COLIN RAFALSKI (10) 


EVERY STUDENT LIFE STRESS 38 













































































1. LET’S TALK ABOUT STRESS Mrs. Stacey Mills. Guidance, talks 
with a student about their stress levels. He finds relief in talking with 
a counselor. “(A student’s guidance counselor] can give them tips 
to balance the stress of their demands if they’re having a hard time 
managing stress.” Mills said. 2. WHEN IN DOUBT, BIKE IT OUT 
Reese Coros (12) talks with Mrs. Stacey Mills, guidance about ways 
to relieve his anxiety. Coros uses biking as his main stress reliever. 

“I use biking to relieve my stress a lot. [I start biking] right to when 
I get home and stop at about 9:30 p.m.," Coros said. Photos by: 
Anastasia Papanikolaou 



CAUSES OF STUDENT STRESS 

poll out of 337 students 

RELATIONSHIPS 

18 percent of students 
said that relationships 
like friends and signifi¬ 
cant others cause their tension. 

SCHOOL 

82 percent of students said that school related 
activities like homework 
and sports cause their 
tension. 




HOW TO DEAL WITH ANXIETY IN EVERYDAY LIFE 


1 SLEEP 

As a teenager, it is important 
to get enough sleep at night 
because it can affect your 
mood the next day. 

2 TIME MANAGEMENT 

Scheduling your day will lower 
anxiety levels because it gives 
you more time to do leisure 
activities. 

3 TAKE FREQUENT BREAKS 

A 15-minute break from working 
allows the mind to de-stress, 
relax and recover. 



“I just pretty much let it go. What really stresses 
me out is all of my school work.” 

Reese Coros (12) said. 


































1. ALWAYS LAUGHING Alexia Geenen (11) and John Gbur (‘14) laugh 
as they enjoy their date at the bowling alley. Geenan and Gbur began 
their relationship last year when he was a senior at Lake Central. “We 
are still close. Him being so far away has really made us closer knowing 
that every time we see each other, it was just as good as it was the time 
before," Geenen said. Photo submitted by: Alexia Geenen 2. WEDDING 
BELLS Victoria Chavez (9) and Nicholas Swanson (9) attend a family 
wedding. Swanson celebrated with Chavez’s family. “[An advantage of 
being in a relationship is] hanging out all the time and just having some¬ 
one contstantly there for you,” Chavez said. Photo submitted by: Nick 
Swanson 3. DOUBLE TROUBLE Sydney Scherzinger (12) and Alex¬ 
ander Nisle (12) walk side-by-side off of the field together. Scherzinger 
played softball, and Nisle played baseball for Lake Central. “You always 
have someone there for you. I mean you can always get whatever you 
need off of your chest and just [have] someone to talk to really," Nisle 
said. Photo submitted by: Sydney Scherzinger 4. DANCE THE NIGHT 
AWAY Kyle West (12) and Nicole Pelc (12) smile as they take a picture 
before a school dance. They went to the dance together because they 
are in a relationship. “My relationship with Kyle is the reason I’m smiling 
when there’s nothing to smile about,” Pelc said. Photo submitted by: 
Nicole Pelc 


SAME LOVE STANDOFF 


69 % 

NO 

23 percent of students 
do not support same sex 
couples. 


YES 

69 percent of students say 
that they openly accept 
same sex couples. 

23 % 


8 % 


INDIFFERENT 

8 percent said they were 
neither for nor against same- 
sex couples. 


40 












MAKING NEW 
CONNECTIONS 


Students grow from relationships 

PAGE BY: SAMANTHA BERNARDY AND HANNAH PRATT 

® n high school, many teenagers form relationships 
that depend on a plethora of factors that range 
from friendships to the relationships that they see 
around them. Today’s society is welcoming of all types of 
relationships from girl-boy to girl-girl to boy-boy. Like any 
other relationships, those formed in high school have their 
advantages and disadvantages. 

“Relationships are great to have when you’re in high 
school because you learn and grow as a person, and you’ll 
have a better understanding of that person,” Brittany Mori 
(11) said. 

Many relationships start in high school, but a lot start in 
middle school, too. High school and middle school relation¬ 
ships vary throughout the years. During the years of high 
school, teenagers grow up and mature. 

“In middle school, it isn’t really like a relationship. It’s not 
as serious because you don’t hang out as much, and it’s 
awkward, and then in high school, it’s kind of more serious, 

I mean you could get married. It’s different. You’re so much 
more serious, and you’re allowed to do so much more,” 
Emily Burvan (11) said. 

In high school, relationships do not only consist of just 
boy-girl relationships. Some students have become more 
comfortable with themselves and have come out as being 
gay, lesbian or bisexual. 

“When I ultimately came out, it was like a weight that was 
lifted off my shoulders. I was very happy about it, and ever 
since then, I’ve tried to be who I am and not hold back on 
who I want to be,” Jeremy Goodale (11) said. 

Relationships in high school can lead to marriage. 
Recently in Indiana, a new gay marriage law has gone back 
and forth until Oct. 7, when a State Legislature made it legal. 

“Marriage is a right, not a privilege. Straight marriage 
is the same as gay marriage, just different sexes. There 
really shouldn’t be an issue on who can marry who, they’re 
people, and they’re not any different from anyone else,” 
Goodale said. 


HOWTO MAKE “BAE” STAY 



“Sometimes when you 
fight, you just need 
to admit that you’re 
wrong.” 


EMILY BURVAN (11) 



“Being loyal is key to 
maintaining a great 
relationship. Also, buy 
her skittles.” 


CHASE DOESCHER (12) 



“Not fighting is a good 
way to maintain your 
relationship.” 


HALEY URBANI (11) 


“You have to com¬ 
municate with one 
another and just be 
happy to be together.” 

Ji STEVEN BOOTH (10) 




“Keeping good com¬ 
munication and having 
trust [is important in a 
relationship].” 

LAUREL GONSIOROWSKI (11) 



THOUSANDS OF MILES APART OR INCHES AWAY 


ONCE IN A WHILE 

“[My girlfriend and I] talk just 
about every day, and I guess you 
just get used to it. We maintain 
being in a relationship by talking 
every day, and I try to keep my 
mind off of it, like staying busy 
with friends. It’s almost like she’s 
not gone because I do talk to her 
every day.” 

AARON MCDONALD (11) 


EVERY DAY 

“It’s easier when you go to the 
same school because you get 
to see them a little bit in the hall 
way, and you might have lunch 
together or classes with them. 
Max Radziejeski (11) and I this 
year don’t have any classes 
together but we still see each 
other in between classes. It 
definitely helps." 

ADARE PITCHFORD (11) 



EVERY STUDENT LIFE RELATIONSHIPS/SEXUALITY 41 











































































































1. MONSTER MASH Ms. Maureen Yaeger, Art, instructs Art Club 
members Jessica Rogers (10) and Anna Hallowell (10). The Art Club 
was painting tin cans to look like monsters. “Normally we paint pump¬ 
kins, but this year we wanted to try something new for the students 
returning," Ms. Yaeger said. Photo by: Emma DeGroot 2. CUTTING 
EDGE Mr. Paul Volk, Art, helps Andrew Angotti (12) with cutting his 
glass using the Morton Cutting System for his stained glass project. 
He explained how one wrong cut could shatter the entire pane of 
glass. “If you don’t cut this right it’s going to be a pain in your glass,” 
Mr. Volk said. Photo by: Jessica Wojton 





1. Brett Balicki (11). Joshua Krout (11). Andrew Aandema (9). Theodoras Karras 
(9) and Adam Gustas (10) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 2. Brett Balicki (11) Photo 
by: Cathryn Cearing 3. Pamela Neth Photo by: Camryn Wallace 


BEYOND THE CURTAIN CALL 

Working together on and off stage 

Mrs. Pam Neth, English, and Brett Balicki (11) have 
formed a lasting friendship over the past three years. 
They work together in the Theater Arts and Advanced 
Theater Arts classes as well as extracurricular produc¬ 
tions. 

“We get each other. When she makes a decision with 
theater, I get why she made that decision. Since she’s 
also my teacher, I learn more things about theater,” 
Balicki said. 


42 



































“I spend most of my time with students, so it is 
nice to see a friendly student,” 
Pamela Neth, English, said. 



CLASSROOM 

CONNECTIONS 


Students connect with teachers 

PAGE BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY 
RABATINE 


hile all students interact with teachers on a daily 
(ifjA) basis, some go beyond the usual small talk and 
form tasting friendships. 

“[Mrs. Roberta Harnish, Science,] I had for two 
years and she’s just awesome. We can talk to her about 
anything. It was a really good connection,” Noelle Mata- 


sovsky (12) said. 

These friendships sometimes span past the years spent 
in the classroom, carrying over from family relations or 
extracurricular activities. 

“[Mr. Darrell Wierzal’s, English] dad taught my mom. 
He was easy to get along with and he taught really well,” 
Rylee Friel (11) said. 

Relationships with teachers often help students real¬ 
ize their potential, which helps improve their grades too. 
Teachers open the door to new opportunities for students 
to learn more about themselves from an adult perspective. 

“[Mr. Bryan Szalonek, Social Studies] helped me decide 
what colleges I want to apply to and he made me decide 
to take the SATs,” Meghan Godinez (12) said. 

Wiser, more experienced friends like teachers can offer 
helpful advice on a variety of issues. Having somebody to 
talk to makes high school life a little more bearable. 

“You know you always have someone to go to during 
school,” Marina Vasquez (11) said. 

The bond between students and teachers can stem from 
or create respect between individuals on both ends, thus 
strengthening their relationship. 

“I had [Mrs. Jackie Ruiz, Science,] all four years for school. 
I always admired her. It’s easier to ask questions [and] I 
don’t feel stupid,” Melia Gonzalez (12) said. 

Fellow students can be distracting during class, while 
the teacher’s attention is on the lesson. For a compromise 


to be reached, talking with friends doesn’t always have to 


be sacrificed. 

“I get really good grades because [Mrs. Jackie Holden, 
English] helps me concentrate in class and not on the kids 
next to me,” Marina Mikhail (9) said. 


BUILDING BRIDGES ACROSS DESKS 


Teachers benefit from the friendships 
they have with students 



"I know that I don’t form close 
relationships here at LC the way 
I used to when I was at a much 
smaller school in Michigan. 

Nowadays, what constitutes 
close for me are students that I 
talk with and that share with me. I 
think it makes the students more 
likely to try harder for me since 
the relationship between us is 
more personal. It makes that hour 
more enjoyable, something to look 
forward to. [By] just being friendly, 
telling stories [and] asking ques¬ 
tions about students’ lives, I think 
they feel that they can ask the 
teacher things or tell private things 
to the teacher without fear.” 

CYNTHIA LALE, WORLD 
LANGUAGE 


GUIDANCE FROM THE WISE 



[Mr. Brian McNamara, 
West Lake] tells me the 
stuff I need to know to get 
better grades. 


TABITHA SAULS (9) 



[Mrs. Cyndi Hurley, Busi¬ 
ness] does things my 
counselor won’t. She 
listens and she helps. 


SUMMER MERRIMAN (12) 



Being close to guidance 
has helped me because I 
will always have a support 
system at school. 

SEAN MEYER (11) 



[Mr. Chris Harmon, 

Arts] helped me want to 
become a section leader. 


NICHOLAS SANFRATELLO (12) 


EVERY STUDENT LIFE INTERACTIONS 43 




























































TECH TAKEOVER 


ONE CLICK FROM SOCCESS 



“[I use RDS] so I can check 
out my rad grades and keep 
up-to-date with them.” 


FRANCIS FREDRICKSON (11) 



“I find it helpful to check 
grades and find out what I 
got on my tests." 


OLIVIA BARNES (9) 



“I use RDS because it can 
show me when my grades 
need improvement.” 


ANTONIO ORTIZ (11) 



“[RDS is] useful, but 
teachers don’t utilize it like 
they should.” 


AARON LUDWIG (12) 



“I think [RDS is] conve¬ 
nient because if I need any 
assignments they are up 
there for me.” 

CANDACE ZUMMAK (12) 


Classes access web as resource 

PAGE BY: EMMA DIPASQUO AND VERONICA DAVIS 


echnology now has a significant impact on every- 

M day life. It is rare to find a student who is not active 
on RDS, My Big Campus or Naviance. Students 
are encouraged to keep up to date and stay active 
on all of these medias. 

“Every student has their own Naviance account, and you 
get to it through your RDS. [Naviance] is for anything col¬ 
lege or career related. What’s great about it is this college 
tab is a huge resource to research colleges without having 
to go to the individual websites, etc. I like to look at it as 
a college Google,” Ms. Brynn Denton, Guidance, said. 

Naviance was first used at Lake Central last year, but 
it is not used as much as common websites such as My 
Big Campus and RDS on the school’s website. Guidance 
counselors are doing their best to spread the word about 
Naviance and its significance as a useful resource for col¬ 
lege and career information. 

“I really like this Supermatch [feature]. [Students type 
in] everything that is applicable to you: your location, your 
major, your test scores, your GPA, what size school you 
want to go to, if sports matter to you, if you want to be 
in a frat or a sorority, you could put in all kinds of things,” 
Ms. Denton said. 

Along with Naviance, My Big Campus is another impor¬ 
tant resource that is used among students to complete 
homework assignments, take mini-quizzes and check up 
on what is going on in class by what teachers post. 

“If you miss a blue or white day, you can get all information 
on there,” Mrs. Claire Kuhlenschmidt, Social Studies, said. 

My Big Campus has been implemented this year for 
students and is encouraged by teachers who view it as a 
helpful resource. 

“It will be a helpful tool for them to succeed in college,” 
Mrs. Kuhlenschmidt said. 

With an abundance of technology present in school today, 
it is likely that students will rely on technology entirely in 
the future.“ln a couple years, students will just know [to 
use technology]. Eventually we will go paperless,” Mrs. 
Kuhlenschmidt said. 



OPPOSING SIDES OF THE GRADE “A” SYSTEM 


I USE RDS 


“I use RDS because it is an easy 
way to keep me updated on my 
grades. When the time comes to 
apply to colleges, RDS will be a 
good source for me to use to look 
at my transcript. I check RDS more 
than the average person because 
it is so easy to access.” 

NATASA BEADER (11) 


I DO NOT USE RDS 

“I do not use RDS. To be 
honest, I don’t care about my 
grades. My parents check RDS 
for me, so I know what is going 
on from them. RDS is not 
something I check regularly.” 


NICHOLAS BLEVINS (9) 



44 EVERY STUDENT LIFE TECHNOLOGY 





















































































































1. PARTNERING UP Raquel Rembert (11) and Kalie Ostapchuk (11) 
enjoy working on their project. Rembert and Ostapchuk teamed up 
in the upper Freshman Center lab to do the project on the computer. 
“I think it is a lot more efficient to work on a project online because it 
is a lot easier to share with everybody so there is equal work"Lauren 
Granskog (11) said. 2. FLYING SOLO James Lee (11) reads through 
a class packet. Lee worked independently to complete an in-class 
assignment. “If it is not someone I know to work with, I can much 
faster go on a computer and type my information without having 
to get someone else’s opinion" Ryan Wojcik (12) said. 3. GETTING 
STUFF DONE Students from Mrs. Dawn Combis’s, Business, class 
work on their computers for Personal Finance and Responsibility. 
These students worked carefully to find cars for an assignment. 
“Using technology in my Personal Finance class really benefits 
me because it is a nice way to display the message and keeps 
me focused." Brandon Walton (11) said. 4. TECHNOLOGY OVER 
PAPER Paige Szymczak (10) uses the school’s computers to do 
research. Szymczak worked diligently in the computer lab. “It is 
easier and less time consuming to use a computer than having to get 
books from the library for a projec" Stephanie O’Drobinak (10) said. 
Photos by: Emma DiPasquo 


EASY STEPS ON HOW TO USE NAVIANCE FOR COLLEGE 


Log in to RDS, click on the 
Naviance link and select the 
“colleges” tab in the top left- 
hand corner of the page. 

Under “college reseach” select 
the “SuperMatch college 
search” link. Continue to fill in 
answers to all of the orange 
tabs such as location, GPA, test 
scores and majors. 


family connection 


[ colleges ^ careers [ about me J £.my p 


3 


After completing all tabs, 
explore the colleges that 
Naviance has narrowed down 
for you as a result of your 
answers. 



Photo illustration by: Hannah Giese 


“Using a variety of technologies in the high 
school classroom gives students the foundation 
they need as they continue on to college or into 
the workforce,” Mrs. Myra Lolkema, Educational 
Technology Trainer, said. 












































1. STAYING IN TOUCH Michael Miller (11) looks at Jessica 
Jarach’s (11) phone. The students were looking at different 
social media accounts during passing period. “I like [social 
media] and dislike it because it can start a lot of drama 
but at the same time it’s nice to connect with everybody. 
[However,] there’s nothing really on social media that can 
help you learn," Jarach said. Photo by: Jovana Dodevska 

2. SNAPPING TO SUCCESS Mrs. Abigail Homans, World 
Language, opens a snapchat from one of her students. 
Snapchat is used as an extra credit opportunity for Mrs. 
Homan’s students. “I thought it was an easy way to get extra 
credit. It made me realize that there is a lot more Spanish 
translations in public,” Hannah Keith (12) said. Photo by: 
Jovana Dodevska 3. TWEET FOR HELP Mrs. Stephanie 
Parks, Science, tweets one of her students. Parks uses Twit¬ 
ter and other social media accounts to help her students. 
“Twitter is effective in interacting with students because 
students are always on Twitter. Twitter seems to be easy 
access to all students,” Mrs. Parks said. Photo by: Jovana 
Dodevska 4. ONLINE INTERACTION Mr. Eric Graves, Math, 
shows his class an example of what to do when they want 
to recieve homework help via Twitter. Mr. Graves responds 
to his students’ questions for a mutual understanding of the 
subject. “[Mr. Graves] is easily accessable through Twitter. 
He’ll answer right away,” Emma Hupp (12) said. Photo by: 
Colleen Quinn 


46 























“Social media is very distracting while I do my 
homework. But I think it’s beneficial in school,” 
Navneet Kaur (12) said. 



E-LEARNING 


Social media eases learning 

PAGE BY: JOVANA DODEVSKA AND COLLEEN QUINN 

# ver the years, society has become more dependent 
on social media for everyday use. Now websites 
and apps such as Twitter and Snapchat are being 
utilized within schools. 

Teachers are taking advantage of these apps to help 
their students. Mr. Eric Graves, Mathematics, has been 
using apps such as Twitter to help his students make their 
education more modern. 

“I give the students my Twitter handle so they can contact 
me outside of school if they have questions about the class 
or questions about the material,” Mr. Graves said. 

Having students ask questions out of class provides 
them with a better understanding of the material sooner 
than waiting for the next class. Mr. Graves’s method is 
convenient for the students because it eliminates the stress 
that students feel when they do not understand something. 
Social media allows the teachers to answer the questions 
outside of class and in a way that relates to their students. 

“It’s a way of answering questions on a time that isn’t set 
to the school. It’s our own time. A student might be work¬ 
ing on homework over the weekend when they have time, 
and they have a question. Well, they don’t have to wait until 
school and they can ask me right away. I can answer the 
question on my time as well,” Mr. Graves said. 

Using Twitter as a classroom resource is beneficial for 
both students and teachers. Mrs. Abigail Homans, World 
Language, uses Snapchat to increase her students’ capac¬ 
ity to learn outside of the classroom. 

“The assignment was for extra credit. I know not everyone 
has Snapchat, but most students do, so I had to give them 
different options [besides] email. I wanted to use [Snap¬ 
chat] to test it out. Now, this year, I’ll be using it more. [The 
purpose is] to see Spanish used in our daily lives, here in 
the Region,” Mrs. Homans said. 

Mrs. Homans’s innovative idea to use Snapchat has 
caused students to become more interested in the class 
and overall more involved. Technology may be advancing, 
but for LC teachers, that just means more opportunities 
and experiences. 


HOW MANY STUDENTS CHECK 
FACEBOOK DAILY? 


poll out of 330 students 

85 % 


DO NOT CHECK FACEBOOK 
DAILY 

85% of students said that they 
do not check their Facebooks 
daily. 


CHECK FACEBOOK DAILY 

15% of students said that 
they check their 
Facebook daily to see 
updates from friends and 
family. 


15 % 


WHEN DO YOU USE SOCIAL MEDIA? 



“I don’t use it. I think it’s 
corrupt, I think its messing 
the world up. People take 
too much time on social 
media.” 

ILIJA MARINKOVIC (12) 



“I usually check it when 
I wake up in the morning 
and then I’ll use it if we 
have free time in class.” 

ELISE BEREOLOS (11) 



“I use it at school, work 
[and] home to see what 
my friends are doing or if 
I could talk to [them].” 

MARCO DOMINGUEZ (12) 


COMMON APPLICATIONS OF THE SMARTPHONE AGE OFFER DIFFERENT CAPABILITIES 



Twitter 

Twitter is a social media service 
where users can post 140 charac¬ 
ter “tweets.” 


Instagram 
Instagram users can easily edit 
and share their photos with their 
friends. 




Pinterest 

Pinterest is a website with virtual 
boards where users can "pin” 
photos and videos of interest. 


Tumblr 

Tumblr is a website where users 
can create their own blog and view 
other users’ blogs. 



EVERY STUDENT LIFE TECHNOLOGY 47 
























































1. FRIDAY FLING Cole Reynolds (11) kicks back with his friends Zachary Hupp (11), Kyle Massa (11). Casey 
Garvey (11). and Jacob Koontz (11). The boys liked spending their Friday nights hanging out with each other. 
“I like spending time with my friends even if we don’t do much. It's nice just to be with them," Reynolds said. 
Photo by: Jodie Hodges 2. HARP MASTER Martha Mapes (11) plays the harp in her bedroom. Mapes has 
been playing the harp for seven years and enjoys playing classical music the most. “I saw an episode of the 
Monkees where someone sold their soul to the devil for a harp and I found that enchanting.” Mapes said. 
Photo by: Darian Smith 3. PRINTED TO PERFECTION Chase Owczarzak (12) works with the school’s 3D 
printer. Owczarzak bought his own printer at the end of last school year. “Well I wanted to get something 
cool, and then I figured out you can buy 3D printers now, and I thought, ‘What better way to waste my 
money on new technology’,” Owczarzak said. Photo by: Jodie Hodges 4. SEWING IT UP Nicole Vusak (9) 
sits on the floor of her bedroom while sewing up a ‘Jack Skellington’ plush toy she made for a sibling. Vusak 
used sewing to make different creations ranging anywhere from toys to clothing. “I’m really glad I learned to 
sew. That way I get to create my own fashions and designs that no one has ever seen before.” Vusak said. 
Photo by: Darian Smith 




HOBBIES: FROM FRONT FLIPS TO KICK FLIPS 


GYMNAST 

“I started gymnastics when I was 
one. I started at Pattie’s. Then 
I tumbled at Midwest Training 
Center for about two years on the 
competitive team. Then I went 
back to Pattie’s to get back into 
gymnastics. Then I went to Lisa’s, 
and now I’m currently at Midwest. 
I practice there six times a week." 

EMMA WEISSBECK (11) 


LONGBOARDER 

“My hobby is long boarding. I 
started in 8th grade. I was at 
the skatepark with my friend 
Logan Sommer (11). He had a 
little 22-inch cruzer. I found the 
same one online and a 42-inch 
one next to it. It was ginor- 
mous. I loved it. That’s what 
got got me started" 

TYLER PALUSZAK (11) 



DO YOU LEAVE FOR VACATION OVER WINTER BREAK? 

poll out of 335 students 



“One Friday, I went to a White Sox game. I got 
to see Jose Abreu play. I got to go with my dad, 
and it was very fun,” Paul Centanni (11) said. 


“7£T 0/ STAY LEAVE OCO/ 

/ O Some students are For some, the biting f ^ 

■ more equipped to cold weather of the f ^ 

handle the winter season than others. These winter is just too much handle. To escape 
students don’t find it necessary to leave from the possibility of frost bite, some stu- 
the cold but instead stay and endure it over dents leave the Northwest Indiana region to 
break. keep warm during Winter Break. 
































COMMON LINKS 




Thank goodness it's Friday 




Mm 




STUDENTS 

“I went to California. I looked 
down into the ocean to what 
I thought were two fish, but 
they were actually walruses.” 

KENDALL BARTOCHOWSKI (11) 

“We did a reeanactment of 
the Battle of Gettysburg in 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 

I learned a lot from it.” 

ALEXANDRA KURIVIAL (11) 

“I really enjoyed going 
to New York. It’s such a 
beautiful city. I love the 
fast-paced lifestyle.” 

CASSIDY MICHAU (12) 


PAGE BY: JODIE HODGES AND DARIAN SMITH 


veryone loves Fridays. What students do on their 
fjfl ^M\ Fridays varies, and it is what sets them apart from 
each other. What links them together is their reason 
for loving this last day: freedom from the school week. 

“On Fridays, I hang out with friends or play League of Leg¬ 
ends. If my friends can’t hang out in person, then League 
is where they usually are. I tried to get my girlfriend into 
it, but she doesn’t like it. School is so stressful so when 
the weekend comes, I just find it stress relieving. League 
doesn’t necessarily relieve my stress. If anything, it causes 
video game related anger, but it at least gets my mind off 
school,” Joshua Kirby (12) said. 

Jeremy Putnam (11) and Kirby both use the virtual realm 
of video games to escape the reality of school life. Though 
they do not know each other nor do they play together, 
their interest in Friday night video game sessions link 
them together. 

“Sometimes I talk to my friends on Skype, and we play 
video games together. My favorite part about Fridays are 
not going to school the next day. I really like not having to 
go to bed early,” Putnam said. 

Similarly to Kirby and Putnam, Martha Mapes (11) uses 
Fridays to forget the strain of school work. Unlike both boys 
who plays video games on Friday, Mapes plays the harp. 

“I practice playing harp with my friends. I get together 
with two other people to practice playing a Pirates of the 
Caribbean medley. I like practicing on Fridays because I 
have my homework to do on the weekdays, so I like to relax 
and play harp on the weekends,” Mapes said. 

While the Fridays of some students are more complex than 
others, some simply just enjoy the company of their friends. 

“Fridays give me a break from all the constant homework. 
School really stresses me out, so it’s nice to just let it go for 
a day. I usually just hang out with my friends. Since cross 
country has ended, I can stay up later on Friday nights 
because I don’t have meets on Saturday mornings. Friday 
nights are the reason I get up on Friday mornings,” Cole 
Reynolds (11) said. 


VARIETY OF VACATIONS AMONG 

“Germany is a cool and 
fantastic country to visit. 

I visited family and went to 
a few waterparks. I would 
definitely do it again.” 

PHILIP JUREK (9) 

“I go to South Dakota 
every year for hunting. 

I hunt pheasants.” 


NIKOLA VUCKOVIC (11) 

“I went ziplining, hiking 
and whitewater rafting 
in Tennessee. I liked the 
mountains and the view.” 



CHASE DOESCHER (12) 





SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME STUDENT LIFE FREE TIME 49 







































































hether it is walking to school in the rain, driving 
in the morning traffic or riding the bus, all Lake 
Central Students have to find a way to get to 
school. Many students have had their ups and 
downs with transportation. 

Isabella Gomez (10) walks year-round to school and 
has never had a problem with getting to school on time. 
She also lives relatively close to Lake Central, which is 
convenient for her. 

“I get to leave later and it takes three minutes [to get to 
LC], so I don’t have to worry about being late,” Gomez said. 

Even when the walk isn’t far, heavy backpacks can be 
a pain when walking to school. Weather conditions aren’t 
always favorable, so it’s good for those who walk to school 
to have a backup plan. 

“[My backpack is heavy] all the time. I carry two of my 
books and put the other two in my book bag,” Gomez said. 

Car riders face other obstacles when it comes to getting 
to school in the morning, but some have found clever ways 
to avoid the nuisance of the parking lot. 

“We don’t park in the parking lot, so it’s pretty good. We 
park in the neighborhood [near the school],” Cara Scott 
(10) said. 

Other students have no choice but to deal with parking 
lot traffic. 

“It takes me a long time to get to school because there 
are so many cars. The fact that they [the office staff] have 
to direct traffic at a high school is a little bit insane,” Jillian 
Cloghessy (10) said. 

Students who ride the bus also experience complications 
while getting to school in the morning. 

“We were driving and this girl was leaning over the seat. 
We hit a bump and she hit the top of the bus. It was really 
funny,” Kristy Willis (9) said. 

On the contrary, some students experience more of a 
scare than a comedy. 

“On the way to school, the bus hit a car. We pulled over 
and a bunch of cops and ambulances came and asked if we 
were OK. We were late to school,” Jacob Denson (10) said. 


MISSING BUT STILL MANAGING 

Sean Harper (11) talks about missing the bus 

“I woke up, realized it was 6:05, 
rushed to get through my daily nor¬ 
mal routine, and I still missed the bus. 
It was the first time I missed the bus, 
too. I wasn’t sure what to do because 
I don’t have any other way to get to 
school. I was like, ‘I guess I will have 
to ride my bike,’ and I did that. It’s 
kind of far [but] not too bad. It’s like 
three miles. I actually got there with 
three minutes to spare. It took me like 
fifteen minutes. It was pretty crazy,” 
Sean Harper (11) said. 

If students miss their bus, they 
might have to take extreme measures, 
such as riding a bike to get to school. 
Sometimes it can be challenging 
to wake up for school on time, but 
classroom attendance is often neces¬ 
sary to keep up with school work. 




50 EVERY STUDENT LIFE GETTING TO LO 

















1 




1. PARKING LOT FRENZY Students walk toward the school with the weight 
of backpacks on their shoulders. After they parked, students walked from their 
space into the school, no matter what weather. “My bus driver ripped the bumper 
off the bus once. She didn’t think anything happened and just kept driving," 
Makayla Morris (12) said. Photo by: Amber Stedt 2. PARADE OF CARS Cars 
make their way through the traffic to enter the Lake Central parking lot around 
6:45 a.m.The traffic has been made worse by the construction, and crossing 
guards direct the traffic to make sure it is safe for students to cross the busy 
parking lot. “I get here really early. There’s no parking spot numbers so it’s first 
come, first serve," Maxwell Rees (12) said. Photo by: Elena Gorney 3. DROP OFF 
Buses line up to drop students off at school. The Students exited their buses 
on the rainy morning and rushed to get into school before getting too soaked. 
“[Once] I was walking across the street and I slipped and fell." Katherine Znavor 
(10) said. Photo by: Amber Stedt 4. A WALK TO REMEMBER Students walk 
from their cars to the entrance of the school. Some students walked a long 
distance in the rain. “[Once] there were like five bees on the bus, and this one 
guy took his shoe and killed them against the window. It was really gross," Halle 
Pederson (10) said. Photo by: Elena Gorney 


WAYS THE STUDENT BODY GETS TRANSPORTED TO SCHOOL 


poll out of 350 students 

4 7.2 % set 

students ride the bus in the morning. More 
than half of those students were freshman 
and sophomores. 


CAR 

More than half of the students drive or get a ride 
to school in the morning. Students who drive to 
school some¬ 
times have a 
problem with the 
morning traffic. 



THE TROUBLE WITH PARKING PASSES 



“I didn’t get [a parking pass] 
at the beginning of the year 
and then they called me 
down and asked if I wanted 
one, so of course I did.” 

ASHLEY NYLEN (12) 



“I had a broken ankle, so 
my mom had to get me a 
parking pass. She got it at 
Zig-E’s.” 


GEORGE THEODORE (11) 



“My uncle works at the 
funeral [home], so it wasn’t 
hard to get a spot.” 


MIKALA KOTECKI (11) 



“It was hard getting a parking 
pass because nobody had 
open spots. Then one day 
Mrs. Lambert gave me her 
spot.” 

PAUL CENTANNI (11) 



“I called Zig-E’s for a park¬ 
ing spot, and I was happy 
to get one." 


MEGAN MISIRLY (11) 



“Luckily, I didn’t have any 
issues [with getting a park¬ 
ing pass]. I got it right away. 

I wasn’t on the waiting list." 

KASSIE WOODWORTH (12) 


“I like [my parking pass]. I think it’s fair because 
[seniors] have an equal chance [of getting one]. 
I think it would be better if there were more 
spaces for everybody, but seniors should get 
spots before juniors," Brendan Kelly (12) said. 






















































“We [office staff] look forward to our new loca¬ 
tion and anticipate moving sooner than later,” 
Mrs. Lori Brumm, Secretary, said. 


BURIAL GROUNDS LAST STAND AND REVAMP 


I The first step of the demoli¬ 
tion of the Burial Grounds was 
demolishing the endzone, which 
took place after the Homecom¬ 
ing football game. 

2 The second step was taking out 
the west endzone and putting 
up the foundation of the football 
facility. 

3 Step three is the process of 
leveling everything on the field 
out and making any last-minute 
changes. 



Football Facility Photo by: Hannah Giese 


EXPANSION OF PARKING LOT EXCITES UPPERCLASSMEN 



“[The new parking is great 
because] usually the park¬ 
ing lot is so congested 
[that] people start backing 
up into each other.” 


JACOB DUNN (12) 



“I’m looking forward to the 
new and improved parking 
lot because there’ll be 
more opportunities for 
people to get spots ” 

VICTORIA SPRINGMAN (11) 



“I’m excited to park at 
school next year because 
walking from the funeral 
home in the rain is hor¬ 
rible. It’ll be easier.” 

MARINA VASQUEZ (11) 


3 



1 


1. BRINGING DOWN THE HOUSE Construction workers make progress on the 
football facility on Oct. 16. This building was planned to be used for several other 
sports besides football like track and cross country. “The new football facility will 
have the locker rooms, concessions and bathrooms,” Mr. Bill Ledyard, Director 
of Facilities, said. 2. FILL IT UP Workers continue construction around the large 
puddles of water in the gym. The new gym was designed to be approximately 
20,000 square feet and seat 4,000 people. “I can’t wait for the new gym because 
it’ll be great to play my senior [basketball] season there," Victoria Gard (11) said. 3. 
A NEW CHAPTER Construction workers build the auditorium. The new auditorium 
was scheduled to be done by the start of the 2015-2016 school year. “It’ll be cool 
to be a part of LC theater history. The bigger space will be like a breath of fresh air,’ 
Madison Breford (11) said. Photos by: Jessica McCullough 




52 






















































FACE-LIFT FOR 
FACILITIES 


Construction moves forward 

PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR, JOVANA DODEVSKA, 
SHANNON HEARNE, JESSICA MCCULLOUGH AND 
COLLEEN QUINN 

hase three of the high school’s renovation will 
(i include a new performing arts and music center 
and sports facilities. 

“We are in the third phase of construction right 
now. The first phase was the new electric substation and 
underground infrastructure. The second phase was the 
academic wing and pool. The third phase is what you see 
now, the fine arts wing, auditorium, gym, media center, 
administration area and athletic fields,” Mr. Bill Ledyard, 
Director of Facilities, said. 

Both boys baseball and girls softball fields were planned 
to be finished in time to host games for the new season. 
However, the fine arts and media center required more 
work, as the project was planned to take nearly a year to 
complete. 

“Since we will have to spend a year in the LGI, [the new 
auditorium] will be a huge transformation from no stage to 
a beautiful one,” Hannah Souronis (10) said. 

Once the majority of the building process is complete, 
finishing touches are planned to conclude the final phase 
of construction. 

“The final phase [of construction] will be to [demolish] 
central office and add parking in that area, and we’ll move 
to the current LCHS administration area. From what you 
see now, we’ll be adding parking where central office is 
currently located and also where all the construction trailers 
and offices are located, just north ofTaco Bell [and] east of 
the new pool,” Mr. Ledyard said. 

To be able to host future commencement ceremonies, 
the gym is being also being rebuilt to seat larger crowds. 

“The building area of the gym is approximately 20,000 
[square feet] and it will seat approximately 4,000 people,” 
Mr. Ledyard said. 

By the summer of 2015, the football field, along with the 
football facility, and the rest of phase three construction is 
scheduled to be ready for the beginning of the school year. 




1. Girls softball field Photo by: Hannah Giese 2. Boys baseball dugout Photo 
by: Hannah Giese 3. Boys baseball dugout Photo by: Jessica McCullough 

SPORTS FIELDS TAKE A HIT 

Workers slide into construction of softball 
and baseball fields 

The baseball and softball teams will face a major change in 
the 2015 season: turf. Both teams’ new fields will be made 
of turf instead of dirt and grass. 

“The new baseball field will be awesome because it’s very 
expensive turf, and our performance will be better,” Zachary 
Turnbough (11) said. 

The fields were planned to be finished by Thanksgiving in 
order to be ready for the next season in the spring. 

“I think [the field] is going to be an advantage for us 
because not a lot of teams are used to playing on turf, and 
we will be used to it,” Emma Frye (11) said. 



SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO EVERY LIFE CONSTROCTION 53 


























WHO IS EATING WHAT? 

poll out of 330 students 

BRING LUNCH 

f 55% of students say that they 
bring a lunch from home that 
J J fl they pack themselves. 

BUY LUNCH 

40% of students say that 
they buy a lunch from the 
school lunch line nearly 
every day. 

NEITHER 

2% of students said that they 
do not bring or buy a lunch 
and prefer to not eat lunch at 
school. 

BOTH 

3% of students say that 
they both bring a lunch 
and buy a lunch; the type 
of lunch they eat varies 
by day. 





PACKING HEALTHY LUNCHES FOR SUCCESS 

Katherine Freeman (11) advises how to pack the 
perfect, healthy school lunch 


“Lunch is a very important part of 
the day. Students should try to eat a 
balanced lunch consisting of fruits, veg¬ 
etables, a nutritious main course and a 
drink. The first step to packing a healthy 
lunch is to make sure you have enough 
energy to be able to. Definitely pack 
your lunch the night before so you don’t 
have to wake up early in the morning. 
Make sure to have enough in your lunch 
so you can eat something in second or 
sixth hour but still have enough to eat 
during your lunch. Even though you want 
to eat the whole thing make sure to save 
some for your actual lunch. Packing a 
lot of lunch does not mean it needs to 
be all junk food. It can also be healthy 
food that tastes good such as fruit and 
veggies. It is also important to stay 
hydrated, so pack enough water.” 



MERGING WITH THE UPPERCLASSMEN 

“[High school] lunch is different [than middle 
school lunch] because if you do not have your 
ID here, you have to get sent to the back of the 
line. There are also four alphabetical lunches 
and you get a break in classes." 

TIMOTHY BRESHOCK (9) 

“Lunch is different because you can walk 
around when you are done eating and you 
can sit with people from different grade 
levels.” 


CHARLES SCHULER (9) 

“[During] lunch in middle school you had 
to sit at one table every day with a certain 
group of people. In high school you can 
choose whoever you want to sit with from 
different grade levels.” 

CONNER TOMASIC (9) 






“I like buying more things and I like that 
there is more of a variety to eat at lunch in 
high school.” 


MORGYN MCALLISTER (9) 



“The lunch rooms are a lot bigger and there 
are a lot more people in the cafeteria. A lot 
of my friends have the same lunch as I do.” 


RAYMOND RAMIREZ (9) 


LIVING (AND EATING) IN THE DIGITAL AGE 



Per the 2014-15 school year, students are now allowed to 
use their cell phones at lunch. Students can now enjoy the 
company of their friends that they are sitting with and the 
company of those who might be sitting at other tables. 

“I think [lunch] is one of the most social times that stu¬ 
dents have [in school], so I think that they should be talking 
with their friends who are at their table instead of texting 
someone who is two tables over,” Mr. Martin Freeman, 
Assistant Principal, said. 



1. BETWEEN THE (LUNCH) LINES Students gather in a lunch line to order their lunch. 
Lunches are now healthier than they were before. “I like to buy school lunches because I 
honestly do not like carrying around a lunch bag all day," Elnora Stroud (12) said. Photo 
by: Joseph Pavell 2. FRIENDS FOREVER Friends laugh with each other during their lunch 
period. Lunch time gives students a chance to relax with one another and escape stresses 
of class for thirty minutes. "I usually eat throughout the day so I do not like to eat at lunch. I 
like to spend time with my friends there." Luzila Lopez (11) said. Photo by: Joseph Pavell 3. 
TAKING A BITE OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL Jack Quinlan (9) eats his lunch during D Lunch. 
Freshmen had to adjust to a new lunch environment in order to make ther high school 
experience easier. "I get to hang out with my friends. [Lunch] really brightens up my day," 
Quinlan said. Photo by: Noelle McBride 


54 




























































































































SCHOOL LUNCH 
REDEFINED 


New health guidelines change lunch 

PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL AND HANNAH BRYNER 



s the cafeteria fills for the much-anticipated lunch 
| hour, so do students’ lunch trays. There are an 
assortment of health-conscious options that are 
beginning to trickle into the cafeteria including 
baked chips and fruit cups. Healthier options are being 
implemented into lunch rooms across the nation due to 
the regulations set by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act 
of 2010. 


“I like to pack my own lunch because I like to 
know exactly what I am eating. I like to know 
what ingredients are inside of my food,” Gina 
Gutierrez (12) said. 




This act’s main purpose is to ensure that all students 
receive a proper nutrition during the school day. It grants 
the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) the 
authority to to set nutritional standards for all foods sold 
during the school day. 

“I think that nutrition is important, but kids should get the 
opportunity to choose what they want. I think they should 
be aware about nutrition, but we are old enough to the 
point where we can decide what we want to eat,” Clare 
Majchrowicz (11) said. 

Instead of just affecting school lunches, the Healthy, 
Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 also affects all types of food 
that are sold on school grounds. 

“For the first time, schools are not just regulating the 
breakfast and lunch program.They are starting to regulate 
what is distributed in vending machines and concession 
stands,” Ms. Gladys Rediger, Food Services Director, said. 

The types of food consumed during school events are 
also monitored. Any food consumed on the school campus 
between the hours of midnight and 30 minutes after the 
school day ends must follow the regulations set by the 
USDA. 

“We are strongly advising that everyone makes healthy 
choices while having celebration days or after-school 
events,” Ms. Rediger said. 

Even though healthier foods are being distributed in 
schools, there are hopes that students will begin to make 
healthier decisions on their own. 

“This is happening across the nation. It is a good thing to 
eat healthy in school, but we always need to do a balancing 
act to stay healthy for the long haul,” Ms. Rediger said. 




Lk J 

EVERY STUDENT LIFE LUNCH 55 




























ADJUSTING TO A NEW SOCIAL SETTING 

Freshman adapts to brand new environment 



“Socially, there’s a lot more people. Out 
of the three middle schools, you have 
about 300 people from each school all 
together, so there’s a lot more diverse 
people [that] you can be friends with. 

It was a lot easier than I thought to 
make friends. I’m still close with my old 
friends, but some of them have a lot of 
new friends now. [There are] definitely 
[times when I have to sacrifice hang¬ 
ing out with friends], especially when 
you have to study for tests; that’s a big 
sacrifice [instead of] hanging out with 
friends. Most of my friends have the 
same classes as me, so it’s easier [to 
talk to them] because we have the same 
homework [and] tests to study [for].” 

MELICAH RODRIGUEZ (9) 


BALANCING A BUSY SCHEDULE 



“[When] I’m working on 
a worksheet [at school], 
[when] I’m done with that, 
I pull out my script [for 
theater].” 

ADAM GUSTAS (10) 

“On away games, I can 
take my homework on the 
bus. I have a study hall 
which comes in handy.” 

NICOLE MILASZEWSKI 
( 10 ) 



“You just have to make 
time and manage your 
time well or else you’ll 
have a lot of late nights, 
which sucks.” 

DAWSON STROUD (10) 



“[For projects], I usually 
try to do it the day it’s 
assigned, so it prevents all 
stress." 

RACHEL KOZEL (10) 


CONQUERING 
HIGH SCHOOL 


Seniors share survival strategies 


PAGE BY: RUTH CHEN, VICTORIA WILKES AND JESSICA 
WOJTON 


s seniors prepare to say goodbye to high school 
and start a new chapter of their lives, they will leave 
prepared with survival strategies developed from 
their years of high school. 

“I’d say there were a lot of things that got me through 
high school because I had a really close friend that I was 
close with in the fourth grade up until now and actually I’m 
going to room with her in college. She is a big part of my 
life because we did dance together, we got our first job 
together, and we’re in a lot of classes together,” Megan 
Barenie (12) said. 

For some, close friendships are a very important part of 
their high school years, while for others family support is 
an essential part of achieving success. 

“I think that my brother has helped me survive too. He 
keeps me sane, grounded to earth,” Tiffany Tao (12) said. 

Students may choose to look outside their personal circle 
of friends for guidance and befriend a teacher for advice. 

“One of my favorite teachers was Mr. [Kendal] Smith, [Sci¬ 
ence]. I don’t think I could’ve survived high school without 
him. Since AP [Chemistry], he has become like a mentor 
for me. He’s been giving me suggestions for college essays 
and writing my recommendations,” Tao said. 

Even though moral support aids students, organizational 
tools are also a key to survival. 

“This year I have [a calendar], and I just write what my 
assignments are and when it’s due. I’ve used the agenda 
every year and this is a new thing because we didn’t [get] 
the agendas right away [this year]. You’re writing down 
what your homework is, when it’s due, quizzes and tests, 
and stuff like that. It definitely will make a big difference [in 
your performance in high school],” Maxwell Rees (12) said. 

Tools such as agendas or calendars along with the com¬ 
bination of support from family, friends and teachers pave 
the pathway to a successful high school career. Over 700 
students will graduate this year, each carrying the skills that 
they have developed throughout high school with them to 
the next step of their lives. 


- 



“[In high school], you get to meet a lot of new 
people, and there are a lot more classes and 
oppourtunities,” Drew Testa (9) said. 


























































































1. PERSONAL PLANNER Maxwell Rees (12) uses his personal calendar in place of the school’s agenda. Since the agendas were handed out 
late, Rees had to find an alternative to use. “The agenda [helped me] because I forget things all the time,” Jacob Navarra (12) said. Photo by: 
Ruth Chen 2. AGENDA MAKEOVER Tess Ruzga (12) writes reminders and notes in the Indian Guide. AP English 12 students are required to 
read the Norton book. “Writing stuff in your Norton helps because you can look back at it. and it has everything that you wrote down in class, 
those little things that you forget, so it’s nice to write [notes] down [in your book]." Ruzga said. Photo by: Ruth Chen 3. PHONE FRENZY 
Alexis Nikolovski (9), Ashley Knerler (9), Faith Huenecke (9). Sydney Batinick (9) and Erika Araujo (9) laugh at their phone after taking a group 
photo after lunch. Since the start of the year, the administration has been more lenient with students using phones during lunch periods. 
“[Friends] make school more bearable because they help with group work, they help you get your work done. They make it more fun,” Alyssa 
Wagner (11) said. Photo by: Madeline Hirschfield 



JUNIORS DISCUSS OPPOSING SIDES OF ACADEMICS 


REGULAR CLASS 

“Tests are the hardest part [of my 
classes] because it’s hard for me 
to study. I definitely [have had to 
sacrifice going out with friends] 
because I had a research paper 
I had to do and could not go out 
at all.” 

HANNAH BOUGHER (11) 


AP CLASS 

“Do your work [right] when 
you get it. Don’t wait until 
the last minute to do it 
because that’s what I do. It 
piles up, and then you’re like 
‘Oh sorry, I can’t go out, I 
[have to] do this first.’” 

JAY CHOPRA (11) 



EVERY STUDENT LIFE HIGH SCHOOL SURVIVAL 57 

























































































O' 






1. MUZZLING HUNGRY BULLDOGS Antwan Davis 
(12) stiff arms a Crown Point defender. The team beat the 
Bulldogs 27-13. “The best part of winning against a rivalry 
was the fact that we proved a lot of people wrong,” Logan 
Lambert (12) said. Photo by: Cassidy Niewiadomski 2. 
READY, SET, GO Tyler Platusic (12) gets ready to run across 
the field on Aug. 15 during a scrimmage against Hammond 
Morton High School. The team made four touch downs 
in three offensive sessions. “[Playing for varsity] is a good 
experience because I get to learn from All-State athletes 
that play with me,” Nicholas Lucas (10) said. Photo by: 
Jennifer Mohamed 3. FALLING SHORT Antwan Davis (12) 
dodges an attempted tackle by a Munster defender. The 
game against Munster was the first official game of the 
season. “The season has [been] really exciting and I’m really 
happy about how it’s going right now, but there’s a lot of 
improvements we can make,” Davis said. Photo by: Cassidy 
Niewiadomski 4.UP IN THE AIR Colin Studer (11) runs the 
ball down the field during the Homecoming game on Oct. 3. 
Homecoming was the last game held at the Burial Grounds. 
“We’ve had a really good year and the team keeps finding 
ways to win and we’re a really hardworking group of guys,” 
Cody Schultz (12) said. Photo by: Hannah Reed 5. LINING 
UP Jacob Johnston (12) prepares to snap the ball to the 
quarterback on Oct. 3, Homecoming night. Despite the 
cold weather, the Indians came out on top with a score of 
6-0; Jillian Doan (12) scored all of the points. “The team did 
a great job getting the win against Chesterton, and it was 
great seeing all the fans cheering us on,” Johnston said. 
Photo by: Hannah Reed 


Colin Studer (11) and Jillian Doan (12) Photo by: Hannah 
Sonner 


HAIL TO THE VICTOR 

Indians travel to Indianapolis 

On Sept. 6, the varsity football team faced off 
against the Portage Indians at the Lucas Oil Sta¬ 
dium in Indianapolis, Ind. Each player had a unique 
experience at the stadium, including starting kicker 
Jillian Doan (12). 

“It was definitely a once in a lifetime experience. 
I’ve never been in a stadium that big and I’ve never 
been to a football game like that, let alone played in 
one," Doan said. 

The game, played on Big Rivals Night, was part 
of a tournament consisting of four football games 
played by various high school teams from Indiana. 
The game started off with LC in the lead and con¬ 
cluded in a 14-6 victory. 



“A few of us stand in front of the student sec¬ 
tion. Depending on how the game is going, we 
use chants to pump up the crowd. Too Much 
Ammo’ has become one of the new favorite 
chants this year,” Nathan Zajac (12) said. 



TEARING UP THE FIELD 



“We are not going to be playing [at 
the old field], so we are not going to 
have all of the motivation behind us, 
but I think we can do it.” 

AUSTIN CHEKALUK (11) 



“I think [the new field is] going to 
be a massive benefit to our team, 
with the primary reason being injury 
issues.” 

COACH BRETT ST. GERMAIN 



“The field, from what I’ve heard, is 
going to be north to south and not 
east to west, so the sun won’t go in 
our eyes, but it should be better [for 
games].” 

JERIMIAH VELAZQUEZ (11) 




















































































FINAL ENDING 
IN THE ZONE 


Indians set records in DAC 




PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR, SHANNON HEARNE AND 
JESSICA MCCULLOUGH 




TACKLING HIS LAST SEASON 

Brandon Scott (12) shares his experience this season 


"[Throughout this season], my favorite game 
was when we played Crown Point. It was the 
point of the season where our team really 
came together, and we proved we were the 
best team around. Last year, we had our 
Coach, [Mike] Bork, and he moved [to Crown 
Point]. We were sore about that because 
Crown Point has always been a huge rival. It’s 
always heated when we play them. [ My over¬ 
all] favorite memories from the past years are 
always [about] Trine. It’s a camp that we always 
go to for a couple of days over the summer. 

The bonding and messing around with each 
other [was memorable]. This season my goal is 
to become the DAC champions. Then [becom¬ 
ing] repeat sectional champions [would be a 
great achievement].” 


rom dominating the Portage Indians at Lucas Oil 
Stadium to conquering the Chesterton Trojans at 
Homecoming, the Tribe has made its mark on the 
playing field throughout the season. 

The Portage game was part of Big Rivals Night, an 
eight-team event that was held at Lucas Oil Stadium on 
Sept. 6. The Tribe defeated their DAC foes 14-6. 

“It was really exciting getting the chance to play down 
there. It’s not an everyday thing getting to play in a profes¬ 
sional stadium” Austin Chekaluk (11) said. 

Teamwork and perserverance led the Indians to the win 
on Sept. 19 against the LaPorte Slicers. With many injured 
players, others had to step up for their teammates and fill 
in the open positions. 

"At a certain point, all the starters that have been on the 
field before, myself included, looked at each other and 
said, ‘We need to go. This is not how we were taught how 
to play the game.’” Robert Pawlak (12) said. 

On Sept. 26, the Indians faced off against the Michigan 
City Wolves. The Indians secured the win with 1:35 left when 
Kenneth Singleton (12) recovered a punt that deflected off 
an opponent’s helmet. 

“I don’t think that we played really well, but we found a 
way to win. At the end of the day, that’s the most important 
thing,” Coach Brett St. Germain, Asst. Athletic Director, 
said. 

The last game on the Burial Grounds was held during 
Homecoming night. The Tribe took home a 6-0 victory 
against the Chesterton Trojans. The field’s construction 
began immediately after the "Final Down ” 

"I think there is a certain energy level that will come with 
playing in a new facility. [I will] expect a higher performance 
on a day to day basis in practice,” Coach St. Germain said. 

For the final game of the season, they defeated the 
Valparaiso Vikings by 24-7 and claimed their first outright 
DAC title, staying undefeated in the conference. The Indians 
moved on to the post season and won the first game of 
Sectionals against Lafayette Jeff, 41-6. The team did not 
win Sectionals due to the loss against Merrillville. 21-19. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY FOOTBALL 61 















he varsity boys soccer team did not start off as 
| planned. As the season progressed, the boys 
proved their critics wrong by placing second in 
the DAC. 

M l feel like this season was better than last year’s. We 
struggled a little last year, but this year we have gotten 
better. I feel like we have gotten more chemistry between 
us because we were a young team last year,” Daniel 
Picioski (10) said. 

The change in chemistry may have helped, but it did 
not blind them from making improvements to boost them 
to the top. 

“If we would have came out on top against Chesterton 
in the shootout, then that game would have been a lot 
more meaningful because that would have given us first 
place in the DAC,” Kyle Kil (12) said. 

The boys’ game against Valparaiso on Sept. 25 deter¬ 
mined their final position in the DAC. 

“This [game] was more of a must-win because it’s a DAC 
game, and you always want to finish as high and confident 
as you possibly can in the conference. All games are seri¬ 
ous, but this one was just a little higher than the others,” 
Samuel Willis (12) said. 

The team’s success has not gone unwarranted; they 
worked hard to get where they are now. 

“In the off-season, like in the summer, we do a lot of 
weight training and conditioning to get ready for the 
season. Since it’s not a very long season, there are a lot 
of games. We have to prepare harder in the off-season to 
get ready for the season,” Michael Flores (12) said. 

As the days of the season dwindle down, seniors began 
to reflect on their high school soccer careers. 

“It’s bittersweet knowing I’m going to college and hope¬ 
fully play soccer in college, but it’s sad that I’m leaving all 
of my underclassmen friends behind. I’m hoping that we 
can do something big this year because we are capable 
of it,” Flores said. 

The varsity boys soccer team lost to Munster at Region¬ 
al in their post season. 


MOVING TO A NEW POSITION 

Benjamin Klebs (11) adjusts to meet the team’s needs 



“I was playing more of a defense posi¬ 
tion, and then they started moving me up 
to more of an attacking position. Coach 
[Orest] Szewciw thought that I would 
be a good forward, so they tried me out 
in a game. It worked out pretty well for 
me and the team. I took the spot, and I 
scored the goals. It was scary at first be¬ 
cause everyone is relying on you to score 
the goals, but once I started scoring, it 
was kind of just free flowing. [Being on 
varsity for three years,] you are used to 
the pressure. You don’t really have to go 
from one team to the other, like from JV 
to varsity You are just on the team, [but] 
you have to work to keep your spot.” 


62 SOME SPORTS VARSITY BOYS SOCCER SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 













1. BLOCKING STAR Joshua Dulski (10) sprints to take control 
of the ball from the Andrean players. The game was at home 
and the boys won 3-0. “If we all do our own jobs correctly and 
play off each other, we can play our best game," Benjamin 
Klebs (11) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 2. RUNNING FOR 
CONTROL Anthony Doreski (11) races to get the ball before the 
Andrean player. This was the first game of the season played on 
Aug. 18. “As a team, we get focused and think about the other 
team and know what we’re going to do heading into the game,” 
Nathan Puch (11) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 3. WATCH¬ 
ING IN WAIT NaserTaharwah (10) watches the ball to see the 
next move of the opposing player. The game was at home and 
Benjamin Klebs (11) scored all 3 of the team’s goals. “After play¬ 
ing [soccer] for so long, you just you fall in love with the game. 
It’s hard to pinpoint one thing that just sticks out over the other,” 
Samuel Willis (12) said. Photo by: Hannah Reed 4. JUMPING IN 
Michael McClelland (11) jumps in the air to kick the ball before 
Valparaiso reaches it. This was McClelland’s third year on var¬ 
sity. “The fans keep us pumped up, and I’m always ready to go 
because the atmosphere of the game keeps me going,” Nathan 
Puch (11) said. Photo by: Hannah Reed 



1 Michael McClelland (11). Nikko Kolintzas (10). Christopher Baranowski (10) and Enrique Dominguez 
(10) 2. Kyle Kil (12) 3. Benjamin Klebs (11) 4. Jorge Trujillo (12) 5. Samuel Willis (12) Photos by: Hannah 
Reed 


VARSITY SOCCER CLAIMS VICTORY AGAINST VALPO 

Indians defeat Vikings after three-year losing streak 

The varsity boys soccer team defeated Valparaiso on Thursday. Sept. 24 with a 
final score of 2-1. The game started off slowly, but eventually the pace picked up. 

“It was a great win. It’s been three years since we beat them last time. Last 
year it was a really tough game, and we lost by quite a few goals. It was nice to 
finally come back this year,” Kyle Kil (12) said. 

The first goal of the game was scored by Nikko Kolintzas (10), and Valpo scored 
their goal at 28:01 in the second half. The game remained tied until Michael 
McClelland (11) scored the final goal of the game with only 3:27 left on the clock. 

“It felt really good [scoring the game-winning goal]. I liked it especially because 
they were in second, and I felt like we should have been ranked higher. To beat 
them, I think that puts us where we should really be,” McClelland said. 


ADVICE TO FUTURE PLAYERS 



“Always listen to the seniors 
because they were there 
before you and have more 
experience.” 

DANIEL PICIOSKI (10) 



“My advice to future 
players is no days off [and] 
to give it your all ” 

CHRISTOPHER 
BARANOWSKI (10) 



“[My advice to future 
players is] to be 
prepared, to eat right, 
work out and run.” 

BERNARDO OSEGUERA (11) 



“Don’t slack off, never give 
up on the ball [and] keep 
practicing until you get 
everything right.” 

NIKKO KOLINTZAS (10) 



“[My advice is] to give it 
your all and always give 
your 110 percent. Try your 
best, and you will suc¬ 
ceed.” 

JOSHUA DULSKI (10) 


“[The game] is always positive, even when 
someone messes up. It is always constructive 
on what we could do better.” 
Michael Flores (12) said 














































































“I couldn’t imagine my life without soccer, and 
I always wanted to be a member of the Lake 
Central girls soccer [team],” 

Hannah Triveline (12) said. 


LASTTIMEONTHE FIELD 



“I really enjoy [this 
season]. I like our new 
coach a lot, and I feel 
it’s been my best year of 
soccer.” 


ALISHA DONOVAN (12) 


f 

vkrsoiJT*, 


“I am going to miss all of 
my teammates and the 
memories we made.” 


HANNAH TRIVELINE (12) 



“When I first started play¬ 
ing soccer, I started with 
four of the seniors that I’m 
graduating with.” 

BRIANNA DOUGHERTY 
( 12 ) 



“I’m really sad because 
I’ve made a lot of friends, 
especially juniors who I’m 
going to miss a lot.” 

SARAH TRIVELINE (12) 



“We play for each other, 
and we play to win. I think 
our team is going to go 
out with a bang this year.” 

TERESA BARANOWSKI 
( 12 ) 


TEAM PERFORMS AT BEST AND SHINES 


Mr. Eric Graves, Mathematics, sees talent 



“[The team] is great 
this year. Their record is 
12-3-1.1 expect us to 
go pretty far this year. 

We fell short of the DAC, 
but we still had a pretty 
impressive conference 
record. I’m [a coach] to 
assist, the head coach 
handles the training. [The 
biggest challenge has 
been] consistency. When 
we’re playing our best, 
we can beat any team in 
the state. [Players who 
have stood out this year 
are] Lindsay Kusbel (12), 
Sidney Dragos (9), Alisha 
Donovan (12) and I’d say 
Tarah Hamby (12).” 



ONE FINAL GOAL 




! * 


Girls varsity season to remember 


PAGE BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY 
RABATINE 


he varsity girl soccer players accomplished 
tremendous goals throughout their season, but 
the girls did not let their success set boundaries 
for the team. 

“Varsity is having a phenomenal season, and this is the 
best we have been in years. We finally have the opportu¬ 
nity to go farther than normal in the tournament,” Clare 
Majchrowicz (11) said. 

They have shown competitors what they are made of 
on the field. 

“We have stepped up our game and came together 
to show how much of a threat we really can be to other 
teams that are strong,” Abigail Peppin (12) said. 

Although they won the regional title, there were still 
aspects of the game that the team strived to improve. 

“We definitely need to work on communicating on the 
field,” Peppin said. 

While improvements can be made, the closeness of 
being on a team makes it a more enjoyable experience. 

“My favorite part about Lake Central soccer is getting 
to share such a successful season with some of my 
closest friends and making tons of crazy memories,” 
Majchrowicz said. 

This season the majority of the team was made up of 
upperclassmen and nine out of the 17 girls on the team 
were seniors. 

“It’s a lot of pressure playing with the other girls because 
they’ve played together for so long and [have] been on 
the team already,” Abigail Meseberg (9) said. 

Next year the graduates will have to make a transition 
from the field they have grown to know so well to a foreign 
college campus. 

“It’s one of those bittersweet feelings. You’ve played on 
this field for four years, you’re there every day and just 
one day you’re not going to come back. I don’t think it’s 
hit me fully yet,” Brianna Dougherty (12) said. 


64 





































































































fei 




r 








1 


1. ARM IN ARM Alisha Donovan (12) kicks the ball around Munster’s Jessica Flores (12). The girls have played together 
for a few years now. “It was fun because I like going up against my friends." Alisha Donovan (12) said. Photo by. 
Samantha Bernardy 2. LAST HURRAH The varsity girls soccer team huddles together before the start of the game. 
The girls lost 3-2 against Chesterton on Senior Night. “I’m upset that we lost, but with how we played and everything, 
it was the best we’ve played this season. I was proud of that,” Brianna Dougherty (12) said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 
3. CUTTING IT CLOSE Brianna Dougherty (12) attempts to steal the ball. She played the toward position in the game 
against Munster. “I like playing Munster because they provide us with the challenge. We need to get better individu¬ 
ally and as a team," Dougherty said. Photo by: Samantha Bernardy 4. SCORING A GOAL Jillian Doan (12) puts in a 
cross to the team. She did this by lifting the ball to another teammate in front of the goal. “It was an intense game, 
Doan said. Photo by: Samantha Bernardy 5. PUSHING PAST HannahTriveline (12) pushes past two Munster players 
on Sept. 4. They tied 1-1. “We wouldn’t be that upset if we lost; however, we played our hardest. Triveline said. Photo 
by Samantha Bernardy 6. RUSHING THE BALL Hannah Triveline (12) attempts to block a player from Andrean High 
School. The team improved in the second half. “After our coach gave us a speech during halftime, it motivated us to do 
better the second half and we did,” Triveline said. Photo by: Jenna Crawford 




SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS SOCCER 65 




















BOYS SERVE UP 
POTENTIAL 



Tennis embraces young player 

PAGE BY: SARA LISAC AND EMILY LISAC 

nlike past years, the majority of the varsity boys 
tennis team consists of underclassmen. Despite 
the younger players on the team, the upperclass¬ 
men see potential. 

“I think my freshmen year, the varsity consisted of all 
seniors and most of JV was all seniors. Progressively there 
were less and less seniors each year, but if [the new play¬ 
ers] play in the off-season they will get a lot better,’’Chase 
Owczarzak (12) said. 

At the start of the season, the team was unsure of their 
skill level because of the number of less experienced play¬ 
ers. The first few practices helped show each newcomer’s 
abilities. 

“We did a lot of challenge matches at the beginning of 
the year. The freshmen are better than you think. For being 
freshmen they have a lot of talent, which was nice,” Micheal 
Hemmerling (11) said. 

As the season progressed, the boys started to improve 
their game and their potential as a team. 

“[The season] has been really good considering our team 
is very inexperienced compared to other [teams]. We’ve 
been able to stay consistent with everything. [The rook¬ 
ies] still have room to improve,” Richard Larson (10) said. 

Although the team is mostly sophomores and freshmen, 
upperclassmen see the benefits of having the younger 
players, and they have set high expectations for the team 
in the future. 

“Because we have a lot of sophomores and freshmen 
who have good skills, that means when they are juniors 
and seniors they are going to be that much better [than the 
current juniors and seniors],” Hemmerling said. 

Being a freshman on a varsity team can be intimidating, but 
having varsity experience can also be beneficial. 

“[Varsity] is more serious. You play a lot more games and 
other [teammates] help you instead of you trying to figure 
everything out yourself. I think [being on varsity] helped me 
improve and I’ve adapted to the playing style and how we 
practice,” Marko Milutinovic (9) said. 



PLAYERS SHARE TENNIS SEASON'S TRADITIONS 


“We have two really 
random pasta parties 
during the season.” 


JOHN MAMELSON (11) 

“[At practice] we get in 
groups of four on each 
court and we hit and we 
do drills with our coach.” 

CHASE OWCZARZAK 
( 12 ) 



“We have a stretch based 
on Brian Mica who gradu¬ 
ated in 2011. He was a 
senior when I was a fresh¬ 
man.” 

RAYMOND POLLALIS (12) 


S .......» We have a c (-, an t we do 

:::::: before a match and we do 
line ups” 



KEITH CRAWFORD (10) 


66 



















































































□ 


i 



“I think the season has been good. We can 
improve, but so far we have been playing our 

best,” 

Marko Milutinovic (9) said 




1. SERVING TO SCORE John Mamelson (11) serves the ball at a varsity boys tennis match. 
Despite the team’s best effort, they lost to the Crown Point Bulldogs. “Crown Point is ranked 
17th in the state, so I knew they were going to be pretty good,’’ Mamelson said. Photo 
by: Colleen Quinn 2. GETTING READY Chase Owczarzak (12) and Micheal Hemmerling 
(11) stand ready during their match on Oct. I.They lost their match to their Crown Point 
opponent. "We lose to all the big schools like Crown Point and Munster because they’re 
ranked topped 20 in the state. But we can beat anyone who is at our skill level.” Hemmer¬ 
ling said. Photo by: Anastasia Papanikolaou 3. SET TO WIN Keith Crawford (10) changes 
the set number at the Portage tennis match on Sept. 4. The Indians left the courts satisfied 
after they won the match 4-1. “I like the people on the team. Practices are fun, and it gives 
me something to do,” Crawford said. Photo by: Noelle McBride 4. WAITING TO HIT Chase 
Owczarzak (12) races to hit the ball on the Indians’ home court. Owczarzak and Raymond 
Pollalis (12) are the only seniors on the varsity team. “(For varsity] we only play one match 
and it lasts much longer [than JV]," Pollalis said. Photo by: Emily Rey 


PLAYERS GIVE INSIGHT ON PRE-GAME PREPARATIONS 


1 

2 

3 


“(At practice] we start out by 
going to the weight room for 
about 30 minutes, and then we 
go down to the courts,” Keith 
Crawford (10) said. 

“I always drink a lot of fluids 
before matches, and I always 
eat granola bars before 
matches,” Micheal Hemmerling 
(11) said. 

“We’ll go through warm ups 
and we’ll huddle up. [Douglas 
Devries (10)] will shout ‘LC on 
three 1,2, 3,’ and we’ll scream 
LC,” Richard Larson (10) said. 



Keith Crawford (10) Photo by: Colleen Quinn 



THE SAME SPORT, DIFFERENT WAYS OF PLAYING 


SINGLES 

“For singles its just you, so only 
you know what you’re doing wrong 
and what’s going right during a 
match. [For doubles] you have to 
trust each other and make sure 
that you are communicating a lot. 
[For] singles you don’t really need 
to communicate." 

RICHARD LARSON (10) 


DOUBLES 

“For doubles you need to rely a 
lot on your partner. For singles 
everything is up to you, but 
for doubles you have to trust 
that your partner will be able 
to return a shot that is his and 
you have to deal with it no 
matter what.” 

MICHEAL HEMMERLING (11) 



SOME SPORTS BOYS TENNIS 67 











































1. SCORING POINTS Victoria Gardenhire (11) hits against the block in the match. 
The girls swept Portage for a conference win. “(A team’s] energy drives the game 
[of volleyball],” Alyssa Born (12) said. 2. CHEER Victoria Gardenire (11), Samantha 
Anderson (11) and Stephanie Spigolon (11) meet in the middle of the court, after Gar¬ 
denhire serves an ace. Gardenhire dominated the game with her serves throughout 
the night. “Serving is fun if you get an ace." Victoria Gardenhire said. 3. PASSION 
The team congratulates Stephanie Spigolon (11) after her tip scores a crucial point. 
The girls swept the LaPorte Slicers on Sept. 16. “Our strong defense and offense has 
helped us win crucial matches,” Brianna Mills (11) said. 4. CELEBRATE The Indians 
cheer after they score a point against Munster. The team lost to Munster in a five-set 
marathon in the Mustang’s home gym. “One thing we need to work on is starting 
strong [and] ending strong, but the game could have gone either way," Alexandria 
Davids (12) said. 5. ENERGY Stephanie Spigolon (11) jumps into Victoria Garden- 
hire’s (11) arms after she gets a kill. Gardenhire was an offensive weapon during the 
match against the Munster Mustangs. "This season is going really well. Even though 
last year we did really good, I think this year we are much more well-rounded," 
Stephanie Spigolon (11) said. Photos By: Madeline Hirschfield 



“Two weeks after [the] school [volleyball] season 
gets out, I try out for club [volleyball]. That leads 
me all the way up to summer conditioning for 
the [next] Lake Central [volleyball season],” Julia 
Zlotkowski (11) said. 































































SAYING GOODBYE 
WITH A VICTORY 


Varsity volleyball holds senior night 

PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD AND VICTORIA WILKES 

he varsity girls volleyball team honored seniors on 
MM Thursday, Oct. 2. Senior night, which was held in the 
home gym, was filled with many different festivities, 
including the celebration of the victory against the 
Michigan City Wolves in three sets. 

“Senior night is a thing that everyone looks forward to since 
they come into the program. It’s just exciting to finally have 
[it] be my turn,” Alyssa Born (12) said. 

Before the senior players arrive for the match, the rest of 
the players in the program spend their time decorating the 
gym and tables specific to the senior. The tables are filled 
with pictures, gifts, blankets and even pets; Born received a 
rabbit from the players. The seniors view their tables and take 
pictures before they get ready and warm up for the match. 

“[There is] a whole table dedicated to the senior. They 
decorate it and put favorite candy, small stuff like lotion, and 
[other things]. Most sports don’t do that. [Our program goes] 
all out,” Alexandria Davids (12) said. 

After the match, the players and families of the players take 
seats in the bleachers. The coach talks about each senior, 
and then some players dedicate speeches to each senior 
player. This is a personal and emotional time for the volleyball 
program since the crowd is gone, and it is just the team and 
families that remain in the gym. It is a private time for seniors 
to take it all in and say goodbye. The night is filled with tears, 
hugs and memories. 

“I am going to miss this season, and next year I am not 
going to be with them, which is sad,” Alyssa Stepney (12) said. 

Although the night can be upsetting, it is also a new begin¬ 
ning for the seniors who will be leaving high school and the 
team. 

“It’s [my] last year playing at high school, and it’s kind of 
happy and sad at the same time; it’s bittersweet. I mean, col¬ 
lege will be fun, but I’m going to miss everyone here and the 
memories that I’ve made with my team. I have been playing 
with them for so many years, and it’s kind of sad,” Davids said. 

The varsity team lost to Munster High School at sectionals. 


PLAYERS CONFESS SEASON FAVORITES 




“My favorite part is playing with all of my 
friends, and the feeling that you get when 
you get a kill or get a point.” 


JULIA KRUZAN (11) 

“My favorite part [of] the season so far 
is how close of a team we all are. We’re 
all best friends, so that makes playing so 
much more fun.” 


SAMANTHA ANDERSON (11) 

“My favorite part is how close we all are, 
and how we get along well. It’s fun playing 
together.” 


MACKENZIE EVERS (11) 


PASSION FOR THE GAME 

Rachel Gross (11) explains the atmosphere of a varsity match 



“Energy is very important in the game 
of volleyball because people feed off of 
energy no matter what; whether it is bad 
energy or good energy, it is always con¬ 
tagious. Spreading good energy really 
helps everyone keep their positive spirits 
up [during matches]. The atmosphere of 
the games is a lot of pressure, but it’s 
really fun [when we] win. The intensity of 
the crowd really changes the atmosphere 
on the court because there is a lot of 
emotion that goes along with scoring 
points. It’s really competitive in the DAC, 
especially now because we’re winning. 
It’s really different being on varsity than 
from being on JV because the intensity 
of actually playing and the crowd [getting 
involved] is a lot more [than JV]. There is 
more pressure [because of] reporters al¬ 
ways being there, and there’s a lot more 
responsibilities that you’re apart of being 
on varsity. I love it.” 



1 Varsity girls volleyball team 2. Stephanie Spigolon (11). Alyssa Born (12) 
and Julia Kruzan (11)3. Alyssa Born (12) Photos by: Madeline Hirschfield 


INDIANS VOLLEYBALL DOMINATES CROWN POINT 


Varsity team beats Bulldogs 

The varsity girls volleyball team beat 
the Crown Point Bulldogs on Tuesday, 
Sept. 2, in the home gym. The Indians 
came out victorious in four sets with 
scores of 25-22, 20-25, 25-14 and 
25-15. 

In order to beat the Bulldogs, some 
of the players were given specific 
goals. With height to her advantage, 


in four-set conference match 

Jacqueline Eader (11) was given a job 
to help the team take down Crown 
Point. 

“I also had a personal challenge 
that was [given] by my coach. My 
personal challenge was to shut down 
[Alyssa] Kvarta, which is the senior 
setter on Crown Point, and block her. I 
did [that],” Eader said. 


SOME SPORTS VOLLEYBALL 69 
















































he varsity boys cross country team had high 
| hopes for the future of their season after months 
of hard work and dedication. The workouts and 
practices were more challenging, but it all con¬ 
tributed to their expectations for success in the end. 

“We’ve gotten better because we’ve done harder work¬ 
outs. We don’t have practice just to get it over with,” Michael 
Lucas (11) said. 

Last year, a new coach joined the team and has helped 
in the process of improving. 

“We’re trying different things and seeing what works,” 
Lucas said. 

With the new challenges, the boys looked forward to 
doing big things throughout the season. 

“So far this year, we got second place at the New Prairie 
Invitational. It's about thirty teams and there’s a lot of 
people from our semi-state who are there [too]. To get 
second place really shows that we’ll make it to state this 
year. Our team goal is to get in the top five [at state],” Cole 
Easterday (11) said. 

The boys reached many goals at the beginning of the 
season, as they aimed for a top spot at state. 

“Our ranking’s pretty good in the state so far, and we’re 
projected to go to state and do really well. For the future, 
we’re projected to do better and better,” Lucas said. 

The runners anticipated to go above and beyond from 
what they accomplished in previous years. 

“Everyone really wants to win. We got 22nd place last year 
and we’re looking to improve,” Easterday said. 

With upcoming meets and projected goals, it is helpful 
to bond with teammates. 

“My favorite part is the team bondings. If you need help 
with anything, you can always ask upperclassmen, and 
they’ll help you,” Lucas said. 

The varsity runners acquired a bond that keeps bringing 
them closer. 

“I like the team aspect of [cross country],” Easterday said. 

The boys placed 5th at Semi-state, which qualified them 
for State, where they placed 14th out of 24 teams. 


PERSONAL BESTS, BETTER THAN THE REST 



“My fastest time is 16:05. 

I like spending time with 
everyone on the team.” 

KAMERON KONOPASEK 

(ID 

“This year [my fastest 
time] is 17:20. I’m looking 
forward to state.” 


BRIAN ST.JOHN (12) 



“[My fastest time was] 
16:21. [I’m excited for] the 
DAC too because we hav 
a good shot of winning 
that.” 

ZACHARY HUPP (11) 

“My fastest time is 17:51. 
That’s my PR, which is 
a personal record. [The 
things I’m looking forward 
to are] just to get better 
MICHAEL LUCAS (11) 


70 SOME SPORTS VARSITY BOYS CROSS COUNTRY SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 












































































wnm** 


RUNNING FOR VARSITY WITH TOP DOGS 


VARSITY ENVIRONMENT 

“It just feels good because I’m a 
freshman and everyone else is so 
much older. Because everyone’s 
older, you have to run harder 
[because] I might not do as good 
as some of the other people. I 
think it’ll help a lot [next year]. [My 
fastest time] is somewhere around 
17:30. I like being around older 
people.” 


WILLIAM DUSZYNSKI (9) 


NO PAIN, NO GAIN 

“[My fastest time is] 17:26. 
Most of the team finishes up 
their season in two or three 
weeks, but [the varsity] season, 
[goes] until Nov. 1. We get to 
go to state meets. We have to 
do more work at practice, but I 
just like running. Getting good 
training my freshman year will 
help me be way faster my later 
years." 


JOSEPH COPELAND (9) 


“My fastest time ever 
is 16:22. [I’m looking for¬ 
ward to] semi-state. 


CASEY GARVEY (11) 




380 






1. RUNNING START Runners for varsity cross country take off at the start of the Bob Thomas Invite. 

The boys placed third overall at the meet. “It’s the start of the race, so we’re trying to get off fast off the 
line," Brian St. John (12) said. Photo by: Gianna Mills 2. FINISHING STRONG Kameron Konopasek (11) 
holds out for the finish of the race. He finished strong at the Culver Invite. “I finished the race, trying to get 
ahead at the end," Konopasek said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 3. SEASON BEST Cole Easterday (11) 
races inthe DAC meet. The boys placed 3rd overall. “[This meet was] in Valparaiso. I placed 29th overall,” 
Cole Easterday (11) said. Photo by: Hannah Giese 4. CATCHING COMPETITORS Zachary Hupp (11) runs 
at the Culver Invite. Hupp caught up with the competition in front of him. “It’s the finish of the race. There 
were two people in front of me. I tried as hard as I could to catch them, and I did.” Photo by: Jennifer 
Mohamed 


1998 





“[My fastest time is] 
17:21. I’m looking 
forward to the post 
season. 

COLE EASTERDAY 

(ID 


It’s more like a family than a team,” Michael 
Lucas (11) said. 








































1. DOMINATING DACThe girls start the DAC meet in the lead. The DAC was on Sat¬ 
urday, Oct. 4 at Valparaiso. “I think because of the weather, we did really well,” Maritza 
Castaneda (12) said. Photo by: Hannah Giese 2. RACING TO THE FINISH Kelly 
Shelton (10) sprints to the finish at the DAC meet. The girls placed second and finished 
strong. “Last year we got third at DAC so I guess [we’re doing better than last year],” 
Jennifer Crague (10) said. Photo by: Hannah Giese 3. RUNNING AT HOME JouleTazbir 
(11) runs ahead at the Rudy Skorupa Invite on August 30th. The Skorupa Invite was 
the only home meet for the team this season. “I think we did improve [from last year],” 
Tazbir (11) said. Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 4. SPRINTING AHEAD Megan Zajac (12) 
tries to sprint ahead of a competitor at the end of the DAC meet. The weather for the 
DAC meet was not ideal, but the girls pushed through it. “Our team did good, [but] 
it was hard because it was really cold and it started snowing and raining,” Jennifer 
Crague (10) said. Photo by: Hannah Giese 5. LEADING THE TEAM Jennifer Crague 
(10), Maritza Castaneda (12), Melissa Spanier (12) and Sarah Hunsley (10) lead the team 
at the start of the Rudy Skorupa Invite. The meet was to commereate Coach Skorupa. 
“Last year was the first year of the Rudy Skorupa Invitational. He coached for a really 
long time, ” Joellyn Polaski (12) said. Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 






















i 

SPRINTING FOR 
ITEAM SUCCESS 

Girls cross country works as one 

PAGE BY: KRISTINA PLASKETT AND JESSICA WOJTON 

he varsity girls cross country team competed in 
nn six meets this year, but the sport is not just about 
competing. It is also about helping teammates 
improve and staying close as a team.This season, 
the girls tried to push each other to perfection. 

“I’ve improved a lot from last year, so it’s [been] a good 
season and a good season for the team, too. I think we’ve all 
tried to stick together more as a pack and push each other. 
We’ve had a good season,” Maritza Castaneda (12) said. 

The girls season started off with the Rudy Skorupa Invite, 
where the girls came in second place. 

“Last year was the first year of the Rudy Skorupa Invi¬ 
tational. He coached for a really long time, so we have 
this invitational now to commemorate his coaching here,” 
Joellyn Polaski (12) said. 

The girls also competed at the Harrison Invite, Bob 
Thomas Invite, New Prarie Invite and Culver Invite, one of 
the team’s biggest invites. Even though Culver did not 
go exactly how the girls had planned, placing 10 out of 21 
teams, the girls still had the DAC meet to redeem them¬ 
selves and turn the season around. 

The varsity girls cross country season came to a close this 
year on Oct. 4 after the DAC meet. Despite the rain and 
cold, the girls placed second out of eight teams. 

“Our team did good. With the conditions it was kind of 
hard because it was really cold and it started snowing and 
raining. It was a rough course, so I think our team did good,” 
Jennifer Crague (10) said. 

After ranking well at the DAC, the girls set the path for 
post-season success. 

“We won our Sectionals and Regionals and came in 1-7th 
for Sectionals. And that was a really great thing because 
our coach said she doesnt think any other team has ever 
done that before. And then we came in second for Semi- 
State [and] we came in 13th and we were still best in the 
region,” Maritza Castenada (12) said. 



“We all work on trying to stay as a pack and 
going faster and getting more consistent,” 
Jennifer Crague (10) said. 



CROSS COUNTRY LOOKS BACK ON ITS SEASON 





“I think [this season] was 
fun. It was a lot harder 
than middle school, but it 
was good.” 

NOVA OLEJNIK (9) 

“My favorite part of the 
season is probably the 
first few meets because 
everyone’s really excited 
to be racing again.” 

JOELLYN POLASKI (12) 

“I didn’t finish my season 
last year, so it’s a lot differ¬ 
ent for me just because I 
didn’t run a lot last year.” 

SARA RAMOS (10) 


“[My favorite part about 
being in cross country is] 
probably just being with all 
the people. They’re kind of 
like our family.” 

KELLY SHELTON (10) 

“When we’re at a hard 
workout, we’ll always be 
encouraging each other to 
finish what we’re doing.” 

MELISSA SPANIER (12) 

“We’re doing really well 
this year. Our pack has 
been really close and tight 
in the last few meets.” 

SYDNEY VANDERSTEEG 
( 10 ) 



HOW THE TEAM PREPARES FOR A MEET 


1 

2 

3 


“On the bus, we’ll usually sleep. 
Then [Ms. Ann Downey] will 
usually wake us up with like 20 
minutes left [of the ride], so we 
can braid hair and be ready,” 
Sydney Vandersteeg (11) said. 

“When we walk the course, 
we’ll usually snack and eat. 
After that, we’ll roll out and 
make sure our legs are ready. 
And we’ll stretch and do our 
drills,” Vandersteeg said. 

“Then we’ll run the meet and 
afterwards, we’ll cool down and 
eat and cheer for the JV girls 
that run after us," Vandersteeg 
said. 




* m 

1 Jennifer Crague (10) 2. Sarah Hunsley (10) 3. Melissa Spanier (12) Photos 
by: Jennifer Mohamed 


Sydney Vandersteeg (10) Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 


CONQUERING CULVER 

Culver challenges girls cross country 

On Sept. 27, the varsity team ran at the Culver 
Invite and placed 10th out of 21 teams. 

“We didn’t do our best, but we definitely could have 
done better," Elizabeth Ayersman (11) said. 

The girls tried their hardest to come out on top, 
regardless of the heat. 

“I thought I would do a lot better. It wasn’t that 
good [because] it was really hot that day, but it’s a 
flat course so that helped,” Ayersman said. 

Even though they lost, the girls kept their heads up. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY 73 








































































SETTING THE PAR 




Girls varsity golf works for success 


PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL, CAMRYN WALLACE AND 
ELIZABETH BUSTAMANTE 


4 


PAGE 


FOR 


VIDEO 


efore the season even began, the girls varsity 
Im golf team concentrated on being the best that it 
could be. The girls worked together to become a 
powerhouse team that went nearly undefeated. 

“We set two records this year for the lowest nine hole 
and most 18 hole score for Lake Central. We played eight 
tournaments. We won six of them, got second place in two 
of them, and we won Sectionals. I am pretty happy with 
that. We won the DAC, so so far, so good,” Coach Chris 
Rossiano, Social Studies, said. 

Hours of work were put into perfecting their birdies, 
bogeys and pars. The girls had to sacrifice a myriad of 
social activities in order to prepare for the season. 

“I always have to [put off hanging out with my friends] 
and have had to for the past couple of years. I cannot hang 
out with friends a lot, and I cannot go to some of the things 
I am invited to because I have tournaments or practice,” 
Alexis Miestowski (9) said. 

Playing on the golf course was exhilarating for the team, 
but winning made the experience even better. 

“I felt pretty confident [out on the golf course] because 
we practice so much after school. It is pretty exciting [to 
win a match] because everyone cheers for us,” Brooke 
Scartozzi (10) said. 

After spending many practice hours and games together, 
the girls developed a strong bond that has stretched 
beyond the golf course. 

“We go out to eat before every match or we go out for 
breakfast [for team bonding],” Allison Onest (11) said. 

Looking back at the season, the girls have taken pride 
in all of their achievements. 

“I am really happy [with my team’s accomplishments] 
because we have all worked really hard. I would not have 
changed anything [about this season],” Onest said. 





































1. TAKING A SWING Julia Beggs (12) hits the ball with a wedge onto the 
green at Sectionals. In order to prepare, the girls practiced for hours after 
school. “During the season, we practice right after achool until about five 
o’clock, and during the summer, I practice six to eight hours a day," Beggs 
said. 2. PERFECTING THE PUTT Allison Onest (11) putts the ball to the 
sixth hole at Palmira. Reaching the perfect putt was not easy to accom¬ 
plish. “I get really nervous [during matches] and then when we win, it takes 
a huge block off my shoulders,” Onest said. 3. LINING IT UP Before putting 
the ball, Brooke Scartozzi (10) concentrates on lining up her shot. Scartozzi 
was ranked number five on the team. “I have improved a lot from last year 
when I first tried out,” Scartozzi said. 4. FOLLOWING ON THE FAIRWAY 
Aiming for the sixth hole, Alexis Miestowski (9) follows through with her 
shot. Even with her bad shots, Miestowski kept an optimistic attitude. 

“You just have to stay positive if you hit a bad shot. You always have to look 
ahead to your other one because if you just concentrate on your bad one, 
it is just going to affect the rest of your game," Miestowski said. Photos by: 
Camryn Wallace 


PAVING THE ROAD TO VARSITY 


1 

2 

3 


“Play as many tournaments as you can because 
the more tournaments you play, the more competi¬ 
tive you’ll get to go against all the players in the 
area.” 

“Practice a lot. Practice your weaknesses to make 
them stronger and keep practicing your strengths, 
but really work on your weaknesses.” 


“Become mentally tough because there are so 
many things that will come at you, but prepare 
yourself for anything. If you do bad, just come back 


and do better.” 


KYLIE SHOEMAKE (12) 


GREATNESS ON THE GREEN 


STEPS FDR SWINGING TO SUCCESS 



“My biggest strength 
was coming from a full- 
rounded team.” 


ALEXIS MIESTOWSKI (9) 



“My biggest accomplish¬ 
ment was winning a 
tournament this year, and 
at an invite I shot a 73.” 


JULIA BEGGS (12) 



“My biggest strength was 
probably my short game.” 


BROOKE SCARTOZZI (10) 



“My biggest accomplish¬ 
ment is winning the DAC 
tournament and shooting 
a 75 ” 

KYLIE SHOEMAKE (12) 



“My biggest strengths this 
year were my drives and 
my putting.” 


ALLISON ONEST (11) 


Golf coach talks about plans for the long run 



“Over the years now, we have been 
setting [the girls] up to play a lot of 
summer tournaments. That is the first 
step. Then we set the tone that practice 
is mandatory and make sure they are 
working hard the whole time. We worked 
on a lot of short game stuff, plenty of 
chipping, getting them on the course a 
lot and putting them in situations. [I] just 
try and preach confidence. That is the 
last major step. They do practice a lot on 
their own and they are very dedicated, 
so I just tried to get them in the right 
mindset. [I feel] very good [about their 
accomplishments]. We had a very good 
team record. For Regionals we did well 
as a team. Nobody did their best, but 
nobody did their worst.” 

COACH CHRIS ROSSIANO. SOCIAL STUDIES 



Mark Beggs and Julia Beggs (12) Photo by: James 
Lafakis 


TAKING A CHANCE AT STATE 

Varsity girls golf dominates at state 

On Oct. 4, 2014, girls golf traveled to PrarieView 
Golf Club in Carmel, Ind., to participate in the 
State tournament. The girls, the first Regional 
Champions in Lake Central history, rode with 
the momentum to the tournament. They placed 
7th out of 15 teams at state. 

“I was happy when we placed seventh. I feel 
like we could have done better, but I am still 
happy,” Brooke Scartozzi (10) said. 


“We did really well. It was the first time in 
[Lake Central] history that [Lake Central] won 
Regionals. We all played our best and it payed 
off through our season,” Alexis Miestowski (9) 

said. 

























































































“Condioning in the summer is hard, but once 
you get through it, it’s nice,” Eric Mender (9) 
said. 


1. LEAPING TO VICTORY: Douglas DeVries (10) leaps in 
the air to hit a forehand volley. This was DeVries’s first year 
playing tennis for Lake Central. “I primarily play JV doubles, 
DeVries said. Photo by: Colleen Quinn 2. RUNNING TO 
THE FINISH: Michael Lucas (11) run with passion at the enc 
of the meet. This cross country meet was against Lowell 
High School. “My Favorite part of the season was team 
bonding, pasta parties and stuff like that, basically just 
being so close to everybody,” Lucas said. Photo by: Gianna 
Mills 3. DASHING FOR THE TOUCHDOWN: Ryan Oljace (9 
dashes across the football field with the ball in his hands. Hi 
ran to get away from his opponent and attempted to score. 
“[The benefit of playing football is] every day you get better 
at it and it’s just fun overall," said Brett Morris (10). Photo by 
Sofia Hay 4. GETTING AROUND THE BLOCK: Jack Quin¬ 
lan (10) focuses on the ball as he decides how to get arounc 
his opponent. The boys came out on top with a 6-0 win 
over Michigan City. “Fall is my favorite time, it’s the heart of 
soccer,” Quinlan said. Photo by:Tabitha Pappas 5. READY, 
SET, HIKE: The JV boys defensive line plays offense. Paul 
Centanni (11) has the ball and is getting ready to snap it 
back to the kicker. “Conditioning in the] is good so we aren’1 
tired during practices and games; it gets you ready,” Andrev 
Owczarzak (9) said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 


ROAD TO SUCCESS 


1 

2 

3 


“[To be succesful] it took a lot of 
dedication and commitment,” 
Antonio Ortiz (11) said. 


“[To be succesful] it takes a lot 
of comitment, good attitude, a 
lot of effort and dedication to 
the sport,” Joshua Drosos (10) 
said. 

“[To be succesful] it takes 
dedication and [you] really have 
[to have] your mind set on that 
sport in order to go far,” Steven 
Sweeney (11) said. 



FUTBOL VS. FOOTBALL 

Futbol 

“There’s still contact in soccer, just 
not with pads. You have to be more 
in shape because you don’t get as 
many breaks, and you’re running 
a lot.” 

NOAH OSEARO (10) 

Football 

“The main difference is that it’s a 
contact sport and a lot of people like 
watching it more than soccer. I like the 
atmosphere in football a lot more; it’s 
a lot more fun to watch ” 

CHRISTOPER FUNDICH (10) 



Kyle Freel (10) 
Photo by: Han¬ 
nah Sonner 



Jason Lionberg 
(10) Photo by: 
Hannah Sonner 


HIGH SCHOOL WELCOMES FRESHMEN TO PARTICIPATE IN THE BIG LEAGUES 



“In football, I made new 
friends and became better 
friends with people I 
already knew.” 


RYAN VOSS (9) 



“I met a lot of new people 
and they helped me get 
around the school, I felt 
more connected with the 
school.” 

DIEGO RUIZ-AVILA (9) 



“It made me more com 
fortable with getting to 
know the school better 
and with playing on a 
team.” 

STEVEN TULSIAK (9) 


76 




















































PAGE BY: SAMANTHA BERNARDY AND HANNAH 
PRATT 

he middle of August is not just the beginning of 
| the school year, it is also the beginning of the JV 
boys fall athletic season.The season is started in 
the summer with conditioning to prepare the boys 
for their future practices, meets, games or tournaments. 

“[Over the summer] I do some weightlifting, some running 
and a lot of cardio,” Mathew Matakovic (9) said. 

Playing sports in the fall is much different than playing 
in the spring or in the winter. Teams spend many hours 
outside of their season to practice and prepare. Fall ath¬ 
letes spend their summer conditioning with teammates 
and coaches. 

“It can get hot sometimes, but I don’t mind [because] 
towards the end of the summer I get bored anyways, so I 
like conditioning in the summer,” Keith Crawford (10) said. 
Playing a sport can benefit many of the players. It teaches 
students how to become more responsible by managing 
their time with their school, athletic, and social life. 

“You really have to learn to manage your time and how 
to balance out everything you do, so you don’t fall behind,” 
Michael Zubeck (10) said. 

While playing on a team, students meet many people 
and make new friends. A lot of freshman play on JV teams, 
to help them make friends as they come to a new school. 

“It gave me a lot of people to know in school, like 
seniors...it gave me an identity,” Jack Quinlan (9) said. 

Starting a new school year can be tough, and starting 
a new season at the same time can get complicated. 
Some students learn to manage the new school year and 
the beginning of their new season very well, while others 
may struggle. 

“It gets a little hectic at times, having to get ahead of 
homework, but other than that, doing what you love is 
pretty fun.” Douglas DeVries (10) said. 



DIGGING DOWN DEEP FOR THE DAC 

JV boys soccer take home the DAC title 

The JV boys soccer team went head-to-head with Valpara¬ 
iso on Sept. 24. The Indians left the field as DAC champions 
with a score of 1-0. The score didn’t change until the second 
half of the game when Michael Bikos (9) scored a goal. The 
boys left the field feeling confident with themselves, as this 
was a major accomplishment for the team. 

1. Enc Santiago (11)2. Jacob Galvan (11) 3. Alexander Reed (10) Photos 
by: Jillian Wilschke 


SOME SPORTS JV/FRESHMAN BOYS 77 























JV AND VARSITY PLAYERS PLAY DOUBLE-TIME 


DOUBLE ROSTERED 


JV ONLY 


“You get to help the other girls out 
that are on JV but you also get to 
help the varsity girls win matches. 

I gained more experience because 
I can practice more when I’m play¬ 
ing JV, but when I play for varsity it 
is more like competition 


“You get to watch the older girls 
play, so you get the feel for the 
team before you have to go out 
and compete. I am really excited 
for varsity. I’m looking forward to 
being able to help freshmen and 
people who are just coming in.” 


STEPHANIE SANDERS (11) 


KAITLYN THOMPSON (10) 


PLAYING FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME 



“My favorite part is when 
your nerves are as high as 
the sky [while you are] wait¬ 
ing on the line, and the guy 
just blows the gun.” 


TERESA THOMAS (9) 


“I like the feeling of when 
we score because it is 
relieving and I like when we 
are ahead because it takes 
the stress off us.” 


EMILY BLINK (9) 



“The bus rides [are my 
favorite] because they 
are all really fun and we 
get to bond during the 
rides." 


FAITH HUENECKE (9) 


“Doing your best every- 
time is such a good 
feeling.” 


RACHEL ALBRIGHT (9) 



HIGH ENERGY HELPS WITH PERFORMANCE 


JV girls work toward making varsity teams 

When playing a sport, players must stick to their commit¬ 
ments and persevere, while doing what they love. 

“Since we all played with each other from the freshmen 
team, [there] was a lot more bonding, and [it was] a lot more 
fun playing with friends,” Frances Kornelik (10) said. 

The JV girls not only proved that they play their roles as 
one, but that they had the strength to succeed throughout 
the season, proving they aren’t just another team on the 
court. 

1. JV volleyball team 2. Linda Morton (10) and Andrijana 
Mihajlovic (10) 3. Frances Kornelik (10) Photos by: Ruth Chen 



“You gain experience and friendships from the 
people on your team.” 

Stephanie Sanders (11) said. 




JV GIRLS GOT GAME 


JV teams help each other get 
through the season 


PAGE BY: ASHLEY KRALIK, TABITHA PAPPAS AND 
EMMA DEGROOT 


o matter what position, every player’s role is impor- 
tant. No matter what attributes are brought to the 
team, more than just athletic abilities are gained 
throughout the season. 

“You gain a lot of friends. The team becomes a family 
because you are with them all the time, and they help you 
through a lot,” Rachel Albright (9) said. 

Teams have a sense of togetherness that brings each 
player closer to one another. 

“I think for me grades aren’t as affected, but others may 
because they are so busy all the time, and it’s hard to fit 
everything in,” Cara Scott (10) said. 

School activities such as a heavy work load, relationships 
and athletic event can add a lot of stress to a student’s life. 

“At first [sports] affect your grades because it’s really 
hard getting into new classes and being involved in a sport, 
but once you get used to it, it’s fine,” Ashley Scanlon (10) 
said. 

Playing sports requires endurance and dedication to 
succeed. Conditioning helps strengthen an individual’s 
athletic abilities, which strengths the entire team’s perfor¬ 
mance as well. 

“Summer conditioning really prepared us for the tourna¬ 
ments we play when we reach the championship. It helped 
us stay strong and play [until] the end,” Olivia Rogers (9) 
said. 

Varying fall conditions did not stop the teams from put¬ 
ting in hard work to better their skills either. 

“I like that it’s still warm outside, and you have the advan¬ 
tage of practicing all summer,” Stephanie Sanders (11) said. 

Regardless of the stresses that everyday life brings along 
with school and sports, the girls have managed to hold up 
their grades and attitudes. 

































































- 


MHMMI 


1. FIGHTING FOR THE GOAL Madison Sarkey (9) attemps to maneuver her way past an 
opponent. The game took place in the afternoon on Sept. 11. “We always have to work hard no 
matter what team it is. Griffith was just another competitor,” Meghan Teumer (10) said. Photo by: 
Jessica Wojton 2. CONCENTRATING ON THE PUTT Stephanie Sanders (11) prepares herself 
for the next move down the course. The golf match was held on Sept. 2. “We’ve improved our 
consistency and course management as a team," Coach Chris Rossiano, Social Studies, said. 
Photo by: JeannineToth 3. SERVE FOR THE WIN Jenna Garza (10) serves the ball to her oppo¬ 
nents in hopes to score a point. The volleyball game took place Aug. 26. “I think that we did very 
well today. We were on top of our blocks, and our defenses and sets were there. We didn’t let 
them get over fifteen points, and our first set was strong,” Olivia Oster (10) said. Photo by: Sofia 
Hay 4. PUSHING TO THE END Sara Erwin (10) runs during a cross country meet. She pushed 
to the finish line. “It was a good season. The team did really well,” Rachel Albright (9) said. Photo 
by: Jennifer Mohamed 


SOME SPORTS 1V/FRESHMAN GIRLS 79 
























■ *' 


1. HARD WORK Maxwell Rees (12) performs during a football game on the home field. Rees, along with the rest of march¬ 
ing band, worked over the summer and during the school year to perfect his performance. “We have to practice extremely 
hard to get the reward we want," Rees said. Photo by: JeannineToth 2. JAMMING OUT Griffin Taylor (11) plays the marimba 
during marching band practice. Marching band practiced up to eight hours a day over the summer. “(In marching band] you 
have a lot of fun and you get to be with people that you are friends with and it’s just a lot of fun in general," Kaitlyn Seitz (10) 
said. Photo by: Madeline Conley 3. HALFTIME MARCH Sean Harper (11) plays the trumpet during the marching band’s 
halftime performance. Marching band’s theme was based on the novel The Scarlet Letter. “There’s a lot of life long benefits 
that come along with marching band. It teaches you determination, discipline and commitment to an activity," Matthew Tao 
(11) said. Photo by: JeannineToth 4. FLUTE TO BOOT Courtney Smith (12) and Samantha McCuaig (11) practice their music 
on the flute while speed walking into their next formation. Even in the boiling hot sun, the marching band still practices in 
order to make their performance the best it can be. “Some days it will be hot, and some days we will practice a lot for hours 
on end, but (marching band] definitely does pay off in the end," Andres Ramirez (12) said. Photo by: Madeline Conley 5. 
HAND UP HIGH Calyn Tinklenberg (12) lifts her flag high in the air during her color guard routine. Color guard practices with 
the marching band, so they can make sure their movements are in sync. “All of us on guard are really close to each other and 
I can’t imagine not doing guard," Cayla Cress (10) said. Photo by: JeannineToth 


GAINING LIFELONG BENEFITS FROM MARCHING BAND 


“(Marching band] gives you 
a good sense of time man¬ 
agement because you’re 
out there so much.” 

MADELYN NOHOS (10) 


JOELLE NIEMZYK (9) 


“(Marching band] usually 
helps with leadership, and 
when you’re going for a job, 
that looks good on your 
resume.” 

MADISON PAYNE (10) 


“It helps you to not expect “(Marching band] gets you to 

anything less than perfec- know what goals are. It gets 

tion and expect a lot of you to know how hardworking 

yourself.” can get you to reach that goal.” 


NICHOLAS SANFRATELLO 

( 12 ) 


80 






































































DEVOTING TIME 


What marching band is all about 

PAGE BY: SARA LISAC AND EMILY LISAC 


ome people believe that marching band is simply 
moving around on a field and playing an instru- 
ment. While Lake Central Marching Band’s per¬ 
formances may appear effortless, a lot of time 
and dedication is put into their work. 

“[Performing is] a completely different experience 
because when you’re actually out there, there’s such a 
physical element of it that sometimes you forget you’re 
playing music. You have to make sure the two are combined 
together really well,” Mateo Morales (12) said. 

Marching band members devote three or more hours a 
day to improve their performance. 

“The hardest part about marching band has to be the 
time commitment. Rehearsals are everyday after school, 
plus [we have] classes during the day. On Saturdays it is 
sometimes all day,” Robert Belzeski (12) said. 

While the football field was being demolished, marching 
band had to build their rehearsals around the construction. 
“We have been doing a lot more with body movements, 
so that’s benefiting us in the long run I think. This year has 
been different too because we don’t have the football field 
like we had in the past years. The football games have really 
helped us practice because we are not in a parking lot for 
competition,” Belzeski said. 

Along with rehearsals being altered this year, marching 
band has taken on a different, more serious theme for its 


performance. 

“[The theme] is The Scarlet Letter , specifically the time 
that Hester [Prynne] is on the scaffold being publicly 
shamed. It’s called 3 Hours because that’s how long she 
is on the scaffold, and it takes you through the emotions 
she feels, like rejection and sin,” Abigail Keith (11) said. 

By adding narration, marching band worked to develop 
the theme into a concept that the audience would under¬ 
stand. Soon after, most band members discovered that 
their hard work was rewarding in the end. 

“[Marching band] is not just a band; you just become a 
family more. We get really close, and I love the feeling you 
get after a performance when everyone is cheering for you. 
It’s amazing,” Alexandra Adams (11) said. 


“You notice that it’s more of a respon¬ 
sibility to be in [marching] band, and it 
teaches you life lessons, like to be more 
responsible and mature,” Ana Boulas (12) 
said. 



WHERE THE PIT FITS INTO IT ALL 

Section leader explains the function of the pit 



“The Pit is pretty much every percussion 
thing that you can’t hook to your body 
and walk around with. We contribute 
to the general effect because with the 
sound system, we have the means to put 
the narration in. For the competitions, we 
have dramatic narrations with this British 
lady who talks about The Scarlet Letter. 

It takes [the performance] from just being 
a bunch of music to being a story, which 
is really important for the competitions. 

Other than that, we just fill in a lot of 
sound [elements] because we have that 
giant sound system. We can make every¬ 
thing sound fuller." 

ANTHONY PANOZZO (12) 



by: Noelle McBride 

A COLORFUL CONTRIBUTION 

Color guard commits to performing 

The music created by the marching band is applaused by 
many audiences, but without the color guard performing 
alongside, a piece of their show is lost. 

“Depending on the show, we add emotion, so if the 
show is sad, then we have to put it on our face while the 
band plays the music. We just perform through it,” Nicole 
Kowalewicz (9) said. 

Color guard practices on their own to improve their 
routine, but they also take the time to perfect their perfor¬ 
mance with the band. 

“When we [practice] with the band, it’s just to make sure 
that the band and guard are cohesive,” Amy Sayger (12) 
said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME PERFORMING ARTS MARCHING BAND 81 














“All of us on Guard are really close to each 
other, and I honestly can’t imagine not doing 
Guard. It’s a cool experience, and it’s really 
worth it,” Autumn Dransoff (12) said. 


GUARD EXPLAINS DIVERSE EQUIPMENT 


1 

2 


“For a flag, one thing we do is a four-count toss. We hold it 
with our left hand over the pole, right hand under. We make 
a cone across our body. We lift and release, and we have to 
push with the left hand to make the rotation. Then we catch 
it with the silk end down." Cayla Cress (10) said. 

“With a rifle, there are many tosses you can do. The one I 
do in the show is a five, which is when it twirls five times in 
the air. You push with your right hand and lift with your left 
hand, and that’s how it gets rotations,” Cress said. 


3 “For a saber, there’s a hilt and a blade. For a blade you 
pinch with three fingers, and you flick your wrist to rotate 
it. A hilt is the handle of the saber, and you dip and 
release it like a rifle,” Cress said. 


ADAPTING TO A HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL 

Freshman shares her first year experience 



“The work is a lot harder compared to 
middle school Guard. There’s a lot more 
practices. The routines are more chal¬ 
lenging. There’s just a lot more work with 
it overall. During warm up at my first high 
school competition for [Color Guard], I 
hit myself in the head. When I was about 
to go on, I thought I was going to die, 
but then I ended up doing fine. After my 
first [Winter Guard] competition, I got off 
the floor, and I was like, ‘I had no idea 
what just happened,’ and that’s still how 
I am. I walk off, and I don’t even know 
what happened. [The performance] hap¬ 
pens so fast, but it’s a good experience. 
I’m looking forward to seeing what our 
coach does after the seniors graduate 
because that’s half the Guard. I just want 
to see what he’s going to do next year.” 

NICOLE KOWALEWICZ (9) 


TOSS AND FLIP 



Guard finds bliss in performing 

PAGE BY: SARA LISAC 

lipping rifles, twirling flags and tossing sabers are 
all seen in the performances of Lake Central’s Color 
and Winter Guard. Color and Winter Guard contain 
similar techniques. They practice and compete during sepa¬ 
rate seasons. 

“For Color Guard we are with the band during the fall season, 
and it consists of dancing and spinning equipment like flags, 
rifles and sabers. Winter Guard is basically the same thing 
without the band, and we are indoors. We compete a lot more 
during Winter Guard than we do with the band in the fall,” 
Cayla Cress (10) said. 

Color and Winter Guard both practice throughout the week 
in order to improve their routines for competition. 

“We stretch for forty-five minutes and then dance for around 
an hour. We have ten minutes to warm up and then we start 
practicing chunks of the show. The rest of the time, we are 
critiqued and we clean different parts of the show,” Andrea 
Kowalewicz (12) said. 

The Color Guard’s routine that was performed with the 
marching band had a theme based off of “The Scarlet Letter.” 
Winter Guard, on the other hand, took on a more unconven¬ 
tional theme. 

“This year [Winter Guard’s] show is about losing someone 
and the baggage that comes along with losing someone. It’s 
based off of ‘Ghost the Musical’ from the 90s. It’s just the 
music though, it’s not the actual show,” Autumn Dransoff 
(12) said. 

While practices may be physically challenging and time- 
consuming, Guard members find exhilaration in their weekend 
performances. 


“It’s really more about the performance than anything. The 
practices are really long and they’re not always fun, but when 
you get to the performance on Saturdays and Sundays you 
get to perform in front of thousands of people. It’s an amazing 
experience because you get all of the audience’s reactions. 
It’s only five minutes long, but it’s an amazing five minutes,’’ 
CalynTinklenberg (12) said. 



DEFINING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SEASONS 


COLOR GUARD 

“Color Guard is with the band, 
and it’s all outside on the football 
field. There’s more of us in Color 
Guard, and that’s from the summer 
until the end of November. The 
competitions are bigger, and they 
are outside. With band, we aren’t 
part of the score; we are only 10 
or 20 percent, where as in [Winter 
Guard], it’s all on us.” 


WINTER GUARD 

“In Winter Guard it’s only us, 
and the work is more challeng¬ 
ing. We’re inside and it’s more 
on our level. In Winter Guard, 
just because you’re on weapon 
line in Color Guard, it doesn’t 
mean you’ll be in it again. You 
have more flexibility. We can do 
more things because we don’t 
have to worry about the wind 
or the band.” 


KATIE PALMER (11) EMALIE VERNENGO (12) 





82 





























1. FRIDAY NIGHT SOLUTE CalynTinklenberg (12) and other marching band members stand on the football field during the 
National Anthem. The marching band was performing the National Anthem before the varsity football game on Oct. 3. “There are 
days when [practice] is frustrating and hard, but there are other days when it’s cool and relaxed.” Brianna Panici (11) said. Photo 
by: Shannon Hearne 2. PROJECTING EMOTION Andrea Kowalewicz (12) holds her saber during the marching band’s halftime 
routine. Kowalewicz was performing as a member of Color Guard. “[Guard] practices Tuesdays. Wednesdays. Thursdays and Fri¬ 
days for three hours, and on Saturdays we have competitions.” Kowalewicz said. said. Photo by: Noelle McBride 3. HALFTIME 
DANCE Autumn Dransoff (12) dances with her rifle while marching band plays the music. Marching band and Color Guard were 
performing at the varsity football game on Sept. 19. “I think if we were gone, [the marching band performance] wouldn’t have 
been noticed because we had the extravagant costumes and flags. Without [Color Guard], it wouldn’t be the same show.” Amy 
Sayger (12) said. Photo by: Noelle McBride 4. WAVING HIGH Katelyn Flanagan (12) waves her flag in the air while she performs 
the halftime routine. Flanagan and marching band members were performing at the varsity football routine on Sept. 19. “I don’t 
like performing at half time; I like it better when we go to Grand Nationals because we get to be with all the people we are really 
close to,” Katelyn Flanagan (12) said. Photo by: Noelle McBride 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS GUARD 83 












1. GET YOUR HEAD IN THE GAME Ian Martin (12) and Norell Smith 

(10) perform a handshake to get each other pumped before the game 
on Jan. 2. The Lake Central Indians played against the East Chicago 
Cardinals at Lake Central High School. “I am proud of my team 
because we always stayed focused. We always kept our heads up,” 
Smith said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 

2. BLOCKING THE BALL Ryan Bereda (11) blocks a Lowell opponent 
from getting to the basket during the home game on Jan. 20. The 
ending score was 67-56. which gave the Indians another win. “I have 
no regrets except that we did not go as far as we wanted to,” Bereda 
said. Photo by: Erin Dosen 3. PASSION FOR THE GAME Gage Ray 

(11) tries to keep a Munster opponent from getting the ball down 
the court. This game was on March 3 during Sectionals at Munster 
High School. "I am proud of my team this year, so I don’t have many 
regrets," Ray said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 4. SWOOSH Joseph Ban¬ 
nister (12) dribbles the ball past his defender and attempts to make 
a basket for the team. The team lost against the Munster Mustangs 
with a score of 61-45. “It was fun seeing a lot of kids grow throughout 
the season," Bannister said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 5. FREE THROW 
FRENZY Ian Martin (12) shoots two free throws, trying to score the 
team more points. This game was on Jan. 20 at home. “Everyone 
really underestimated us, and I believe we showed more than we had 
in the beginning of the season," Martin said. Photo by: Erin Dosen 

6. LAYING IT UP Austin Atkins (10) goes in for the layup at the 
Sectional game on March 3 against Munster. The team unfortunately 
lost the game. “We are close as a team. We all hang out with each 
other and are basically a family,” Skyler Smith (11) said. Photo by: 
Sofia Hay 


84 SOME SPORTS VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 





























OUTSHINING EXPECTATIONS 

Varsity player gives input on successful season 


PUSHING IT 
TO THE LIMIT 

Boys basketball carries out season 

PAGE BY: ERIN DOSEN, HANNAH GIESE AND LAUREN 
DAVIDSON 

xceeding expectations was a goal for this year’s var- 
sity boys basketball team. Yet doubts were disproved, 
as their team was rumored to be poorly prepared for 
the season. 

“We’ve had some bad games. A lot of us regret some of 
the poor decisions we’ve made with plays and not taking 
some stuff seriously, but I am proud of my team because no 
one thought we would do much this year. I think we came out 
better than anyone thought,” Ian Martin (12) said. 

The team held a 13-10 record during the regular season 
and carried a 3-4 conference record. 

“No one expected us to be too good, but we came out 
and beat some pretty good teams. Some games just slipped 
away from us, but it was definitely a good season for the most 
part. Down the stretch, in the fourth quarter sometimes, the 
ball just didn’t go our way,” Skyler Smith (11) said. 

Losing does not carry over easily for a team, but learning 
how to overcome those losses and turn them into a learning 
experience takes courage. 

“Our team played great together. We always had the team 
work and the hustle against teams that came off as more 
athletic. I have no regrets [from this season]. The kids came 
on a daily basis with a good attitude to be better,” Coach 
Dave Milausnic, West Lake, said. 

Coming together benefits the team as a whole. The team 
put much of their effort into creating closer relationships to 
help accomplish their dreams for the season. 

“We all really bonded well together and came together as 
a team. We played better when we had good competition,” 
Ryan Bereda (11) said. 

Coaches have one of the biggest influences on players’ 
attitudes in practice and during games. Good relationships 
between players and coaches is essential to the well-being 
of the team. 

“We worked hard to get better, which was no different than 
any other previous teams. This was a fun team, and I had a 
good time coaching them,” Coach Milausnic said. 



“I thought it was a pretty good season. 
We had a lot of ups and downs. Overall, 

I thought we proved a lot of people 
wrong because a lot of people said that 
we wouldn’t be anything this year. I am 
also really proud of only losing to East 
Chicago’s team by two points. I felt like 
we all grew as a team. We had a young 
team, and I feel like that will help us in 
the future for next year. The student sec¬ 
tion was pretty cool this year. We had a 
lot of people show up to almost all of our 
games, so that was a good experience 
and something that will most likely help 
us next year. I think we’re going to have a 
good, older team next year.” 

GAGE RAY (11) 





1. Varsity boys basketball team 2. Joseph Bannister (12) 3. Gage Ray (11) 
Photos by: James Lafakis 


PUTTING PRESSURE ON THE PIRATES 

Indians put up a fight against Merrillville Pirates 

The Indians played the Pirates on Jan. 3 at Carroll High School’s 
shootout. The Pirates won the game with a final score of 65-60, and 
the Indians placed seventh out of the 12 teams. 

“There [were] a lot more quality teams in this [tournament]. It 
wasn’t one of those easy games where you [could] take a break or 
anything. [It was] just a quality tournament,” Joseph Graziano (10) 
said. 

Despite the tough competition, this was the first time the boys 
basketball team participated in this tournament. Although the team 
took a loss after going into overtime against Merrillville, the team 
redeemed themselves in another game against the Pirates on Feb. 
2, winning 44-40. 


MOTIVATION FROM DEDICATED SUPERFANS 



“My friends and I always 
had a great time getting 
involved with the themes 
at every game.” 


KAITLIN BEHRENS (11) 


“I like cheering on the 
players and giving them a 
desire to play harder.” 


BRETT MAROVICH (12) 


“I am proud of all of our effort. We weren’t a 
slacking team. We practiced hard every day and 
hit everything hard," Ryan Bereda (11) said. 



















































1. SECTIONAL CHAMPS The varsity girls basketball team jumps in excitement after winning Sectionals. The 
girls had their eyes set on Sectionals for the entire season. “We wanted to get the DAC Championship, and we 
were able to do that. Sectionals is obviously a goal for any team, and we accomplished that,” Gina Rubino (12) 
said. Photo by: James Lafakis 2. EYES ON THE PRIZE Kylie Fehrman (10) blocks her opponent from passing 
the ball to her other teammates. Fehrman and Faith Maldonado (10) were the only sophomores on varsity. “The 
way we had success [this season] was [because] we were a very unselfish team, and we thought of each other 
more than ourselves.” Emily Miklusak (11) said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 3. GETTING PUMPED The girls high five 
Gina Rubino (12) as she runs on to the basketball court. Rubino made plans to attend IUN and playing basket¬ 
ball there with her teammate Tara Zlotkowski (12). “[What I will miss most about the team is] just being with the 
people that I’ve been playing with my whole life, really. The varsity team this year had girls that have been play¬ 
ing together since we were in fifth grade, so that’s a lot of time being spent together now that everyone is going 
their separate ways.” Rubino said. Photo by: Cassidy Niewiadomski 4. SPRINTING FOR THE POINT Jayla 
Harvey (12) holds the ball as she sprints to the basket to make a shot for her team. This was Harvey’s last high 
school season. “I’m really excited to help the underclassmen [next season] to get them to where they need to 
be and push them to [work] harder,” Rachel Bell (11) said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 



HOW AGE CAN AFFECT ROLES ON THE COURT 


TEAM VETERAN 

“It was different [being a junior on 
the team] because being consid¬ 
ered an upperclassman, you have 
to take on a lot more responsibili¬ 
ties and be a role model for the 
younger kids.” 


EMILY MIKLUSAK (11) 


NEW TO THE TEAM 

“The seniors really helped 
me out [because I was an 
underclassman on the varsity 
team]. I learned a lot from them 
hopefully to carry on into this 
season. I’m looking forward] to 
playing again and [seeing] the 
competition.” 

FAITH MALDONADO (10) 


CLOSE BONDS WITH TEAMMATES 


4 


“We were a family. We 
would do things outside 
of basketball as a team. It 
never got old.” 

ALYSSA TODD (11) 



CREATE NEW FRIENDSHIPS AND SUCCESS 


“Our team is close, espe¬ 
cially the seniors. Being a 
close team really helped 
with our teamwork.” 

LAUREN LADOWSKI (9) 



“We were like a family. We 
just all got along so well, 
and all the seniors had 
been playing together for 
so long.” 

KYLIE FEHRMAN (10) 



“I think the chemistry of the team [helped with 
the success of the season]. We’re all really 
close, so we all wanted the same exact thing 
and the same goal,” Ashley O’Malley (12) said. 






















































SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 87 














TOP-NOTCH TEAM 


Players complete a rewarding season 


HOWTO SHOOT A FREE THROW SHOT 


Before you shoot, your posture and 
composure have to be on point. This 
is a simple, fundamental technique. 
“You got to get your feet set,” Victoria 
Gard (11) said. 

Next, it is important that you are in 
the correct position. Look at how you 
are holding the ball. “Get your elbow 
tucked and your hands on the ball,” 
Gard said. 


The final step is to go for the shot and 
be confident in your abilities. “Just 
shoot and hold your follow through,” 
Gard said. 


PAGE BY: RUTH CHEN, AMBER STEDT AND VICTORIA 
WILKES 

his winter season proved to be successful for all 
sports, especially for varsity girls basketball. The team 
closed the season with a 22-4 record, among other 
accomplishments. 

“Winning the DAC, it has never happened in our girl’s his¬ 
tory at Lake Central, so it was really an accomplishment for 
all the girls and coaches and everyone who puts time into the 
program just to have part of a championship,” Gina Rubino 
(12) said. 

The girls left the season with not only a DAC championship, 
but also a Sectional title. 

“We had a bad loss [at Sectionals] last year. We played [who 
we lost to in the] first round at Sectionals, so it was good to 
get past them. It was an awesome feeling to beat them,” 
Rachel Bell (11) said. 

With any sports season comes losses that allow them to 
bounce back and become stronger. After they faced tough 
losses, they took time to learn from it and improve with the 
help from mutual support. 

“The Westfield loss [was important]. We were down at 
halftime and came back but lost at overtime. I think that was 
a great game to learn from. We took the next week and we 
learned from our mistakes from that game, and that was very 
important,” Lindsay Kusbel (12) said. 

The girls’ ability to focus on the common good of the team 
resulted in a successful season. 

“I think everyone wants everyone else to succeed just as 
much as they want themselves to succeed. Players that did 
not get as much playing time still were cheering on the bench 
and wishing our shot would go in and that [support] is big to 
have,” Kusbel said. 

For the seniors, this season’s success was a final farewell. 

“Overall, I had a good season, and the team had a lot of suc¬ 
cess too. We reached most of our goals, not quite all of them, 
but we reached some major goals that we wanted to get to. I 
was able to personally make The Times second team all area 
and some all state honorable mentions, so that was a good 
personal goal that I was able to accomplish,” Rubino said. 



















GROWING GILLS 


Secrets behind techniques 

PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR AND JOVANA DODEVSKA 

11 swimmers work year-round to get better and 
decrease their times, but the dedication and show- 
manship it takes at Sectionals far outranks any other 
competition. The team placed second out of 17 teams, just 
behind the Munster Mustangs, and to achieve this, they had 
to go through extensive training and conditioning. 

“I think as a team we did fantastic. We really have come 
together this season, and we had a lot of guys step up at 
Sectionals,” Matthew Applegate (12) said. 

The high placement of the team reflected the intense training 
the members went through to prepare for the meet. The team 
displayed great focus and determination throughout the event. 
Spirits and scores were raised through the several traditions 
annually practiced at the time of Sectionals. 

“Before Sectionals, we shaved basically all of the hair off 
our bodies, which I did my freshman and sophomore year, but 
not this year because it’s pretty intense I guess. [We shaved 
for] part speed [and] part team unity. We walk out with the 
Indian statue before the meet starts, so that’s always a good 
time,” Kyle Massa (11) said. 

In a technical sense, the boys varsity team shattered 
numerous expectations at Sectionals. All team members 
emerged victorious, and each swimmer contributed to the 
team’s final score. 

“We did really well. It was the only meet we cared about for 
the entire year, so it’s nice to finally be rested and ready to 
go. Every single person dropped [time] in every single event, 
so I’m pretty sure everyone did well,” Gavin Baisa (10) said. 

Many athletes find scholarships and collegiate opportunities 
in their sport, and swimming is no exception. Several swim¬ 
mers, including Joshua Barajas (12), have had new doors 
opened by their high school performances in swimming. 

“I’m swimming at IUPUI next year. I’m really going to miss 
my coach and my teammates. I’ve been swimming with all 
these guys and this coach my whole life, and it’s going to be 
a tough goodbye,” Barajas said. 

















1. Alexander Morgan (11) 2. Cameron Westerman 3. Alexander Morgan (11) 
Photos by: Victoria Wilkes 


DIVING INTO THE FUTURE 

Colleges impressed by divers’ performanc 
es throughout season 

Many people see sports as a way to stay in shape or 
have fun with friends, but for many athletes, sports can 
be a great source of financial aid for college. 

“I started [diving] freshman year. I’ve already been 
talking to colleges, and when I started as a freshman, 
it really improved my grades. I have a lot of opportuni¬ 
ties to go to a better school than I would have [if I didn’t 
start diving]. Colleges I’ve talked to about diving are the 
University of Kentucky, Notre Dame, University of Utah 
and Dartmouth,’’ Alexander Morgan (11) said. 























“I try to go out and support [the boys’ swim 
team] whenever I can [and] they were awesome 

at Sectionals,” 
Sarah Diviney (11) said. 



1. IN THE ZONE Jamiere Wilson (12) competes in the 
100-yard butterfly in the meet before Sectionals. Wilson 
finished the round with a final time of 54.23. “This season, 

I dropped a lot of time but [at] Sectionals, I didn’t do that 
great. I did not drop as much as I wanted to in finals, but 
I still placed and got points for the team, so I was happy 
about that,” Wilson said. Photo by: Hannah Sonner 2. ON 
YOUR MARK Boys varsity swimming prepares to face the 
Michigan City Wolves for Senior Night. This meet was one 
of the last for varsity swimmers going off to college. “[The 
seniors] are good guys. I’m really going to miss them. 
We’ve become really good friends over the years,” Bran¬ 
don Walton (11) said. Photo by: Anastasia Papanikolaou 

3. PREGAME CHEER The varsity boys swim team and 
the crowd cheer before the meet at Sectionals. Out of the 
seventeen teams competing, they placed second. “The 
crowd is the best part of Sectionals. Everyone is scream¬ 
ing for you when you jump into the water and when you 
walk out,” Gavin Baisa (10) said. Photo by: Victoria Wilkes 

4. PRACTICE PAYS OFF Gavin Baisa (10) swims the 100 
yard breaststroke. Baisa broke his personal record for his 
200 yard freestyle. “All of our 200 freestylers did really 
well. We have a lot of guys in the top eight. We’re hoping 
to finish in second place,” Barajas said. Photo by: Camryn 
Wallace 




SOME RECORDS ARE MADE TO BE BROKEN 


I BEAT THE RECORD 

“[I broke] two of [Coach Smolinski’s 
records], the 200 IM and the 100 
fly. It has been a goal of mine since 
freshman year. I really didn’t think 
that it was not realistic [until] last 
year, my junior year. After [breaking] 
the first one, [Coach Smolinski] came 
up to me and shook my hand, and I 
could tell it was a bittersweet feeling 
for him, but he told me he was proud 
of me. It was a really great feeling 
because I finally accomplished my 
goal all season, and I felt just really 
accomplished of myself.” 

JOSHUA BARAJAS (12) 


I SET THE RECORD 

“I was really happy for him, 
actually. He had been talking 
about [breaking] it all year. I saw 
him turn at the halfway and [I 
thought], well, he could do it, 
and he touched the wall and got 
it by a tenth [of a second]. I was 
happy for him. When I set them, 
of course, I was excited to get 
the records, back in my junior 
and senior year of high school, 
so it’s always great when you 
break a record. Joshua set his 
goal to break mine, so you know, 
good for him.” 
MR. TODD SMOLINSKI, SOCIAL 
STUDIES 





DO LONG 



PRACTICES STRENGTHEN YOUR STROKE? 


“Practices have helped 
a lot, I don’t think I’d be 
anywhere near as good 
without [them]. They’re 
tough, but they’ve really 
helped me.” 

COLBY HOFFMAN (9) 



"Our practice schedule is 
very rigorous, and through 
the season, all of us have 
dropped time. It’s very 
beneficial.” 


MICHAEL SINCHAR (10) 


“We [practice] four hours a 
day, an hour and a half before 
school and two and a half 
hours after school. It’s defi¬ 
nitely worth the time.” 

MATTHEW APPLEGATE (12) 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY BOYS SWIMMING AND DIVING 89 










































“Overall, we had a very good season. We had 
some Sectional champions and DAC cham¬ 
pions. We swam well at State,” Coach Todd 
Smolinski, Social Studies, said. 



VARSITY DIVERS REMINISCE ON THEIR SEASON 


QUALITY TIME TOGETHER 

“My favorite part about diving is 
that I can be with [my other team¬ 
mates]. There may only be [one 
other diver and I], but we are with 
the boy divers a lot, too. We spend 
a lot of time together and it’s 
always a lot of fun.” 


A SENSE OF BELONGING 

“One of the things I look for¬ 
ward to most about the meets 
is cheering on my other team¬ 
mates. The energy I feed off of 
is from my teammates, and I 
feel right at home whenever I’m 
competing. 


KALLIE HIGGINS (10) HANNAH LEYBA (11) 



1. MAKING A SPLASH Kallie Higgins (10) dives into the water. 
The girls placed third at Sectionals. “I dove at Sectionals and 
did well. I ended my season strongly by making it to State," 
Higgins said. Photo by: Tabitha Pappas 2. SECTIONAL SUC¬ 
CESS Sara Erwin (10) is in the midst of one of her two meets 
at Sectionals. Erwin swam the 50 and 100 freestyle and had 
the second fastest time on the team. “I swam when I was little, 
but quit in sixth grade. I just started again this year, and I made 
varsity. I didn’t think I was going to make varsity, but then I made 
the Top 8 [at Sectionals],” Erwin said. Photo by: JeannineToth 3. 
TOP TIER Julianna Massa (9) swims the backstroke at Section¬ 
als. She placed fifth in the Top 8. “[A big accomplishment this 
season] was that I was really surprised to make the Top 8 as 
a freshman,” Massa said. Photo by: JeannineToth 4. CON¬ 
GRATULATORY EMBRACE Kaitlyn Krachenfels (12) and Hailey 
Garlich (12) hug after a race at Sectionals. Girls swimming and 
diving had many swimmers place at Sectionals, and a few made 
it to State. “Kaitlyn and I are proud of how we did so well in the 
500 at Sectionals. It was a great feeling,” Garlich said. Photo by: 
JeannineToth 



90 




















BEATING THE HEAT 


1. Victoria Springman (11) 2. Marina Vasquez (11) 3. Hailey Garlich (12) 

Photos by: JeannineToth 

QUALIFYING FOR STATE AT SECTIONALS 

Three varsity swimmers advance to State 

Girls swimming had a successful run at Sectionals, and Marina Vasquez 
(11), Hailey Garlich (12) and Victoria Springman (11) made it to State. 

“I got second in both the 50 and 100 freestyle. Our 200 and 400 freestyle 
relay got second. I made it down to State in both of my events,” Springman 
said. 

This season was filled with many achievements. At the sports banquet, 
swimmers were awarded for their great performance during the season. 

“My greatest accomplishment this season would probably be getting 
MVP for the season,” Springman said. 






Varsity swimming adjusts to changes 

PAGE BY: JENNA CRAWFORD AND GIANNA MILLS 

Ithough many valuable swimmers left the team with 
fVAw graduation, the varsity girls swimming and diving 
team had many tremendous achievements this 

season. 

“We lost a lot of girls last year, so we had a lot to make up. 
We had a lot of good incoming freshmen, so overall we placed 
third at Sectionals. We took some girls down to Sectionals 
and did pretty good,” Kaitlyn Krachenfels (12) said. 

The girls had great success at Sectionals. Three swimmers 
placed at the top of their heats, so they were able to advance 
to State. 

“We got third at Sectionals, which was pretty good. We 
had a couple people qualify for State. Marina [Vasquez (11)] 
managed to get first in the backstroke at Sectionals so she 
went to state. Hailey [Garlich (12)] went to state and Victoria 
[Springman (11)] did, too,” Margaret Elton (11) said. 

Krachenfels reflected on her best memories with her team 
and her greatest highlights. 

“[Memories from this season were] a lot of team bonding and 
pasta parties. Also, just going to meets together and cheering 
each other on was a really big highlight,” Krachenfels said. 

Being on a team means spending time together, so the girls 
have a lot of chances to bond and build friendships. 

“Before Sectionals, the guys wereTPing our houses. We 
were all at Kaitlyn’s [house] one day when the boys came to 
TP it, so we ran out with silly string and fought,” Elton said. 

Returning swimmers will have to adjust to the new dynamic 
of next season, since so many swimmers of this season will 
graduate. 

“We had a lot of seniors this year. They were all really good, 
and we’re going to miss them a lot,” Elton said. 

Being a part of the team has made a positive impact on 
the swimmers, and the seniors are nostalgic of their time on 
the team. 

“I’ve become family with all the girls on the team for the 
last four years. It’ll definitely be different not swimming, but 
it was a lot of fun,” Krachenfels said. 




SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS SWIMMING AND DIVING 91 




















1. SOLID SEASON Jacob Stewart (12) lifts his Crown Point competitor into the air. Stewart finished his 
senior season with plans to wrestle at Calumet College in the fall. “[My season] was decent. I was sad I 
didn’t go to State, but I am probably going to be wrestling in college,” Stewart said. 2. OVERTHROW¬ 
ING OPPONENTS Nicholas Taylor (12) carries his Michigan City opponent over his shoulder at Sec¬ 
tionals. Taylor moved on to the Regional tournament after Sectionals. “When Sectionals comes around, 
it is usually the best time [of the season]," Joseph Szydlo (10) said. 3. SERIOUS STARE DOWN Tristan 
Pappas (11) stares down his East Chicago competitor at Sectionals. Pappas won first place at the 
120-pound weight class in the Sectional tournament. “[The post season] is pretty important. It’s mainly 
what you work for the whole season," Pappas said. 4. TAKING DOWN COMPETITION Kodie Chris¬ 
tenson (12) grabs the leg of his Crown Point opponent and proceeds to take him down. Christenson 
won his match at the 152-pound weight class during the Crown Point dual meet. “[This season] there 
was good performance of out most of [the wrestlers],” Tyler Pilackas (10) said. 5. HARVESTING SUC¬ 
CESS Jacob Kleimola (11) puts his opponent on his back and attempts to pin him at the Harvest Clas¬ 
sic. Kleimola received second place in the 182-pound weight class at this tournament. “The Harvest 
Classic is the start of the actual season. It’s the first big tournament we have, and it just gets everyone 
motivated for the rest of the season,” Romel Spight (11) said. Photos by: Madeline Hirschfield 



FINAL CHANCE TO GO FOR THE GOLD 

Kleimola explains how he will achieve his goals 



“[Off-season preparation is important 
because] you have to get bigger, faster 
and stronger, especially if you plan on 
moving up weight classes. You have to fix 
a lot of your mistakes in order to get bet¬ 
ter. Without doing that, you shouldn’t ex¬ 
pect much improvement. I’m lifting three 
days a week with one of my coaches. 

Over the summer, I’ll continue to lift, and 
I’ll be wrestling freestyle. After August, I’ll 
do two months of preseason wrestling, 
club wrestling, and then it will be school 
season again. As a junior, qualifying for 
State was a great experience. I came 
up short of my goals, but next year, I 
definitely plan on wanting to be at the 
top of the podium. That’s ultimately been 
my goal in high school. I plan on trying 
to win Semi-State [as a senior] and then 
make a run at Indy. I’m not going to go 
down there and try to just place. I want 
to be at the top of the podium.” 

JACOB KLEIMOLA (11) 


SHARING SEASON FAVORITES 



“[My favorite part was] 
being on varsity for the 
first time. My favorite point 
in the season was winning 
third place at Sectionals.” 

BRETT BROWN (10) 



“[My favorite part] is prob¬ 
ably just hanging out with 
all the guys. After a while, 
you all just become friends 
and hang out.” 

TRISTAN PINTOR (11) 

“My favorite part of the 
wrestling season was win¬ 
ning the Munster Super 
Duals. I went 5-0 that tour¬ 
nament.” 


RUSSELL GIBBS 


on 


92 SOME SPORTS VARSITY WRESTLING SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 



























































VARSITY FINDS 
SUCCESS ON MAT 


Team achieves many accomplishments 


PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD 



he varsity wrestling season started on Wednesday, 
| Dec. 3, in the Indian’s home gym and took off from 
there. With a tough schedule consisting of seven DAC 
dual meets, six tournaments and the postseason, the 
team came out with plenty of achievements. 

“As far as [our record] goes, I think we did good overall 
[during] this season,” Kodie Christenson (12) said. 

The wrestlers ended with a DAC dual meet record of 4-3, 
placed second at the Lake County tournament, went 5-0 
at the Munster Super Duals and were fourth overall in the 
conference. 

“Right as school starts in August, we start conditioning [to 
prepare and help us] for our season,”Tyler Pilackas (10) said. 

After the regular season ended, the Indians roared into 
the postseason tournaments. The team placed second at 
the EC Sectional with four champions. Joseph Szydlo (10), 
Tristan Pappas (11), Kodie Christenson and Jacob Kleimola 
(11), including eight other Regional qualifiers. They placed 
fifth at the Calumet Regional with three champions, Branden 
Truver (11), Christenson, Kleimola and two other Semi-State 
qualifiers. They placed sixth at the Merrillville Semi-State and 
had three state qualifiers, Truver, Christenson and Kleimola. 
Truver ended the season, placing fifth at State Finals, while 
the team as a whole placed 44th in the state. 

“I like to experience everyone’s [success] and get to [see] 
and live through them. It’s a cool experience, and it’s fun to 
watch,” Elizabeth Ayersman (11), mat maid, said. 

Not only did they have team accomplishments, but individu¬ 
als received personal awards as well. Christenson and Truver 
were given DAC All Conference Awards, and Romel Spight 
(11) and Kleimola earned spots on the IHSWCA Junior 1st 
Team Academic All State, placing eighth and 11th respectively. 
Personal team awards were also given out to members.Truver 
received the MVP Award, Spight received the Most Improved 
Award, Brett Brown (10) was given the Sportsmanship Award. 
Kleimola earned the Pride Hustle Desire Award and Christen¬ 
son was given the Crossface Award, a distinction for being 
the toughest on the roster. 



1. 126-pound place winners 2. Branden Truver (12) 3 Coach Ryan Alb. Science. 
Coach LukeTriveline and Branden Truver (12) F’hotos by: Madeline Hirschfield 


INDIANS TAKE THE ROAD DOWN TO STATE 

Three varsity wrestlers compete, one stands out 

Branden Truver (12) qualified for the 2015 IHSAA State Finals at 
Banker’s Life Fieldhouse on Friday, Feb. 20 and Saturday, Feb. 21, 
along with two other wrestlers. Truver was the only athlete to win 
during his Friday round, which allowed him to move on and win fifth 
place the next day. 

“I knew I could do it. It was just a matter of putting in the time and 
the effort to do it,”Truver said. 

Truver’s journey to State was an impressive one, where he appeared 
in the Sectional, Regional and Semi-Semi State finals, beating long¬ 
time rivals, Jason Crary of Munster and Gaige Torres of Portage and 
won a Regional Championship for the first time. 


“I like being a mat maid because I like work¬ 
ing the tournaments and seeing all the boys. 
They’re funny. It’s good when they win 
[because] you feel happy for them," Kaitlin 
Brack (11) said. 























1. Varsrty cheerleaders Photo submitted by: Alexandra Gomez (11) 2. Olivia Middleton (11) 
and Brittany Jacinto (11) Photo submitted by: Brittany Jacinto 3. Abby Cappello (11), Ken¬ 
nedy Moore (11). Makayla Sullivan (10), Kayla Camarillo (10) and Brooke Glover (10) Photo 
submitted by: Brooke Glover 


CHEERLEADERS TAKE ATLANTA 

Varsity heads to Cheersport Nationals 

On Feb. 13-15, the varsity cheerleaders traveled to 
Atlanta, Ga. to perform in the Cheersport Nationals. The 
team came in second place by 0.4 of a point, but they 
still believed they did their best. 

“Being able to fly down to Georgia and being able to 
spend my whole weekend with the team was really fun. 
We also go to the aquarium that was there. In all of our 
opinions, we got screwed when it came to awards, but 
we came in second by 0.4,” Brittany Jacinto (11) said. 


SPEARHEAD OF THE INDIANS 

Mrs. Joan Loden, Math, tells how to lead a team 



“I’ve been coaching for 27 years, but I 
have been a teacher for 31. My assis¬ 
tant coach is a choreographer, but he 
also brings in a dance choreographer 
to do their dances. We put together 
their stunts, and he puts together the 
formations and so forth and so on. Part 
of the routine we hire people to come 
in and do for us, and the other part of 
the routine we put together. Then we 
practice basically twice a week. Plus, 
they tumble once a week, so basically 
they’re practicing three times a week. We 
pretty much do that starting in June, and 
we go until we finish competing. With 
three days a week, that’s a lot of practice 
they’re getting in.” 


SMELLS LIKE SCHOOL SPIRIT 

poll out 331 students 

r) Q 0/ ON THE COURT 

S f \ 28 percent of students 

/ w prefer when the cheerlead¬ 
ers cheer at basketball games rather than cheering 
at football games. 

ON THE FIELD 

72 percent of students 
prefer when the cheerlead¬ 
ers cheer at football games rather than when they 
cheer at basketball games. 




[Games and competitions are] all really loud. 
There’s so many people. Competitions are 
different because we don’t do the cheers that 
we do at football and basketball games," Molly 
Stokes (9) said. 


BLUE AND WHITE 
BRING THE FIGHT 

Varsity cheer brings it on all season 

PAGE BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU, HANNAH PRATT AND 
EMMA RITCHIE 



uring football and basketball games, cheerleaders 
| encourage the fans and crowd to participate more 
actively throughout the game. Whether the cheerlead¬ 
ers are on the court, field or stage performing, the effect they 
have on the atmosphere can be positive for all who take part. 

“I feel like we make the fans pumped up by including them 
in cheering," Alexandra Gomez (11) said. 

This year gave the varsity cheerleaders a chance to be on 
the sidelines during Big Rivals Night at Lucas Oil Stadium. 
“Every second you didn’t know if you were going to be on 
TV or not, so you always had to smile and have fun with it," 
Molly Stokes (9) said. 

Compared to football games, where the whole team cheers, 
basketball games split the cheer team throughout the quar¬ 
ters. The four quarters in the basketball games allow each 
cheerleader a balanced amount of floor time. 

“We do a whole team thing. Then at basketball games, we 
split up during the quarters of them, and at football we cheer 
all together,” Stokes said. 

Preparation for competitions include numerous practices, 
hard work and dedication.The team practices each day during 
the competition season. 

“A lot of us listen to music to get pumped. We also make 
sure that we stretch out really well so we don’t get injured,” 
Gomez said. 

This year, the team performed at Cheerfest National Cham¬ 
pionships in Atlanta, Ga.This was the team’s first time at this 
competition. The varsity cheer team placed second, coming 
after Little Rock High School in Arkansas by 0.4 points. 

“Nationals was a new competition that was way bigger than 
ones that we’re used to. We got second by 0.4 points. It was 
a different experience for all of us," Gomez said. 













1. HYPE UP THE FANS Molly Stokes (9) does a needle during a basketball game. Cheerleaders often 
performed these moves during home games. “We do a whole team thing at basketball games. We split up 
during the quarters of them, and then at football, we cheer all together,” Stokes said. Photo by: Jennifer 
Mohamed 2. JUMP FOR JOY Brooke Glover (10) is lifted after a team meeting during a cheer competition. 
The team went to many different competitions throughout the season. “Competitions are different because 
we don't do the cheers that we do at football and basketball games,” Molly Stokes (9) said. Photo by: 
James Lafakis 3. FLIP TO THE FINISH Olivia Middleton (11) performs a back handspring at the Big Rivals 
Night game at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind. The cheerleaders traveled to Indianapolis to support 
the varsity boys football team. “Lucas Oil Stadium was a lot of fun. It was a great experience," Molly Stoke 
(9) said. Photo by: Hannah Sonner 4. BRINGING IT HOME Varsity cheerleaders pose with the student 
section at the Big Rivals Night game. Lake Central played Portage at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. 
"Cheering at Lucas Oil was really fun because we got to cheer in a professional stadium,” Alexandra 
Gomez (11) said. Photo by: James Lafakis 5. HYPE UP THE FANS Alexandra Gomez (11) and other cheer¬ 
leaders hype up the crowd during a Friday night football game. It was the cheerleader’s job to motivate the 
players, fans and families during games. “I prefer football games more because you do more things with th 
crowd," Molly Stokes (9) said. Photo by: James Lafakis 


SOME SPORTS VARSITY CHEERLEAOING 95 



























DANCE TEAM 
DOMINATION 


Centralettes showcase skills 

PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL AND CAMRYN WALLACE 


his season, the varsity Centralettes proved their 
ability to come out on top no matter what the 
circumstances Pushing themselves as hard as 
they could, the Centralettes finished with a season to 


tie ptoud of. 

"I was proud of the season. It went well VVs won Nation¬ 
als. we won State, we won Regionals. we basically won 
all of the big competitors that we wanted to w in.’ Nicole 


Vanek (111 Mid. 

Along with the plethora of skilled upperclassmen on 
the team, a tew freshmen were given the opportunity to 
|oin varsity. 

"I got thrown (into the season) late because someone 
on the team w as miured With varsity, you get there, tbu 
dance Xbu're done.’ Paige Kotecki (91 Mid. 

All of the practice throughout the season led up to 
Nationals which w as held m Orlando, Fla The girts placed 
first in Jaii and seventh *1 Hip-Hop. 

*1 had no wonts when (we won Nationals), I squeezed 
my whole team as tight as possible because we earned it, 
l w as thinking that I knew we were going to wm because 
we worked for it and nailed our last performance.’ Gna 
trwtn (11) said 

Along with Nationals, the g«ts participated m State, 
where they placed first for the 21st consecutive time. 

’I was having thoughts about (the pressure of placing 
1st), (because) .1 was my last time pertomwig (at State', 
I had to do the best performance I could, and I Ad. I had 
the best performance of my I V' A*v$on Vanek (12) said 

The team went nearly undefeated with only a tew set¬ 


backs along the wav 

’There was one competition where we a> s»st got reaNy 
nervous tor no ro*sorv’ Medeen# Andrews (91 said. 

Seng Ptose outakt* of the stucho has acted the Cen- 
traettes by aacweig them to crhgie each other when a 
e needed 

‘Seingfiwdsw'ithaachothe* mawsusvaimorociom- 
iurtab* tafiu ig to each ether and corre ct ing each other It 
"•aves re tea- -vre w-hoe.’ -v» Strohacker (111 sard 


BEGINNING WITH THE BIG LEAGUES 

Freshman dancer starts out on varsity team 



•When l first made [varsity], it was re¬ 
alty surprising to me and to a tot of my 
fnends. but it was a tot of fun. The girls 
were super nice to me. It's a tot of pres¬ 
sure to make st*e you bve up to your 
expectations, it was realty cool to team 
from them, and they hefp you mature- It 
was a tot of fun. My favorite part was 
[being] with my team, and competitions 
were fun too. tt was a tot efrffere^t [than 
rmddte school] because in rmddte schoot 
I used to get so nervous for competi¬ 
tions. This year they made rt seem so 
easy and so kn There was a tot more 
pressure, and we sbi had to make sure 
we we&. but <t w3s a tot more er^x- 
atote.* 


MADELINE ANDREWS (9> 


SPORTS VARSITY CENTRALETTES SCAN PAGE FOR VIOEO 
















1. FIERCE FINALE Varsity Centralettes strike the final pose during a home basketball game. 
The Centralettes performed at the boys varsity basketball game on Feb. 20. “I feel like the 
way the crowd feels [at games] is definitely different than at a competition. At competitions, 
it is usually just our parents watching. I usually feel more relaxed [dancing] during games 
because we don’t have to win," Emma Hupp (12) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 

2. REACHING BEYOND At the LCDI, the varsity Centralettes extend their arms during one 
of their performances. The Centralettes performed two types of dances: hip-hop and jazz. 
“Jazz is more graceful and hip-hop is more hard-hitting. Jazz is for the money and hip-hop 
is for fun,” Abby Markowski (10) said. Photo by: James Lafakis 3. HANDS UP Michaela 
Vuckovic (12) throws her hands in the air during the hip-hop performance. The theme of the 
dance was Gladiators. “Before practice, we go through with our warm-ups and usually do 
our runs. Then, we go over the parts we messed up," Abby Markowski (10) said. Photo by: 
James Lafakis 4. CALM BEFORE THE STORM Reyna Crothers (11) extends her arm before 
starting the jazz routine. Much preparation went into perfecting these dances. “[Before we 
start dancing] all of the nerves are taking over. It is an exhilarating feeling. You have to think, 
‘You can’t mess up.\t>u can’t mess up. This is all or nothing/” Crothers said. Photo by: Jillian 
Wilschke 


EVACUATE THE DANCEFLOOR MEGAN HELFERS (11) SHARES SECRETS TO SUCCESS 



“Definitely winning 
nationals [was my favorte 
part] because that ’s a 
great memory to have for 
senior year" 

AMANDA ROBERTS (12) 

"Everyone bonding 
together [was my favorite 
part of senior year] 
because everyone just got 
along." 

MICHAELA VUCKOVIC (12) 

“[The team was] really 
dose, and I really enjoyed 
that aspect of dance. I 
definitely danced for the 
girls." 

EMMA HUPP (12) 

*1 had the greatest 
performance of rny life 
at State. It was the best 
feeling in the world." 

ALLYSON VANEK (12) 



JV and varsrty Centralettes Ptxxo piwdsd bf Dave Gross 


1 “ Practice the same two 
routines. Jazz and Hip- 
Hop. for seven months 
straight. Rehearse them 
for at least nine hours a 
week," Heifers said. 


2 

3 


“Always be together. 

Being close with your 
team improves dancing 
immensely since we all 
have the same struggles, 
hopes and goals.” Heifers 
said 

“By the time March rolls 
around, all the time and work 
we put in is ready to be shown 
at State. The way to succeed is 
by dedication," Heifers said. 


“We know there are people out there that would 
like to see us fail so we always bnng our game 
and make it our goal to perform to the best of 
our capabilities." Kristina Ptaskett (11) said. 
































































“This year, as a team, I think we were a lot more 
motivated to do better, and we learned new 
skills that we didn’t have last year. We made 
some new goals for ourselves,” Lauren Markulin 
(12) said. 


1. Maya Tobin (10) Photo by: James Lafakis 2. Lauren Markulin (12) Photo 
by: James Lafakis 3. Megan Gora (11) Photo by: JeannineToth 



BENDING OVER BACKWARDS 

Gymnasts take part in multiple events 

Gymnastics is a very diverse sport. It is made up of 
four main events: balance beam, vault, floor and bars. 
The gymnasts on the team will sometimes take part in 
more than one event, allowing them to raise their skill 
level. 

“My favorite part about being on the team is that we’re 
more of a family this year and it just has that family 
atmosphere. When you’re doing stuff like the beam or 
the floor, everyone is cheering you on and it’s just a really 
good feeling,” Lauren Druzbicki (11) said. 


WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A GYMNAST 

Andi Wartman (12) shares the struggles of gymnastics 



“[Being a gymnast] obviously takes a lot 
of guts because you’re flipping on a four- 
inch beam, running at an unmoving ob¬ 
ject, and that takes courage. You have to 
have a lot of muscle memory in order to 
not be afraid of what you’re supposed to 
do. Muscle memory is doing something 
over and over again until your muscles 
can basically do it blindfolded. You have 
to want to be a gymnast. You have to be 
[physically] strong and you have to be 
mentally strong because if you’re going 
into something afraid, you’re most likely 
going to get hurt. My favorite part [about 
being a gymnast] is competing. I really 
like the atmosphere and everyone cheer¬ 
ing for you. I like the feeling of sticking 
things and getting a high score because 
that makes me feel good. The experience 
[of State] was incredible. It was so nice 
to perform somewhere I’ve never been 
before and having that big of a crowd 
was also awesome. My goal was to go 
down there and perform. It still is surreal 
and something I'm going to remember 
for the rest of my life. I was State runner- 
up and I was the first person from LC 
to make it to State and tied the school 
record for my score at State.” 


SEASON HIGHLIGHTS 



“My favorite memory 
would be when we all rode 
down to state for [Andi 
Wartman (12)].” 


LAUREN DRUZBICKI (11) 



“My favorite [memory] was 
at the Christmas party, we 
had to act out the person 
whose gift we got. It was 
hilarious.” 

MEGAN GORA (11) 


MAKING A GREAT 
COMEBACK 



Bouncing back from last season 

PAGE BY: JODIE HODGES AND DARIAN SMITH 

his year, the girls gymnastics team saw much 
improvement compared to last year. Even with the 
small number of team members, the team pushed 
through the season and reached goals they never thought 
were possible. 

“Since we only have eight girls, it’s just varsity, but we all act 
as one whole team. My favorite part this year is the thrill of 
[competing] and being able to be apart of a team and pretty 
much just have eight good friends; we’re all like one family, 
and I love it,” Megan Gora (11) said. 

The girls are extremely dedicated to what they do and always 
bring the best. Their dedication is evident through the many 
years that they have been involved in the sport. 

“I’ve been doing gymnastics since I was two years old. I 
always enjoyed doing gymnastics, and I got more serious 
about it when I was 10, and then ever since I really wanted to 
be on the team here,” Morgan Markulin (9) said. 

Being a gymnast on the team requires a large amount of 
commitment and hard work that can really take its toll on the 
gymnasts’ body. 

“I thought [gymnastics] was a great way to make new friends 
and get into school activities. I really enjoy the people and 
I like that the sport pushes you over your limits and you get 
stronger. Overall getting new skills is really hard because you 
have to work your body in different ways that your not used 
to,” Maya Tobin (10) said. 

The girls work to perfect their routines for meets and com¬ 
petitions. The season ended with leader Andi Wartman (12) 
representing the team at the state championship. Wartman 
came in second place for floor. 

“We practice every single day. [The most challenging thing 
is] probably all of the meets that are sometimes back to back 
to back because we’re all running on low fumes. Especially 
since we have to drive out and we can’t have our own home 
meets. We have to go every single day out to the gym and then 
practice, and then even when we don’t practice, we practice. 
And then the next day we have a meet and we practice. It gets 
so tiring, and we’re all running on low fumes and it’s terrible. 
It takes a lot of hard work and dedication,” Gora said. 


98 













































1. THE FINAL FINISH Maya Tobin (10) finishes her floor routine with a pose. Tobin 
started gymnastics her freshman year when she joined the Lake Central team. “I 
thought it was a great way to make new friends and get into school activities. I really 
enjoy the people and I like that the sport pushes you over your limits,"Tobin said. Photo 
by: Kayla Hallowed 2. SPREAD YOUR WINGS Madison O’Drobinak (9) preforms her 
floor routine during a meet in February. The meet took place against Hobart. “I like 
everyone that you get to compete with that’s on the team, and you get to do what 
you want with the people that you like,” O’Drobinak said. Photo by: JeannineToth 3. 
LEADING THE WAY Lauren Markulin (12) performs her floor routine during the DAC 
Championship in Portage. The team came in seventh place. “I joined the team because I 
really liked gymnastics, and I wanted to do something for school. I like being with all my 
teammates and being able to encourage them,” Markulin said. Photo by: James Lafakis 
4. STRIKE A POSE Morgan Markulin (9) does a pose during her floor routine. Although 
it was Markulin’s first year on the team, she had been in gymnastics her whole life. “I’ve 
been doing gymnastics since I was two years old. I got more serious about it when 
I was 10, and then ever since I really wanted to be on the team here,” Markulin said. 
Photo by: Kayla Hallowed 5. READY, SET, CHEER The team sits on the floor before 
their big competition. After the Pledge of Allegiance was recited, the team preformed a 
team cheer to get pumped for the day. “[After I graduate] I’ll miss gymnastics the most 
because I’ve been doing it since I was three, so not doing it after high school will be a 
downer. Plus, being a leader was probably the best part. It was ready fun,” Andi Wart- 
man (12) said. Photo by: Kayla Hallowed 









SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS VARSITY GYMNASTICS 99 




































r. m 




ipW-*-. , 
























1. SWIMMING THE LAST YARD On Jan. 27, the varsity and JV boys swim teams competed 
against Portage. Both teams won every event. “I think we did really well as a team because we 
were all swimming for Sectional lineups, so we tried all of our hardest,” Zachary DeJoris (10) 
said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 2. DRIBBLING TO THE FINISH Justin Graves (9) dribbles the 
ball after it is passed to him. Graves was surrounded by players from the Portage team. “We 
scored well as individuals, but we didn’t score good as a team,” Graves said. Photo by: Gianna 
Mills 3. PUSHING THE LIMIT Antonio Gonzalez (10) holds his Crown Point opponent as the 
match goes on. On Nov. 22, the wrestling team went to Crown Point to compete. “Crown Point 
was good when we wrestled them. We keep everything [in] same [routine] when we prepare 
to wrestle,” Brett Morris (10) said. Photo by: Emma Ritchie 4. DEFENDING THE BALL Ryan 
Davidson (10) has his eye on the ball and gets ready to go in for a steal. The final score of the 
game was 45-34. “Coach told us we need to get better at the little things. Personally, I need to 
just play well on both ends of the floor at all times,” Davidson said. Photo by: Annabella Piunti 
5. BLOCKING THE EAGLES Norell Smith (10) blocks his opponent from passing the ball to his 
teammate. Smith and the rest of the JV boys basketball team lost to their opponents, the John 
Adams High School Eagles with a final score of 41-59. “I feel we played decent as a team. [We 
should have played] more full on the offense. [There were] a lot less [three pointers] and better 
closing out on defense,” Justin Graciano (9) said. Photo by: Amber Stedt 




100 






















[The weight lifting competition] got me really 
ready for football season and offseason,” 
Paul Centanni (11) said. 


ATHLETIC 

INSPIRATION 


Varsity teaches from experience 

PAGE BY: EMMA DEGROOT, ABIGAIL HINES AND TABITHA 
PAPPAS 

x&x ost sports at Lake Central have JV and varsity teams. 
(fll^D Both teams work together to make each other 
become better players, but JV uses the help of varsity 
to teach certain skills and work ethics. 

“[In wrestling] the more experienced guys help us get better 
by using what they have learned.The varsity guys will help us 
out if we need help on a new move or if we don’t get something 
they learned last year,” Walker Brummett (10) said. 

JV players look up to varsity players for examples on how to 
improve their skills. Staying in a sport for four years can build 
players into more well-rounded athletes. Some long-standing 
varsity players may take leadership roles throughout the 
season and work as mentors for JV team members. 

“We actually participate in [varsity events]. We are usually 
fillers, but [practicing with varsity] really pushes us because 
we have to do our best and keep up with them,” Colby Hoff¬ 
man (9) said. 

One goal that JV players strive for is to get on varsity teams, 
and while doing so, they also attend and even participate in 
varsity games. 

“[Practicing with varsity] helps you mature a lot as a person 
and on the court,” Sean Lopez (10) said. 

As JV members watch their varsity counterparts play, they 
try to pick up on their skills. JV and freshmen players try their 
best to help fill the seniors shoes after they graduate. 

“We get a lot of pressure from the upperclassmen.They really 
want us to succeed and get better,” Hoffman said. 

The players condition with the seniors and even attend the 
varsity games to acquire the varsity mind set for upcoming 
school years. 


UNDERCLASSMEN SEASON 



“[While practicing with varsity wrestling], you 
learn a lot of new moves and techniques 
from them.” 


JOSHUA TAYLOR (10) 



“[Participating with varsity swimming] really 
just pushes us because we have to do our 
best and keep up with the varsity guys.” 


^SM COLBY HOFFMAN (9) 



“[Our wrestling season] was pretty good. We 
lost some. We won some. I loved it, every last 
minute of it.” 


THOMAS MCCLAIN (9) 




1. Antwan Davis (12) 2. Quinn Paprocki (12) 3. Aaron Chadd (10) Photos 
by: Jennifer Mohamed 

LIFTING FOR THE TITLE 

Indians work together to up hold first place title 

On Jan. 17th, the 16th annual NWI Weight Lifting Competition 
took place at Hobart High School. The day was filled with high- 
energy preparation and motivation for every student involved. 

“The energy at the competition was really good because every¬ 
one kind of came together and put a lot of effort in and really saw 
that we had a chance,” Malik Suleiman (11) said. 

During the competition both boys and girls competed for a 
combined score that decided which school would win. Family and 
friends cheered for the students. 

“We did really well as a team overall. Alone the guys or girls could 
have won the competition,” Jakob Brown (11) said. 


THE FUTURE OF VARSITY WRESTLING 

JV wrestlers prepare to take the roles of varsity 



“[The season] started out kind of bad 
because freshman year I didn’t do too 
hot. Then as the year came by, I started 
practicing harder, and then I started 
winning more tournaments. [You have 
to prove yourself because] you’re pretty 
much the future varsity. Sometimes I 
wrestle with [varsity] during practice. 
[Practices give us experience because] 
we switch partners and I wrestle with the 
varsity wrestlers. If you do something 
wrong, [varsity] will help you out. There’s 
a couple seniors this year that are really 
good, and we’re losing them, but overall 
I think we’re going to be decent [in the 
future]. [Our best season achievements 
are] winning the Crown Point and 
Rensselaer Invite.” 

JOHN RIZZO (10) 


SOME SPORTS JV/FRESHMAN BOYS 101 











































































1. TWO FEET ON THE GROUND Brianna Mills (11) winces as she lifts the bar. 
The girls in weight lifting trained with the guys after school until the weightlift¬ 
ing competition. “It’s definitely different [being a girl in weightlifting]. We were 
looked at weirdly when we went to the competition. When you think of girls 
that weight lift, you think of big body builders. The guys look at us and expect 
us to look weird, gross and really built, but girls [stereotypically shouldn’t be 
like that],” Brooke Glover (10) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 2. PER¬ 
FORMANCE Lauren Druzbicki (11) lays on the balance beam as part of her 
performance. Only some of the varsity gymnasts attended the state competi¬ 
tion. The JV girls hope to follow their lead. “Every practice we worked hard, 
drilled all the drills and did everything our coach told us to do. We improved 
every meet." Druzbicki said. Photo by: James Lafakis 3. DOWN THE COURT 
Lauren Ladowski (9) dribbles the ball down the court during a game against 
Lowell. The JV team won conference. “Our season went really well this year, we 
only lost one game, and it was towards the beginning [of the season]. I think 
we improved a lot. We were also undefeated in conference which was really 
good,” Hannah Sarkey (10) said. Photo by: Emma DeGroot 4. SCREAMING 
FOR VICTORY Laura Schoonmaker (12) hoists the bar for a deadlift. The girls 
helped the boys reach the team’s ultimate goal of getting first place. “This year 
the team got first. There were a lot of girls and guys on the team. It was a mixed 
group," Alexandra Hickey (10) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 5. FACIALS 
Carling Louden (9) expresses her emotion through her facials in the middle of 
her performance. Some of the JV dancers use dance to relieve stress. “Danc¬ 
ing is a means of escape from all the hurt in life. It lets me express the way I am 
feeling through movements when I am unable to form words,” Alexa Szatkowski 
(10) said. Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 























LIFTING ‘LIKE 
A GIRL’ 


Girls weightlifting team reaches the top 

PAGE BY: ANNABELLA PIUNTI AND OLIVIA OSTER 

s one of the many clubs Lake Central has to offer, the 
fVA w weightlifting team is open to both genders. However, 
when Lake Central students were asked what came 
to mind when they thought of weightlifting, many had the 
same response. 

“When I think of weightlifting, I think of mostly guys, but I 
know girls can weightlift too,” Anthony Smierciak (10) said. 

Many girl athletes joined the weightlifting club to gain 
strength and help them improve in their spring sports. 

“I started because my friends did it and to build more muscle 
for softball,” Rylee Platusic (9) said. 

Many stereotypical comments about boys being superior 
to girls are made when it comes to weightlifting. 

“I think a lot of guys look down at us, almost as if we’re 
not strong enough and that we shouldn’t be doing weightlift¬ 
ing, but then we really come out and show them that they’re 
wrong,” Jessica Kiefor (9) said. 

Many of the girls started preparing months in advance for 
the single competition. Some of the girls went to the gym after 
school everyday to train, and also made dietary adjustments. 

“[To prepare], I went to the gym six times a week and slowly 
increased weight. I cut out the junk and made healthier deci¬ 
sions,” Brianna Mills (11) said. 

When the competition they have been preparing for finally 
arrived, the boys and girls on the team separated into differ¬ 
ent categories. For girls it was based on grade, and for guys 
it was based on weight class. 

“You go there as a team. If you’re a girl, you’re categorized 
as a freshman, sophomore, junior or senior. Then guys are 
separated by weight class. I do think that guys did have a 
better chance at lifting more, so to get the competition moving, 
they separate guys and girls that way,” Kiefor said. 

The team remained confident throughout the competition, 
and had a successful outcome. 

“We got first, and the girls could have won it all by them¬ 
selves,” Olivia Smith (9) said. 


DIVING INTO THE JV LIFESTYLE 

Ana Zanza (10) talks about her swimming schedule 



“I think we did well this season. We combined 
some practices with the varsity, so that helped 
everyone get better. Being a swimmer is really 
hard. Practices are long. We don’t stop. There 
are no breaks. I think the amount we practice 
definitely helps us. You can tell we are better 
than some of the schools that don’t practice as 
much as we do. Swim helps me manage school 
I know that I have to get things finished on time 
because I have to rest. Swim motivates me to 
finish my homework early. I got into swim when 
I took swim lessons as a little kid. I swam for 
about five years. I quit for a while, but I wanted 
to be in an LC sport, so I decided I would do 
swimming again. I love staying in shape, being 
with my team and the sport itself. I always have. 
Next year, we need to take some things more 
seriously. Sometimes people don’t show up for 
practice, or they will mess around. We really 
need to make better attendance. We had a lot 
of girls with bad attendance this year, including 
me.” 



1. Alexis Miestowski (9) Photo by: Annabella Piunti 2. Samantha Walker (9) 
Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. Madisen Tucker (9) Photo by: Olivia Oster 


FREE-THROWING WITH AMBITION 

Freshman girls basketball team shoots for goals 

The freshman girls basketball team set high goals for the 
season, which, in the end, helped them succeed. 

“[Our goals were] to get better than our eighth grade year, 
to get faster, higher pace and to get ready for all the upcom¬ 
ing seasons. The season went very well overall. We worked 
hard and played hard,” Carley Jansky (9) said. 

This season, the team had an enormous advantage in their 
court. These girls have been working as a team for quite 
some time. 

“I was expecting this to be a very good team because we 
have been playing with each other since we were in fourth 
grade, so it was just about the transition from middle school 
to high school,” Anna Weir (9) said. 


SOME SPORTS JV/FRESHMAN GIRLS 103 
















BRANCHING FROM THE FAMILY TREE 

Bowler talks about why she joined the sport 



“When my grandpa got out of the Army 
he taught [my family to bowl]. He told me 
it takes a lot of hard work and dedication 
and I was ready for the challenge. When 
I joined the high school team we got 
more in depth of the game. He was upset 
because he couldn’t help me anymore, 
but he tried his best. I have something 
specific to remember him: his first 300 
ring. I carry it with me everytime I go 
bowling to bring me good luck and to al¬ 
ways have him there with me even though 
he isn’t physically with me. I [wouldn’t] be 
bowling now if it wasn’t for him. The day 
he passed away we had a high school 
match, and I still bowled because I knew 
that is exactly what he would have want¬ 
ed me to do. [That Saturday] we qualified 
first and won the tournament so they let 
me keep the trophy. I couldn’t be more 
thankful that my biggest supporter and 
hero taught me what I love to do best.” 


MEGAN HEFLIN (10) 


IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNITY SPORTS 



“I think travel volleyball is important 
because it helps you bond with other 
people who love to do the same thing you 
do.” 

JACQUELINE EADER (11) 



“I think every sport is important to a com 
munity, but soccer is important because 
it gives both girls and boys an outlet to 
express themselves.” 

CLARE MAJCHROWICZ (11) 



“Volleyball is important to the community 
because you’re never alone, it’s always a 
team sport and you have to work together 
in order to succeed.” 


KELLY ORZE (10) 


ANOTHER SPIN 
ON SPORTS 

Community sports make impact 


PAGE BY: KAYLA HALLOWELL AND JACQUELINE HOFFMAN 



he numerous athletes from the Tri-town community 
I are connected through the sports they play. Though 
certain sports are not recognized by the IHSAA, stu¬ 
dents feel they are just as important as the school’s teams. 

“You want to have experience so you can cooperate with 
the coaches and know what you’re talking about [so] they 
can help you out,” Andrew Pruitt (10) said. 

Though the school offers its own volleyball team, there are 
many club teams such as Altitude and Ignite. Even though 
the teams are not recognized by the school, the teams still 
go hand-in-hand. 

“[Lake Central] volleyball and Altitude connect because 
most girls who play for [Lake Central] also take part in club,” 
Kelly Orze (10) said. 

Commitment, talent and teamwork is not just for volley¬ 
ball. Club soccer requires talent, but also teaches athletes 
valuable lessons. 

“[Soccer has] taught me how to master any skill and how 
repetition and practice can really help you achieve your goal,” 
Nathan Puch (11) said. 

Along with club sports, bowling and hockey are other 
community sports that students have opportunities to become 
involved in. 

“It bothers me that the school pretends that we do not 
exist. The girls bowling team has won four state titles and the 
school has barely recognized us,” Bowling Coach Stephanie 
Cooley said. 

Though some believe the school does not recognize com¬ 
munity sports enough, others feel that circumstances are 
different for other teams and their players. 

“Hockey is not considered a school sport because IHSAA 
does not recognize hockey. We are grateful that the school 
allows the hockey team to have their own board, and [let] 
players to earn letters, but I think it’s best hockey remain a 
club sport,” Hockey Coach Brian Black said. 

Even though these programs are not recognized by the 
IHSAA, they are still a part of students’ daily lives. 



1. Lake Central Hockey Team during Uliana Cup tournament 2. Group of 
hockey players celebrate 3. Hockey players huddle to discuss tactics for the 
game 

Photos by: Marie Hickey 


ENFORCING TEAM CONFIDENCE 

Student discusses team’s immense spirit 

The spirit of players is one of the most important aspects 
to the way a team performs. Though there are a plethora of 
unique characteristics that go into hockey, Aaron Ludwig 
(12) feels strongly about the team and their ability to work 
well together. 

“[Hockey has a sense of pride with] being a team sport, 
everyone takes a lot of pride in the team; trying to make 
everyone look as good as we can. There’s definitely a lot 
of heat between teams with who’s better and things like 
that,” Ludwig said. 


104 SOME SPORTS COMMUNITY SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 























































/ 




1. A GAME TO REMEMBER Lake Central girls bowling team pose after winning the 
Region Rumble. This was the game the entire team decided to give Megan Heflin (10) the 
winning trophy. “All the girls on the team wanted Megan to have that trophy. Her grandfa¬ 
ther was a huge supporter and we felt it was only right that she take the trophy. It was a 
very emotional day for us, and we wanted to make her grandpa proud,” Coach Stephanie 
Cooley said. Photo submitted by: Denise Heflin 2. IGNITING THE FIRE INSIDE Ignite 
girls volleyball team poses after a game. They received second place. “I was really proud 
of us because we didn’t have all our players with us and we really stepped up. It’s awe¬ 
some to see how the team comes together in those tough moments,” Nicole Milaszewski 
(10) said. Photo submitted by: Nicole Milaszewski 3. HUDDLE UP Joseph Testa (12), 
Elijah Lea (9), Brian Ludke (11), Cameron Gabouer (10). and Ryan Clark, Hanover, (11) 
huddle together before the game. They discussed what their approach will be. “[The 
team is] really supportive. Telling [teammates] how to do better during the game [shows 
our sportsmanship],” Testa said. Photo submitted by: Marie Hickey 4. SHOWING SUP¬ 
PORT ON THE FIELD Fusion boys soccer poses after winning second place in the finals. 
The team was very encouraging during the game. “Whenever [the team is] out on the 
field we are always supportive. We are always looking out for each other. [Sportsman¬ 
ship] comes when every time we sore a goal: we don’t claim the goal for ourselves, we 
consider it as a team goal,” Mohammed Hijaz (10) said. Photo submitted by: Mohammed 
Hijaz 



“My favorite part [of playing a community sport] 
is meeting all these new people because some 
people I’ve met before; others I’ve just got to 
know and we’ve become really good friends,” 
Hannah Bohlin (9) said. 




























1. GO BIG, GO BLUE The student section cheers at Lucas Oil Stadium for a varsity 
football game on Sept. 6, 2014. The game was the first DAC conference game of the 
season. “[Painting my face blue] was an impulse decision. I just thought, ‘Senior year, 
so why not go all out?’ We’re going all the way to Indy to play at Lucas Oil Stadium, so 
might as well make a statement as a student in the student section,” Danielle Morang 
(12) said. Photo by: Hannah Sonner 2. BEACHIN’ AT BASKETBALL During a Hawaiian- 
themed game, the student section goes crazy after Frank Dijak (11) made his second 
free throw in the game against East Chicago. Dijak’s free throws gave the Indians a lead 
of 62-60. “My favorite theme this year for Lake Central’s sports is the beach theme 
because everybody looks great. It’s freezing cold outside, but everyone gets to wear 
shorts, and that’s cool,” Quinn Paprocki (12) said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. CHEER 
ON On Aug. 15, the student section screams in anticipation for the scrimmage against 
the Hammond Morton Governors. The game was held in preparation for the upcom¬ 
ing season. “I love football games. I just love the energy and how it translates from the 
fans on the stands on to the field,” Alyssa Born (12) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 
4. REST IN PIECES On Feb. 20, some students from the student section gather around 
a gravestone for the Crown Point bulldog, George. Even though the Lake Central boy’s 
basketball team lost the game with a score of 71-46, the student section was still able 
to show their support. [I cheer in the student section] just to pump up the team and 
make them play better and just to have fun, go crazy, [and] show spirit,” Kristen Kaiser 
(12) said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 



“[The best parts of the student section are] to 
be around everyone, have a great time, and just 
cheer my team on. Everyone goes crazy and 
just is positive about everything. It’s just a good 
time,” Jacob Mantel (11) said. 














STAYING TRUE 
TO THE BLUE 


Taking school spirit to the next level 

PAGE BY: CAMRYN WALLACE, LAUREN DAVIDSON AND 
JACQUELINE HOFFMAN 

he crowd gapes in anticipation for the next move in 
HH the game. Screams break the silence. Erupting with 
excitement, students start jumping on the bleachers 
and throwing their hands in the air. 

“[The student section] is basically just all the students. 
Anyone can come -- freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors 
- and we just all get in the same area and cheer on our 
teammates. It’s a wild atmosphere, and we love it,” Brett 
Marovich (12) said. 

Many students go to the games to cheer on Lake Central’s 
sport teams. More than one hundred students often attend. 

“It’s just really exciting to know you’re cheering for your team. 
It’s fun to be there because it’s a really fun environment. It 
makes you anxious for them to win and have some fun with 
it,” Gabrielle Gomez (12) said. 

The school spirit of the student section makes the games 
much easier to be a part of the crowd. With the chaos in the 
hallways and the hectic times during classes, students rarely 
get to spend time to talk or spend time with friends. 

“You just see all your friends getting crazy, and everyone just 
has fun. You see them all laughing and a lot of joking around. 
It’s pretty cool,” Russell Gibbs (11) said. 

Lake Central students put aside their differences and unite 
as a single group of supporting fans. 

“It’s really cool just to go to a game, support our team. Dif¬ 
ferent friend groups come together as one [to] just all have 
fun together,” Kristen Kaiser (12) said. 

A theme for each game is chosen in advance to give students 
enough time to get their outfits put together. 

“I’ll text my friends and we’ll try to figure out what outfits 
will work best for it. Sometimes we’ll go to the dollar store or 
thrift store and put costumes together to make it all work,” 
Gomez said. 

With dozens of themes, some students favor one more 
than the others. 

“[My favorite theme was] probably the Hawaiian theme 
because it was really nice out and warm. There was a lot of 
people and all my friends were there so it was fun,” Kaiser said. 


SECTIONED OFF FROM THE STUDENT SECTION 



“Sometimes I’m sad about not being in [the student 
section] but other times I’d rather be a part of the game 
[by cheerleading], instead of just watching and messing 
around with my friends in the student section.” 

ABBY CAPPELLO (11) 



“[Band is] separate from [the student section], sectioned 
off. We have to remain reserved, so we can see when we 
have to play. If you’re on the drumline, you have to play 
during the game, so you can’t be as wild.” 

GRIFFIN TAYLOR (11) 



“[Dancing is] different [than being in the stands] because 
we’re representing the Centralettes and our coach is there 
with us. We have to be on our best behavior. You can’t 
really cheer or anything, and you just have to sit there and 
try to be focused on the performance." 

AMANDA ROBERTS (12) 


BROOKS BREAKIN' IT DOWN 

Devonte Brooks (12) explains Lucas Oil Dance Off 



“At first, [dancing in front of everyone] 
was the worst decision I’ve ever made 
in my life. I knew I sucked at danc¬ 
ing. When it was over, I felt like I had 
the best experience out of everyone 
there because I got to go to Lucas 
Oil [Stadium] and be on the field, look 
up at everyone, not a lot of people 
can say they’ve done that before. We 
didn’t have a big section [at the game]. 
It was just a group of my friends and 
[I thought they were] gonna prank 
me.[l thought they were] gonna let me 
go out there and embarrass myself. I 
kept reminding them to cheer for me. I 
was gonna be so embarrassed if they 
weren’t gonna cheer for me. People 
kept telling me I’d be fine, but when I 
got out there I was like I’m not gonna 
be fine. I would do it again actually, so 
I could win [the dance off] this time.” 



1. Alyssa Staszewski (11) Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 2. Jacob Dulski (12), 
Andrew Tellas (12) and Colin Chenoweth (12) Photo by: Hannah Giese 3. 
Student section Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 


CRYING FOR CROWN POINT 

“Mourning” over the bulldog 

On Feb. 20, the student section dressed in funeral 
attire, mourning the “loss” of Crown Point’s statue of 
the bulldog, George, who was smashed after a football 
game. The theme was originally “Jersey Shore” but was 
changed due to unfavorable reactions. 

“I liked that it was a funeral theme because people 
could dress up. There wasn’t anything to wear [to the] 
Jersey theme [game], but for the funeral theme there was 
a lot of options. You could dress up or wear LC black,” 
Christina Gomez (10) said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME SPORTS STUDENT SECTION 107 














































SERVING UP IMPROVEMENTS FOR THE UPCOMING SEASON 



M l wish to start off strong, 
and just keep my serves 
going and not get down 
on myself.” 


NAVNEET KAUR (12) 



“I want to improve my 
record, and I want to con 
tinue in the post-season 
as long as possible.” 

KRISTINA TINSLEY (10) 



“I want to become more 
consistent with my shots 
and learn from other play¬ 
ers.” 


KATRINA LOZANOSKI (10) 



SETTING THE SERVE FOR SUCCESS 

Tennis coach makes goals for the season 

“Obviously get through the week, you’re 
trying to let the team know who they’re 
playing. You know where they can 
succeed, and what strokes to hit. You 
obviously have to keep their game up by 
challenging them. We set goals for every 
match. We’ve hit every goal this year, 
except one. We’ve only had one loss so 
far, and that was a tough one. You have 
to rebound from losses like that, and 
don’t let the kids get down too much. As 
the coach, you have to be like a parent in 
a way. You know when they do good, of 
course, you praise them, when they need 
help, you give them help, and when they 
need a kick in the butt, you give them 
a kick in the butt. I’m kind of a realistic 
coach. I let you know where you stand." 

MR. BRIAN SZALONEK, 
SOCIAL STUDIES 


Elayne Wisniewski (12) and Jeannine Toth (11) Photo by: James Lafakis 

DOUBLE, DOUBLE, TOIL AND TROUBLE 

“At the beginning of the match, we come together and discuss our 
strategy for the game,” Elayne Wisniewski (12) said. 

2 “During the match, we come together and have a handshake that 
we do to pump each other up," Wisniewski said. 

3 “When one of us is down, we try and get the other up by discuss¬ 
ing the good things that they are doing,” Wisniewski said. 


COURT-WIDE 

COMPETITION 

Varsity tennis abolish their competitors 

PAGE BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU, HANNAH PRATT AND 
EMMA RITCHIE 

rom preseason to postseason, the girls varsity tennis 
team demonstrates their athletic and scholarly skills on 
and off the court. 

“[Tennis has] taught me time management. I try to get everything 
done during school, because I know my practices will go late. 

I have also learned work ethic, because for any sport you have 
to have a good work ethic,” Tinsley said. 

Many people begin sports for different reasons that may vary 
between staying in shape, reducing stress, or building friend¬ 
ships. Some do it to continue their sport at the college level. 

“I really want to continue my education after high school and 
playing a college sport is a good pathway to education. I love 
playing tennis, and that motivation to play in college is really the 
reason why I play,” Kristina Tinsley (10) said. 

Although their motives for being on the team may all be dif¬ 
ferent, the girls have come together to pursue the ultimate goal: 
making it to State. Early in the season, the team was undefeated, 
winning all of their matches 5-0. 

“I am a senior, so I have to aim high. Ultimately, I would like to 
get to State, but I definitely hope to get out of Sectionals and 
maybe Regionals,” Emily Birlson (12) said. 

Many of the varsity girls are looking forward to the rest of the 
season, and hope to continue their undefeated streak. 

“I’m expecting that we do finish off strong and we do have 
some goals that we set out for ourselves and I’m hoping we 
do accomplish those. I would like to go further in the DAC and 
Sectionals,” Navneet Kaur (12) said. 

While looking towards the end of the season, the girls are look 
ing to better themselves as individuals and as a team. 

“I would like to improve on working with my doubles partner 
to improve our game and make sure that we are both at 100 
percent. I think we have a good chance [to continue our current 
winning streak]. We have a really young team, but we’re also 
pretty strong. I don’t think that there isn’t a team that we can’t 
beat,” Birlson said. 

The team had high hopes and pushed their hardest to come 
out on top, but fell short as a team during sectionals. Birlson 
and Kaur lost in the first round of Regionals; Tinsley made it to 
the regional championship but was defeated.The underclassmen 
look forward to improving for the next season. 

























































“I always loved tennis. Ever since elementary 
school I would hit on a wall. I started going to 
middle school tennis, and that came into fresh¬ 
man year and now here I am. I just love it,” 
Navneet Kaur (12) said. 


1. SWINGING TO VICTORY Claire Gronek (9) uses a backhand stroke to return the hit. 
Gronek played varsity No. 1 doubles.“We always have a team huddle with our coaches, and 
they tell us what we are going to strive for and give us encouraging words. Then we have our 
team huddle, and we basically give each other our last words of encouragement. We always 
say, ‘Doubles hit the alley, singles good luck,’” Katrina Lozanoski (10) said. Photo by: James 
Lafakis 2. IN IT TO WIN IT Emily Birlson (12) and Navneet Kaur (12) talk with Coach Katelin 
Ellis, science, about game strategies. Birlson and Kaur won against their Hanover High 
School opponent. "As a team we did pretty well [against Hanover]. We won 5-0, so it was a 
good accomplishment,” Navneet Kaur (12) said. Photo by: Anastasia Papanikolaou 
3. REFUSE TO LOSE Lauren Gronek (9) uses a backhand stroke to return the hit. Gronek 
played varsity No. 2 singles during the match against the Portage Indians. “You get like an 
adrenaline rush, and you just feel like you could do anything. When you hit the ball or hit an 
ace you just feel unstoppable," Gronek said. Photo by: Elizabeth Bustamante 4. CLASH OF 
THE INDIANS Anna Wachowski (10) runs to return the ball. Wachowski played singles and 
won her match against Portage.“This is my second year taking [tennis] seriously. Overall, I’ve 
been taking lessons since fifth grade, but my second year trying to take it to the next level,” 
Kristina Tinsley (10) said. Photo by: Elizabeth Bustamante 


SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS TENNIS 109 




























































































“Everybody has their own sport, and if the 
people who play golf like it, then it is just as 
good as any other sport,” Brice Doescher (9) 
said. 



Tyler Copak (10) demonstrating how to putt Photo by: Annabella Piunti 


3 STEPS TO THE PERFECT PUTT 

1 “When you first approach the ball, you’re supposed 
to look at the slope. Then, you get down and read the 
line-up between the ball and the hole,” Anthony Bossi 
(10) said. 

2 “Next, you adjust the line up with the ball and the 
hole, take a few steps back and make sure you have 
the correct line-up,” Bossi said. 

3 “Lastly, you approach the ball and take a couple 
practice strokes, to prepare for the actual hit. Then 
you step up to the ball, and hit it into the hole,” Bossi 
said. 


LOOKING UP TO UPPERCLASSMEN 

How this junior is on his way to Senior success 

“I have been golfing ever since I was a 
young kid. My grandpa mostly got me 
started in golf. He signed me up for a 
couple of junior tournaments, then I got 
some lessons, and things just got roll¬ 
ing from there. The desire to always do 
better [keeps me motivated]. In golf you 
always work on consistency, and scoring 
a lower score the next day. There’s really 
no limitation on the lowest score. We are 
ranked second in the DAC this year, right 
behind Crown Point. This season we are 
looking good, we have a sophomore and 
junior stepping up to fill two varsity spots 
from last year. We lost four or five seniors 
last year, so we need to fill those spots. 
This could potentially be a good season. 
It’s a lot different [being a junior] because, 

I have been on varsity for three years 
now, so I was always the youngest kid on 
varsity. But this year, we only have three 
upperclassmen on our team, so this year I 
am one of the leaders on the team.” 

NICHOLAS GOOD (11) 



1. EYE ON THE BALL Tyler Copak (10) swings for the ball at Palmira 
Country Club. The boys golf team had high expectations for the season. 
“I think we are going to have a good year as a team. I think we are going 
to win the DAC conference, win Sectionals, then Regionals and have a 
good chance for State,” Jordan Lykowski (10) said. Photo by: Olivia Oster 
2. SWING HIGH Reid Dahlkamp (9) watches his ball soar through the 
sky during a meet. Dahlkamp had an older brother on the team, Ryan 
Dahlkamp (12). “I think we have good chemistry. We are all friends on the 
team. That helps because there is no tension between players, it is just 
a fun environment for everyone,”Tyler Copak (10) said. Photo by: Olivia 
Oster 3. SUSPENSE Ryan Dahlkamp (12) watches his ball during a tri¬ 
meet on April 14. The Lake Central boys got first. “Play your own game, 
go your own speed, do what makes you comfortable. Do not compare 
yourself to other people,” Tyler Good (9) said. Photo by: Olivia Oster 4. 
PREP TALK Coach Christopher Rossiano, Social Studies, gathers the 
boys for a quick talk before their Tri-meet against Munster and Highland. 

The Tri-meet was held at Palmira Golf Course in Saint John and had a 
successful outcome. “We did really good at the tri-meet against Munster 
and Highland, we came in first, we shot 151 and it was a good way to 
start off the season,” Reid Dahlkamp (9) said. Photo by: Annabella Piunti 



110 


















VIEW FROM HOLE 18 


PROS AND NEWBIES 

“It’s not necessarily different 
[being a freshman]. We’re all 
pretty close as a team, so it 
doesn’t affect me,” 

JACK GOOD (9) 




“Because I’m new to the 
school, the team treats me 
the same as a freshman, but 
not as bad because I’m a 
sophomore,” 

ALEX KAYE (10) 



“Being a senior is cool 
because everyone looks up to 
you. You have to set a good 
example,” 


RYAN DAHLKAMP (12) 



Golfers swing toward success 

PAGE BY: VERONICA DAVIS, OLIVIA OSTER AND 
ANNABELLA PIUNTI 

long with talent and motivation, one of the most 
important characteristics of a successful team is 
xfix a compatible chemistry between the athletes. This 
year’s boys golf team is promised to have all of those com¬ 
ponents and more. 

“[The team has] been together for a good two to four years, 
so we all know each other really well and we like having fun,” 
Ryan Wells (12) said. 

The golfers appreciate this sport for many different reasons. 
“Golf is a very peaceful and humbling game. It’s a lot about 
honesty and integrity,” Jordan Lykowski (10) said. 

Many of the boys on the golf team have been playing golf 
since they were on junior leagues at local country clubs. 

“My grandpa always played golf, so I just followed his lead. 
[I’ve been golfing] for about ten years,” Benjamin Uram (10) 
said. 

With many players having a background in the sport, the 
team is optimistic about their achievements. 

“We are going to be successful this year. We lost a lot of 
seniors from last year, but we are going to keep working to 
get better as a team,” Andrew Hegan (9) said. 

Just like every other team, there is room for improvement, 
even early on in the season. 

“Short games are always really important in high school 
golf. Other than that, [we need to improve on] learning how 
to remain calm on the golf course,” Coach Christopher Ros- 
siano, Social Studies, said. 

With only two seniors on the team this season, the upper¬ 
classmen have leadership roles to fill, along with having to 
leave a good impression on the team. 

“It’s really different [being a senior]. I know that I have to 
keep my head up, and be a great leader for younger kids. [It’s 
different] because I was the quiet kid my first and second year 
[on the team], but now I have to pass on all the knowledge I 
have to the younger golfers,” Wells said. 

This season, the golfers were able to move past Sectionals, 
but were unable to move past Regionals with a 7th-place 
ranking. 






























































































Boys track shows off their skills 

PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR, HANNAH BRYNER, CATHRYN 
CEARING, JOVANA DODEVSKA AND JOSEPH PAVELL 


or the past three years, the boys track and field team 
has traveled to and from three different locations for 
practices and home meets. 

“It’s unique in that this is the third straight year we haven’t 
had a home track at Lake Central High School. We have to 
bus the girls and the boys track teams all the way over to 
Clark [Middle School] every day for every practice, as well as 
our home meets. It’s really tough sometimes to get everything 
together and to make sure everybody is on the same page,” 
Mr. Jeff Rhody, Science, said. 

However, with those three years without a home track under 
their belt, the team has overcome the obstacles that traveling 
has placed in their way. 

“Overall the season went better than expected. We had 
always talked about making it to State, but I never thought we 
could actually place there. We had a new sprinting coach this 
year who dedicated all of this time and effort into us. Once 
you added that with the talent our team already had, then 
we were basically going to be unstoppable in the sprinting 
events,” Ethan Gomez (12) said. 

This season, the team has broken five Lake Central records, 
including the 4x4, the 100-meter, 200-meter, 400-meter and 
4x100 meter relay. 

“At State, I was the first person in Lake Central history to 
qualify in the 400-meter. I’ve only ran it five times total. For 
me though, the record was not as important as qualifying for 
State. I knew I’d have to break it if I was going to run another 
day so I went out there and it happened,” Clayton Goldman 
(11) said. 

With these accomplishments behind them, the team can 
look forward to continuing their streak on a home track. 

“The new track looks great. [We will] be able to do workouts 
at the school instead of having to go to Clark everyday, so 
that’s nice,” Kameron Konopasek (11) said. 


RUNNING HIS HEART OUT 

Charles Sykes (12) breaks four Lake Central records 

“[I have been in track] for three and a half 
years. I joined track to stay in shape for 
football, but during the process I have 
started to love track more than foot¬ 
ball. [This year] I broke the 100-meter, 
200-meter, the 4x4 relay, and the 4x1 
records. I was DAC Runner of the Year, 

The Times Athlete of the Year, [Lake Cen¬ 
tral’s] Athlete of the Year and the MVP 
for the track team. In college, I plan on 
running track at Carthier next year. Last 
year, I was named the DAC champion 
in 100-meter, sectional champion in the 
200-meter and then at Regionals, I came 
in second in the 200 [-meter relay]. For 
Ohio, [at the Midwest Meet of Champi¬ 
ons] it was a meet of the best runners in 
the state. I ran in the 4x2 relay and broke 
the meet record ” 




112 SOME SPORTS BOYS TRACK 



















1. REACHING THE FINISH LINE Ethan Gomez (12) runs to the finish line in a meet against 
the Chesterton Trojans. Gomez was part of the 4 x 100 team that went to State this year. “We 
got a new coach this year, so the practices have prepared us for running in general. Practices 
[this season] are much harder than they were last year, so it really helps us pull through in the 
meets," Nicholas Lucas (10) said. 2. VICTORY VAULT Joseph Schneider (12) prepares to pole 
vault. Team members who vault were trained separately from the rest of the team. “Half of our 
training we spend upside down, so we need to get really comfortable inverted because that 
is what half of the jump is. It is more of crossfit stuff because we do not do a lot of running," 
Schneider said. 3. SPIN SHOT Brandon Scott (12) prepares to throw the shot put on the 
Clark Middle School field. The team won against Chesterton and LaPorte on April 28. “It’s 
always the goal at the end of the year to do as well as you can to medal at the state finals, 
which is top nine in the state," Mr. Jeff Rhody, Science, said. 4. HURDLING HEROES Noah 
Tracy (11) and Maxwell Hill (9) jump hurdles in the track and field meet on April 28. The team 
placed first at the meet against Chesteron and LaPorte. “We get taken aside and do several 
drills before [we start]. We do a lot of stretching, more than what the other guys do.” Tracy 
said. Photos by: Hannah Sonner 



1 Tyler Kramer-Stephens (11) Photo by: Erin Dosen 2. Joseph Schneider 
(12) Photo by: James Lafakis 3. Michael Dahlkamp (10) Photo by: Hannah 
Sonner 


GETTING EVERYTHING TO COME TOGETHER 

Exploring the track and field trifecta 

All events for track and field fall into three general categories: running, 
jumping and throwing. These three categories are broken into 16 individual 
categories, with some team members competing in more than one category. 

“There are three different events. Distance, fielding and sprints. Distance 
is from 800 meters to two miles. Field is throwing and jumping and pole 
vaulting. Sprints is from 100-meter dash to the 200-meter dash plus all of 
the relays. The two mile and the mile train their lungs. The 800 and sprints 
work on [the runners] leg muscles and how to run through lactic acid,” Tyler 
Kramer-Stephens (11) said. 


SUCCESSFUL SEASONS FOR SENIORS 



“This [was]my second 
year. [I like] long-jumping, 
[because] it always strives 
me to do better.” 


JARED BENSON (12) 


“At our indoor Portage 
meet, [in the] 4x4,1 came 
in first. Knowing the hard 
work paid off was a good 
and rewarding feeling.” 

NATHAN ZAJAC (12) 



“Last meet I took first place in Mer¬ 
rillville. We just ordered a new pole 
vault pole, and I jumped on it for the 
first time, and I will probably beat my 
record on it ” 

KURTIS MARKIEWICZ (12) 


“The whole experience was absolutely 
amazing for me. When we originally broke the 
4x4 record, I was a last minute addition to the 
relay. All of a sudden, we broke the record and 
right there we knew something special.” Clayton 

Goldman (11) said. 














































“[Track] is a passion of mine. I just kind of have 
this strong feeling, and I really like competi¬ 
tion. It’s fun because it’s focused on me more 
than more of the whole team, so I can focus on 
myself and working to better myself,” Katelyn 
Rusiniak (9) said. 


iake central 


LAKECE 














tMircrttnui 


**i 


TRAL 


1. HURDLING THE COMPETITION Sarah Heuberger (11) leaps over a hurdle 
during a meet against Michigan City. Heuburger also broke records in 100-meter 
hurdles and 4x400 events. “I hurdle and that’s my favorite thing to do. I like it 
because it’s really stressful, and it makes me really motivated for something. It’s 
something I look forward to,” Heuberger said. Photo by: James Lafakis 2. HAND¬ 
ING OVER THE PRIZE Holly Blair (12) hands off the baton to Victoria McKenzie 
(11) in the 4x100 relay. The girls competed against the Valparaiso Vikings and placed 
second in this event. “When you finish the race, and you know that you’ve pushed 
yourself to your limits, it’s an immortal feeling. You have that powerful endorphin 
rush. It’s a sublime feeling, just for that moment,” Holly Blair (12) said. Photo by: 
Jennifer Mohamed 3. THROWING A WIN Kylee Freckelton (10) winds up to throw 
in the discus event. Along with discus, Freckleton also participated in shot put this 
season. “Sometimes, there is a lot of pressure on you because it’s not only a team 
sport. It’s an individual sport, so you have to perform your [best] for your team,” 
Megan Zajac (12) said. Photo by: James Lafakis 4. JUMPING FOR JOY Etura 
Williams (12) jumps the hurdle during a meet held at Clark Middle School on April 
21. The girls faced off against the Michigan City Wolves and won. “I’m really close 
with most of the girls. We’re really close, so it’s fun. We push each other, and in the 
workouts, we stick together and try to get better every week,” Morgan Olson (11) 
said. Photo by: James Lafakis 

























SPRINTING FOR 
TEAM SUCCESS 



Varsity girls hurdle new challenges 

PAGE BY: RUTH CHEN, VICTORIA WILKES AND JESSICA 
WOJTON 

his season, the varsity girls track team overcame 
I many obstacles, both mentally and physically, with 
success. 

“It’s going good. We’re winning a lot, and we’re hoping to 
do good post-season. I think we’re doing good. We have a 
lot of good freshmen who came in this year, and they’re really 
helping us out,” Morgan Olson (11) said. 

The team’s close bond was shown through their perfor¬ 
mances during the season. 

“We’re all really close. It’s fun. When you’re running or prac¬ 
ticing, they are always there for you and [are] always helping 
you,” Nicole Verdeyen (11) said. 

Other team members weren’t the only push they received to 
improve. There were other contributors to the team’s success. 

“[The coaches] motivate you.They really push you. Practices 
are really hard, but we get through them, and we have to know 
that this is our time to get better. This is our chance to make 
that extra step during a race,” Verdeyen said. 

With every season, the team members mature with more 
responsibilities brought upon them as upperclassmen. 

“[Being an upperclassman], you have a little more respon¬ 
sibility. You have to make sure the underclassmen know what 
drills they’re doing and make sure they’re doing them right,” 
Zhanae Howard (11) said. 

Some freshmen also landed varsity spots this season, an 
achievement that is accompanied with higher pressure. 

“It’s really cool because that’s been my goal ever since 
seventh grade. I wanted to make varsity as a freshman. I 
did and I have respect from people, I guess. People don’t 
see me as ‘that freshman’ because I have skills,” Katelyn 
Rusiniak (9) said. 

Although track can be intense, the team has a constant 
hunger for success, even when confronted by obstacles. 

“The fact that [track is] a mental sport [keeps me motivated]. 
You have to find your own motivation, whether it’s singing to 
yourself in your head to get through the pain or just knowing 
that you’re trying to better yourself. If you don’t push yourself 
that day, you know that other people around you are pushing 
themselves, and they’ll beat you,” Holly Blair (12) said. 



Kayla Capshaw (11) Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR POLE VAULTING SUCCESS 

1 “The first step is your run. You have to have speed to have the 
momentum to propel yourself over the bar,” Melanie Stepanovic 
(11) said. 

2 “The second step is the actual plant. [You] plant as in like putting 
the pole up. So, you’re running, and then you have the pole in your 
hand, and you just plant,” Stepanovic said. 

3 “Don’t be scared of heights [because] confidence is definitely a 
really big part [in pole vaulting],” Mariah Contreras (9) said. 


SHARING THE LOVE OF THE GAME 



“I joined track because 
all my friends from cross 
country do it, and I just 
really like running. I always 
have.” 

KELLY SHELTON (10) 



“My favorite part about 
track is that I can do what 
I love and still have the 
people I love around me.” 

KYLEE FRECKELTON (10) 



“[My favorite part of track 
is] knowing that at the end 
of every hard work out, the 
whole team got better.” 


DANIELA ZUBIC (9) 



“My favorite part about 
track is the girls and 
the friendships we have 
together. We’re all really 
close.” 

BROOKE GLOVER (10) 



GO THE DISTANCE WITH STEADY PERSISTENCE 


SHORT DISTANCE 

“I like [running short distance] 
because it’s shorter, it’s quicker 
and more like [an] adrenaline rush. 
For the shorter ones, like 100 [or] 
200, it’s just half a lap around the 
track or a straight away. We do a 
lot of short, quick training. We go 
hard in the weight room [to] get 
stronger. Then, [we do] a lot of 
squats and training our legs more, 
training them to go faster.” 


LONG DISTANCE 

“Ever since middle school, [I 
was] in long distance [when] I 
did cross country. Coming to 
track, this is what I’m better at 
because I’m not really good at 
sprinting. [In] long distance, it’s 
easier to get better. You just go 
out and run on your own. You 
have room to get better.” 



SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS TRACK 115 


RENEE DININO (11) 


MELISSA SPANIER (12) 
















































































VARSITY BASEBALL FOCUSES ON FUTURE PLANS 

TEAM GOALS PERSONAL GOALS 


“[Our future goals are] to win Sec¬ 
tionals and win our DAC games. 
They matter the most. We have 
to beat Morton and Munster for 
Sectionals because they will be 
our toughest opponents.” 


“I would like to be an All-State 
Academic and be the best player 
I can be. [To help obtain this 
goal], I go hitting a couple times 
a week outside of school, and I 
work out [with] the travel team.” 


JOSEPH GRAZIANO (10) STEVEN MEYER (11) 



PERFECT PITCH WALK-THROUGH 


1 

2 

3 


“Stand even with the catcher. Being right-handed and 
having a lot of movement toward the right, I stand toward 
the left side of the mound to create an angle going in to 
make it harder to hit,” Bryan Vanderlee (12) said. 

The second step is to choose your pitch. “Since I don’t 
throw as hard, I use my change up. I use it to disguise my 
fastball. If I get a hitter reaching out in front, I can roll over 
and get a ground out. I know my defense can back me up 
and make a play for me,” Vanderlee said. 

The last step is to make sure your head is in the game. 
“You have to go out there and command the zone for your 
team no matter who the opponent is. You have to go out 
there and throw strikes to give your team the best chance 
to win the game,” Vanderlee said. 


BASEBALL THROWBACKS 



“[My favorite memories are] post 
season, winning Sectionals and 
Regionals and playing those big 
games. It’s a great time and great 
for experience.” 

ALEXANDER NISLE (12) 



“[Baseball] has made me a 
better person, and it has taught 
me how to work hard for what 
I do ” 

JACK KUEHNER (12) 



“My favorite memory would be 
after we had a bad loss, and 
Coach Sandor threw a bat up in 
the air and started yelling at us 
and [the bat]. It was funny." 

JAMES MAYS (12) 


BASES LOADED 


Swinging through baseball season 






PAGE BY: COLLEEN QUINN AND AMBER STEDT 

rowds gather and bats clink against the fence. 

I Coaches and players prepare themselves for the start 
of the game. Baseball, like all other sports, requires 
time and dedication from everyone involved. Although the 
season brought many challenges, the players were able to 
help each other push through. 

“Everything with our group is mental. As soon as we over¬ 
come [that] and believe that we are our own worst enemies, 
we’re going to be OK. If we don’t overcome that, it’s going to 
be a short end to our season,” Coach Jeff Sandor, English, 
said. 

The team shared moments of celebration and reflection that 
helped them build their challenges into something bigger than 
a high school baseball team. 

“My favorite part is being able to play with my friends 
and having the team atmosphere. We get to go to practice 
everyday and get to see and bond with everyone. It’s kind of 
like a family. We learn a lot about one another. We know each 
other’s strengths and weaknesses. It’s good to be able to pick 
everyone up and work together to create something great,” 
Ian Gifford (11) said. 

As new players were brought to the varsity level, the whole 
team had to work together in order to strengthen any loose 
ends. There were numerous goals that the team shared as a 
whole; however, personal goals are just as important. 

“Personally, I can improve on throwing more strikes. I was 
not as sharp as I wanted to be. I want to get a lot of kids out 
and not walk as many. My goal as a pitcher is to just pitch my 
game and to get guys out and put our guys in a position to 
win no matter what,” Matthew Litwicki (10) said. 

Rather than building specific skills, other players were 
focused on building skills to become a more well-rounded 
player on the field and at bat. 

“[In order to improve] I try to find my weak points, [such 
as] fielding, base running, hitting and mentality. I try to find 
different ways to improve,” Christian Mota (11) said. 

After winning a heated game against Munster in the Sec¬ 
tional rounds, the team faced a loss in the championship 
against Morton. 




















































































M [l like] the leadership that the seniors bring, 
and the atmosphere that you get in every 
game,” Ryan Ruthrauff (11) said. 


1. STRIKING PITCHES Joseph Graziano (10) winds up 
for a pitch against Crown Point. Graziano was one of few 
sophomores on varsity. “[Baseball] has made me a better 
person and has taught me how to work hard for what I do." 
Graziano said. Photo by: Cassidy Niewiadomski 

2. PROTECTING THE BASE Jorey Dimopoulos (12) 
attempts to tag out a Valparaiso Viking. The game was at 
home for the Indians, and they beat the Vikings 3-2. “I used 
to play second base my whole life, but then I [moved] to 
shortstop because my arm got stronger,” Dimopoulos said. 
Photo by: James Lafakis. 3. TEAM CELEBRATION Jack 
Kuehner (12) and Ryan Ruthrauff (11) high-five after winning 
against Morton Governors. The Indians won at home 10-9. 
“Baseball is a lot about getting over things, but the team 
teaches you to get back up with things aren’t going your 
way,” Kuehner said. Photo by: James Lafakis. 4. SLIDING 
IN SAFE Ian Gifford (11) slides into the base as his oppo¬ 
nent attempts to tag him out. When the Indians are not up 
to bat, Gifford played as the catcher. “I have been playing 
baseball my whole life, but I’m not full-pledge searching to 
play college baseball,” Gifford said. Photo by: Olivia Oster 



SOME SPORTS VARSITY BOYS BASEBALL 117 
































“I like playing second base because I get to 
be in charge of a lot at once and take on two 
different bases: second and first base. I like 
doing that,” Sarah Banasiak (12) said. 


1. EYE ON THE BALL Madison Blythe (10) focuses on the ball and takes a swing. Batting caused mounds of 
pressure on the players and some found it best to tune out the distractions. “(When I’m up to bat], I concentrate 
on hitting the ball. I try to clear my mind and focus on what is going on," Blythe said. Photo by: Shannon Hearne 

2. PITCH PERFECT Julia Schassburger (11) pitches to her Highland opponent. The new turf field changed how 
the team practiced and played. “(The new field] takes getting used to. We had to play on it for a while to actually 
get a feel for it, but I like (the field],” Schassburger said. Photo by: Emily Lisac 3. SWING FOR SUCCESS Ashley 
Nylen (12) swings her bat and hits a softball into the air. Players on the team felt like they played better offense the 
defense during the season. “I feel like we are a more aggressive [team this year] because of our practices. We hav< 
been practicing more than we usually do and we have new coaching this year than last year," Jayna McDermott (1 
said. Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 4. PEP TALK Team members high-five each other after striking out the oppo¬ 
nent. During games, inspirational words helped pick up the team. “(After we get an out, we] go to the circle and a 
encouraging words, give pep talks and say ‘good job’ for getting [the other team] out,” Paige Carter (11) said. Phol 
by: Emily Lisac 


FRESH FACE ON THE FIELD 


BATTING THE NERVES AWAY 


Freshman makes varsity appearance first year 

“I think it’s really cool to be a freshman 
and be able to play on varsity all the 
time. I’ve never played a JV game. I’ve 
always worked hard [in softball] and 
[getting on the varsity team] was one of 
my goals. I really like [being on the team]. 
I play on older teams for travel, so I’m 
used to [being on older teams]. My most 
memorable part of the season was being 
able to pitch the first game of the season 
on the new field. I thought that was really 
cool. Another part was when I threw a 
no-hitter against Merrillville. I need to 
keep working for college because I want 
to get into a Division I school, [as] one of 
the top schools for softball. I want to be 
able to pitch on TV. I need to keep work¬ 
ing at [softball], but obviously education 
comes first.” 



“I usually listen to music 
before a game just to 
relax and get some of my 
nerves out.” 

CRYSTAL GUZMAN (10) 



“To calm my nerves 
before a big game, I just 
mentally prepare myself 
[for it] and work on what I 
need [to improve].” 

CIERA NOVAK (11) 



“Everyone supports each 
other, so it calms my 
nerves when I hear my 
team cheering me on.” 

SYDNEY SCHERZINGER (12) 


MADISEN TUCKER (9) 







































































pa y-' 

v( 


i 

■ 


i 



md „., 

mm 

Aspyn Novak (12) Photo by: Shannon Hearne 

BALANCING WORK AND PLAY 


1 

2 

3 


“I try to get my school work done during the school day, so I have 
time to hang out with friends and do softball after school. I mostly 
finish homework in my classes, but I aide too, so I try to get some 
of it done during aiding,” Aspyn Novak (12) said. 

“I definitely get my softball work, like practicing and going to the 
batting cages, done before I go out. My social life is usually on the 
weekends, though,” Novak said. 

“Some of the softball girls [and I] go to Starbucks and try to get our 
work done together. I guess that’s kind of putting my softball life, 
social life and school life all in one,” Novak said. 


PAGE BY: ELENA GORNEY, EMILY BADGER AND EMILY 
LISAC 

s the varsity softball season unfolded, the team faced 
a change of scenery. The new AstroTurf field, which 
was finished in January, required some adjustments 
in the team’s game. 

“The turf field has affected us a lot because we were so used 
to playing on the turf for our first home games. When we went 
away, we [played on] grassy outfields and bumpy infields. 
Our players were not used to it, so it affected how we felt the 
ground ball, caught pop-ups and how our game altogether 
was played," Jayna McDermott (11) said. 

Playing on a new field can be tough, but with hard work and 
practice, the team adjusted well. 

“[Even though] it’s different playing on a turf field, I like it 
more [than the old field] because the ball bounces [better], 
and it is easier to catch ground balls,” Ashley Nylen (12) said. 
The team had 10 upperclassmen players this year, and their 
experience was beneficial during practices and games. 

“We have a lot of upperclassmen, so [the seniors] are show¬ 
ing the underclassmen the ropes. Everyone bonds really well, 
and everyone gets along,” Nylen said. 

Eventually, the team found its footing in the competition and 
continued to move forward, landing them at State.There, the 
Indians were able to beat two of the three top-ranking teams 
in Indiana. 

“We have won some very big games, and we have lost some 
games that we wish we wouldn’t have. However, we are start¬ 
ing to find our niche right now, and this is the perfect time to 
be doing that,” Coach Jeff Sherman, Math, said. 

The girls faced a loss against the Center Grove Trojans, how¬ 
ever, with a final score of 6-2. And while this game dashed 
their hope for the championship, the team is still able to reflect 
on the impact of their run. 

“I think we proved a lot of people wrong in the postseason, 
and making it to State showed all of the hard work we put 
into that goal. Even though we didn’t win we made a great 
run and it was an awesome end to my senior year,” Sarah 
Banasiak (12) said. 


SOME SPORTS VARSITY GIRLS SOFTBALL 119 

















































FUTURE STAR PITCHER OF VARSITY 


Freel prepares for some varsity team goals 



“[I plan on] trying to make varsity next 
season. Winning a State Champion¬ 
ship [next year] is a goal. [I’m going 
to] achieve it by working hard in the 
off-season, having good team chemis¬ 
try, playing smart baseball and working 
hard in the weight room. [I] go to 
pitching lessons and hitting lessons, 
and I come in [to school] in the morn¬ 
ings to work out [to prepare and reach 
my goals]. I’m a pitcher. I just try and 
throw strikes, and I have my teammates 
to back me up in the infield and the 
outfield.” 

KYLE FREEL (10) 


MOST MEMORABLE MOMENTS 



“I participate in long jump, the 200, and 4x4. 
I really like long jumping a lot. It makes me 
feel like a superhero, like Superman.” 


NOAH WHITNEY (9) 



“[I am going to miss] running with the guys 
during practice [because it] was really fun. 
[My most memorable win was] beating 
Munster and Crown point at a meet that was 
in Munster." 

MICHAEL LUCAS (11) 



“My most memorable win was when I 
cleared 10. I thought it was really cool 
because it was just double digits, and I’ve 
never done that before. It felt great, and my 
coach was excited.” 

DANIEL MATCHAIN (12) 


STEPPING UP TO 
THE PLATE 


Baseball players prep for the future 

PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD, VICTORIA WILKES, RUTH 
CHEN AND JESSICA WOJTON 

t the start of every season, players take the field and 
hope to shine in their positions on the team. After 
months of preparation, the baseball players plan to 
bring their developed skills to the game, and contribute to 
the team’s success throughout the season. 

“My favorite thing about baseball is just being around the 
game I love. The hardest part is coming out everyday, and 
giving 100 percent. It’s hard to do that on a day-to-day basis,” 
Douglas Visnack (9) said. 

Even though the JV and freshmen teams are different, they 
do a lot of the same conditioning and workouts to prepare 
for the upcoming season. 

“Sometimes [the] JV [team] and freshmen [team] practice 
together. We usually have to do field maintenance after it rains, 
so we lose a lot of practice time. Conditioning is pretty much 
the same [for both teams]. I think [JV’s games] are harder 
since they have more experience,” Ryan Ruberry (9) said. 

For any team, it’s important to set team goals as well as 
personal goals to strive for every season. 

“I believe our team and personal goals for the season will 
probably be to win as many games as we can and win the 
end-of-the-season tournament, which will probably be against 
Munster,” Martin Ewing (9) said. 

The team found success throughout the season. They over¬ 
looked their mistakes and focused on the things they did well. 

“I think one of our best highlights was playing [against] 
Crown Point. We were down 4-3 and going into the top of the 
seventh inning. We started batting, [and] I led off the inning 
with a double [and] then we got a walk. [Then], someone 
struck out, and Tyler Frank (10) hit a three run home run, and 
we ended up winning 7-5,” Bradley Loden (10) said. 

Although the stakes are not as high for the JV and fresh¬ 
man players, they still strive to do their best and improve 
every game to eventually earn the varsity spot they hope to 
get in the future. 

“It’s just fun being around the whole team [because] it’s a 
great group of guys. I just hit and field as best as I can [to 
contribute to the team’s success]. I do what I can do,” Logan j 
Carver (9) said. 



DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN TWO TOUGH TEAMS 


FRESHMAN PITCHER 

“For the freshmen, it’s their first 
time all together, and we’re still 
trying to work together and start to 
feel more comfortable as a team. 
JV has been together for a while; 
they have all been on the same 
travel [team].” 

NICHOLAS SWANSON (9) 


JV FIRST BASEMAN 

“I would say the freshman 
[team] is a little more laid back. 
[In terms of] JV, [the coaches] 
expect a little more from us. 
They expect us not to mess up 
as much because we are older, 
and we’ve been in the program 
longer than the freshmen.” 

CHRISTOPHER FUNDICH (10) 



















































































“I compete in the 800 and the mile. I enjoy 
running, and I wanted to improve my times,” 
Samuel Matchain (12) said. 




1. HIT AND RUN Nicholas Bandura (10) bunts the ball before sprinting to first base. Bandura put down the bunt in order to bring 
in a run. “[My goal] is to win every game [we have left] in the season and to get better as a whole team," Bandura said. Photo 
by: Camryn Wallace 2. TAKING A TIME-OUT The freshman baseball team talks about their game plan on the pitcher’s mound. 
After taking time to recuperate, they came out strong during the rest of the game. “My favorite part is just seeing everyone play 
and the team working together." Payton Sanders (9) said. Photo by: Ashley Kralik 3. SLIDING IN SAFELY Colton Rydlewski (10) 
slides into home plate. The JV baseball team beat the LaPorte Slicers 9-2 on Tuesday, April 28. "We are bonding well and win¬ 
ning all of our games by a lot," Rydlewski said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 4. IN THE STRIKE ZONE Sam Barnhart (10) throws 
a pitch. Barnhart pitched six innings against the LaPorte JV baseball team. “[Our season] is going great. We lost [one] game [so 
far], but you know what, we just [have] to keep plugging ahead.” Barnhart said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 


i HAjh* V ' rrai 





SOME SPORTS JV/FRESHMAN BOYS 121 








































ill!!! 


IlSljllll 



hJI' ' vsvs\vv\ 

; iSI ' v W' v v N \ N 


v,** * >* *- W, 

v \ V \ v v vr ^ 


S %*\ \ V \ \ V/M*v 


\ W\X v v 
s \ \ \\S \ ^ 


< V- x.\ I / I I 1 X \ s V \ \ V \ \ • \ V \\\ \ >? \ 

A I. / l 1 *iS v svvv^v .v ^\ \ N \ v\\ \ v \ 

ifW- ; %/ ■ ' i I ^^<^\Vx\VA\\\\\V 

T 7 W ' • >r jLww ,: \\\\\\\\\\V 

1; fil; iTi , HtTTTiT iTrTTnTfirTTuTTpnnTrTTTTrij'fTTTTTf i | i • 

im!i 


III!! I 

!!»!!! 


• hhlllfl 

I! !! 


j !i i|i;i|i!ji i|l]i|!]i|i 
I I i l !!l I I it I I 

jiji !,!,(! 11111 ; 

I ! It! i Hi ill ill!; 

I i]l i,':l :.l i'!:l; 

Ijljl!: jlMHH 


i! 


I I I l!i. 

i t Hi" 


II. I. 

h\k*A* 


11 m ■!*;*!* ■ ' 


I i«111. <* 

lillllii! ;:r 


! i i .jit UH ; : 
i mJmii 11!; ;m ; ; :j ; 


I I 1 I iM I I'l :» I | 

* • : I * Mm* 1 ' i I ' • 1 • u 

, • ' I 1 •. 1 1 ■ 




* * ■ i • » I f . « t » 


I * I . * • • j.. tliithtM 4 1«• • * imiUmMimmi • * • • • f • * • t • 

* lii I I 1 i 111 h I :! 

!i !i!iiilill !i:i«, ; r !: ! 


. i:. 'm: ' ! 

i»;: Ml! I V’ / 


• i 1 . M * ’ M 

»•!»•♦» » 
> * • C» . i 


ii » i. 

!•! I! iil'li 


r M 


IT ^ i r • < M i * * I ;«* I 

:!i!l i! |j ’ !» v: ; s > • 

V . { .. ! : • i • * f * m • * • 


3 Jl'l ! ill l 2 :!ijii ji,:M.‘ , 

^1 I I !!! HIM !;',i « ! i! ! .»■ ; : 'M 


W i! ?! 

| 

t ! i,' 

Mil i I (.; 1111«j M * i » f ♦ u 

1 h i! ; l :!:?!;!; 


mmrr 



1. VICTORY OVER VIKINGS Anna Wachowski (10) serves the ball across the court. The team 
beat Valparaiso with a score of 3-2. “It feels really good after a big win because usually big wins 
aren’t that easy. You have to try really hard, and you’re really tired by the end, so coming out on 
top is the best feeling ever,” Wachowski said. Photo by: Jovana Dodevska 2. TEAM HUDDLE 
Tennis players huddle at the beginning of their match. The girls encouraged each other to do 
their best in the difficult, upcoming match. “I just really love playing competitive tennis, the 
matches and most importantly, the bonding with my team. I love all the girls, and I like that we’re 
such a close team,” Lauren Gronek (10) said. Photo by: Jovana Dodevska 3. FAST PITCH Alexa 
Pinarski (9) is in the midst of pitching the ball during a home game. The girls beat Valparaiso 
with a score of 19-2. “I just love that I’m right there every pitch. I’m involved with everything,” 
Pinarski said. Photo by: Michael Clark 4. RELAY RACE Morgan Clapman (10) holds the baton 
while she sprints to hand it off to the next runner. Clapman ran in the 4x800 relay race. “In relays 
you get to accomplish everything with the three other girls on your team,” Clapman said. Photo 
by: James Lafakis 5. HITTING HARD Kristen Hecht (10) hits a fly ball to the outfield. As Hecht 
ran around the bases, Coach Melissa Magdos stood next to first base, guiding the batters. Our 
base running and hitting improved significantly from game one to game two. I think we had 
some first game jitters, but we got that out of the way, and we are ready to take on anyone,” 
Coach Melissa Magdos said. Hecht said. Photo by: Michael Clark 









“My most memorable moment was going to the 
away meets. Even being on JV, I got to go to the 
varsity meets,” Mackenzie Goncher (9) said. 









































































SWINGING 
INTO MOTION 


JV girl athletes stay determined 

PAGE BY: MICHAEL CLARK, JENNA CRAWFORD AND 
GIANNA MILLS 

houghout the season, girls spring sports such as 
MB]track and field, tennis and softball have had teams 
filled with goals and aspirations. 

All teams are in full swing, with JV girls tennis striving to 
fulfill its team goals. 

“Overall, the team is doing really well. Our number one goal 
is to get number one in the DAC,” Hannah Hill (9) said. 

Track and field is another spring sport that has set goals 
for itself. 

“The season is going great. A lot of people are getting their 
[personal records],” Clairese Urchell (9) said. 

While the teams have been working toward success, indi¬ 
viduals are on their way to improving their performances. 

“So far my season is going really well. There’s always room 
for improvement for me. I play doubles. I personally believe 
that doubles is harder because you have to communicate with 
your partner who’s on the court with you. I ended up playing 
a singles match and winning it, so that was cool. My personal 
goal for the season is that I want to win more, especially with 
my doubles partner because that would be such a great 
accomplishment for the two of us,” Hill said. 

With tennis players perfecting their skills, members of track 
and field are also striving to achieve their goals. 

“My personal goal is to hit at least 32 in shot put and about 
90 in discus. [The goal for] the team is to make it to Section¬ 
als,” Urchell said. 

With the end of the year quickly approaching, JV softball 
players have high hopes for the last few games of their season. 

“[Our team goal is] to go to State and Regionals,” Rylee 
Platusic (9) said. 

Through each sport, team members have been brought 
together and have grown closer during the season. 

“[My favorite part is] being able to play. We’re really a family, 
everyone on the team. I know it’s kind of cheesy to say, but 
I look at other teams and then at our’s, and Lake Central is 
really like a family,” Hill said. 



1. Kylee Freckelton (10) 2. Jazmyn Zapata (10) 3. Sarah Spivak (10) Photos 
by: James Lafakis 


PREPARATIONS FOR TRACK AND FIELD 

JV track’s insight on events and warm-ups 

Track and field has an abundance of events for those 
who are exploring activities pertaining to endurance 
and strength. The field events include discuss, shot put, 
pole vaulting, hurdles, high jump and long jump. When 
competing on the track, there is a variety of different dis¬ 
tances to participate in. Whether a person is competing 
in a track event or a field event, it is important to stretch 
and do warm-ups. 

“I run [the] 400, 200, 100, 4x100, and 4x400. Before I 
run, I usually do a-skips, b-skips, and c-skips, and I like 
to do different stretches and warm-ups. That’s pretty 
much how I prepare,” Savanna Spears (9) said. 


JV SOFTBALL HAS HIGH HOPES FOR SEASON 



“As a team, I think we just 
want to be able to work 
together better so we can 
get a good win ” 


AMANDA NOBLETT (9) 



“We’re 15-1 right now in 
the season, so we just 
want to keep winning 
games and improving." 


JESSICA KIEFOR (9) 



“[The team wants] to go 
far in Sectionals. We need 
to hit better and get more 
girls on base." 


CHEYENNE MATHAS (9) 



“For the rest of this 
season, I would like to win 
the last few games and go 
out with a good record.” 


SELENA MICHAKO (9) 



SISTERS WHO PLAY TOGETHER STAY TOGETHER 


BOND THROUGH BLOOD 

“I like [playing in high school] 
because we’re all at about the 
same level. [My sister and I] do 
everything together. We’re pretty 
much best friends. [Tennis] is just 
another thing we do together and 
both enjoy.” 


BOND THROUGH TEAM 

“I like [playing at the high 
school level] because it’s a 
challenge. We all have this 
bond since we’re teammates. 

[I like playing with Hope] 
because you’re not in this 
alone. It’s fun because we’re 
really close.” 


HOPE MARTENS (10) 


SKYLAR MARTENS (10) 



SOME SPORTS JV/FRESHMAN 123 






























































sweetFrog 4 

pr emiumfrozen yogurt ) j 


LOVE ON THE JOB 


Couple meets at Texas Roadhouse 

PAGE BY: JODIE HODGES AND DARIAN SMITH 

ost people find work to get a little extra cash. Tyler 
Hires (12) and Lauren Granskog (11), however, 
\ 1 Vi w ) ende d up gaining a little more than money at work. 
Hires and Granskog, who have been dating since 
July of 2014, met each other while working at Texas 
Roadhouse. 

Tve been working there for about a year and half 
since last March and she started this March, so she’s 
been there for a while. When she first started, I was still 
swimming. I only worked one day a week, so we didn’t 
really talk. Then we started working together. We started 
talking and I was like ‘Oh who’s that cute girl, I should 
probably go talk to her,”’ Hires said. 

Before Granskog and Hires got their jobs, they had 
never met each other. 

“I had no idea who she was. She did not exist to me 
before March,” Hires said. 

Texas Roadhouse is open six hours a day so the major¬ 
ity of their time spent together was at work. 

“Most the time we have worked together because 
everyone works the same hours there. Sometimes we 
work three hours, sometimes it’s six hours a day. Some 
weeks, we get lucky, and we get the same days off,” 
Granskog said. 

With their schedules constantly changing, the couple 
deals with working different hours. 

“Every single week [the schedule] is randomized, so we 
don’t always have the same schedule,” Granskog said. 

Granskog and Hires manage to make the best out of 
their situation. 

“The thing I like most about working with him is the 
fact that even though we are working, we can still see 
each other. It let’s us see each other more,” Granskog 
said. 

Having jobs and being busy with school can take time 
away from relationships. In Hires and Granskog situation, 
their jobs have worked into their relationship, bringing 
them together as a couple. 


BALANCING TWO JOBS AND SCHOOL WORK 

Neal Broad (11) works at Aspen Cafe and Gino’s 



Not a lot of students can handle the 
pressure of one job on top of school- 
work, let alone two jobs. Neal Broad (11) 
deals with these pressures on a regular 
basis. 

“I work five days a week. During the 
week, I work 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. every day 
after school at Gino’s. On weekends, I 
usually work 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Aspen 
Cafe, then go back to Gino’s at 5 p.m. 
and work untill 11 p.m.,” Broad said. 

Despite the stresses of juggling two 
jobs and schoolwork, Broad makes the 
best of his situation. 

“I’ve been working at Aspen for a little 
under a year, and then I’ve been working 
at Gino’s for about two months. I bus 
and wash dishes,” Broad said. 


124 SOME STUDENT LIFE I0BS SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 




































1. SWEET MONEY While working at Sweet Frog, Sean Meyer (11) cleans and works the cash reg¬ 
ister. Meyer has worked at Sweet Frog since his freshman year. Meyer is given a free twelve-ounce 
cup of yogurt after every shift. “My favorite part about working at Sweet Frog is interacting with 
people most of the time, and I like being able to work at a very popular place," Meyer said. Photo 
by: Jenna Crawford. 2. WHATEVER RINGS YOUR BELL Victoria McKenzie (11) works at Taco Bell/ 
Pizza Hut. She was hired at the beginning of September this year. “[I like this job because] I get free 
food whenever I have a break and I get a lot of discounts,” McKenzie said. Photo by: Jenna Craw¬ 
ford 3. LOVIN’ IT AT MCDONALDS Amanda Mitcheltree (11) has worked at McDonald’s since late 
February of 2014. Mitcheltree has loved her job and has even made many of the friends she has now 
from working there. “My favorite part is being at the front because I like being able to interact with 
the customers and some of the ‘regulars’ that come in,” Mitcheltree said. Photo by: Jenna Crawford 





HOW TO HUNT FOR JOBS 



1 

2 

3 


“Some of the best ways to find 
jobs is to look in the newspa¬ 
per, the internet and to talk to 
friends,” Chase Lowden (12) 
said. 

“I learned that when your inter¬ 
viewer asks to tell them about 
yourself, say stuff that shows 
good work ethic,” Kyle Massa 
(11) said. 

“Apply everywhere. Remain 
unbiased and remember to 
keep an open mind because 
you’ll be making money,” Jes¬ 
sica Sellers (12) said. 



Jessica Sellers (12) Photo by: Darian Smith 


DO YOU HAVE A JOB? 


CRAMMING CRAZY HOURS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM 


poll out of 329 students 

DON’T HAVE JOBS 

There are two major factors 
that can determine why 74% 
of students do not have jobs. 
Some students might not have the time in their 
schedules, while others are too young to apply for 
a work permit. 

DO HAVE JOBS 

26% of students are driven to apply for a job, de¬ 
spite their busy schedules. 

Working outside of school 
can help a student expand 
their communication skills 
and learn responsibility. 





“This past August, I 
worked almost every 
single day, and so far I’ve 
worked all holidays except 
Easter.” 

DANIELLE NOWAK (12) 

“I work four to five days a 
week and five to six hours 
a day at Sicilan Joe’s. The 
hours are pretty rad.” 


IAN LITTRELL (10) 



“I work at Rico’s pizza in 
Lansing, and on average 
I work about 20 hours a 
week.” 


JERALD LYDA (11) 



“I was a lifeguard over the 
summer at Deep River. I 
worked 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
just about every day.” 


ADAM LECHOWICZ (11) 



“Last year I babysat my 
neighbor’s kids from 5:40 
a.m. to eight at night 
everyday. I had weekends 
off though.” 

ANDREA SCHUSTER (12) 



“I work at Chips and Salsa 
in Dyer. I work 2 days a 
week from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m ” 


NICHOLE HEUSMANN (11) 


“I think [working jobs] has to be hurting their 
academics. They should be going home with four 
classes a day, that’s two hours of homework. If 
they’re working eight hours, that homework isn’t 
getting done. They have to have some study 
time,” Mrs. Joan Loden, 
Mathematics, said. 






















































































1. GAME PLAN Eva Elmalh (11) and Emily Segovia (11) discuss how they are going to assist 
people. The girls volunteered at the St. Jude Walk to earn volunteer hours for N-teens. “I did a 
cancer walk. Relay for Life, with my friends. It felt good to give back," Andrea Kowalewicz (12) 
said. 2. PUSHING THROUGH THE COLD Jeanine Gilbert (11) and Lauren Druzbicki (11) are 
bundled up for the chilling temperatures during the St. Jude Walk. Many participants in the walk 
consisted of church members. “I volunteer for church stuff like a children’s day. It’s pretty fun,” 
Micheal Hemmerling (11) said. 3. MARCHING FOR A CAUSE Walkers make their way through 
the 1.3 mile course for the St. Jude Walk in Lansing. All of the money collected from the walk 
went toward St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. “I volunteered at the Munster Humane Soci¬ 
ety. (Helping] made me feel very confident and happy,” Kaitlyn Opperman (10) said. 4. FRIENDS 
AND FUN Eva Elmalh (11), Maria Moricz (11) and Emily Segovia (11) are laughing and having 
a good time at the St. Jude Walk. The walk took place on Saturday, Oct. 4. “I like to volunteer 
at Piefer to see my old teachers and help out,” Mohammed Hijaz (10) said. Photos by: Jessica 
Wojton 


~ J* — 


126 












STUDENTS STEP INTO COMMUNITY SERVICE 


“I currently volunteer at the Gary food bank, and 
I’ve been doing it for four years now. It makes 
me feel better because I know I’m helping the 
community in some way,” Parker Danner (10) 

said. 




“I volunteered at the 
St. Agnes Fest in Chi¬ 
cago Heights over the 
summer. I like to make 
people smile." 

RADIANT SYKES (10) 



“There’s that feeling 
of fulfillment doing 
something good for 
the community, so that 
makes it worth it ” 

RYAN WIEBE (12) 




“I gave presents 
to the homeless 
people with my 
church” 

KENNEDY KNOX (12) 

“I volunteered at a 
camp over the summer 
for a week. It’s called 
Silver Bridge Ranch, 
and it’s in Wisconsin ” 

BROOKE LANTING (10) 


WALKING TO 
FIND A CURE 



Students help at the St. Jude Walk 

PAGE BY: SOFIA HAY AND ANNABELLA PIUNTI 

he St. Jude Walk took place on Saturday, Oct. 4, 
in Lansing, III. This all-day event included a 1.3 
mile walk and fun fair to raise money for St. Jude 
Children’s Research Hospital. Some N-Teens 
members volunteered to participate in the walk and helped 
with the fun fair. 

“I was getting hours for N-Teens, and I thought it would 
be fun and easy to do with my friends. It was really cold, 
but it was fun,” Jeanine Gilbert (11) said. 

The registration fee was $5 and a t-shirt was $20, but 
all funds were donated toward research for the children. 

“I’ve always enjoyed volunteering, and I think St. Jude’s 
is a great cause,” Emily Segovia (11) said. 

Many people participated in the walk. The fun fair that 
followed included bounce houses, face painting, a hoola 
hoop contest, games, concessions and giveaways. All of 
the proceeds went to St. Jude’s as well. 

“It was a good turn out. Almost all of the [Lansing Church 
of Christ] came to support it and walk,” Segovia said. 

N-Teens supplies volunteers for programs that need 
assistance for different events in the community. The club 
coordinator, Mrs. Kelsey Becich, English, helps organize 
the students for these occasions. 

“Basically I, with help from some other students, provide 
different volunteer opportunities from many different com- 
munitites. What is so great about Lake Central is that we 
come from many different communities, so there are many 
different opportunities,” Mrs. Becich said. 

All the hard work N-Teens members put in does pay off. 
Along with the general rewarding feeling that volunteering 
provides, members recieve other benefits as well. 

“Based on how many hours [members] save up, they can 
participate in different social events that we have through¬ 
out the year. In the fall we might go to the pumpkin patch, 
in the winter we go to Chicago, and at the end of the year 
we do a Six Flags trip,” Mrs. Becich said. 


HAUNTED BY LOCAL SCREAMS AND SCARES 


Nina Strubing (10) volunteers for haunted house 



The Lake Hills Haunted House is a local 
attraction that takes place from Oct. 3 through 
November. 

Lake Central students are among those who 
volunteer to work as actors, makeup artists, and 
prop and set designers. 

“[When I joined,] I was expecting to basically 
make friends and scare people. It was super 
fun,” Strubing said. 

Anyone can go to the haunted house and 
anyone interested can volunteer. Strubing was 
inspired to volunteer for the haunted house after 
experiencing the scare in previous years. 

“I went through [the haunted house] a few 
years prior to working it. My brother worked it, 
so we would go and support him,” Strubing said. 

Strubing and numerous other staff members 
took on the acting role for the haunted house. 

“The key is don’t be loud and obnoxious and in 
their face, be more quiet and creepy. It doesn’t 
have to be loud to be scary,” Strubing said. 







N-Teens members volunteer at fairgrounds 

One event that members of N-Teens volunteer their time 
at is the Covered Bridge Harvest Festival. This festival takes 
place at the Lake County Fairgrounds in Crown Point every 
year. 

“It’s hard to make it to every event. I feel like [The Cov¬ 
ered Bridge is] one of the most fun events. Everybody is 
having fun, and there are lots of little kids. It’s a good time,” 
Miranda Anuszkiewicz (11) said. 

N-Teens holds various social events for members as well. 

“I needed to join a club because I want to be in National 
Honors Society. [N-Teens teaches] people skills and 
responsibility,” Serene Fakhoury (10) said. 

1. Kristen Hecht (10) Photos by: Annabella Piunti 


SOME STUDENT LIFE VOLUNTEERING 127 











































































“I have only applied to one college so far, so I 
am winging it. I am pretty lucky, so I hope to get 
into Ball State,” Kyle Hayes (12) said. 


JOINING THE HOOSIER HYSTERIA 

Samantha Copeland (12) commits 
to dream college in Bloomington 


“I applied to four colleges, but my 
top choice was IU Bloomington. 

I want to go there for the Kelly 
School of Business and get a de¬ 
gree in accounting. I got accepted 
on October 15 while I was sitting 
in Mr. Smith’s room. I am planning 
on rooming with my best friend. I 
cannot wait to end my high school 
career and start a new one in 
Bloomington. I am excited to meet 
new people and learn new things. 

I received a $4,000 scholarship. 

I hope to attain more to help my 
family pay for the expenses. As 
long as I maintain a 3.0 GPA in col¬ 
lege, my scholarship will continue 
through my years of schooling.” 


1. LOOKING FORWARD Gina DiNino (12) discusses graduating at 
semester with Mrs. Brynn Denton, Guidance, while looking at her 
status with different colleges. DiNino has decided she will work 
the rest of this year and go to college the next year. “I visited my 
guidance counselor for my senior meeting, and she taught me how 
to explore Naviance and college [applications],” Megan Bareme 
(12) said. 2. ACCEPTANCE FRENZY Students have acceptance 
letters and scholarships from different colleges. Early admission 
started in November for most colleges and the Common App. “I 
recieved my acceptance letter from Indiana University, and I am 
still anxiously awaiting my letter from my dream college, University 
of Illinois,” Marisa Mendoza (12) said. 3. COLLEGE QUESTIONS 
Aidan McCambridge (12) talks to the representative from Indiana 
University Northwest. This booth was set up in Main Street on Nov. 
11 to provide answers to curious students. “I wish I had taken the 
opportunity of looking at the college booths. However, I already 
knew where I wanted to attend,” Jacob Graziani (12) said. 4. COL¬ 
ORADO BOUND Michaela Krysinski (12) looks at her acceptance 
letter to University of Colorado Springs. She applied at the end of 
October and got her letter in the beginning of November. “When 
I recieved my first acceptance letter, I was so excited. I knew I 
would get in, but it was still a nice reassurance,” Aaron Ludwig (12) 
said. Photos by: Hannah Bryner 























THIRD YEAR IS 
THE CHARM 


Students graduate in three years 

PAGE BY: HANNAH BRYNER 

n May 29, 2015, when seniors sit in their caps 
(mmm and gowns thinking about the past four years of 
high school, there will be eight students who only 
reminisce on three. These three-year students are 
still considered part of this year’s graduating senior class. 

“I started researching colleges my freshman year, and I 
realized I would have enough credits to graduate after my 
junior year, so I decided to. My mom has played a big part 
in this because she has planned all of my courses out for 
me ahead of time,” KalebToweson (12) said. 

Not all students go away their first year after graduating. 
Some reap the benefits of staying home an extra year. 

“I get a scholarship for graduating a year early, so that 
scholarship will cover my first year of Purdue Calumet. I’m 
going to get all of my core classes out of the way. Then 
after that, I will transfer down to Purdue West Lafayette,” 
Sarah Milzarek (12) said. 

Although these students have chosen to sacrifice a year 
out of their high school careers, some are faced with more 
responsibilities than ever before. 

“It is pretty nice not having a junior year, but it is also very 
stressful. I have to take four online classes to get all of my 
credits,” Milzarek said. 

This handful of students has had to adapt to changes in 
order to graduate this year. However, the jump from sopho¬ 
more year to senior year is not one that happens over night. 

“I think it is going to be different and a little weird walk¬ 
ing with kids who I haven’t been in the same class as my 
whole life. In the long run, I do not think that it will matter 
that much to me,” Morgan Shoemaker (12) said. 

Being a senior has plenty of perks, such as hang-out spots 
and the best seats at football games. These also come 
with being a three-year graduate, if the student chooses 
to participate. 

“Sitting in the front row at games or standing on the senior 
wall before school is not really important to me. Most of 
my friends are juniors. I also hang out with seniors, so I still 
get the senior experience,” Toweson said. 



Tiffany Polyak (12) Photo Illustration by: Hannah Bryner 


16 APPLICATIONS AND COUNTING 

1 “At first, I researched a lot about medicine because that 
is what I for sure want to go into. I looked for the top 
schools and applied to them. I started looking in fresh¬ 
man year, but chose the schools this past summer," 
Tiffany Polyak (12) said. 

2 “Most of the schools were on the Common App, so 
I was lucky for that. The only schools that were not, 
were IU, four schools in California and University of 
Washington. Besides that, I only had to fill out the 
Common App,” Polyak said. 

3 “I had to write at least six major essays. I had to 
write around twenty including the personal state¬ 
ments. I filled out all of my information and turned 
them in. I have been accepted into IU, but none of 
the Common App ones were sent back yet,” Polyak 
said. 


STUDENTS GRADUATING AT SEMESTER 


Source: Lake Central 

Ta/ ARE GRADUATING 

/ | The last day before Christmas 

f break, Fri. Dec. 19 will be the last 
day for 4% of the seniors. They 
are called “early grads’ and complete high school 
in three and a half years. 


ARE WAITING r\r\ C\ / 

The other 96% of students 
are completing high school f 

in four and a half years. They 
will come back to school after Christmas break and 
continue to finish the school year. 


SOME STUDENT LIFE PLANNING EARLY 129 















PARKING AT ZIG-E'S, PRODUCE DEPOT AND FAGEN-MILLER 


1 

2 

3 


It costs $150 per semester to 
park at Zig-E’s Funland and 
students can recieve a $25 
deposit back. There were 40-50 
spots sold this year. 

It costs $125 per semester, 
including a $25 deposit, to park 
at Produce Depot. Students 
call in to renew or cancel their 
spots. They sold parking spots 
to 10 students this year. 

It costs $1 a day, which is paid 
in full up front, to park at Fagen- 
Miller Funeral Home. Students 
do not need to renew the pass 
to keep the spot all year. They 
sold 37 passes this year. 



Joseph VanVuren (10) Photo by: Kayla Hallowell 


STUDENT DRIVERS 


poll out of 330 students 


37 % 


DO NOT DRIVE 

These students do 
not park in any lots 
offered by the school 
or by the surrounding 
areas. 


DO DRIVE 

These students park in 
one of the four lots that 
are offered by Lake 
Central or any of the 
other three lots. 


63 % 


TAKING ON THE LONG STRIDE 

Student driver explains his parking spot at Zig-E’s 


“Parking at Zig-E’s is all right so far. It hasn’t 
been very cold, but when it does get cold 
the walk will suck. It’s organized well; it’s on 
a first come first serve so it’s fair and not 
crowded. When I get there in the morning, I 
usually just get right in. I drive three or four 
other people, including myself. I have to get 
there by 6:55 a.m. at the latest so that we 
won’t be late after the long walk. I think it’s 
expensive, but it’s worth it just because driv¬ 
ing to school is convenient. It’s pretty easy 
to get out of the lot after school. I plan on 
parking there next year if I can’t get a parking 
spot at the school.” 


MAX BARNHART (11) 



PARKING PANIC 



Businesses offer valuable parking 

PAGE BY: ADRIANNA PORTELA, KAYLA HALLOWELL 

AND ERIN DOSEN 

ach year, a number of students are selected 
P ark their car in four different locations: the 
school’s parking lot, Zig-E’s Funland, Fagen-Miller 
Funeral Home and Produce Depot. The chances 
of being rewarded with a spot are slim, so the parking war 
is pretty hectic. 

“[Parking at the school] is more convenient. I park on the 
side by 41, and it is a much shorter walk than what some 
other people have to do. I get here early, so I like the first 
come first serve idea,” Michael Flores (12) said. 

The school lot is divided into four sections consisting 
of faculty and senior student drivers. The most common 
student parking passes are red and the parking spots face 
Route 41. These spots are first come first served, which 
offers students who arrive to school earlier the chance to 
park closer to the school. Other passes, labeled yellow 
and green, are also given out to student drivers. These 
passes are for the lot by the academic wing. These are 
less common for students, as faculty covers most of that 
section. 

“I’m happy about the short distance walk [from Fagen- 
Miller Funeral Home]. I think the price is okay, and you can 
get in and out of the lot quick,” Madison Schroeder (12). 

Fagen-Miller Funeral Home is located south of Lake 
Central on Route 41, while Zig-E’s and Produce Depot are 
located north of the school near the soccer fields. Although 
walking distances may vary, each business provides ran¬ 
domly selected students with a paved walkway to enter 
the school grounds. 

“[The walk from Produce Depot] is not too bad. The price 
is the same as the other places, I think it’s well-priced,” 
Nikolas Sambor (11). 

Between parking passes administered on school grounds 
and spots reserved by neighboring businesses, the fight for 
parking spots wages on at Lake Central. Once construction 
is completed, there will be- more parking spots available 
for student drivers. 


130 SOME STUDENT LIFE PARKING 




























T 










1. RED ZONE PARKING The majority of student drivers park in the lot 
near Route 41. Seniors are the only students allowed to park in this lot. 

“It is really hectic in the afternoon,” Alex Baker (12) said. Photo by: Erin 
Dosen 2. FAGEN-MILLER FUNERAL HOME LOT This spot is directly 
across from the south wing of the school. Students that apply for these 
spots are put into a random drawing to recieve passes. “It’s really far. By 
the time I get to school, I am sweating," Katarina Radoja (11) said. Photo 
by: Kayla Hallowell 3. ZIG-ES AND PROUCE DEPOT LOT Breanna 
Patrick (11) opens up the door to Payton Pawelski’s (11) car. Pawelski 
recieved a parking pass fot Zig-E’s at the beginning of the year. “I like 
that [we] park at Zig-E’s because it is not as crowded as the main parking 
area. We also could not get parking passes for the year,” Patrick said. 
Photo by: Erin Dosen 


FUTURE PLANS OF VICTORY IN PARKING WARS 


“[I would like a parking 
pass] because I have 
dance after school, and I’d 
like to drive to dance." 

LAUREL GONSIOROWSKI 

(ID 


“I have a job and need a ride. 
I can get to work on time [if 
I have a pass]. I’ll be pretty 
[upset] if I don’t get one." 

JAMES MCINTIRE (11) 


“[Forking in the back lot] is a lot easier. I like it 
because there is not as much traffic,” 
Jessica Ladowski (12) said 


















































































BARBERSHOP 
BEAT TO DEFEAT 



Sophomore girls take the stage 

PAGE BY: VICTORIA WILKES AND JESSICA WOJTON 

here are several barbershop quartets from several 
* schools that compete at the ISSMA (Indiana State 
School Music Association) competition at the 
beginning of February, including four from Lake Central. 
While many of the members of the quartets are toward the 
end of their high school career, Jenna Buntin (10), Isabella 
Gomez (10), Kellie Repasi (10) and Hannah Souronis (10) 
are new to the experience. 

“We formed [the group] amongst ourselves. [Ms. Sandra 
Hobbs, Music,] lets us choose what we want to do for 
ISSMA, so we chose a barbershop quartet with the four 
of us because we thought that our voices really meshed 
together well,” Souronis said. 

The process of learning a barbershop quartet can take 
a lot of effort and skill. In other cases, working with your 
peers can be beneficial. However, for this group, working 
with friends proved to be distraction at times. 

“The hardest part is probably us four actually getting to 
work when we’re together because we don’t want to [when] 
we actually have to learn parts. It’s tough sometimes,” 
Gomez said. 

Along with the tribulations with working with friends, the 
group faced many other challenges such as having to learn 
the song without accompany from the piano. 

“[It is] definitely [more difficult to sing without a piano] 
because you have to stay on pitch the entire time, and you 
have no help from the background music,” Repasi said. 

Despite the challenges of performing acappella, the group 
has enjoyed the experience and hopes to gain a lot from it. 

“[The best part of this experience is] getting to spend 
a lot of time with [my friends.] It’s fun learning how to do 
something different because a barbershop is acapella. 
It’s four completely separate parts, so it’s challenging,” 
Buntin said. 

In the beginning of February, the quartets traveled to 
Munster High School to compete at ISSMA. 

“ISSMA is a good way to have people have an outlet to 
still express their talents even if they don’t have room in 
their schedule to [take a musical course],” Souronis said. 


1.THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM Kellie Repasi (10), Isabella Gomez (10), Jenna Buntin (10) and Hannah Souronis (10) practice before their perfor¬ 
mance with the judge. They were awarded a silver medal at the ISSMA competition. “We were kind of disappointed because we didn't do as well as we 
thought we were going to do and I think our nerves got to us. [But it] wasn’t that big of a disappointment because theTrebelaires got a perfect [score], 
Souronis said. Photo by: Stephanie O’Drobinak 2. SNAPPING ALONG TO THE SONG Hannah Souronis (10). Jenna Buntin (10). Kellie Repasi (10) and 
Isabella Gomez (10) practice their facials and choreography for their song, “Java Jive." This was their first time competing as a barbershop quartet. I 
think that if we did it again we would know because of the experience we had, we would know that we have to practice more and be focused. Repasi 
said. Photo by Jessica Wojton 3. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Hannah Souronis (10) and Jenna Buntin (10) practice their facials for the song. The 
girls gathered in a practice room one last time before they compete. “I feel like we were all hoping for our performance to go better than it did because 
when we were practicing we had good vibes going, everyone was watching us and it was good to have all of our friends supporting us and encourag¬ 
ing us.” Gomez said. Photo by: Jessica Wojton 


SOME PEOPLE FEATURE 133 













“[Performing on the field] for the last time was 
bittersweet. I am very excited for the new field, 
but it will still be different performing on a brand 
new field and not on the one where so many 
memories were made,” Samantha Marino (11) 
said. 


FINAL DOWN ON THE BURIAL GROUND 

Football team goes out with a bang during last game at home field 

PAGE BY: ERIN DOSEN AND JOSEPH PAVELL 


m 


motion and adrenaline were at an all-time high as the varsity 
| football team ran out onto the field for their final time. As 
the former school building was reduced to rubble last year 
because of the construction, the football field followed suit. 

“It was a great feeling to know that I was part of the senior class 
that was the last team to ever play a down at the Burial Grounds and 
to go out with a win made it so much better,” Jacob Dulski (12) said. 

Seniors were not the only ones who were sentimental; freshman took the 
moments that they were on the field to heart, especially because they were 
the last class to have their beginning on the Burial Ground. 

“It was a special feeling to be the last freshmen team on that field. I’m 
ready to move forward onto the new field, though,” David Markert (9). 

Along with trying to be the best they could be this season, many senior 
players reminisced over the past years playing. However, instead of weeping 
over the demolished field, the players maintained an optimistic attitude as 
they spent their concluding moments on the burial grounds. 

“I liked the atmosphere of the game before everyone was hyped and it 
was a cool experience to spend time with friends and just have fun without 


the stress of dressing up and buying flowers and stuff like that,” Brittany 
Busby (11) said. 

The team dominated Chesterton on Oct. 3 with a score of 6-0. Finishing 
off with a win made walking off the field for the final time an exhilarating 
experience. 

“We tried to keep all the emotions out of our heads during the game 
and stay focused on football, but after the game it was emotional 
realizing that was the last time we will play a game there,” Dulski said. 

Students were also emotionally affected during this memorable game. 
The student section has been known to come together in support for 
their team for games, especially those on the home field. 

“I had always heard how great it was by the previous seniors, and 
I was excited about our chance. It definitely lived up to the hype. The 
game was good and competitive, which gave our student section 
something to cheer for. There was a great vibe going through the 
stands, and it felt like everyone knew that this was going to be the last 
game ever played on that field,” Daniel Sanchez (12) said. 



1. Matthew Burgess (12) Photo provided by: Matthew Burgess 2. James 
Mays (12) Photo provided by: James Mays 3. Andi Wartman (12) and Alisha 
Donovan (12) Photo provided by: Alisha Donovan 


CARRYING ON THE SPIRIT 

Students show-off their school spirit 

One of the longest-running traditions for homecoming 
week is the competition for the best costume. This year, the 
spirit days were as follows: Monday was pajama day, Tues¬ 
day was twin day, Wednesday was decade day, Thursday 
was superhero day, and Friday was blue and white day. 

The students competing were instructed to post their 
photo on Instagram with the hashtag “#LCH0C02K14”. 
The top two photos with the most “likes” moved forward to 
the LC News Twitter account. At that point, the photo that 
recieved the most favorites won that spirit day. 


HOMECOMING DANCE DILEMMA - DANCE CANCELLED FOR THE FIRST TIME 

poll out 330 students 



CARE 

3 percent of students said they did care that 
the Homecoming dance was cancelled. 


DON’T CARE O "7 0/ 

97 percent of students said they t 

did not care that the Homecoming Vx f X VX 
dance was cancelled. 


“The student section was a lot more 
excited and there were a lot of people 
there. I felt powerful being a senior 
and being able to wear pink,” 
JENNIFER EINTERZ (12) said. 


“I was freezing, but there was a lot of 
energy and excitement [at the game]. 
I was sad because the Homecoming 
shirts reminded me that this was the 
last game on the field," 

EMMA BARNETT (9) said. 


“I didn’t watch the game much. I 
spent most of the time walking around 
and being around my friends," 
MICHELLE BUCKMAN (10) said. 


134 
















“I got to perform with the band at the 
game and It was my birthday,” 
DAWSON STROUD (10) said. 


“My favorite part of Homecoming was 
being with all of my close friends, 
hanging out with new people and get¬ 
ting to watch the football game,” 
KAYLYNN WARD (10) said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME STODENT LIFE HOMECOMING 135 


1. THE LAST HOORAH Colin Chenoweth (12) cheers in the student section during the Homecoming game. Che- 
noweth was the appointed Indian for the 2014-15 school year. “It was bittersweet being the last Indian to be on the 
original field. I wanted to go out with a bang and be supportive,” Chenoweth said. 2. DOWN AND READY Jacob 
Johnston (12) prepares to hike the ball to commence the play. This was the last game ever played on the original Lake 
Central field. “[Playing on the field for the last time] was very emotional. There were a lot of people from previous years 
who played on the field. Everyone was there and it was very good that we won. We went out with a bang and a lot 
mixed emotions." Johnston said. 3. HOMECOMING ROYALTY Chase Owczarzak (12), Emma Hupp (12), Nicholas 
Kiepura (12). Veronica Davis (12), Jillian Wilschke (12), Ryan Wiebe (12), Hannah Sonner (12). Jessica Sellers (12) and 
James Lafakis (12) stand together after Homecoming court was announced. Hupp and Kiepura won Homecoming 
queen and king. “[Winning homecoming queen] was very exciting. I was standing there not to get my hopes up just in 
case. Everyone around me was great and I would have been happy for anyone to win. It was crazy. Hupp said. 4. SEA 
OF BLUE Nikola Tepsic (12) is held up by those in the student section. The student section was widely recognized as 
one of the best in the area. “I wanted the last ‘I Believe’ chant to be very special and be the best one that we have 
had. The night was pretty tight,” Tepsic said. Photos by: Hannah Reed 
























“Everybody was just there having fun, and it felt 
like everybody was really a community because 
you knew everybody there. I saw a lot of people 
I knew, and I had fun and danced with them,” 
Brendan Kelly (12) said. 


1. CROWD SURFING Cole Reynolds (11) surfs the crowd at the beginning of the Winter Formal dance. At first, stu¬ 
dents were hesitant to step on the dance floor, but the fun started when the lights went down. “(My friends] picked 
me up, and then all of a sudden everybody started pushing me to the center," Reynolds said. Photo by: Shannon 
Hearne 2. DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY Students form a circle around Eric Ainsley (12) in the middle of the dance 
floor and take turns stepping inside. This happened numerous times throughout the dance, depending on what type 
of music was playing. “This formal was the best one yet, and my friends and I had a blast,” Rylee Ollearis (11) said. 
Photo by: Emma DeGroot 3. BELTING THE LYRICS Joshua Barajas (12) sings a verse of the “Fresh Prince of Bel 
Air theme song into the DJ s microphone. The DJ returned for his second year of playing music at Formal. “The 
DJ was really good this year, and the photo booths were really cool with all the props,” Elise Jones (10) said. Photo 
by: Shannon Hearne 4. TAKING IT SLOW Madeline Young (11) and Nicholas Schmitt (11) dance together during 
a slow song. Only about two to three slow songs played during the dance. “I think a good amount [of slow songs] 
was played. I think people would like it if they did more, but there was a good variety," Young said. Photo by Emma 
DeGroot 















THE PERSON BEHIND THE CURTAINS 

Winter formal coordinator plans night to remember 



“I did this my junior year, and I loved it 
and thought it was fun. Seeing it in the 
end and how it all came out and how 
everyone has fun at it is just pretty cool. 
We started [planning] in November. I had 
people come for a Winter Formal [meet¬ 
ing], and we made a group decision on 
what the theme should be. For the deco¬ 
rations, last year when I did it, I made 
them all myself, and this year I just hired 
[people] for the balloons. I knew I wanted 
balloons [this year] because I wanted to 
hire someone for it, so I wouldn’t have 
to do it all myself. Paul [Segal] was the 
DJ this year, and he has really good 
organization and a big team. He also has 
the photo booths included, which costs 
a little bit more but is totally worth it.” 


KASSIE WOODWORTH (12) 



1. Veronica Davis (12) and Nathan Zajac (12) Photo by: Jessica Wojton 2. 
Alexandra Gomez (11). Jessica McCullough (11), Joseph Pavell (11) and Sean 
Meyer (11) Photo by: Emma DeGroot 3. Students voting for Winter Formal King 
and Queen Photo by: Shannon Hearne 


FORMAL COURT CLAIMS THE CROWN 


Nominated students recognized at dance 

At Winter Formal, juniors and seniors were nominated 
by teachers and students to be on court. At 8 p.m., 
the court was recognized, and the senior winners were 
announced. Nathan Zajac (12) and Veronica Davis (12) 
took home the crowns as king and queen. 

“I was really excited when I got nominated because 
it was pretty unexpected. The most exciting part [about 
winning] was how my best friend got king, too. That was 
really cool,” Davis said. 


AND WE’LL ALL ‘FLOAT ON’ OKAY 

Students attend Winter Formal Dance, based around Modest Mouse song 


PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD 


After a long day of planning and pampering, around 850 students 
from grades 10 - 12 arrived at the Halls of St. George on Saturday, 
Jan. 24, for Winter Formal. The large room was soon crowded with 
dancing teenagers, chaperoning staff and colorful balloon decorations. 

“I thought it was really fun. There was just a lot of people there, so 
it was really crowded. It was great. The music was OK, but it was still 
really fun. I think it’s good [that freshmen can’t go to Formal] because 
there is a lot of people in the school, so it should just be for older kids,” 
Devon Kelley (10) said. 

Tickets were sold for the dance over a month before the event and 
were priced at $35 each. Only single tickets were available due to 
problems with couples tickets that have arised in the past. On the last 
day of sales, tickets were completely sold out. 

“I was glad that seniors had their own day to go get their tickets. 
They were pretty cheap, and I prefer standing in line for them [rather 
than buying online],” Jeffery Scott (12) said. 

Although the tickets were sold a month before, N-Teens started 


planning ahead much before that. Decisions such as the DJ, theme, 
decorations and more were decided in the beginning of the year. The 
theme that was chosen was called “Float On,” based on a song by 
Modest Mouse. Different types of balloon decorations made this theme 
come together at the dance. 

Appetizers such as pizza rolls, egg rolls and unlimited drinks could 
be enjoyed in-between dancing breaks. Two photo booths were also 
available in the hallway to take group pictures. The booths were sup¬ 
plied with plenty of props to take pictures with, such as signs with 
funny sayings, hats, sunglasses and mustaches. 

After four hours of music, dancing and fun, “Float On” was played as 
the last song to wrap up the event and added the perfect touch to the 
theme. Students then went to their limos and party buses to continue 
on to their next destination, which was either a restaurant or home. 

“[My favorite part] was being around all my friends. We were having 
a lot of fun dancing. We went to House of Kobe [afterward] and had 
some food.Then we went to my friends house and chilled,” Scott said. 


“My favorite part about Formal was 
dancing and just having a good time 
with my friends,” 

JENNIFER WRIGHT (10) said. 


“I thought the theme was really cool. I 
liked all the balloons and stuff. I think 
they could have had a little more food 
[options] though,” 

RYLEE FRIEL (11) said. 


“I went [to Formal] with a bunch of 
people that I knew and talked to oc¬ 
casionally, but never really hung out 
with. After that night, we were all kind of 
just friends,” 

RACHEL JENSEN (12) said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME STUDENT LIFE FORMAL 137 














DANCING ACROSS THE UNIVERSE 

Students celebrate the closing of the school year with a “big bang” at prom 

PAGE BY: SOFIA HAY, CAMRYN WALLACE AND ELIZABETH BUSTAMANTE 


With the early month of May comes sunshine, blossoming flowers, 
and of course, Prom. On Saturday May 2, juniors and seniors of Lake 
Central gathered in the Halls of St. George to celebrate the last dance 
of the school year. 

Before the dance, couples going to Prom arrived at Lake Central for 
the Grand March. Many Prom dates had their pictures taken as they 
walked around the gym for their family and friends to observe. 

“I like [the Grand March] because I like seeing everybody’s dresses 
and stuff like that. And walking it is fun,” Alyssa Staszewski (11) said. 

Although every one who went to prom was in the same location, each 
person had a unique experience. 

“It was exciting; I’m ready to graduate, but it was a good way to end 
the year. [The best part] was going with my best friend for sure and 
just dancing with everyone there,” Alexis Martinez (12) said. 

Of the many songs people enjoyed dancing to, some of the hits 
consisted of “Trap Queen,” “Sandstorm” and “Shut Up and Dance.” 

“The ending with ‘Sandstorm’ was the best part. It was a good group 
of people on the floor,” Ethan Gomez (12) said. 


The Prom activities did not end once the clock struck 10 on Saturday 
night. For many students, the festivities lasted an entire weekend. 

“The dance was a good time, and we went to Steak and Shake 
after the dance. I went to Chicago with my date the next day,” Sarah 
Heuberger (11) said. 

A lot went into making prom the success that it was. The set-up of 
prom, courtesy of Junior Class Cabinet, took months of planning and 
hours of preparation. 

“We’ve been planning it for a couple months. On the day of Prom 
we got there at like 9 in the morning and some of our Class Cabinet 
members, and they blew up all of the balloons for the balloon drop. 
We did all of the centerpieces, and when the students started to leave 
the DJ started to come in with a giant truck full of equipment. We were 
there for about 13 hours,” Ms. Allison Peda said. 

The hard work of Class Cabinet members paid off, as students enjoyed 
their prom experience. 

“I thought that everyone was just having a good time and the atmo¬ 
sphere was really fun,” Jessica Vrbanoff (12) said. 



CROWNING KING AND QUEEN OF THE COURT 


PROM QUEEN 

“[Winning] was such a good expe¬ 
rience. I’ve never been on court 
before, and to win Prom Queen 
my senior year is a great way to 
end my year. The moment that was 
the coolest was right before they 
called my name, when everyone 
was just screaming my name, and 
then when they actually did call 
my name it was cool, like all of 
the anticipation building up to it. 
[Joseph Schneider] is one of my 
good friends so it was really cool 
to win Prom Queen with him.” 

ERIN TODD (12) 


PROM KING 

“Being Prom King was fun. 
About two years ago when my 
brother was a senior, he won 
Prom King, so it felt good. I 
think I was sweating a little 
bit when they were doing the 
[Prom court] announcements, 
but nothing was really going 
through my mind. [Erin Todd] 
has been my friend since fresh¬ 
man year, so it was nice having 
her as the queen and me king. 
Our dancing picture turned out 
nice, too.” 

JOSEPH SCHNEIDER (12) 




1. Joseph Schneider (12) and Emma Hupp (12) Submitted by: Emma Hupp 

2. A promposal involving golf balls Submitted by: Kylie Shoemake (12) 3. 
Timothy Matthews (11) and Sydney Halfeldt (11) Submitted by: Sydney 
Halfeldt 


STUDENTS PREPARE PERFECT PROMPOSALS 

The sky’s the limit for students’ Prom preparations 

Every year, students kick off the Prom season with promposals - 
creative ways to ask one another to prom. While some people keep 
their promposals simple, others go all out. 

“[Joseph Schneider (12)] jumped out of the plane first. We tandem 
sky-dove, and when I got on the ground he was waiting there with 
this huge tarp, and that’s how he asked me to Prom. He told me 
it was going to be epic, but I was not expecting that at all,” Emma 
Hupp (12) said. 



“Prom was fantastic. My favorite part was the 
chocolate fountain. I had never been to a [Lake 
Central] dance, and Prom was top notch,” 
Brittany Busby (11) said. 




















1. WATCH ME WHIP Eric Ainsley (12) dances in the middle of a group of his peers at Prom. 
Students gathered around to watch “dance battles” between other students. “The best part 
(was] dancing with the guys in a circle, the dance battles and all of that. When the DJ played 
Trap Queen’ everybody started going crazy,” Ainsley said. Photo by: Sofia Hay 2. THE GIANT 
DROP Students reach for balloons that were dropped toward the end of the dance began. 
Junior Class Cabinet members prepared the balloon drop before the dance. “When the (bal¬ 
loons] actually dropped at first, it was really cool and fun. It made everything seem so much 
more magical,” Christi Raichle (12) said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. DANCING THE NIGHT 
AWAY Joshua Krout (11) and Breanna Powers (12) slow dance together at Prom. The DJ 
accepted students’ requests and played a variety of songs. “(This year’s Prom] was probably 
the best one. The DJ was really good this year,” Marina Vasquez (11) said. Photo by: Camryn 
Wallace 4. CALLING THE COURT The Prom court lines up along the stage as they anticipate 
the calling of the king, queen, prince and princess. Students attending the dance voted for the 
court as they entered the hall. “Being up there in front of all of the people was really nerve- 
wracking. The anticipation to find out who was going to win was also nerve-wracking. Just 
the fact I was nominated on Prom court was a high honor," Ronald Lee (11) said. Photo by: 
Sofia Hay 5. GRAND DEBUT Kelly Matakovic ( 4 14) and Ryan Bertossi (12) stop to pose for a 
picture at the Grand March. The Grand March took place in the gym for the public to watch. “I 
went with my best friend so that was a lot of fun. We did the Grand March together, and then 
we did it again with a guy in a t-shirt and cargo shorts,” Alexis Martinez (12) said. Photo by: 
Camryn Wallace 























V 


1. FRAZZLE DAZZLE Nicolas Frassinone (12) dances in a huddle of students at Senior 
Banquet. The banquet featured a DJ that played a plethora of popular songs. ‘‘[Senior 
Banquet] was very fun and exciting because there wasn’t [any] underclassman there, so it 
wasn’t as crowded as normal dances,” Frassinone said. 2. BREAKING IT DOWN Andrew 
Dittrich (12) breakdances in the middle of the dance floor. Senior Banquet differed from 
other school dances because no underclassmen were allowed to attend. “I had a lot of fun. 

I had a couple of dance-offs in the circle. Me and a couple of guys would dance to see who 
would be the best; I usually won because of my extreme flexibility,” Dittrich said. 3. THE 
FINAL MOMENTS Tiffany Jessup (12),Teigen Breshock (12). Elizabeth Stefaniak (12), Monica 
Almeida (12) and Alyssa Stepney (12) laugh with each other during the banquet. Senior 
Banquet was a moment for good friends to get together at a school event one last time. 

“My [favorite part] was the food [because] they actually fed us,” Breshock said. 4. DO THE 
NAPOLEON DYNAMITE Nathan Zajac (12) performs the Napoleon Dynamite dance as his 
peers take pictures. Zajac and his group went as the characters from the movie ‘Napoleon 
Dynamite.’ “I practiced [for this dance] all week and I practiced like five times on the other 
side of the banquet hall,” Zajac said. 




“It was fun, and I loved seeing every¬ 
one’s costumes. I saw a lot of people 
I didn’t even know were in my grade,” 
JORIE KELLEY (12) said. 


“[Winning best costume] was great. 
I think we won because we stayed 
in character the whole time," EMIL 
GOVANI (12) said. 


“[Senior banquet] was really fun. [My 
favorite part] was seeing everybody’s 
costumes because it showed every¬ 
one’s creativity,” CANDACE ZUMMAK 
(12) said. 


“My favorite part was when they 
[announced] the awards. My friends 
and I would guess who got the certain 
award before they announced them," 
ELENA EICKLEBERRY (12) said. 


140 









I can’t believe my group didn’t win best 
costume,” 
Quinn Paprocki (12) said. 





A NIGHT OF “MAGICAL” MEMORIES 


Students finish off their final high school year at the annual Senior Banquet 

PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL, ERIN DOSEN AND JACQUELINE HOFFMAN 


athering at the Villa Cesare for Senior Banquet on Friday, April 
17, the senior class had one thing in mind: to make their last 
moments together as a class something to remember. 

“It was a lot of fun dancing with my friends. [My favorite part was] 
dancing and seeing everyone all together. Not everyone was with their 
date [at this dance]. It was more like a big get-together with everyone 
instead,” Hannah Triveline (12) said. 

A tradition, Senior Banquet is the last time the graduating class has 
together, with only seniors present, before graduation. 

“I think that [Senior Banquet] was a good experience for all of us. 
We have all been together since freshman year and we came through 
this journey together through all of the ups and downs,” Eric Ainsley 
(12) said. 

One of the most memorable aspects of Senior Banquet is the cos¬ 
tumes students put together for the event. 

“I thought that [having costumes] was a great idea. It was cool to 
see how creative people were with everything. I was John Blutarsky 


from ‘Animal House,’” Jacob Marcinek (12) said. 

Instead of serving hors d’oeuvres like other school dances, 
students were served in a dinner-like fashion with foods such as salad, 
chicken wings, pasta and green beans. 

“I think all the food choices were really good. I love food so I loved 
it all,” Morgan Kelly (12) said. 

The theme of the dance was Magical World, though many students 
felt the theme was not incorporated into the dance. 

“I think [the theme] was glossed over. I was part of the making 
of Senior Banquet, so I think that we didn’t incorporate it too well,” 
Kelly said. 

Emotions were high for students as the reality of graduation finally 
began to set in. 

“It kind of hit me a little at the end when [the DJ] said, ‘We are danc¬ 
ing the last song,’ but you know you will always be close with your 
friends. At the end, you come to the realization that this is the end [of 
high school],” Jorey Dimopoulos (12) said. 






1. Megan Barenie (12), Gina DiNino (12). Abigail Peppin (12). Megan Zajac (12) and Alyssa Bom (12) 
Photo submitted by: Megan Barenie 2. Morgan Kelly (12), Erin Dosen (12), Sydney Scherzinger (12), 
Erin Todd (12), Sarah Banasiak (12), Jennifer Mohamed (12). Hannah Keith (12) and Hannah Giese 
(12) Photo Submitted by: Eva Kimberly 3. Ryan Ryba (12), Samuel Willis (12). Kyle Kil (12). Nikola 
Tepsic (12). Michael Flores (12) and Jorge Trujillo (12) F^hoto submitted by: Eva Kimberly 


COMPETITION OF THE COSTUMES 

Students aim to win coveted award 

The outfits that students put together for Senior 
Banquet are the essence of the dance. Each group uses 
their creativity to form a costume that will give them the 
chance to stand out. 

“[Senior Banquet] was good. My group won best cos¬ 
tume,” Piotr Parol (12) said. 

The winners for the best group costume of this year’s 
banquet dressed up as Barack Obama and the Secret 
Service. The winner for the best individual costume 
dressed up as Napoleon Dynamite. 


STUDENTS FINISH OFF THEIR LAST YEAR WITH A BANG 



“[My favorite part] was 
seeing the awards that 
people won. My friend 
Lauren Markulin (12) won 
best dressed.” 

ALYSSA CAMARILLO (12) 



“My favorite part was 
seeing all my classmates 
I’ve been with for four 
years going out for one 
more dance before Prom ” 

BRYAN VANDERLEE (12) 



“It was different than 
[dancing] at other dances 
because it was just seniors, 
and it wasn’t as crowded as 
other dances are.” 

HANNAH KEITH (12) 


“A lot of people were really creative 
and funny. I think it was a lot more 
fun than other dances because the 
music was better and there was more 
seniors there,” JOELLYN POLASKI 
(12) said. 


“[Senior Banquet] was pretty good. 

It was really cool to see everybody in 
their costumes,” SAMUEL KIRMANI 
(12) said. 


“[Senior Banquet] was alright. It was 
good. The DJ wasn’t that bad either," 
APRIL KOEPKE (12) said. 


“The costumes were really funny. 

The awards were funny too, and the 
people that I voted for actually ended 
up winning. The whole thing had a 
great atmosphere," SARAH GRIMLER 
(12) said. 


SOME STUDENT LIFE SENIOR BANQUET 141 











































“My favorite memory would have to be walking 
into the Freshman Center during summer gym, 
right before my freshman year. Meeting new 
people was so much fun,” Michael Opperman 
(12) said. 


GRADUATES REMEMBER BEST MOMENTS OF HIGH SCHOOL 



“My favorite isn’t neces¬ 
sarily one memory, but a 
collection of memories 
with a certain group of 
individuals” 

BRENDAN KELLY (12) 



“[My favorite memory was] 
graduating, hanging out 
with friends and Mr. Bafia’s 
class.” 


LINDSEY BROOKER (12) 



1. Elise Bereolos (11). Parker Danner (10). Alayna Prisby (12) and Brett Balicki (11) Submitted By: Gio- 
las Photography 2. Nina Angus (11) and Alexandra Adams (11) Submitted By: Giolas Photography 3. 
Zachary Hansen (10). Christi Raichle (12) and Adam Gustas (10) Photo by: Olivia Oster 


SOUNDING OFF FOR SENIORS 

Band and choir remember senior class 

While the graduates had their time onstage as they 
received their diploma jackets, the Wind Ensemble and 
the Counterpoints choir also had their time in the spot¬ 
light. While some performers were part of the graduating 
class, others had a special bond with those crossing the 
stage. 

“I felt honored to play for [my sister’s] graduation. Just 
knowing I added a little something special to her special 
day was an awesome feeling,” Alexandra Adams (11) said. 




TASSELS WORTH THE HASSLES 

Students take their last steps across the stage as high school seniors 

PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD, JOSEPH PAVELL AND ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU 


Donning their caps and gowns, students from the class of 2015 
packed into the Star Plaza to celebrate what they have been waiting 
for their entire high school career: graduation. 

“We have survived the anxiety of failing an exam we studied extremely 
hard for. We dragged ourselves to school while trying to hold back tears 
of a first heartbreak. We desperately tried to hold onto friendships that 
we knew were slowly fading. We have even said goodbye to some of 
our classmates who were taken from us too soon but deserve to be 
sitting here with the rest of us today. We have been through it all,” 
Alexis Morales (12) said. 

Mr. Sean Begley, Principal, began the night by congratulating the 
class of 2015 on its accomplishments as well as the faculty and board 
members who were present at the event. 

“[The class of 2015] is an impressive one. Through their hard work, 
grit and determination, our class of 2015 will move on to many new 
and great challenges,” Mr. Begley said. 

Two speeches given by students were presented, one focusing on 


looking back and the other on looking forward. The speeches were 
given by Karlie VanHouten (12) and Morales, respectively. 

“We will miss Taco Tuesdays and Pasta Wednesdays. We will miss 
sports updates, morning announcements and dances. We will miss 
coming home from long days to our parents and [families]. We spent 
the last four years thinking high school would never end, that we 
would be stuck walking three flights of stairs every morning. As we 
look back, we realize [high school] was all really just a blink of an eye,” 
VanHouten said. 

The procession of reading the graduates’ names began at approxi¬ 
mately 7:41 p.m. and ended around 8:26 p.m. After the names were 
rattled off, the graduates moved their tassels to the left side of their 
cap, and in that moment, they began their lives after high school, 
walking away with a diploma in hand. 

“[Graduating lifted a] huge weight off my shoulders, but now I have 
even greater challenges ahead of me. I’m ready to tackle them,” 
Nicholas Kiepura (12) said. 


“My favorite part about graduation 
was the speeches by classmates who 
condensed our four years at [Lake 
Central] perfectly,"TAYLOR MACK 
(12) said. 


“I’m so happy to be graduating but 
also sad to be leaving my home away 
from home for four years. I’m excited 
to be starting a new chapter in my 
life." CHRISTI RAICHLE (12) said. 


“As I walked across the stage, I felt 
like I was dying. My childhood is over. 
Although it was heartbreaking, I am 
looking forward to the next chapter of 
my life," MONICA ALMEIDA (12) said. 


“I thought that graduation was 
nicely done. It went by quicker than I 
thought,” SUMMER MERRIMAN (12) 
said. 


142 









































1. SIGNING OFF Alexis Morales (12) speaks at Commencement on May 27 The commence¬ 
ment ceremony was held at the Star Plaza Theatre in Merrillville. “Think about it, you are 
moments sitting here, moments away from becoming Lake Central’s class of 2015," Morales 
said. 2. PRESIDENTAL ADDRESS Nicholas Kiepura (12) and Tiffany Polyak (12) present the 
gift from the class of 2015. The class cabinet set aside money for a mural, a mirror, money for 
Dollars for Scholars and the class of 2019. “It was amazing to have the experience to stand 
up in front of my class and present our gift to Lake Central,” Polyak said. Photos by: Olivia 
Oster 3. TURN THE TASSELS Tiffany Tao (12) and other magna cum laude graduates shift 
their tassels from right to left. This officially symbolize that they have graduated. “I liked hear¬ 
ing the speeches and then hearing my name be called was cool. It’s so weird to finally be 
done,’’ Alyssa Born (12) said. Submitted by: Giolas Photography 4. START OF SOMETHING 
NEW Don Bacso, School Board President, hands Joshua Bell (12) his diploma. It took 45 
minutes to call the names of all 742 graduates. “I loved seeing the excitement as they walked 
off the stage. Everyone has come such a long way from freshman year: it’s a feeling you wish 
you could hold onto forever, but now it’s our time to change the world," Bell said. 


m 


i 


“My favorite part of graduation was 
seeing the people I care about now or 
formerly cared about walking across 
the stage. I was just happy to see that 
people I care for made it through," 
JACKSON SPANBURG (12) said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME STUDENT LIFE GRADUATION 143 


“The student speakers were excellent, 
and I am happy I was recognized for 
my academic achievement,” 
MAXWELL REES (12) said. 


“My favorite part of graduation would 
have to be being able to graduate 
with all of the people that made high 
school so enjoyable for me," 
MICHAEL FLORES (12) said. 


“Finally graduating felt like saying 
hello and goodbye at the same time. 
I really appreciated the ceremony," 
JULIET JOHNSON (12) said. 











BEND AND 
STRETCH 


Students explore the world of yoga 

PAGE BY: EMILY LISAC AND ELENA GORNEY 

ver the past year, yoga has become increasingly 
ffjQjj] popular among students. Even though interested 
students all participate in the same activity, they 
do it for different reasons. 

In some sports, yoga can be beneficial for athletes. 
Because of this, some athletes are required to take yoga 
classes to improve their performance. 

“Our track coach wants our sprinters to start working on 
their flexibility, so he said we have to start doing yoga about 
three times a week. That was when I started. [Because of 
yoga,] I’m not as sore as I used to be after stretching. I 
guess I’m becoming more flexible,” Ethan Gomez (12) said. 

While some athletes are introduced to yoga through 
other sports, some of them take it a step further as a 
recreational activity. 

“I actually used to do softball for the school, and [Coach 
Todd Iwema, Business,] would teach us yoga. I thought it 
was really cool because I enjoyed stretching, and it was a 
mix of stretching, balancing and strength. It just seemed 
interesting. I think it gives you a sense of self-worth, [which 
is] basically the reason anyone does any kind of activity or 
hobby,” McKaya Pozzi (12) said. 

While some do yoga at home, others choose to take 
classes at a studio with family and friends. 

“[A coupon for hot yoga] was on Groupon, and my mom 
told our family that we are going to go. The first time I went, 
I had to sit on the floor for 10 minutes because it was dif¬ 
ficult and really hot. My parents get a kick out of it. My mom 
goes every day of the week, but because my sister is now 
in college, my whole family only gets to go together about 
once a month. I could [continue yoga], but probably not 
hot yoga. Maybe [I’ll try] something less intense and more 
peaceful instead,” JouleTazbir (11) said. 

If one sees benefits in doing yoga, it may be something 
he or she continues for a long period of time. 

“I don’t really like to think about stopping. I mean it’s 
nothing bad, so [I want to continue] for as long as I am 
physically allowed to,” Pozzi said. 



1. STAND TALL Megan Barenie (12) stands tall in standing hand to big toe pose. She took classes atYouniqueYoga. “My mom likes [yoga] a lot 
because she goes all the time. [The instructors] talk to her and she’s going to school now to be a yoga instructor,” Tazbir said. Photo by: Sara Lisac. 2. 
REACH FOR PEACE Gabriella Goncher (11) focuses on doing the triangle pose. Goncher started when she was on the swim team and has continued 
the exercises ever since. “I do [yoga] to release a lot of frustration. It is very peaceful and calming. You can cool down and have no thoughts. My mind 
goes blank, and I am in a state of peace," Goncher said. Photo by: Elena Gorney. 3. UNWIND YOUR SPINE Taylor Kroon (10) begins to transition into 
the toe pose. She started doing yoga to have better posture and to be more active. "Personally, I think [yoga] takes a lot of stress off me at the end 
of the week. When you’re doing the yoga poses the right way, it definitely gives you this intense, warm rush feeling of sensation through your body," 
Kroon said. Photo by: Elena Gorney. 4. PILE POSING McKaya Pozzi (12) does the dancer pose while balancing on a log. Pozzi has been doing yoga at 
home for about a year. “I have a book about [yoga] that teaches the whole purpose of it and basically how to do it, but I have never been to a studio. I 

would really like to though,” Pozzi said. Photo submitted by: McKaya Pozzi 





















• 1 











1. DODGING TROUBLE Anastasia Rauch (11), acting as Emily Book, uses her superpowers to freeze her classmates. The 
students teased and harassed her in the previous scene. “[Emily] can fly, and she’s telekinetic. When she was young, she was 
bullied a lot, and one day her powers just went out of control,” Rauch said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 2. GOT THE WORLD ON 
A STRING Nicholas Kiepura (12) dips Anastasia Rauch (11) for his role as the shy, awkward Mr. Christopher in "The Sparrow.” 
This was Kiepura’s second role in a play for the year. Tm Mr. Christopher, a Biology teacher who kind of takes Emily, which is 
Anastasia, the female lead, under his wing,” Kiepura said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. FLY AWAY In this scene, the fliers por¬ 
tray Emily’s superpowers. This was caused by Emily’s lack of control over her abilities. “[Emily] stops dodgeballs midair, catches 
a marble before it hits her, flies to rescue a cheerleader and even brings a teacher back to life," Ms. Nicole Raber, Clark Middle 
School Guidance Counselor, said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 4. DESIGN DECISIONS Makeup artists, Tabitha Prowse (12) and 
Samantha Bredar (9), prepare Anastasia Rauch (11) for the last rehearsal before tech week. The makeup team was responsible 
for the hair and makeup of the entire cast. “I got to get reality creative with [the designs], it wasn’t like what we normally do. I 
had to do bird makeup, and there was glitter everywhere,” Prowse said. Photo by: Sarah Bredar 


“I kind of just tell myself that it’s OK 
to be nervous because if you are 
nervous that means you care,” 
NICHOLAS KIEPURA (12) said. 


“[Acting] comes naturally to me. I get 
a small adrenaline rush before I come 
on, but I just calm myself down with 
a cup of hot tea. I’ve never really got 
extreme stage fright,” 

PARKER DANNER (10) said. 


“We always do shakes or warm ups every 
show. I always think to myself that it’s going 
to be a great show, and there won’t be any 
problems,” 

BRETT BALICKI (11) said. 


146 






































“I feel like [after] everything that I’ve heard, with 
audience interaction and all the hard work that’s 
been put into the show, I can’t wait to see it.” 

Jackson DeLisle (11). 



WHAT IT’S LIKE TO STAND OUT 

“The Sparrow” welcomes a first-time lead 



“[Being the lead] is so exciting. I’ve 
been in shows before, but I was always 
smaller characters, and I never thought 
[being cast as a lead character] would 
happen so soon. I’m really excited, [but] 
it’s really nerve-racking. I’m the type of 
person who would get nervous with my 
smaller roles, so [the cast] is kind of like, 
‘Take a breath, calm down [and] don’t 
freak yourself out about it, know that 
you’ve got everything down and that you 
won’t make a mistake.’ I kind of just take 
that in. So I just stick with them [and] be 
around the positive energy. I always pray 
a ton before I go onstage. We also do 
group games to get our energy up.” 

ANASTASIA RAUCH (11) 


HOW TO PREPARE FOR A SHOW 


“The first step is to choose a cast and set up all of the tech¬ 
nical components of the show. “I do a lot of the technical 
stuff [for rehearsals], and for actual shows, I wear a headset 
and I’m backstage. I have to know all of the cues for when 
the actors go onstage and when to know when to turn the 
house lights on and off,” Student Director, Sarah Colby (12) 
said. 


2 “The second step is the growth period, with the director 

adding or removing parts from the show. “I have had several 
long discussions with the cast, crew and technical direc¬ 
tor about how we can pull off some of the more challenging 
scenes. As a result, the play has truly been a collaborative 
effort, not just me calling the shots,” Ms. Nicole Raber, Clark 
Middle School Guidance Counselor, said. 



“The third and final step of preparation is tech week. This is 
the most stressful week of the whole process, with changes 
almost everyday leading up to the performance. “We 
decided to use a lot of technology such as lights, voice¬ 
overs and even six girls who are essentially playing Emily’s 
super powers during the show,” Ms. Raber said. 


SOARING INTO SPOTLIGHT 

Theater Company debuts “The Sparrow" 

PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR, COLLEEN QUINN, ALAYNA WALLACE AND MADELINE CONLEY 


n Oct. 23, the Lake Central Theater Company opened “The 
Sparrow,” the story of the supernatural Emily Book and her 
return to the small town of Spring Farm for her senior year of 
high school.The story follows Book’s struggle to fit in at school and the 
people she befriends along the way, including head cheerleader Jenny 
McGrath and biology teacher, Mr. Christopher. 

“The ultimate theme of The Sparrow’ is accepting someone uncon¬ 
ditionally no matter what they may have done or who they may be. I 
think everyone can relate to that 100 percent. Plus, it’s about a girl with 
superpowers, that alone deserves a few performances,” Ms. Nicole 
Raber, Clark Middle School Guidance Counselor, said. 

One major challenge for the cast was the absence of their usual stage 
in the auditorium. This show had to be performed on a smaller stage 
in the LGI, which made many scenes of the show difficult to perform. 

“In the auditorium we had better lighting, [and] techniques. In the 
LGI we don’t have a lot of that, but we’re getting through, and I think 
it’s going to be a good show,” Brett Balicki (11) said. 


Since the location of this show was unfamiliar to many of the returning 
cast members, it was not a surprise that several of the performers put 
a lot of energy into their characters. 

“This character is a lot different because normally I’m either playing 
a student like in Zombie Prom, and over the summer I was the Giver, 
who’s an old man. So it’s the first time that I’m actually a middle-aged 
person, which I think fits me best,” Nicholas Kiepura (12) said. 

Many aspects of the show that were easier to portray in the old 
auditiorium became more difficult with the lack of space the cast had 
available. Although the cast was not accustomed to performing in the 
LGI, the move proved to be less of an obstacle than anticipated. 

“Because we are in the LGI room, it has pushed me to really think 
outside the box. I have had several long discussions with the cast, crew 
and technical director about how we can pull off some of the more 
challenging scenes. As a result, the play has truly been a collaborative 
effort, not just me calling the shots. That has to be the coolest part of 
doing such a different show,” Ms. Raber said. 


“I have a pasta and movie night the “I have no nerves. Once you get out “Me and the other [girls who played Emily’s pow- 

night before the show to calm my there, you become the character [and] ers,] we do some stretching, meditation, and we 

nerves,” just dive into it,” just focus on what we have to do. We know our 

DYLAN FOSTER (9) said. WALTER ALEKSIC (10) said. parts [down] very well and we just have to focus,” 

ERINI COLLAROS (11) said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME PERFORMING ARTS FALL SHOW 147 












“It was really great to do a musical with people 
I have been friends with for years. We got to 
make fun of some of my favorite musicals, so 
performing that was fun,” Aaron Cappello (9) 
said. 


STUDENTS TAKE ON LEADERSHIP ROLES 



“[‘‘Forbidden Broadway”] is the 
second show in which I am stage 
manager. It’s different from acting, 
but it presents me with another 
kind of challenge, so I enjoy it.” 

SARAH COLBY (12) 



IN THEATER 

“It’s really fun [to be a student 
director] in the musical even though 
I’m not acting or singing. It’s in- 
between tech and acting, so it’s like 
getting to be a part of both groups." 

MADISON FREDERICK (9) 



1. IT’S TOO HIGH Ronald Lee (12) plays Jean Valjean in “Les Miserables.” The song “It’sToo High" poked 
fun at the pitch of the original song. “It was really challenging [to play Valjean] at first, because it’s such 
an iconic role, and to spoof it up and make fun of it was even harder," Lee said. 2. DANCING QUEENS 
Alayna Wallace (12), Isabella Gomez (10), Madison Magdziarz (10), Christi Raichle (12). Anastasia Rauch 
(11) and Brittany Busby (11) strike a pose at the end of the number “Mamma Mia.” The girls sang a medley 
of “Dancing Queen” and “Mamma Mia”. “It was so much fun working with the other girls because we 
really got to know each other, and we worked well together. We harmonized perfectly and made the 
number on point," Busby said. 3. GOING GREEN Megan Barry (11) plays the pompous Elphaba in the 
spoof “Wicked.” Throughout the song “Defying Subtlety,” flying monkeys catered to her every whim. 
“There was a ton of different ways of doing [the makeup]. It was really intense and a pain to take off, 
but people said it looked really similar to the one on Broadway. It worked pretty well." Barry said. 4. SO 
MUCH HYPE Theodoros Karras (9), Hannah Souronis (10), Zachary Hansen (10), Parker Danner (10) and 
Samantha Bredar (9) express exaggerated distress in “Seasons of Hype,” a spoof of “Seasons of Love” 
from “Rent.” Throughout the number, the group thrashed about on the stage, singing of their frustrations. 
“’Rant’ was probably the most exciting [song] to perform because we had to make fun of this group of 
angst-ridden people, and it was fun because we all love ‘Rent,’” Danner said. Photos by: Emily Badger 


148 





































WHERE PRETTY SONGS DON’T QUITE BELONG 

Theater Company leaves audience in stitches with “Forbidden Broadway” 



PAGE BY: ELENA GORNEY, EMILY BADGER AND EMILY LISAC 

rom March 11 to March 16, Lake Central Theater Company showcased 
I “Forbidden Broadway” in the LGI Room.The musical was a parody of 
hit Broadway shows such as “Wicked” and “Les Miserables.” 

“The musical is a revue. It’s a spoof on about 20 different musicals, [both] 
older and more modern. The songs sound the same [as they do in the origi¬ 
nal productions], but the lyrics are changed to make them funny,” Mrs. Pam 
Neth, English, said. 

Because Lake Central does not currently have an auditorium, the theater 
company dealt with challenges presented by performing in the LGI room. 

“Some challenges [of performing in the LGI room] are things like sound. 
If we had a regular auditorium, the sound booth and all the microphones, 
transmitters and receivers would all ready be set up. [We had] some staging 
issues. If we wanted actors to walk through the aisles, there were certain 
areas they couldn’t go to because of the pit or because of chairs set up in 
the back,” Mrs. Neth said. 

Over the course of four months, the actors worked on songs, dances and 
knowing their parts. Meanwhile, technicians designed the set, costumes, 


makeup, lighting and sound. 

“We rehearsed anywhere from two to four days a week and on various Sat¬ 
urdays. Tech was going on at the same time, so there was a lot happening,” 
Mrs. Neth said. 

Although acting and technical work occurred simultaneously, actors and 
technicians do not collaborate until the final rehearsals. 

“Tech and the actors work separately until [tech] has an idea of what they 
need us to do. Once [tech] has the ideas, they will fit us for costumes and 
microphones and call us up on stage to see how the lights and sound work. 
We adjust things to fit them, and they adjust things to fit us. We go hand in 
hand,” Jackson DeLisle (11) said. 

Despite the obstacles that the cast and crew had to overcome, the produc¬ 
tion was a success and sold out almost every night. 

“It was really great that two shows sold out and got rave reviews from the 
audience. I was happy with the [performance], and I had fun with it. It was 
almost a release just to be silly and fun. It made me want to do more comedies 
in the future,” Mrs. Neth said. 



STARS COME AND GO BUT ALWAYS GLOW ft 




LOOKING TO THE PAST 

“[Being a senior in the musical] is 
terrifying. It’s just scary knowing 
I’m going to be leaving in three 
months. I’m proud that we have 
so many underclassmen that 
are so good at theater, and I feel 
confident that [the seniors] can 
leave them behind. [The journey] 
has been crazy. I have so many 
stories. [Theater] is my whole 
life, and I try to get along with 
everyone in it because they are my 
family.” 

TABITHA PROWSE (12) 


LOOKING TO THE FUTURE 

“It’s really enjoyable working 
with upperclassmen and being 
able to experience working 
with them before they leave. 

[In the future], I wouldn’t want 
big roles in a musical because 
I’m not the best singer, but 
I’d definitely want to portray 
someone who is funny. [This 
year] I’ve learned how to 
become a better actor and 
open up my emotions as a 
character.” 

THEODOROS KARRAS (9) 




BUSY BEES BEHIND THE SCENES 


How technicians contribute to the show 

When attending a show, the majority of people pay attention 
to what happens onstage, but not necessarily to what hap¬ 
pens behind the scenes. 

“In a [play or musical], the actors portray emotions and the story, 
but lighting and sound people put everything together so that 
[the performance] works,” Matthew Hughes (10) said. 

Costume and makeup designers are vital to the show as 
well. 

“Costumes contributes a lot because it puts a good factor 
1. Candace Jarzombek (10). Madison Breford (11). Nichole Heusmann (11) 2. Set j nto ac ^j n g making people more in tune with their charac- 

design made by Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (12) 3. Megan McLaughlin (9). Olivia _ . . . . 

Throckmartin (9) Photos by: Elena Gorney ters, Raquel Rembert (11) Said. 


“Being alone and focusing on things that 
aren’t what I’m stressing about beforehand 
helps calm my nerves [before a perfor¬ 
mance!, 

SARAH HERMANEK (10) said. 


“I don’t get too nervous before I go on 
stage because I know that the audience 
wants the show to go well, and I’m 
performing with all of my friends. I just 
go out there and go crazy,” 

ELISE BEREOLOS (11) said. 


“Usually, I just take a deep breath and do some 
warm-ups with the rest of the group [to calm my 
nerves]. We do some voice warm-ups and physi¬ 
cal warm-ups, and that’s what we do to prepare 
for a show,” 

BRANDON BIANCO (12) said. 





















“When [the audience laughs] at the jokes, and 
they actually react how you wanted them to, it’s 
really fun,” Vanessa Torres (9) said. 


TIPS FOR PREPARING FROM THE PROS 

1 “[Know] your lines. You need to understand your lines off the 
top of your head. You shouldn’t be thinking. You should just be 
doing,” Nichole Heusmann (11) said. 

2 [Have] good chemistry with your coactors. If you don’t, you 
can still act, [but] you’re just going to have a really hard time 
doing it,” Heusmann said. 

3 “Don’t be nervous. Just be crazy because when you’re crazy 
and you’re just up there having fun, the audience will enjoy your 
performance as well,” Elise Bereolos (11) said. 



Nichole Heusmann (11) Photo by: Candace Jarzombek 





FRESHMEN SHOW OFF SKILLS 

Student directors choose silent show 

Hannah Scherer (12) and Nicole Guillermo (12) made a 
daring decision in choosing a silent show for the fresh¬ 
men to perform, which had never been done before. 
Because there is no dialogue, the actors put in double 
the effort to make their show enjoyable for the audience. 

“We really, really wanted to try and push it through to 
see how the freshmen would work with it but also how 
we would work with it. It’s like a whole new learning 
experience to do something like this,” Scherer said. 

1. Madalyn Kruszewski (9) and Olivia Throckmartin (9) 2. Madalyn Krusze- 
wski (9). Alexis Lawley (9) and Noah Katalinic (10) 3. Theodoras Karras (9) 

Photos by: Brittany Rabatine 


SPOTLIGHT LANDS ON UP-AND-COMING STARS 

Freshmen shows give new thespians a chance to shine without upperclassmen competition 

PAGE BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY RABATINE 


he Freshmen Shows wrapped up the theatre company’s season by 
allowing the upperclassmen to try their hand at directing all-freshman 
cast plays. 

“The freshman plays are an opportunity for freshmen to experience acting 
and technician roles with no competition from upperclassmen,” Mrs. Pamela 
Neth, English, said. 

Upperclassmen apply to direct by picking a script and creating a portfolio 
of their costume, sound and lighting ideas. Once four groups of directors are 
chosen to direct their shows, they hold auditions for the freshmen. 

“With the freshmen, it’s kind of cool to see them come out. This is their first 
show that they have the spotlight on them because [they] don’t usually have 
the spotlight on them when they’re in a big show,” Sarah Colby (12) said. 

Although the directors tried to create a low-stress environment for the 
actors, outside factors, like the school board calling a last-minute meeting 
during the last technical rehearsal, could not be controlled. 

“I’m really nervous about this play, but I know that my directors and that my 
fellow actors will help me get through it,” Timothy Bakas (9) said. 


“I think [acting with freshmen] is fun “Not all of [the freshmen] are 

because you see what other people in [as upperclassmen] but sorm 

your grade can do and how they are are even more outgoing than 

compared to yourself,” other upperclassmen,” 

MADISON FREDERICK (9) said. MASON CRAWFORD (9) said 


The shortened practice time, along with the limited actors participating in the 
shows, caused additional challenges for the student directors to overcome. 

“There [were] 16 characters [in our show] originally, and one kid was playing 
nine parts. Just making sure there was timing in between for him to change 
and add little accessories was probably the hardest [part of directing] because 
we didn’t know if we would make it in time,” Raquel Rembert (11) said. 

Working with student directors can be easier for the freshmen because they 
can connect with the people they will be working with for the next three years 
if they continue participating in theatre. 

“[The student directors are] amazing, because they always try to help out, 
but they’re not mean about it like, ‘Oh yeah, you suck.’ No, they’re kind of 
[giving] constructive criticism like [a] sandwiching kind of thing,” Bakas said. 

The student directors and actors work mostly on their own, only asking one 
of the teachers for help when it is absolutely necessary. 

“We are more guides in this whole process, and that is what is great about 
The Freshmen Shows. It empowers the students and gives them experiences 
they might not have otherwise,” Mrs. Pam Neth, English, said. 


as skilled “We’re still trying to figure out where we 

of them belong in the theatre organization, and the 

some upperclassmen all know each other," 

ALEXANDER VRBANOFF (9) said. 



150 















1. BROTHERLY BOND Adam Gustas (10), who plays Timothy Bakas’s (9) brother in “Face Forward: 

Growing Up in Nazi Germany, criticizes Bakas. who plays a member of the Hitler Youth, for not having 
perfectly shined shoes. Bakas’s character was about to advance to the senior Hitler Youth. “[The] show 
was about these three kids growing up in Nazi Germany and following the story of how different walks of 
life experienced different things during that time period," Sarah Colby (12), who directed the show, said. 

2. PRINCESSES THEN AND NOW Andrew Aardema (9) and Isabella Kowalczyk (9) act out the the differ¬ 
ences between the original Disney princesses and today’s princesses in the show “Crushed.” Both actors 
played multiple parts as they demonstrated what not to do in a relationship. “I play three characters. I play 
Maggie [who is] in love with [a] guy, and then I play April, and she’s like a tomboy and she loves sports, 
and then I play princesses one through four," Kowalczyk said. 3. TOUGH DECISIONS Vanessa Torres 

(9) and Adam Gustas (10), who played German parents in the show “Face Forward: Growing Up in Nazi 
Germany,” discuss the matter of hiding a Jewish family in their home. The play followed the stories of three 
teenagers living in Germany during World War II. “It’s a really fun show, and I’m glad I have amazing direc¬ 
tors that can help me get through my first show,”Timothy Bakas (9) said. 4. A SILENT CROWD The cast 
of “Emotional Baggage" crowds around Kassandra Hansen (9) as she tries to convince them to overcome 
their emotional issues. All of the characters were holding on to their pasts and were reluctant to drop their 
baggage. "I play the dead-end job, which [is] basically a janitor who hates his job and picks up garbage 
after people and just hates everything,” Madalyn Kruszweski (9) said. Photos by: Brittany Rabatme 



SOME PERFORMING ARTS FRESHMAN SHOWS 151 

















































A NEW TWIST ON THE SAME OLD SONG AND DANCE 

The Trebleaires show choir finishes competing and begins their concert season 

PAGE BY: SHANNON HEARNE, COURTNEY KREYKES, AND STEPHANIE O’DROBINAK 


hile many students may be familiar with the choir department, they 
may not know about the different groups that the choir is divided into. 
The Trebleaires is an all-female group that started in 1978 that has 
accomplished many things throughout the years. On Feb. 7, the girls headed 
out to the Indiana State School Music Association (ISSMA) competition to 
test their skills at the district level. 

M l am an alto in the group. There are three different sections: soprano, alto 
[and] second soprano. [Since] I am an alto, I sing the lower part. We got a 
perfect score at ISSMA. I feel we could have been a bit better in general [by 
being] louder and more accurate with our notes, but the judges thought it 
was perfect,” Anastasia Rauch (11) said. 

The Trebleaires traveled to Munster High School for the ISSMA competition 
and came home with gold for their ensemble piece. 

“Our group piece [for the competition] was called ‘Stopping by the Woods 
On A Snowy Evening.’The Trebleaires won, and all of the kids that had solos 
and received gold qualified to go down to State on Feb. 16. There were 14 
solos and ensembles, which included about 50 to 65 kids,” Mrs. Sandy 


Hobbs, Music, said. 

Due to a bad snowstorm, the girls never made it to Indianapolis for State. 
However, as they began their concert season, the girls received an oppor¬ 
tunity to begin singing again and create new melodies to entertain different 
audiences. 

“Performing has given me much more confidence. I’ve made new friends, 
and I’ve performed for some wonderful people. We performed [at First 
Methodist Church in Crown Point] to provide entertainment and good times. 
We sang a few pieces from The Andrews Sisters such as ‘Bei Mir Bist Du 
Schon’, ‘Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree’, ‘Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy’ and our 
ISSMA piece named ‘Stopping By the Woods On A Snowy Evening’,” Jen¬ 
nifer Alvarez (11) said. 

Every year the girls learn new pieces and perform them to new audiences. 
The mass preparation that is needed for these new productions to take place 
is both time consuming and tedious. Next season, the girls will be taught new 
melodies and rhythms to stage their hard work for the anticipating public. 
Soon, auditions for the next years show choir will begin. 




1. Zachary Addington (9) 2. GiannoulaTjortjis (10) 3. Kaitlyn Seitz (10) 
Photos by: Victoria Wilkes 


TONES THROUGH TECHNOLOGY 

Electronic Music classes clash tones 

In Electronic Music, students use electronically 
enhanced instruments to learn how to be able to pro¬ 
duce music through technology. The course teaches 
students to use a programmed called Pro Tools to record, 
compose and mash-up songs. 

“[We are currently working on] our final project which 
is a video game project. I give them video game trailers 
and they strip away all of the sound. [Their project is to] 
write a new sound track,” Mr. Dave Nelson, Art, said. 



HOW TO BECOME A BEGINNER OF THE BELLS 


I USE A SMALL BELL 

“[I play bells] anywhere from C-6 
to A-5. [If you are just starting 
bells], I would [suggest getting] 
some experience before coming to 
bells, but if you don’t it’s okay - it’s 
[easy to learn]. [Typically], you’re 
assigned your bells, but if you’ve 
played before [you can try to get 
one you have already played]. I like 
[the class] so far. I’ve been in the 
same spot for plays, so I’m used 
to where I have been playing.” 

MAYA TOBIN (10) 


I USE A LARGE BELL 

“[I play] a ten pound bell. [The 
most difficult part is] picking it 
up and ringing it. I have been 
playing since sixth grade. In 
eighth grade, we were all taken 
into a room and the bell choir 
played for us. [Since then,] I 
knew I wanted to play. [Advice I 
would give would be to] 
practice a lot. The music does 
get confusing.” 


SPENCER WISE (11) 



“[My favorite about Jazz II class is] 
mastering new techniques in music. 
It is something I am very passionate 
about,” 

ZACHARY HANSEN (10) said. 


“[Jazz has] this aspect of creativity 
where you can be your own unique 
person. It has a relaxing environment 
as well,” 

JOSHUA VELAZQUEZ (12) said. 


“What I like about Jazz is that you have 
a freedom to express yourself through 
improvisation. I love jazz music and I play 
the alto sax,” 

MATEO MORALES (12) said. 
















“[Band is nice because] you get to see everyone 
and get together after concerts and school. It 
feels pretty great when you’re performing in 
front of people,” 
Jessica Jarach (11) said. 



1. THE TREBELAIRE TRIO LeAnn Stutler (12). Breanna Powers (12) and Larissa McBride (11) sing the 
Trebelaire’s show piece titled “Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening.” Their performance was held 
at First United Methodist Church in Crown Point. “I really like the song [and] think our performance went 
really well. I really enjoyed singing at the church. [As a senior] I am going to miss these performances a 
lot," Powers said. 2. ATTENTION PLEASE Mrs. Sandy Hobbs, Music, gathers the attention of the audi¬ 
ence. Hobbs organized the event a year prior to the performance. “I work at the church [the girls sang 
at]. I am the organist and pianist. I have been at that church for about eight years and have been in the 
music ministry for 20 years. They booked us [to sing] a year ago for their fundraiser," Mrs. Hobbs said. 3. 
BELTING OUT THE BEAT LeAnn Stutler (12) sings the lead in "He Never Failed Me Yet.” Multiple singers 
participated in solos in various pieces throughout the day. “[The piece I sang] was a gospel piece. I really 
love gospel music and I want to make a career out of it. [The piece] fit me really well because I love ad- 
libbing.” Stutler said. 4. THE SONGS OF SIX Anna Samels (10). Jenna Buntin (10), Jennifer Alvarez (11), 
Anastasia Rauch (11), Hannah Scherer (12) and Lindsey Solan (12) sing theTrebelaires show piece titled 
‘Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening.’The audience applauded and thanked the girls for singing 
at their church. “I think the performance went really well. The people enjoyed listening and the piece is 
really pretty. It was our contest piece,” Buntin said. Photos By: Shannon Hearne 



SOME PERFORMING ARTS MOSICAL CLASSES 153 




























FOR THE LOVE 
OF THE GAME 

Athletes participate in travel teams 

PAGE BY: ERIN DOSEN 


hile there are many sports offered at school, some 
(wjjjij students find interest in participating in organiza- 
tions outside of the corporation. There are also 
some students who are active in school sports, yet still 
find time to play on another competitive team. 

“[I am playing on the] Three Lions United soccer team. 

I play center-mid, and I’ve been playing since 2011. I plan 
on playing with this team for the rest of high school, while 
I play soccer at Lake Central,” Emilie Dunne (9) said. 

Students who take part in these teams have the chance to 
play with and compete against kids from different schools. 

“Some people on the team are friends [that I already 
had,] and others are people from [Valparaiso] that are on 
the team,” Dunne said. 

Not every sport requires a team. Kyle West (12) is a part 
of a summer track program. 

“[The summer track program] is all across the country, and 
I’m in the Midwest region. I’m not featured on any teams. 
I’m an independent runner. I run track here, too. [The two 
seasons] overlap a little bit because the track season for 
school goes a little bit after the school year ends, and State 
is sometime in June,” West said. 

Traveling for a sport takes a great deal of dedication. Some 
athletes carry their skills farther than some may realize. 

“I went to an open preseason national tournament in Iowa 
for wrestling. It was open to all the high school kids in the 
country,” Jacob Kleimola (11) said. 

For most athletes who double up on sports, the com¬ 
mitment can be exhausting, but new friends can be made 
throughout the journey. 

“I play travel softball for the Orland Park Sparks. I am 
new [to the team] this year. I like the experience of traveling 
to different states and meeting new teammates,” Jayna 
McDermott (11) said. 

Whether students choose to play for a high school team 
or a travel team, most teams are formed under a common 
goal: to bring athletes together in a competitive and encour¬ 
aging environment where their skills can be exercised. 



1. TEAM SPIRIT Jayna McDermott (11) swings her bat at an incoming pitch. McDermott was a new member of the Orland Park Sparks this season. 

“I think [travel softball] is more competitive, but only because of the travel ball team I am on. People have different opinions depending on how hard 
the coach pushes you," McDermott said. Photo Submitted by: Jayna McDermott 2. LUCKY NUMBER SEVEN Jacob Kleimola (11) stands for winning 
seventh place at an open preseason wrestling tournament. This tournament took place in Iowa and was open to all competitive wrestlers throughout 
the nation. “It’s a double elimination tournament. I ended up losing my first match of the day, so then I had to win four in a row just to place. I did, and I 
ended up getting seventh place,” Kleimola said. Photo Submitted by: Jacob Kleimola 3. ONE TEAM, ONE GOAL Emilie Dunne (9) and her teammates 
take a photo for a travel soccer team. The season for this team did not interfere with the Lake Central soccer season. “This year, Three Lions started in 
the beginning of January. When I played for Lake Central this school year, [the two teams] didn’t collide in times, but they may start to next year,” Dunne 
said. Photo Submitted by: Emilie Dunne 4. HURDLING OVER COMPETITION Kyle West (12) competes in hurdles during his summer track program. 
West started running track before he entered high school. “[I got involved] by track in middle school. I was looking for somewhere else to do it because 
the school season wasn’t very long, and I wanted something a little more competitive," West said. Photo Submitted by: Kyle West 



154 





























“With hands-on learning, you actually get to 
physically understand what your teacher is 
trying to explain,” Kaylynn Ward (10) said. 



1. Edward Halbe (11) and Justin Cortez (12) Photo by: Megan Heifers 2. 
Olivia Barnes (9). Brianna Frenden (9) and Delayna Macak (9) Photo by: 
Megan Heifers 3. Kendall Bartochowski (11) Photo by: Annabella Piunti 


COOKING BY THE BOOKS 

Students learn valuable lessons in FACS 

Mrs. Chris Mockovak, Family and Consumer Sciences, 
and Mrs. Vivian Velasco, Family and Consumer Sciences, 
teach Nutrition and Wellness. The class gives students 
a chance to work with new equipment and has students 
work together to make meals, snacks and desserts. 

“[My favorite part about Nutrition and Wellness is] 
mostly associating with a bunch of people and friends,” 
Tabitha Burrink (10) said. 


STUDENTS ENROLL IN ACTIVE-LEARNING CLASSES TO GAIN PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE 



“I took [Adult Roles] 
because I thought it would 
be beneficial to me, so I 
would learn skills to be a 
responsible adult” 

TAYLOR RUDNICK (10) 



“I think [Interior Design] 
will help me to decorate 
my house when I’m older 
and make it more livable 
and comfortable.” 

DEVON KELLEY (10) 


“[I chose to take Family and 
Wellness] to learn more about 
jf^J Ijj the body because I’m going into 

nursing, and I thought it would be 
a great start.” 

HLii mm SARA TREMBCZYNSKI (12) 


mcnnwrnmn 

DIlPliRlNG 








Practical projects help teach students important life skills 

PAGE BY: EMMA DEGROOT AND TABITHA PAPPAS 


roup projects and labs are helpful for students 
to fully grasp course concepts and interact with 
others. Child Development, Nutrition and Wellness, 
Adult Roles and Housing and Interior Design are four classes 
that use projects as their main strategy of learning. 

The baby project in Child Development is a hands-on 
experience that shows students how to take care of a child 
before parenthood. They are responsible for feeding, cloth¬ 
ing, and taking care of the simulation babies as though they 
were real children. 

“[In Child Development] the kids get to take a baby home 
for the weekend, and they’re totally in charge of taking care 
of it. It makes the kids realize that being a parent is a very big 
responsibility,” Mrs. Kathy Szewciw, Family and Consumer 
Sciences, said. 

Learning how to cook and bake with modern technology 
is also important for students. It can help them develop the 
skills needed to excel in high school, college and even in 
their lives after schooling. 

“[In Nutrition and Wellness] we do 13 different labs through¬ 
out the semester, using new equipment they’ve never used 


before. We have new stoves. We do a microwave unit, and 
[the students work] with different ingredients,” Mrs. Chris 
Mockovak, Family and Consumer Sciences, said. 

Students in Housing and Interior Design get the chance 
to choose fabrics that they would put in their future houses. 
Not only does this get them started on thinking about their 
futures, but it also gives them the chance to tap into creativity 
with a practical goal in mind. 

“Clothes, food, shelter, water and love are definitely 
components everybody needs. Family Consumer Science 
covers all of those [needs],” Mrs. Louise Tallent, Family and 
Consumer Sciences, said. 

Students who take these classes and participate in the 
projects gain important and unique life skills. 

"My goal for the kids is to have an overview of a lot of 
topics that are really important in the whole idea of parenting 
and development of children,” Mrs. Szewciw said. 

Family and Consumer Science classes help students 
understand the responsibilities of child development and 
adult roles. 



























































































































































































TWO PERSPECTIVES ON FAMILY AND WELLNESS 

WHAT I TEACH WHAT I LEARNED 


“I hope [my students] gain life 
skills about what it takes to be 
well and recognize and obtain 
skills that can be applied when 
people are not well in their homes 
for themselves or extended family, 
or in the future, their own wives, 
husbands or children.” 

MRS. LOUISE TALLENT, FAMILY 
AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 


“[I learned] the knowledge of 
CPR, how to take care of your 
body, how to solve different 
situations in a medical emer¬ 
gency and how to stay calm. 
[Mrs. Tallent] treats everyone 
fairly” 


NICHOLAS TOCCI (12) 




1. PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE Madison Magdziarz (10) puts pants on one of the mechanical babies as 
she prepares to feed it a bottle. Child Development students worked with the simulation babies for hands-on 
learning. “I took this class because I’m a baby-sitter for a family that is pregnant, so I am learning how to 
take care of their baby," Magdziarz said. 2. NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND Madison Magdziarz (10) fixes the 
baby’s pants before she starts to rock it. The class prepared students for future parenting experiences. “You 
get experience if you decide to have a child later in life," Lara Mitchell (9) said. 3. PRACTICING PARENTING 
Kyra Fitzgerald (10) smiles at her baby boy while she and her class get the opportunity to practice childcare 
skills with mechanical babies that make sounds. The students took a baby home for a whole weekend and 
were graded on the quality of their care for the baby. “I took this class to have the whole baby experience,” 
Fitzgerald said. 4. NEW PARENTS, NEW SKILLS Brandee Kinney (10) giggles as she and her classmates 
make jokes and get the experience of a real child crying to be fed and changed. The students acquired life 
skills from this class, especially when they learned how to hold the babies. “Taking this class is a learning 
experience. It will help anyone who takes the class to be prepared for life. If you ever have a baby unexpect¬ 
edly. you won’t be completely confused on how to take care of it," Kinney said. Photos by: Emma DeGroot 



SOME ACADEMIC HANDS-ON 157 






















WORKING IN A MAN’S WORLD 

A childhood passion becomes a career 

Following her passion for the automotive industry, 
Breann Bolton (12) has participated in vocational auto¬ 
motive classes for three years. As one of the only girls in 
her class, she felt like she first had to prove her capabili¬ 
ties to her male counterparts. 

“I think that [the vocational auto program is] the greatest 
opportunity that we could have in high school because 
a lot of other schools don’t have it. I think that anyone 
thinking about taking it should,” Bolton said. 

Breann Bolton (12) 3. Breann Bolton (12) Photos by: Brittany Rabatine 



1. Nicholas Hansen (11), Beniamin DeBaggis (10) and Breann Bolton (1 !) 2. 



iililiiiiill 








An inside look at a program taking hands-on experience to a new level 

PAGE BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY RABATINE 


n Mr. Dennis Brannock’s, Vocational, Auto-shop 
classes students learn the inner workings of 
automobiles and the automotive industry. The 
program focuses on providing students with 
mechanical skills. 

“The vocational classes provide students the oppor¬ 
tunity to obtain the necessary hands-on experience to 
transfer from high school into the workforce or take col¬ 
lege level courses at the high school,” Mr. Brannock said. 

The automotive program consists of three classes: Intro 
to Automotive Technology, Transportation II andTranspor- 
tation III. The two higher level courses can be taken for 
dual credit from Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana. 

“The automotive classroom runs like a dealership in that 
students are trained on the service desk with Ms. [Lisa] 
Pajkos, [West Lake,] as well as train to be a technician 
and a mechanic,” Mr. Brannock said. 

Students learn through demonstration and work mostly 
in teams for larger projects, but they are tested individually. 
The real-world problems addressed in the class prepare 
future mechanics for their careers. 

“We’ve taken out two motors this year, and those were 


pretty difficult because of all the wiring and hosing you’ve 
got to disconnect and you’ve got to make sure you get 
it all done right and not break anything,” Tristan Hiduke 
(11) said. 

Even if a student does not plan on pursuing a career 
in the automotive industry, the program teaches life skills 
that could be beneficial to any car owner. At least a basic 
knowledge about vehicles could prove useful. 

“I feel that cars are a necessity and I feel like everybody 
should take [this class] because cars are an everyday part 
of life,” Lauryn Winarski (12) said. 

The classes push the students under real life conditions 
without being completely left on their own. While letting 
the students solve problems independently, Mr. Brannock 
provides guidance and support. 

“The hands-on learning [is my favorite part] because 
[Mr. Brannock will] go out in the shop and teach you how 
to do stuff, like how to change a tire or rotate them, and 
then you have to do it yourself. He’s kind of strict and he’ll 
yell at you, but if you get on his good side he’s really nice, 
and cares and wants everybody to learn and be success¬ 
ful,” Winarski said. 




“[Mr. Dennis Brannock, Vocational] takes no silly 
business. He’s kind of strict and he’ll yell at you, 
but if you get on his good side, he’s really nice 
and wants everybody to learn and be success¬ 
ful,” Lauryn Winarski (12) said. 






















































































































































































FROM AT SCHOOL TO IN THE REAL WORLD 



“This year is my first year of vocational 
[auto]. Last year was my first year of 
intro. [The hardest part of auto] would be 
when there's a problem with the car you 
can’t seem to fix it, get something to fit 
right or get a bolt off. I was looking for a 
better job and my teacher said to apply 
[to Grimmer’s] and I'd have a chance. 

[I’ve been working there for] probably 
four months. It’s nice because I’m us¬ 
ing a lot of the skills I learn in school; 
however, I do think I learn a little more at 
work. At work everything’s expected to 
be done quickly and efficiently. At school 
that’s not as much of a concern, and at 
school I also have Mr. [Dennis] Brannock, 
[Vocational,] watching my back and mak¬ 
ing sure I do things right. At work it’s up 
to me to ask if I’m not doing something 
right." 

JAMES MCINTIRE (11) 


HOW TO MAKE IT IN AUTO 



“Respect Mr. [Dennis] 
Brannock, [Vocational] and 
listen to him. Don’t mess 
around, then you’ll get on 
his bad side.” 

ZACHARY STANEK (10) 



“[Auto is] a really good 
class and you learn how to 
do things hand-on and not 
having other people do it 
for you.” 

MAMIE REISING (10) 



“Main colleges aren’t the 
smartest choice. Some 
community colleges are 
the better choice for 
mechanical engineering.” 

ESAM YACOUB (10) 




1. SHOWING HIS SKILLS Alec Glinski (11) examines a car’s brake 
caliper. As a student in the Vocational program, Glinski was helping 
teach students in the introductory course. “[The auto program is] 
very hands-on and you learn a lot. You can save money [and] help 
friends and family,” Glinski said. Photo by: Brittany Rabatine 2. ALL 
IN THE FAMILY Benjamin DeBaggis (10) and Jacob Gibson (10) 
study a car’s brake system. Gibson wanted to learn more about 
automotive service, so he could help with the family business. “My 
grandfather happens to have a shop in Lansing, and my dad hap¬ 
pens to work there, so I might as well help out." Gibson said. Photo 
by: Brittany Rabatine 3. CAPTIVATED BY CALIPERS Ty Kullman (11) 
concentrates on his assignment to learn about brakes. The Intro to 
Automotive Technology class was studying brake systems and cali¬ 
pers in preparation to replace brakes. “The enviomment’s fun. just 
being in a workshop and working with the tools." Kullman said. 


SOME ACADEMICS HANDS-ON 159 
































































Students get head start on career paths by taking beneficial classes 


PAGE BY: RUTH CHEN, VICTORIA WILKES AND JESSICA WOJTON 


ome students at Lake Central are taking specialized 
classes in art, drafting and science to get a head start 
^5^ on their career path. 

“If you know what you want to do, then it’s good to take 
as many courses as possible. Especially if you can get dual credit 
or AP credit, it’s great for college when you have to pay less. I 
am in AP Physics right now and AP Calculus. If I score a 4 or 5 
on both tests, I am able to get AP credit for college, and I don’t 
have to take those classes. I’ll have a head start of a year, so I can 
finish college in three years for engineering," David Park (12) said. 

Even though some of the students are taking these classes for 
their career, some choose to take these classes because they 
have a passion for the subject. 

“I don’t want to pursue art, but I’ve always liked it. I’ve always 
had a sort of talent for it, and I feel like it’s a really good way to 
express myself. A lot of my art is inspired by my culture, black 
history and just showing the truth and giving credit where it should 
have been given,” Ugonna Nwannunu (12) said. 

Students not only leave classes with skills for their career, but 
also with life lessons. 

“[The benefits of taking Drafting class is] that it helps you learn 


creative solutions to problems that you normally would just be 
like, ‘Hey, what do you think?’ It lets you think of the solution 
yourself,” Kevin Calderone (12) said. 

When taking a closer look, the concepts of art and science 
classes actually interconnect with each other. 

“I think that art has helped me because when you go to college 
interviews, they don’t just ask you about academics and things 
that will relate to your major, they ask you other things. Art was 
one of the main things I spoke about. I want to go into biology, 
so a lot of people don’t see the correlations between fine arts 
and science, but for me, [I see] the detail that you have to notice 
when you're looking at art or when you’re looking at the structure 
of a DNA helix. You have to appreciate the same things in the two 
fields. It teaches you certain skills that you will use in college,” 
Nwannunu said. 

Although getting ahead is not necessary in high school, it allows 
students to dip their feet into the real world. 

“If you think you want to do something now, and you take that 
class, maybe you'll find out you do like it [or] you don’t like it. 
Without the cost of college and without wasting college years on 
that, you can do it here,” Joseph Grzybek (10) said. 




illiili 


.. WORKING WITH WHEELS Austin Chekaluk (11) centers the clay on the 
wheel. Without the clay centered, it would not have been made properly. “[Art 
is] just a good way to calm down from school." Jennifer Einterz (12) said. Photo 
by: Kristina Plaskett 2. STUDYING SCIENCE Kenneth Wolfrum (11) and Jack 
Larson (11) mix a copper sulfate solution for a lab in ACP II Chemistry Honors. 
Mr. David Harnish’s, Science, classes did a spectrophotometric experiment 
involving a solution in water. “[To prepare for my career, I m taking] tons of sci¬ 
ence and math, but definitely [focusing] on science, AP [Biology], AP [Chemistry, 
and] things like that, but just stocking up on those two,” Joseph Grzybek (10) 
said. Photo by: Shannon Hearne 3. PRINTING PROCESS Chase Owczarzak 
(12) prints from the 3D printer. Using the 3D printer is a common occurrence 
in Mr. Garrett Gray’s, Vocational, Drafting class. “I recommend taking Draft¬ 
ing because you learn to use a lot of programs that professionals use for that 
career.” Owczarzak said. Photo by: Victoria Wilkes 



160 SOME ACADEMIC PROJECTS SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO 

































































































STUDENTS DISCUSS REASONS BEHIND THEIR PASSION FOR SCIENCE 



“I like how you can help 
people out by [going into 
the medical field,] and I’m 
interested in how the body 
works.” 

GEORGE BESHARA (11) 

“[What I like about science 
is that] it compasses life, 
and that it can be used to 
explain a lot of things that 
have happened 

MARC MERTSCHING (12) 



“I like [the medical field] 
because it’s really logical, 
and it makes sense.” 


LAUREN GRANSKOG (11) 

“I’m good at science and 
math classes, so I thought 
it is best for what I would 
do [as a career] ” 


TIMOTHY GIAZZON (12) 



“There’s a really big 
future in [genetics.] I get 
to manipulate DNA, and 
possibly cure genetic 
diseases,” 

SARAH HERMANEK (10) 

“I grew up with computers, 
and I’ve been using computers 
since I could read. [Computer 
Science] is something that I’m 
good at.” 

JACOB ZAK (10) 





:::::::::::::: 

:::::::::::: 

;;;;;;;;;;; 

::::::::::: 

::::::::::::: 


:::::::::: 

::::::::: 


::::::::: 


:::::::: 

::::::::: 


::::::::: 
::::::::: 
:: 


::::::: 


:::::::: 

:::::::: 

:::::::: 

:::::::: 

:::::::: 


:::::::: 


II 

:::::::: 

::::::: 

::::::: 

lllilli 




:::: 

:::: 

:::: 


DISCUSSION ABOUT DRAFTING 

Teacher describes importance of engineering 

“Basically [Drafting class] is a hands-on, 
problem-solving class that’s project- 
based. So, students are going to be 
involved in hands-on projects and solve 
problems, which may be different than 
typical classes in high school. It’s a dif¬ 
ferent classroom where we can do those 
hands-on projects. It’s more out in front 
of you, something that you can touch 
and work with rather than in a book. I 
think it’s a great class for any student. 

The engineering world has so many 
opportunities out there. If you can gradu¬ 
ate after high school with some type of 
engineering degree, you’re going to have 
a high-paying job somewhere. So, I really 
recommend it for anybody. I think it’s a 
really fun class for students that like to 
engage and like problem-solving activi¬ 
ties [and] group activities.” 

MR. GARRETT GRAY. VOCATIONAL 


FINE ARTS FIASCO 


poll out of 330 



57 % 


ART CLASS 

More than half of Lake 
Central students took an art 
class to get their Fine Arts 
credit. Some art classes include 2D or 3D Art all 

the way to Theater Arts. MUSIC CLASS 

These students fulfilled their required Fine Arts 
credits by choosing a music-related class. Some 
music classes include Choir, Jazz Ensemble, 
Concert Band, Color Guard, 

Hand Bells and Electronic , 

Music.' 


3 unoir, Jazz tnsemoie, 

43 % 


“[I like science because] my mom has been a 
science teacher since the beginning, so I was 
introduced to science early. It’s just something 
I want to do." Jered Pawlak (10) 














































































































































































“I like [Sports Marketing] because it has helped 
me get a lot stronger, and it helps me with the 
sports that I play,” Kylee Freckelton (10) said. 



SAVING LIVES 1,2,3 STEPS AT A TIME 

1 “First, you should see if the person is breathing and if they 
have a pulse. Then, you should immediately call 911 and 
return back to the victim,” Rachel Frieling (10) said. 

2 “If there is no pulse or breathing, then start giving them chest 
compressions. Tilt their head back and lift their chin. For every 30 
compressions, give the victim two breaths,” Frieling said. 

3 “Check if they are breathing again and if they have a pulse. 

If they do not, repeat steps 1 and 2 until help comes,” Friel¬ 
ing said. 


STRETCHING SCHOOL HOURS FOR SPORTS 

Fitness Training offers athletes extra practice time 



“FitnessTraining helps with me with 
baseball because it helps us get our lifts in 
during school so that after school we can go 
straight to practice. During the class, we do 
our lifts, and then if everyone wants to do 
extra stuff, we will do abs as a team and do 
stuff more team-oriented. Fitness Training 
is more for people who are in sports where 
Leisure Sports is more for people who want 
to be active, but are not in a sport. My coach 
put me in the class. The only final we have 
is when we test for our body weight. We 
have to do a certain amount of weight for 
each lift.” 


BRYAN VANDERLEE (12) 





::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

I:::::::::::::::!::::::::::::::::::::::!::::::::::::::: 

I*::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


::::::: 


::::::: 

::::::: 


::::::: 

::::::: 






LEISURE SPORTS HAS STUDENTS LOVING CLASS 



“Leisure Sports is very fun. It 
gets competitive sometimes 
because kids like to take things a 
little too far, but other than that, I 
think it’s a really good class.” 

MARCO DOMINGUEZ (12) 



“Coach [Andrew] Gurnak, 
[Physical Education], has 
a point system, so we will 
have a champion of Leisure 
Sports.” 

RYAN WELLS (12) 



“You play a bunch of different sports 
that get everyone interacting. I like it a 
lot. It keeps me active, and everybody 
fits in because we do a lot of different 
sports.” 

RYAN FIFE (11) 



It’s a good class for senior 
year because you can have 
fun during the day and not be 
stressed out about classes." 


ALEXANDER NISLE (12) 



“[Leisure Sports] is pretty 
intense. The sports are really 
fun, and you make a lot of 
friends." 


JOREY DIMOPOULOS (12) 



“We do a basketball unit in 
Leisure Sports, and it is a 
lot of fun for everybody.” 


NATE EDVARDSEN (10) 


162 























































































































1. ACTING IT OUT Sean Reddy (11) and Nicholas Brandner (12) rehearse their scripts for their Six Flags project in their 
Sports Marketing class. The Six Flags project was a commercial competition that Ms. Terri Budlove’s, [Business], Sports 
Marketing classes completed during second semester. “The Six Flags project is a great marketing experience because it 
allows us to act as a real-world business marketing department,” Reddy said. 2. TEAMWORK Sam Barnhart (10). Kobe 
Cook (10), Walker Brummett (10), and Manual Brooks (10), work together on a project during Ms. Budlove’s fourth hour 
class. The Sports Marketing class did many group projects. “Group projects are the way I perfer learning. It allows me 
to delegate work between classmates,” Nicholas Brandner (12) said. 3. SLAPSHOT Cailee Wilkinson (10) shoots into 
the “Clark" net during class on Feb. 20. The hockey net was used for a fundraiser organized by the Sports Marketing 
class. “You pay money, then shoot the puck. All the money went to the food drive, and then kids would get a lollipop for 
participating. Ultimately, it was to raise money for the food drive. We separated it so that each class period did their own 
competition. We sold T-shirts, phone cases and came up with a lot of different ideas on how to raise money," Marisa 
Mendoza (12) said. 4. INDEPENDENT WORK Brett Guffey (11) works independently during fourth hour on Feb. 24. 
Although the class did a lot of work in groups, there was time set aside for solitary work. “We do a lot of independent 
work to help us learn about marketing companies in the real world," Jerald Lyda (11) said. 

Photos by: Annabella Piunti. 



CDflDTC MADKCTIMP Dl IIMPCC IMTft I IT 

5i UKI5 IVIAKrxt I INb rLUNiitw INIu LIT 


How Sports Marketing incorporates everyday business experiences in the classroom 

PAGE BY: ANNABELLA PIUNTI AND OLIVIA OSTER 



s.Terri Budlove’s, Business, Sports Marketing class is a specialized 
I marketing course that allows students to apply the principle of 
marketing to sports, recreation and entertainment. 

“[The class] teaches us how to handle people [and] how to approach situ¬ 
ations involving business. We do a lot of presentations, so we know how to 
talk in front of people,” Alyssa Staszewski (11) said. 

The class often goes on field trips, including attending a Chicago Bulls game 
and a Chicago Wolves hockey game. They go to these games to observe 
examples of how advertising and marketing are used locally. 

“During the games, they do a lot of advertising for other companies. That 
really involves sports marketing because they are advertising at a sporting 
event,” NikolaTepsic (12) said. 

The class is not just field trips, though. The sports marketing class is cur¬ 
rently working on a project about Six Flags Great America. For this project, 
students are creating videos. 

“The Six Flags project is a commercial competition. Six Flags has a mar¬ 
keting and business day, and they create the guidelines for the commercial 
contest.Then we meet those guidelines, develop the commercials and send 
the commercials in ahead of time. When we go to Six Flags, there is a presen¬ 


tation. The president of marketing for Six Flags meets with the students in the 
Pictorium, and he goes over some basic fundamental marketing concepts. 
Then they show the six finalists. Last year was the first year we entered the 
competition, and Lake Central won first place,” Ms. Budlove said. 

Teaching style varies from classroom to classroom. Ms. Budlove tends to treat 
her students as adults more than as high school students. 

“I really enjoy the class. I think Ms. Budlove does an amazing job. She 
doesn’t act like a teacher. She acts like a manager towards us. She treats us 
like employees, rather than students,” Nathan Pasyk (11) said. 

This class is hands-on, and students do a lot of projects that help them 
prepare for real-world marketing and entertainment. 

“[We do] a lot of hands-on projects and group work [and] have a lot of higher 
level projects. We don’t do a lot of worksheets, and we are always talking 
about the levels of learning and understanding. Before I assign projects, I 
make sure that the students have the correct information that they need. 
Then we finally talk about the foundations. We also have projects that go 
hand-in-hand with what they are learning. They do a ton of presentations 
in class because in marketing it is so important that they have good com¬ 
munications and presentation skills,” Ms. Budlove said. 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIOEO SOME ACADEMICS PROJECTS 163 





























































































































































WHAT MAKES FRENCH APPEALING TO YOU? 



“I didn’t want to go the same 
route that everybody goes with 
Spanish. I think it’s really cool to 
learn about [France’s] heritage as 
well as their language.” 

WILLIAM KRUZAN (10) 



“I have a French uncle, and 
I went to visit Paris over the 
summer. I really liked the city, so I 
wanted to learn more about it ” 


HELANA ZAKHER (10) 



“What compelled me to take 
French was that I was planning, 
after I graduated culinary school 
that I would travel to France to 
specialize in pastries.” 

SERENA MORTON (11) 

“My brother took French, so 
he could help me out if I ever 
needed help. I’m Canadian, so 
[it’s] useful in Canada.” 

MICHAEL BESHARA (9) 



“Spanish kind of seemed like 
everybody was taking it, so 
I wanted to take French just 
because it would be different. I’ve 
kind of always wanted to learn it.” 

NOAH TRACY (11) 



“I think [French] sounds really 
fancy, and it’s pretty easy com¬ 
pared to English. I didn’t want to 
take Spanish, because I took it in 
middle school 

SARAH BENEDICT (12) 





::::::::::::::::::: 

:::::::::::::::::: 




1. STUDYING IN SPANISH The students of the Spanish II class practice conjugating 
new verbs. All of the phrases that the students were practicing related back to commonly 
used actions and feelings. u l think so many people come to America not knowing Eng¬ 
lish, so knowing even a little bit of Spanish can help me in the future,” Danielle Sprouse 
(11) said. 2. LEARNING SOMETHING NEW Students of the German II class take notes 
on a new vocabulary unit. The students learned to form sentences using the vocabulary 
they have been learning since their first year. “[Learning German] has shown me where 
English is derived from. The class itself taught me the culture of Germany, the language, 
and it [has shown me] a lot more than just English," Marc Garcia (11) said. 3. PRACTICE 
MAKES PERFECT Madeline Jurek (10) and Reetam Mander (10) practice their French 
vocab lesson before a quiz. The unit was on daily routines, such as getting dressed or 
eating breakfast. “I like when we do the little activities about the vocab. It makes me 
understand it more and makes it a little bit easier to pronounce,” Mander said. Photos by: 
Jovana Dodevska 

































































































“I love teaching French because it’s something 
which is completely new to students,” 
Mrs. Nancy Tilka, World Language, said. 



THE NEW GIRL IN TOWN 

Jessica Wolowicz (11) shares about her struggle 
to fit in^as a foreign exchange student. 

Transferring to a new school is always 
a difficult task for any teenager. However, 
coming to a foreign country can make 
the change even harder. Every new 
student has fears about making friends 
and fitting in at school, but being a 
foreign exchange student creates unique 
obstacles. 

“I came here [from Germany] and I 
did not know anyone. My first day was 
awful because the school is huge, and I 
didn’t know anyone. The guys were nice 
to me, but the girls, when I asked them 
where can I go [or] where my next class 
is, they didn’t help me. I signed up for 
cheer, and I found friends. It’s been bet¬ 
ter since [then]. Lake Central is huge. At 
my school we have 800 [students] in the 
whole school, and we don’t have stuff 
like school sports or a pool.” 




1. Mrs. Leslie Iwema. World Language 2. Lauryn Winarski (12) 3. Jack 
Larson (11) Photos by: Emily Rey 


GIVING THE GIFT OF LANGUAGE 

German III class takes time to teach stu¬ 
dents at Watson Elementary School 

The German III classes have a very diverse learning 
experience. Not only do the students get the opportunity to 
immerse themselves in the German language and culture, 
but they are also able to share the knowledge they have 
acquired with the next generation. Students, during their 
matrix period, travel to elementary schools to teach some 
of the children a little bit of German and hopefully make a 
lasting impact. This is not only a great opportunity for the 
children, but also for the students experiencing the view 
from the other side of the classroom. 






Students experience cultures from around the globe in various language classes 

PAGE BY: SARAH BREDAR AND JOVANA DODEVSKA 


anguage is the glue that holds together communications worldwide. 
The three foreign language classes are French, German and Span¬ 
ish provide fundamental knowledge, allowing students to immerse 
themselves in the world outside of Northwest Indiana. Taking a language 
class for at least two years is a graduation requirement, so every single 
student has the opportunity to learn another dialect and another culture. 

“I was actually born in Germany, but I am not fluent in the language, so 
I decided to learn it. It definitely gives you the opportunity to socialize with 
people of that country, in their native language and other German speaking 
countries,” Eric Rasmussen (11) said. 

Learning a new language is not an easy task. Not only does a student 
have to learn how to form ideas in another language, they also have to 
explore the culture of the language. From Mardi Gras to Cinco De Mayo, 
there are endless opportunities for a student to engross themselves in what 
seems like another world. 

“[My Spanish class] does a project on Mexican or Spanish culture every 
quarter and then sometimes we watch different TV shows that are popular 


in Spanish-speaking countries,” Alyssa Panczuk (9) said. 

Understanding another language not only increases a student’s knowl¬ 
edge of the world, but it also helps him or her with standardized exams. 
Spanish and French are Latin based, which really helps students decipher 
complex words on tests like the SAT and the ACT. Employers tend to hire 
workers who have worldly knowledge. Being bilingual, trilingual or even a 
polyglot, one who speaks four or more languages, can open many doors 
in the future. 

“I think [learning a language] taps into a different part of the brain, and 
I think it helps students understand English grammar a little bit better 
because English grammar and German grammar are very similar. I think 
it makes you more sensitive and also more appreciative of what we have 
here in the United States. The students are always shocked to learn that, 
for example, a driver’s license is so much more expensive in Germany than 
it is in the United States, and when they learn that students from Germany 
can’t wait to live here, that blows their mind,” Mrs. Leslie Iwema, World 
Language, said. 



SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME ACADEMICS FOREIGN LANGUAGE 165 


































































































































































Students learn advanced placement classes eventually pay off 

PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD 


m 


ach year students who are enrolled in Advanced Placement 
I math, science and English classes have the opportunity to 
earn $100 for passing the AP exam that corresponds with 
those classes. 

“If you pass a test, you get a [monetary] grant. So, if you get a 3, 
4 or a 5, you get $100,” Kristen Kaiser (12) said. 

A few classes that qualify for this grant are AP English Language 
and Composition, AP English Language and Literature, AP Chem¬ 
istry, AP Biology, AP Statistics and AP Calculus BC. Social studies 
classes, such as AP Psychology or AP U.S. History, do not qualify 
for this grant. 

Students who earn these grants use the money in a variety of dif¬ 
ferent ways. There is no limit or restriction on what the students put 
their money toward. Some popular ways to spend the cash include 
shopping or saving the money for different costs in college. 

“I took AP Chem last year and AP Calculus AB and got $100 for 
each [test]. I used some of [the money] to help pay for my biddy ball, 


and some of it I just used for [other stuff],” Ryan Palkon (12) said. 

This money is also a way to encourage students to enroll in AP 
classes and study for the exams. A student can earn money per test 
they pass, so more classes and passed tests equals more money 
for the student. 

“I think it’s a good idea because it motivates kids to study for their 
AP tests and do well on them instead of just blowing it off because 
then they have a reward for doing well,” Kaiser said. 

The opportunity to receive the grant also motivated some students 
and helped them make decisions about their class schedule in the 
future. 

“I do think [the grants] are a good idea because they definitely 
encouraged me to take some AP classes this year to get $100 and 
spend it on whatever [I] want,” Palkon said. 

English, math and science exams are of no cost to students, so 
most are expected to take the exams. AP exams take place at the 
end of the school year in May. 




COMPARING POPULAR AP SCIENCE CLASSES 

AP BIOLOGY AP CHEMISTRY 


“I really like the teacher, and the 
atmosphere. It’s really interesting 
too because it pertains to your life. 
I dislike the tests. They are really 
hard, and it’s a lot of taking what 
you learned and applying it.” 


ADARE PITCHFORD (11) 


"The class is probably the 
hardest thing that I’ve taken 
throughout my entire high 
school career. The homework is 
online, and it gives you pretty 
much a good overview of what 
your test is going to look like.” 

ANDREW VOSS (12) 



HAVE YOU EVER TAKEN AN AP CLASS? 

poll out of 331 students 


47 % 


TAKEN AN AP CLASS 

Lake Central High School 
offered 22 Advanced 
Placement classes in the 2014-2015 school year. 
Some of those classes include AP Psychology, AP 
Calculus AB and AP Computer Science A. 


NOT TAKEN AN AP CLASS f“ Q f)/ 

While some students choose j C\ 

not to take AP classes, they / \J 

do take the honors and regular courses that are 
available. Some of these classes include Statistics, 
Advanced Lifesaving and Computer Programming I. 



“I am in an AP Art class right now. [I took this 
class because] I wanted to find out more of 
what I could do with my art skills,” Nicholas 
Mazon (12) said. 






























































































































































ADVANCED PLACEMENT CLASSROOM ENGAGEMENTS 




[My favorite AP class is] 
probably AP Physics. I like 
how hard it is. [It’s good] 
career wise for engineer¬ 
ing. 

TAKODA POTTS (11) 

I am in AP Macroeco¬ 
nomics. I like AP classes 
because it's a smaller 
class size. 


DARIA POMIOTLO (11) 



[I am in] AP Government. I 
like the stuff we talk about, 
like politics and govern¬ 
ment [because] I think it's 
interesting. 

CODY MCCALL (12) 

I am in AP Psych. It was 
year-long, and I felt like 
I would get more out of 
it than just the regular 
Psychology class. 

JACOB MAVITY (12) 




•• 

... 



::::::::: 


.. 

... 

:: 

::::::::: 

::::::::: 


:: 

::: 


:::::::::: 

::::::::: 


:: 



::::::::: 

iiiiii! 

::::::: 

:: 

I!: 

jj 


:::::: 

:::::: 


1. STAR BURST AND STATS Christina Tipman (11) sorts Starburst for an activity in AP 
Statistics. This activity related to the probability and distribution lesson they were learning 
at that time. “[I took AP Stats because] I am very successful in math compared to other 
subjects.” Tipman said. Photo by: Kristina Plaskett 2. GETTING GRANTS Christopher 
Tarnowski (12) recieves his AP grant of $100. Students earned this monetary grant if they 
scored a three or higher on an AP math, science or English exam. “I gave [the grant] 
to my parents, and I believe they probably put it toward my college fund. I figure that’s 
probably one of the best uses I could of had for that, even though I personally wanted 
to spend it on myself,” Tarnowski said. Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 3. TASTING IN COLOR 
Mr. Ralph Holden, Social Studies, paints Lindsey Gercken’s (11) tongue with food dye. 
This project was done to determine what type of taster Gercken was based on her taste 
buds. “I was a super taster, so that means I can easily taste stuff," Gercken said. Photo 
by: Sara Lisac 



SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO SOME ACADEMICS AP CLASSES 167 


































































































PAYING 

PRINCESSES 


Working while playing the part 

PAGE BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU AND CATHRYN 
CEARING 

igh school is usually the time for teenagers to find 
(!■§) their first jobs. These can include anything from 

flipping burgers to stocking store shelves to bus¬ 
sing tables. Some students, however, have found a more 
magical means of earning money. 

“The company I work for is Once Upon a Celebration. A 
friend I have from Munster, who also works for the com¬ 
pany, told me about it. I was able to interview, and I got 
the job,” Elise Bereolos (11) said. 

Once Upon a Celebration is a company that provides 
actors and actresses for events like brunches and birth¬ 
day parties to play cartoon characters, princesses and 
superheroes. 

“I’ve been working there since November, and it’s the best 
job in the world. Depending on how long the party is, I take 
pictures with everyone, sing whatever song the princess 
I’m playing sings, dance with the kids, sing happy birthday 
and if we have time, we play a game,” Bereolos said. 

Some employees at Patti’s All-American also have expe¬ 
rience of playing princesses, which has required them to 
brush up on their fairy-tale knowledge. 

“Sometimes the girls will recognize you and you have 
to think on your feet and convince them that you’re not 
who they think you are. Also, you really have to know your 
movie because the kids want to know all the answers to 
the movies and why you did what you did in the movie,” 
Brittany Busby (11) said. 

While some students like Bereolos and Busby earn money 
as part of a company, others have taken initiative to earn 
money by dressing up on their own time. 

“It’s actually a funny story. I work for [a] little girl’s mom, 
and we were just supposed to go to [her] party, but 
because of the snow, the princesses canceled. She asked 
if I would dress up, [and] of course I said yes. My friend, 
[Jennifer Wright (10)] looks like Elsa, so she decided she 
would dress up too. We sang the songs and played with 
the kids. They actually thought we were them. A mom from 
the party asked if we would do her kid’s party too,” Anna 
Pinkus (10) said. 

Whether on-the-spot or planned ahead of time, dress¬ 
ing up for the job is a new way to find balance between 
work and play. 

“I’ve always wanted to be a Disney princess. The look on 
the faces of all the little girls when you walk into a party 
dressed like their favorite princess is priceless. I just love 
it,” Bereolos said. 



1. PRINCESS PARTY Elise Bereolos (11) plays a game with children at a party with a “The Little Mermaid" theme. Bereolos had to dress up as Ariel 
for the event. “It’s the best job in the world." Bereolos said. Photo submitted by: Elise Bereolos (11) 2. FROZEN FUN Elise Bereolos (11) dresses up as 
Princess Anna from Frozen for a birthday party. Bereolos has gotten to dress up as a range of characters for her job. “I’ve played Ariel, Tinkerbell, Anna 
and Elsa," Bereolos said. Photo submitted by: Sarah Miller 3. ROYAL ROUND-UP Alexandra Majchrowicz (Andrean 11), Mary Langdon (11), Meaghan 
Ehlert (11), Madeline Young (11), Brittany Busby (11) and Renn Arvanitis (11) show off their costumes at an event. Busby and the other girls dressed up 
for their jobs at Patti’s All American. “We do all sorts of camps and fun stuff for the kids, and the coordinator of the camps kind of picks us by who we 
can believably be and if we could pull off a princess," Busby said. Photo submitted by: Brittany Busby (11)4. SNOWMAN MEET-UP Madeline Young 
(11) dresses up as Princess Anna from "Frozen” for a camp at Patti’s All American. Previous camps have featured workers dressed up as Cinderella. 
Rapunzel and other Disney princesses. “When you first walk in the room, (the kids are] just frozen. They can’t believe they’re in the same room as you," 

Brittany Busby (11) said. Photo submitted by: Patti’s All-American 






















SOME PEOPLE FEATURE 169 





















1. STORY TIME Gabrielle Frigo (12) listens as 
Matthew Protsman (9) tells a story at the first Best 
Buddies meeting of the year on Sept. 29. The first 
meeting included activities that helped members get 
to know each another. “I love being Matt’s buddy. 
Matt and I have gotten along really well ever since 
the beginning, and it’s nice because I go and visit 
him at his house. It’s probably one of the most fulfill¬ 
ing things I have ever done," Frigo said. 2. BEST 
FRIENDS AT BEST BUDDIES Jacob Kiefor (11) and 
Christian Huber (12) hang out at a Best Buddies 
meeting. The meetings provide an opportunity for 
members to socialize with each other. “[At the meet¬ 
ing,) we got our Buddies matched up. [My favorite 
part about Best Buddies] is meeting people." Huber 
said 3. THE ART OF LAUGHTER Amie Goulet (11) 
and Taylor Barchi (12) laugh while coloring pictures at 
the Best Buddies meeting on Nov. 10. The two were 
paired up to be buddies for the year at the meeting. 
“[Taylor is] really nice, and we get along really well. 
She’s always happy and smiling with me,” Goulet 
said 4. GIGGLES AND GREETINGS Kiera Schultz 
(12) and Ali Raja (11) laugh together while getting 
to know each other at a meeting. The beach ball 
had questions written on it such as “What is your 
favorite movie?” “[Ali is my buddy]. He’s kind of shy, 
but I like being able to get him to open up and talk,” 
Schultz said. Photos by: Sofia Hay 


FRESHMAN CLASS CABINET: Freshman Class Cabinet is run by Mrs. 
Robin May, Guidance. The goal of Freshman Class Cabinet is to raise 
money by selling class t-shirts, sweatshirts and sweatpants. Members 
of class cabinet help design and choose the logo for these items. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS CABINET: Sophomore Class Cabinet is run 
by Ms. Carrie Wadycki, English, and Mrs. Sarah Verpooten, English. 
Sophomore Class Cabinet does not plan any dances, but members 
participate in decorating for Homecoming and making the Sophomore 
class’s banner. 

JUNIOR CLASS CABINET: Junior Class Cabinet is run by Miss Stepha¬ 
nie Sivak, English, and Miss Allison Peda, English. The Junior Class 
Cabinet is in charge of planning Prom. Members choose a theme, pick a 
DJ and put up decorations for the dance. 

SENIOR CLASS CABINET: Senior Class Cabinet is run by Mrs. Joan 
Loden, Math. Senior Class Cabinet plans Senior Banquet by picking 
a theme, choosing a DJ, choosing meals and more for the event. The 
members also choose awards that are voted on to be given out at the 
banquet. 


CLASS CABINET CRASH COURSE 


























“[I joined Class Cabinet because] I wanted to be 
able to be involved in my school and specifically 
my class. I wanted to be able to be involved in 
preparing for Homecoming and dances.” 

Robert Belzeski (12) said. 



Students form friendships with others in Westlake program 


PAGE BY: SOFIA HAY AND ELIZABETH BUSTAMANTE 


tudents come together and form friendships that 
stretch beyond the classroom through the Best Buddies 
program. Best Buddies is a non-profit organization which 
assists students in creating relationships with people who have intel¬ 
lectual and developmental disabilities around the world. 

“Best Buddies is a great club that helps unite a peer buddy with a 
buddy with differing abilities. I see everybody as being very talented 
in their own way.” Ms. Cynthia Hoffman, West Lake, said. 

Every other Monday, students involved in the club gather at meetings 
for various activities. Many of the activities include holiday parties, 
movies and ice breakers, which are games that help students get to 
know each other. 

“[At one meeting,] we were writing on this poster about Thanksgiv¬ 
ing [and] what we would do on Thanksgiving. [We also] just talked 
about what we would do if we hang out with our buddies,” Christian 
Huber (12) said. 

Usually each member is paired with a buddy for the year, but every¬ 


one is encouraged to be friends with each other. With overwhelming 
interest and support this past year, there were members left without 
a buddy. 

“I’m glad that I’m a part of Best Buddies because I’m not only 
working with students with special needs, but I’m also making new 
friends,” Brooke Lanting (10) said. 

Not every program is perfect, but students and staff are putting 
forth much effort to make Best Buddies the best it can be. 

“We have a quickly growing program that has been hard for all 
of us to get the experience, but we have a lot of heart and a lot of 
enthusiasm,” Ms. Hoffman said. 

Best Buddies continues to impact students in various ways. 

“For the student with a developmental disability, [Best Buddies is] 
an opportunity for them to have role models and interact because 
they can learn far more from someone who is participating in the 
general education program. They get help and encouragement from 
them,” Ms. Hoffman said. 




INSIDE SCOOP ON STUDENT COUNCIL 

Former Lake Central student returns as a 
teacher to take over Student Council 



“[Being back at Lake Central] is very 
interesting. I’m working with teachers 
that I used to look up to, and now they’re 
my colleagues, so it’s very different. As 
for Student Council, it really helps that 
I have some really great officers that 
help out a lot with Student Council. It’s 
very enjoyable. Student Council has to 
put together the Homecoming dance, 
and we’re in the process of trying to 
establish a dance marathon here at the 
high school to help with Riley Children’s 
Hospital, so that’s a lot of work. We are 
also in charge of fundraising in general. 
Once we get the auditorium, we will also 
be doing the talent show again. Student 
Council has a great group of kids. They 
do a lot of things for the school and for 
the community. [Being head of Student 
Council] just seemed like a great op¬ 
portunity.” 

MS. STEPHANIE VILLARREAL, 
ENGLISH 



1. Kristen Hecht (10) Photo by: Annabella Piunti 2. Eva Kimberly (11) and 
Jeanine Gilbert (11) Photo by: Kayla Hallowell 3. Anna Hallowell (10) and 
Nicole Geer (10) Photo by: Candace Jarzombek (10) 


N-TEENS TAKES INITIATIVE 

Students help their school and community 

N-teens is a club run by Mrs. Kelsey Becich, English, 
that encourages members to volunteer their assistance 
throughout the school and community. 

“I like to help around the school and community and 
getting others involved with volunteering. The events are 
always so much fun to be at,” Anna Hallowell (10) said. 

Students sign up to work at events such as charity walks 
and festivals. N-teens is also in charge of planning and 
working at Winter Formal. Members are encouraged to 
volunteer a total of 40 hours throughout the school year. 
Those who reach 40 hours of volunteer time are rewarded 
with a free ticket to Six Flags. 


SOME EXTRACURRICULAR CLUBS 171 














































































































































































































“What’s fun about [Science Olympiad] is that 
[when] you know somebody’s down, you pick 
somebody up and you say, ‘OK, you didn’t do real 
well today but next week is another one, and you 
can redeem yourself,”’ Mrs. Mary Joan Martin, 
Science, said. 



Eva Kimberly (11) Photo by: Anastasia Papanikolaou 


STEPS TO SPELL BOWL 

I This club is run by Mr. Jack Moorhouse, English. 
“[Students have to] go to [Mr. Moorhouse] and tell 
him that you want to join," Eva Kimberly (11) said. 

2 In order to be in Spell Bowl, students have to do 
some paperwork. “Fill out the permission forms for 
going to the competitions,” Kimberly said. 

3 After that, Spell Bowl becomes just like any other 
club. “Attend the meetings, go to the competitions 
and study the words you receive," Kimberly said. 


WISE BEYOND THEIR YEARS 


W.I.S.E. students prepare for the future 



“W.I.S.E. is [an acronym] for Women in 
Science and Engineering. It’s just a club 
that tries to initiate the women at Lake 
Central into science and engineering, to 
build their own awareness of oppor¬ 
tunities, as well as a kind of a support 
group for the women who are going in 
the direction. Engineering and science 
are great opportunities overall. For the 
W.I.S.E. side of things, I mean, I’m a 
man, and it is pretty easy for the boys 
at school to find role models who are 
scientists or are engineers, and I think 
it is a little more difficult for the women. 
When they join W.I.S.E., then they’re go¬ 
ing to be exposed to former students or 
other women who are successful in the 
science and engineering community, and 
maybe they can develop some contacts. 
These women can serve as role models 
for the freshmen and sophomores,” 


MR. KENDAL SMITH, SCIENCE 



1111 111 





Academic clubs can help students learn skills that will benefit them in the future 

PAGE BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU, ABIGAIL HINES AND ASHLEY KRALIK 


fter school clubs and activities have many benefits. Some 
clubs, such as Spell Bowl, W.I.S.E. and Science Olympiad, 
can help students when applying to colleges, receiving lead¬ 
ership opportunities and acquiring skills that can help students in the 
professional world. 

“I needed more clubs and after school activities, and I thought that 
[Spell Bowl] would be a fun academic one to do. It’s pretty straight¬ 
forward,” Eva Kimberly (11) said. 

These clubs give students the opportunity to expand their skills. 
Members can be taught skills for practical and intellectual use, such 
as learning how to work with others on a team and managing time 
for good study habits. 

“[Science Olympiad] teaches me how to study and work with the 
team, to let loose and have fun at the same time,” Rachel Kozel (10) 
said. 

Spell Bowl is an after-school club where students learn different 
words and compete in a competition by spelling as a team. This club 


introduces students to different words and their uses. 

“[Being in Spell Bowl] helps with my memorization skills a lot because 
you just have to memorize the words. That kind of helps me through 
my study skills for my regular classes,” Kimberly said. 

Science Olympiad is a club that gives students hands-on opportuni¬ 
ties to learn about all things science, from engineering to meteorology 
to mathematics. 

“[Science Olympiad] allows me to go more in depth with my academ¬ 
ics and study more to actually know what I want to be. I’m thinking 
about being an electrical engineer or a chemical engineer, so being 
in this club will help,” Kozel said. 

W.I.S.E., or Women in Science and Engineering, is a club that 
teaches female students to appreciate science and engineering as 
a future career. 

“[W.I.S.E.] is a club that teaches students to build their own aware¬ 
ness of opportunities, as well as [being] a support group for the women 
who are going in [that] direction,” Mr. Kendal Smith, Science, said. 














































































































































1. A W.I.S.E. COLLABORATION TiffanyTao (12). Taylor Duffy (11) and Jocelynn Cheese- 
bourough (11) discuss dates for their upcoming trip to the Field Museum. Tao was the head 
of W.I.S.E. club. “Most students don’t know what opportunities are available in engineering 
and science." Mr. Kendal Smith, Science, said. Photo by: Ashley Kralik 2. SCRAMBLER IN 
MAKING Raymond Pollalis (12) helps Nicholas Applegate (12) and Joyce Cometa (10) fix their 
device. Applegate and Cometa competed in an event called “Scrambler." “I joined (Science 
Olympiad] because [when] my brother was in it, I saw he made a lot of great friends and had 
lot of fun doing it,” Raymond Pollalis (12) said. Photo by: Stephanie O’Drobinak 3. SCIENCE 
SKILLS Taylor Duffy (11), Megan Gabe (11) and Madelyn Ackerman (11) meet to find a spring 
break date for a W.I.S.E. trip to the Field Museum. Students who joined W.I.S.E. learned to 
appreciate science. “(Students] started the mentor program at Lake Central where we match 
up freshmen with seniors so that they can get guidance regarding what courses to take 
[and] what to think about if you want to go into science and engineering." Mr. Kendal Smith. 
Science, said. Photo by: Ashley Kralik 4. MISSION POSSIBLE Tiffany Tao (12) and Robert 
Belzeski (12) work against the clock together. Tao and Belzeski competed in an event called 
“Mission Possible.” “(Science Olympiad members] all get along, and it’s a family. They tease 
each other, pick each other up and by doing all that, that’s the reason we have had success. 
They all respect and understand what everybody’s capabilities [are]," Mrs. Mary Joan Martin, 
Science, said. Photo by: Stephanie O'Drobinak 5. PROJECT PROJECTILE Raymond Pollalis 
(12) shoots a ball into a target for Science Olympiad. Pollalis successfully managed to shoot 
the ball to the target. “Running the ‘Air Trajectory’ experiment was an exhilarating experience, 
firing the ball five to seven meters,” Pollalis said. Photo by: Stephanie O’Drobinak 








BREAKING DOWN THE OLYMPIANS 



“I like science classes and 
I want to be a doctor. Even 
though it’s a lot of work, 
the competitions are fun,” 

JAY CHOPRA (11) 



SCIENCE OLYMPIAD 


“You make a lot of friends 
and you use things that 
you learn and apply them 
out of school,” 


SARAH HERMANEK (10) 



“(Science Olympiad] lets 
me use my intellegence in a 
competitive way. It’s always 
nice to show that you’re 
smarter than someone,” 

AUSTIN KUNIS (12) 


SOME EXTRACURRICULAR CLUBS 173 


















































































Interact offers students a unique opportunity to build houses for veterans 


PAGE BY: SARA LISAC, SHANNON HEARNE AND COURTNEY KREYKES 


® nteract club, sponsored by Mr. Tom Clark, Social Studies, 
has organized many life-changing projects throughout the 
year. From the Thanksgiving Food Drive to March of Dimes, 
their efforts are aiming to make a difference. 

“(I like Interact because] we all come together and help out as much 
as we can. We get to spend time with Mr. Clark and learn a lot about 
what is going on in the world. In school, [teachers] talk about situ¬ 
ations across the seas, but you get to find out more when you talk 
about it with people. [Another project we do is] Habitat for Humanity, 
and that helps out a lot,” Dyanna Munoz (12) said. 

Aside from the events that they conduct each year, Interact also 
supports the local Veterans of Foreign Wars organization and volun¬ 
teers time to the Habitat for Humanity project. 

“[Samantha Marino’s (11),] mom is part of the organization, so she 


came in and explained to us what it is and what to do [if we were 
interested]. We build houses in the less fortunate neighborhoods,” 
Duaa Hijaz (11) said. 

Interested members have been gathering information on what time 
specific builds would be and forming volunteer groups to help make 
the missions happen. 

“We have [volunteered with Habitat for Humanity] in past years. We 
constantly have a link up on Mr. Clark’s board where you can sign up, 
do all of the volunteer activities and get general information about 
Habitat for Humanity. [When you are volunteering], you basically 
build houses for people who are financially in need. [Building takes 
place] on the weekends, and you spend eight hours or so working 
and helping. It’s really fulfilling and an experience that nothing else 
can replicate,” Ryan Wiebe (12) said. 




DISCOVERING DEPTH AND NEW SKILLS 

Art Club gathers to craft geometric drawings 

On Jan. 23, members of the Art Club assembled to construct their 
^ monthly project. The project consisted of students tracing overlapping 
L shapes to create an original geometric piece. 

“I chose that project because I wanted to show [the students] that 
they can add depth and visual space to a drawing. A lot of my Art Club 
students can draw, but I wanted to show them things they could do to 
bump up their skills just a notch. I had a student return yesterday and 
finish, and it turned out nice,” Mrs. Maureen Yaeger, Art, said. 


1 Jennifer Popieia (12) 2. Mrs. Maureen Yaeger. Art 3. Julie Popiela (9) 
Photos by: Shannon Hearne 


HOW TO PREPARE FOR A PERFORMANCE 


1 

2 

3 


“[It takes ] a lot of running over things in your mind, if you have any 
duets. Normally do a pickup rehearsal right before [to] rehearse 
things that you might have had problems with before.” 

“It is a little different for each show, but since it’s a musical, [I am] 
constantly spot checking [to see] if there are any notes that I am not too 
sure about. I’ll give somebody else my script and have them looking at 
my lines as I say them to make sure I have them right." 

“Backstage there is not a lot that goes on. Especially when we 
are in the LGI, we have to keep the volume level down because it 
will carry through. Backstage it’s just getting out of peoples way if 
they need to get on stage, setting up [and] giving props to people,” 
Zachary Hansen (10) said. 



Megan Barry (11), Hannah Souronis (10), Nichole Heusmann (11) and Vanessa Torres (9) 
Photo by: Madeline Conley 



“I like Interact because they give us different 
opportunities to volunteer. I volunteered for 
setting up for Winter Formal. It was super fun 
seeing the transformation throughout the day,” 
Rachel Frieling (10) said. 


































































































































































































FUTURE MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS GET CLOSER LOOK AT CAREER INTERESTS 


“We call in surgeons or 
jjjjjnyjjj nurses from different 

medical fields, so you find 
out a lot more for your 

career path." 

NIJI SHAH (11) 



“I’m already looking into 
the medical field, so 
[Future Medical Profes¬ 
sionals] is telling me more 
about the process.” 

NICOLE GEER (10) 



“[The speakers] give really 
good tips about how to 
get into medical school or 
what you’re going to do 
once you’re a doctor” 

TIFFANY POLYAK (12) 






1. SCARY FACES Mrs. Maureen Yaeger, Art. shows 
Art Club members the project that they will be working 
on for that month. The meeting took place on Oct. 28. 
“The projects in Art Club aren’t too challenging for 
the students. I get most of it done. Even if [you] don’t, 
you can take it home and finish it,” Anna Hallowell (10) 
said. Photo by: Emma DeGroot 2. PIG PROPORTIONS 
Anastasia Rauch (11), Nicholas Kiepura (12) and Joshua 
Krout (11) dissect a pig in Lake Central Theater Compa¬ 
ny’s “The Sparrow.” The show was about a high school 
girl with magical powers. “I love my character. I feel 
like I actually don’t have to act because the ‘awkward 
teacher’ is kind of exactly what I am, so it’s really easy 
and also makes it really fun to be on stage,’’ Kiepura 
said. Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. INTERACTING 
Alejandra Meraz (12) and David Park (12) listen to the 
presidents of Interact Club discuss possible upcoming 
events. The meeting took place on Jan. 14. “I wanted to 
get involved in school somehow, and doing [Interact], 
you feel good because you’re helping out your commu¬ 
nity," Mitchell Nickolaou (12) said. Photo by: Shannon 
Hearne 4. SPEAKING UP Ryan Wiebe (12)speaks to 
Interact Club about possible volunteer opportunities. 
Interact Club planned to help build houses with Habitat 
for Humanity. “Me and my friends are trying to get a 
group together for Habitat for Humanity. I really want to 
do it this year," Duaa Hijaz (11) said. Photo by: Shannon 
Hearne 


“You get to see all the 
different professions and 
learn more about the 
different specialties they 
have.” 

PAYAL BHATT (10) 


“[Speakers] have given us 
information on what to do 
in high school and what to 
look for towards college.” 

ANDRIA TALAVERA (11) 


SOME EXTRACURRICULAR CLUBS 175 



































































LOOKING TOWARDS THE FUTURE 

DFS helps students with college preparation 



1. Justin Price (11). Ariana Bulett (12) and Kara Guinn (12) Photo submitted 
by: Mrs. Jackie Ruiz. Science 2. Water basin made by Environmental Club 
Photo by: Emma DiPasquo 3. Container of bottle caps used for projects 
Photo by: Emma DiPasquo 

SPREADING AWARENESS 

Environmental club puts recycling to use 

Environmental Club meets once a month and works to 
better the environment. 

“We have a couple goals [to] make Lake Central, as a 
school, students and staff more aware. Also we are trying 
to work in the community more and participating in Earth 
Day activities,” Mrs. Jackie Ruiz, Science, said. 

The club has focused its attention on projects that use 
recycled materials to promote recycling and encourage 
others to care for their home. 

“Our projects so far have consisted of a recycled Christ¬ 
mas tree, which is now on display at the Dunes Learning 
Center, and next we are decorating a rain barrel to compete 
in a contest at the Porter County Fair,” Mrs. Ruiz said. 



“Dollars for Scholars is a club 
where students can volunteer 
to do community service hours, 
and their senior year, they can 
complete a profile. Being in 
Dollars for Scholars gives them 
eligibility for different scholar¬ 
ships, and they can put those 
activities that they volunteered 
for in their profile. The more you 
put in there, the more eligible 
you are for different types of 
scholarships. Dollars for Schol¬ 
ars is in charge of the Grand 
March decorations, and we 
promote all kinds of volunteer¬ 
ing opportunities,” 

MS. ASHLEY KLINE, 
GUIDANCE 


CLUB INVOLVEMENT MAKES AN IMPACT 


Environmental club members strive to make the school a cleaner, better place 


PAGE BY: EMMA DIPASQUO AND JESSICA MCCULLOUGH 

tudents have the opportunity to choose from nearly 30 clubs 
to be involved in. Environmental Club offers its members 
the chance to learn about and care for their surroundings. 

“I joined Environmental Club because it’s really good on college 
applications. When I joined the club, it seemed pretty simple, but I 
grew to really enjoy it,” Justin Price (10) said. 

Environmental Club strives to make an noticable impact by being 
aware of the environment and making the school a cleaner, better 
place. 

‘‘We [clean] our wetlands and pick up garbage around the school,” 
Ariana Bulett (12) said. 

Environmental Club does a number of activities with the common 
goal to improve the environment and raise awareness throughout 
the school. 

“We promote awareness, collect caps, try to make a difference 
and keep our school clean,” Bulett said. 


During the winter months, when the club cannot do outdoor 
activities, they do what they can inside to prepare for the spring 
and summer months. 

“We can’t do any activities outdoor at the moment, but we still 
try to volunteer. Everything we do must be inside [for now],” Carlos 
Salas (12) said. 

In the fall, the club created a project that is displayed at the Dunes 
Learning Center in Chesterton, Ind. 

“We made a mural out of recyclable material to raise awareness 
about recycling. Recycling is an easy thing you can do that can really 
make a difference," Price said. 

Club members planned a project for spring activities that also 
involved arts and crafts. 

“[For] our next project, we are making a mural for Earth Day out of 
painted recycled bottle caps. The mural is going to say Earth Day,” 
Price said. 

































































































































































“Lake Central’s clubs are great because there’s 
such a diversity and you can be in anything. 
There’s science clubs and volunteering; it’s 
great,” Eva Elmalh (11) said. 



NHS SCHOLARS STEP INTO COMMUNITY SERVICE 




“I volunteered at a thrift 
store in Crown Point for 
five hours, and I helped out 
my grandpa a lot because 
he can’t be alone." 

ABIGAIL PEPPIN (12) 

“I work swim meets, base¬ 
ball camps [and] go to the 
Humane Society. I also 
worked a walk for cancer.” 


JACK KUEHNER (12) 



“I volunteered at a place in 
Lansing for disabled men and 
women, and I volunteered to 
work at different cancer walks.” 


ERIN TODD (12) 



“You have to maintain a high 
GPA [to be a member of National 
Honor Society]. [NHS] involves 
a lot of volunteering. It focuses 
mainly on leadership.” 

NATHAN BOWDISH (12) 



^ auosi pv, 


“Through the hockey 
team, we did a thing simi¬ 
lar to Toys for Tots where 
we wrapped presents for 
families for Christmas.” 

RYAN WIEBE (12) 

“I wanted to join because 
I felt it would be a good 
experience. I looked forward 
to volunteering my time and 
bettering myself.” 

MEGAN BARENIE (12) 




1. PREPARING FOR COLLEGE Christopher Shell (12), Kyle Vlcek (12) and Noelle Matasovsky (12) sit at a Dollars for 
Scholars meeting. Meetings were held once a month in the LGI Room or the cafeteria and were run by Ms. Ashley Kline, 
Guidance. “[Dollars for Scholars] gives you a lot of volunteering opportunities to help in the community to get scholarships 
when you’re a senior,” Sarthak Aggarwal (11) said. Photo by: Hannah Pratt 2. FINANCING FOR THE FUTURE Gurleen 
Khatra (12) and Reetam Mander (10) listens to Ms. Kline, Guidance, talk about upcoming volunteer opportunities. Dollars 
for Scholars is a club designed to offer students scholarship opportunities for their senior year. “We should be very thankful 
for what we have because other people have to work hard to support their families during the holiday season, and that 
one thing you can give can help so much," Mander said. Photo by: Hannah Pratt 3. LEARNING FROM ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS Gabrielle Rangel (9) helps organize supplies at Protsman Elementary School for Camp Kindergarten Literacy 
Night. Students who volunteered earned service hours to go toward different clubs. “I joined [Dollars for Scholars] for 
scholarship opportunities in the future,”Tyler Krachenfels (9) said. Photo by: Jessica McCullough 4. EARTH AND THE 
ENVIRONMENT Julie Popiela (9) signs her name on a sheet of paper for Environmental Club. Mrs. Jackie Ruiz. Science, 
passed out the sheet to make a club roster. “We meet every other Wednesday, and we come up with new ways to raise 
awareness about environmental issues," Alyssa Graves (12) said. Photo by: Darian Smith 



SOME EXTRACURRICULAR CLUBS 177 





































































































































“[Debate Club] improves my speaking skills. It 
makes me feel like I’m getting my opinion out 
more,” Matthew Korneck (11) said. 



HOW TO CONSTROCT A CONVENTION WORTHY COSPLAY COSTUME 


1 “You need to choose what you’re 
going to cosplay and know what your 
skill level is. If you’re just starting out, 
you’ll want to start with something 
simple,” Kimberly Hainsworth (11) 
said. 

2 “You have to get your materials 
together, whether you’re doing it by 
hand or modifying what you already 
have,” Carlie Mikuly (12) said. 

3 “After you get the entire costume 
part done, the most important part 
is putting it all together [along] with 
doing proper makeup and a [wearing 
a] wig,” Hainsworth said. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiliii 


::::::::::: 


::::: 

:::::::::::::::::::: 


FYTDAftDniMADV rYTDAPIIDDIPIII ADC 

fcAlHAUK^ 

Students expand interests and skills through a variety of after-school activities 


:::::::::::: 
::::: 


::::: 


:::::::::::: 

:::::::::::: 


:::::::::: 


PAGE BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY RABATINE 

imagine entering an alternate universe where it is possible 
to travel anywhere in an instant, get an early experience 
in the business world, see the Eiffel Tower without leav¬ 
ing home, hear another’s opinion on the world and meet creatures 
from your wildest fantasies. Book Club, Business Professionals of 
America, French Club, Debate Club and Anime Club provide these 
opportunities. 

“[Anime Club is] so unique. It makes you question everything, and 
it makes you question life. I was put here for a purpose, and you see 
what can happen when you find out that purpose in life and act it 
out. It’s the same thing in anime where you see the characters fulfill 
their destiny,” Emily Barnes (9) said. 

Clubs open doors and offer a place to escape from the rest of the 
world, even if only for a short time. 

“I got to meet a lot of really interesting people who have a similar 
interest in anime like I do,” Jacob Mavity (12) said. 

The learning environment within clubs works to give students new 
perspectives without the pressure of grades. 


“[I joined French Club] just for the experience [of learning] more 
about French culture and hanging out with other people interested 
in that as well,” Madelyn Ackerman (11) said. 

Some may say that the key to a full high school experience is 
doing every possible activity, but finding a single club that fits one’s 
personality can be just as fulfilling. 

“I would really suggest joining Book Club because it’s very con¬ 
structive and leads to amazing conversations,” Gabrielle Frigo (12) 
said. 

Certain clubs such as BPA, Debate Club and French Club can pre¬ 
pare a student for higher employment jobs with the skills they endow. 

“I like how we, as a [debate] team, get to discover new topics along 
with their pros and cons. I get to dive into information that I’ve never 
even heard of, which I end up enjoying. I believe that Debate Club is 
an excellent club to participate in for those who want to gain more 
knowledge. [It] has helped me improve my speaking skills and offered 
me a better way to defend my beliefs,” Spero Vrehas (10) said. 



178 








































































































































1. GETTING CRAFTY French Club members put together ornaments at their holiday meeting. They met once a month to 
learn about French culture. “I just thought it would be a fun experience [to] learn more outside of school in French Club 
and about France,” Madelyn Ackerman (11) said. Photo by: Darian Smith 2. BIG BUSINESS NikolaTepsic (12) looks over 
paperwork at a BPA meeting. The club helped prepare students for careers in the business field. “I liked [BPA] just because 
I’m really into business. I thought it’d be a good firsthand experience.” Tepsic said. Photo by: Sarah Bredar 3. DEVELOP¬ 
ING DEBATES Maria Moricz (11) reads papers from the Debate Club call out meeting. Many students have joined the club 
to improve their communication skills. “My friend and I thought it would be a good idea [to join] something different because 
we’re already in a lot of clubs,” Moricz said. Photo by: Hannah Bryner 4. RAVENOUS READERS Gabrielle Frigo (12) con¬ 
tributes to a conversation about Truman Capote’s "In Cold Blood." The Book Club picked a murder mystery theme for this 
school year. "We all get to pick the books together on our mutual interests, and it creates a lot of interesting discussions 
about them," Frigo said. Photo by: JeannineToth 




BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS OF AMERICA PREPARES STUDENTS FOR FUTURE 



“It’s something I can put 
on my college resume. It 
teaches me about respon¬ 
sibility.” 

NEAL GOVANI (10) 

“It’s a fun way to win 
awards but also meet new 
people." 


MICHELLE BUCKMAN (10) 



“It gives a perspective on 
how different business 
fields work.” 


BRENDAN KELLY (12) 

“I feel like if you go into 
the business field, it really 
helps.” 


KYLE HOLMAN (10) 



“It’s just a really good 
experience hanging out 
with fun, smart people ” 


ANDREW RING (12) 


| :ii: “It helps you with technol- 
:::: ogy and how to work with 
:::: technology” 

LmufllH SARTHAK AGGARWAL (11) 


SOME EXTRACURRICULAR CLUBS 179 








































































1. PICTURES OF YOU Abagail Betancourt (10) smiles for her 
school picture on Aug. 27 The photos were taken in the LGI Room 
by Giola’s Photography during English Classes. Photo by: Jessica 



















































































































ehind every activity at Lake Central, there is one person 
(!•§) managing it all. From making new ID cards for students 
to planning graduation, Mrs. Lori Brumm, Secretary to the 
Principal, ties the school’s staff together. 

Q: What is your job? 

A: I am [Mr. Robin Tobias’, Principal] secretary and I am the office 


manager. I help all of the other assistant principals as well. I do daily 
announcements, work permits and [the] payroll. 


Q: What are your responsibilities? 

A: My major job is graduation. Graduation is my baby, [but] of course 
I do payroll and other various jobs here. I do a little bit of everything. 

Q: Why is your job important? 

A: I would think that all of the secretaries’ jobs are important. All of the 
girls up there in all of the offices are important. I do not think that one is 
more important than the other. Combined together it’s the force, it’s the 
glue that holds the office together, and the school. 


Q: How long have you been at this job, and what have you learned? 

A: This is my 25th year. It’s not what I have learned, it’s how I have always 
wanted to be. I wanted to be a source that people could get their infor¬ 
mation from cheerfully, politely and informatively, and if I didn’t know it, I 
could direct them to someone who did. I always [imagine] myself as the 
other person that’s calling, and that’s very important to me. 


STORY BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU AND EMMA RITCHIE 
PHOTO BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU 



Don Bacso, School Board 
President 
George Baranowski, 
Semester 1 School Board 
Sarah Castaneda, Director of 
Secondary Education 
John DeVries, School Board 
Secretary 
Al Gandolfi, Assistant 
Superintendent 
Rebecca Gromala, Director of 
West Lake 

Rob James, Director of 
Business Services 
Bill Ledyard, Director of 
Facilities 

Sandy Lessentine, Semester 
2 School Board 
Janice Malchow, School 
Board Member 
Howard Marshall, School 
Board Vice President 
Larry Veracco, Superintendent 


DISTRICT ADMINISTRATORS 



FACULTY 


Jaclyn Alessandri, Math 
Amanda Allen-Breski, Math 
Pam Anderson, Technology 
Karen Arehart, Physical 
Education 
Joe Bafia, Social Studies 
Tim Bannon, Business 



182 






































Kelsey Becich, English 
Beverly Bovard, World 
Language 

Lori Brumm, Secretary 
Eric Bushong, Math 
Darryl Carstensen, Math 
Josh Clark, Social 
Studies 


Kathryn Clark, English 
Tom Clark, Social Studies 
Dawn Combis, Business 
Ann Downey, Math 
Dawn Duerst, West Lake 
Aide 

Katelin Ellis, Science 


Christopher Engel, 

English 

Jennifer Fandl, Math 
Joe Fox, Math 
Scott Freckelton, 

Math 

Kim Freeman, 

Physical Education 
Val Gardner, Math 

Rachel Gray, Art 
Andy Gurnak, Physical 
Education 

Chris Harmon, Music 
David Harnish, Science 
Roberta Harnish, Science 
Scott Hilyard, Social 
Studies 


Cynthia Hoffman, West 
Lake 

Ralph Holden, Social 
Studies 

Robert Jackowski, World 

Language 

Rob Kania, Science 

Julie Koricanac, West 

Lake 

Brandi Krolak, English 

Cynthia Lale, World 
Language 

Jessica LaPato, West 
Lake 

Rita Laskey, World 
Language 

Andrew Locke, Math 
Joan Loden, Math 
Doug McCallister, Math 

Dave Milausnic, West 
Lake 

Chris Mockovak, Family 
and Consumer Science 
Jack Moorhouse, English 
Lisa Moreno, Science 
David Nelson, Music 
Pam Neth, English 


ONE PEOPLE FACULTY 183 

































































Erin Novak, English 
Caryn O’Hara, Physical 
Education 
Angela Ohlenkamp, Math 
Richard Ohlenkamp, Math 
Ray Palasz, English 
Allison Peda, English 


Adam Pieters, West Lake 
Jereme Rainwater, Vocational 
Gabrielle Rapin, Science 
Jeff Rhody, Science 
Terry Richardson, Vocational 
Andrea Rodovich, West Lake 


Amy Rokita, West Lake 
Brianne Rubesha, Science 
Jackie Ruiz, Science 
Lisa Schilling, English 
Amanda Schuyler, Social 
Studies 
Jeff Sherman, Math 


Julie Shupryt, Science 
Stephanie Sivak, English 
Kendal Smith, Science 
Todd Smolinski, Social 
Studies 

Bryan Szalonek, Social 
Studies 

Kathy Szewciw, Family and 
Consumer Science 

Louise Tallent, Family and 
Consumer Science 
Rachael Thomas, Science 
Nancy Tilka, World Language 
BrianTomson, Social Studies 
JimTonkovich, Physical 
Education 
Rachel Underwood, Social 
Studies 

Marc Urban, Physical 
Education 
Vivian Velasco, Family and 
Consumer Science 
Dustin Verpooten, Science 
Sarah Verpooten, English 
Stephanie Villarreal, English 
Carrie Wadycki, English 


Darrell Wierzal, English 
Amy Wilkins, Social Studies 
Patrick Winters, English 
Maureen Yaeger, Art 
Rhonda York, English 
Teresa Zentz, Social Studies 



184 


































































r. Joe Fox, Math, is commonly known as an Algebra II 
Honors and AP Statistics teacher. Not many people know 
that beyond the classroom, he also takes on the respon¬ 
sibilities of a farmer. Farming has become a lifestyle for Mr. Fox 
and has helped him in various aspects of his life. 

Q: When did you start farming? 

A: I was out with the livestock when I was one to two years old, and I 
was driving a tractor when I was six, so I’ve been doing it for a long time. 
Q: What do you farm? Or what is on your farm? 

: Crop-wise there is corn, beans and hay. Livestock-wise, we have 
hogs and cattle. 

Q: What are the positives of farming? 

A: I enjoy being outside a lot. It’s totally different from [teaching], where 
I’m inside the whole time. When I go home, I’m outside, so there’s kind of 
a contrast. [Here] you’re inside a room, whereas [at the farm], I’m outside 
in the 40 below [weather], [and] I’m outside in the 100 degree heat doing 
things. It also really helps developing a sense of family [and] the act of 
doing work together. 

: Have you ever disliked having a farm? 

A: Growing up when I was [a teenager], I wasn’t a big fan of it because I 
didn’t get to go places. I can’t remember the last time I’ve taken a vaca¬ 
tion because we couldn’t find someone to take care of things. There were 
responsibilities where we had to do morning chores [and] afternoon chores. 
When the crops are being put in and taken out, you’re doing that. The 
weather dictates a lot of what you have to do. It’s really all about respon¬ 
sibility. If we were in harvest or planting season, that was our priority.There 
were fun times though, too. 

STORY BY: SOFIA HAY AND ANNABELLA PIUNTI, submitted photo. 



BUILDING ADMINISTRATORS AND GUIDANCE 




Laurel Bankroff, Guidance 
Tony Bartolomeo, Athletic 
Director 

Ed Beck, Assistant 
Principal 

Sean Begley, Freshman 
Center Principal 
Karen Bowman, Guidance 
Erica Churilla, Guidance 

Martin Freeman, Assistant 
Principal 

Robin May, Guidance 
Stacey Mills, Homeschool 
Liaison 

Richard Moore, Assistant 
Principal 

Melissa Rettig, Dean of 
Counselors 

Jamie Rodgers, Guidance 



Nicole Satterfield, Guidance 

Melissa St. Clair, Guidance 

Brett St. Germain, Assistant Athletic Director 

Robin Tobias, Head Principal 


ONE PEOPLE FACULTY 185 
































1. Olivia Barnes (9) Photo by: Megan Heifers 2. Ashley Todd (9) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 3. Mi¬ 
chael Bikos (9) Photo by: Jillian Wilschke 4. Theodoros Karras (9) Photo by: 5. Jazmyn Zapata (9) 
and Faith Cooper (9) Photo by: Emily Badger 6 Zachariah Wittenhagen (9) Photo by: Sofia Hay 
7. Freshman football players Photo by: Sofia Hay 8. Olivia Throckmartin (9) Photo by: Madeline 
Conely PAGE BY: SARA LISAC AND EMILY LISAC 



































Andrew Aardema 
Samantha Abbasi 
Christina Abbassi 
Muaath Abdeljaber 
Christopher Abrinko 
Logan Adams 
Bahaa Al-Abed 
Rachel Albright 

Chantal Almazan 
Natalie Almazan 
Angelo Altieri 
Kolbie Amptmeyer 
Cade Anderson 
Matthew Anderson 
Noah Anderson 
Tea Andrade 

Jendryk Andrews 
Justin Andrews 
Madeline Andrews 
Alivia Angotti 
Hanna Anthony 
Jessica Antonakopoulos 
Sahin Apalak 
Amanda Aponte 

Erika Araujo 
Christina Arevalo 
Adam Artman 
Rebecca Ashby 
Spencer Ashby 
Nathan Augustino 
Nicholas Augustino 
Timothy Avelar 

Haya Azzam 
Nicholas Bacso 
Bianca Badillo 
Jackson Bais 
Timothy Bakas 
Hunter Balazs 
Blake Balcazar 
Jessie Balka 

Michael Bandura 
Christian Banfield 
Lisette Barajas 
Emily Barnes 
Olivia Barnes 
Emma Barnett 
Kyle Barnoski 
Morgan Barton 

Benjamin Basem 
Sydney Batinick 
Samantha Bednarek 
Michael Beemsterboer 
Jon Beilfuss 
Michael Bellar 
Hailey Benko 
Samuel Berg 

Nickolas Bernal 
Michael Beshara 
Haley Betten 
Dakota-Travor Bettis 
Michael Bikos 
Westen Black 
Corinne Blastick 
Ian Blaze 

Nicholas Blevins 
Emily Blink 
Sophia Boeckstiegel 
Ryan Bogie 
Hannah Bohlin 
Josef Botkin 
Laney Bouck 
Jason Boutcher 


ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 187 
































































Brian Brackins 
Michael Bradich 
Mia Brann 
Christian Brazzale 
Jacob Brazzale 
Samantha Bredar 
Jasmine Brennan 
Timothy Breshock 

Destini Briggs 
Ryan Bronecke 
Hanna Brown 
Dana Brownewell 
Kaitlin Broz 
Lindsey Buchler 
Lauren Bulf 
Jenna Bunner 

Robert Burney 
Maruel Caduco 
Rachel Cain 
Tyler Caird 
Breeanna Campbell 
Joseph Cano 
Sydney Cantrell 
Gavin Cantu 

Nicole Capestany 
Aaron Cappello 
Audrey Capps 
Courtney Carlson 
Matthew Carper 
Anthony Carter 
Logan Carver 
Julia Casner 

Ashley Castillo 
Christian Cavanaugh 
Kayla Cavazos 
Ryan Cetnar 
Taylor Chandler 
Jakob Chatel 
Alicia Chavez 
Caroline Chavez 



188 



ince the age of three, Margaret Sablich (9) has been 
mastering the skills of dance, which include movement, 
performance and technique. Currently, she competes on 
the Visceral Studio Company directed by Nick Pupillo (‘97), a 
former Lake Central student. 


Q: Why do you dance? Why do you keep it up? 

A: I feel like I couldn’t survive without dancing. Whenever I have a break, 
I basically go crazy. Dance is the way I express myself, and it’s also like 
therapy on a bad day. Without it, I’d be lost. 


Q: What do you focus on when you are dancing? 

A: In the studio, I focus on thinking about corrections and just making it 
the best I can make it, but also trying to explore new ways to do it. While 
I’m on stage, I don’t focus on anything at all. I just dance. 


Q: Where do you perform? 

A: We do shows, but we also compete.The shows [have] a lot of benefits 
like Dance Chicago, Chicago Youth Summit and then Chicago Dance for 
Life. Then, we go to a lot of different competitions. Some of those are 
Star Power [and] VIP Dance. We go to those every year. 

Q: What do you love most about dancing? 

A: When you’re performing - the feeling you get while performing.That’s 
why I dance. I get chills even though I’m sweating and it’s the best feel¬ 
ing ever. 


STORY BY: CANDACE JARZOMBEK AND BRITTANY RABATINE 
PHOTO BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED 















































Victoria Chavez 
Ashley Chess 
Tyler Childress 
Mark Chmielewski 
Michael Christensen 
Hope Ciarrocchi 
Lydia Ciarrocchi 
Bartlomiej Cias 

Kayli Cinko 
Garrett Clark 
Brianna Clyde 
Michael Coll 
Jennifer Companik 
Maeve Companik 
Meghan Conner 
Mariah Contreras 

Jessica Cook 
Brenden Cooper 
Faith Cooper 
Joseph Copeland 
Louis Covelli 
Dylan Cox 
Mason Crawford 
Danka Cucuz 

Kacey Cummins 
Hayley Curran 
Jack Curtin 
Kailie Czerniawski 
Tyler Czernoch 
Jillian Dahlkamp 
Michael Dahlkamp 
Reid Dahlkamp 

Jessica Daniels 
Jeffrey Davids 
Lauren Davidson 
Edward Davies 
Robert Davis 
Luis Degollado 
Joshua DeJarlais 
Guadalupe Del Rio 

Amy Denton 
Ariana Desiderio 
Nathanial Diaz 
Noah DiDonato 
Sydney Dinan 
Morgan Dines 
Mia DiNino 
Samantha Dittrich 

Elyssa Djordjevich 
Petar Djuric 
Nicholas Dobias 
Amanda Dobos 
Brice Doescher 
Servando Dolores-Ramirez 
Sara Donohue 
Collin Doogan 

Jillian Downs 
Nicholas Doyle 
Sydney Dragos 
Ashlynne Dransoff 
Devin Drlich 
Kaitlyn Dross 
Jack Drosset 
Nicole Dubish 

Evan Dudy 
Ryan Dunn 
Emilie Dunne 
William Duszynski 
Taylor Dwyer 
Nathan Eagle 
Megan Earl 
Alaysha Earving 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 189 









































































hile some students have trouble deciding the career path 
they will pursue when they are done with high school, 
Aaron Cappello (9) does not. In middle school, he decided 
that a career in the performing arts would become his path, and 
he has been on the track to make this dream a reality ever since. 
Q: What made you want to become an actor? 

A: I wasn’t good at anything else. When I was younger, my family would 
put on plays for our parents. 

Q: What theater groups have you been involved in since you took this 
interest in theater? 

A: The school theater wasn’t enough at the time, so I just wanted a more 
intense [experience]. I started at Kolling [Elementary School] and after 
that was L’arc en Ciel. [After that] was Clark [Middle School] theater, then 
the Towle Theater, and now the Lake Central [Theatre Company]. 

Q: How has being involved in theater affected your social life and how 
would your life be different if you hadn’t started theater? 

A: I met all of my friends in theater, and without theater, I would be 
friendless and bored. 

Q: What advice would you have to give anyone interested in trying theater 
for the first time? 

A: Have an open mind about any of the aspects you would want to be 
involved in. Any experience is a good experience when you are starting 
out, and work harder and you will get what you want. 


AARON CAPPELLO 


STORY BY: SARAH BREDAR AND JOVANA DODEVSKA 
PHOTO BY: JOVANA DODEVSKA 


Rachel Eder 
David Edmond 
Latashyana Edwards 
James Egnatz 
Ayah Eid 
Brandon Elea 
Demiana Elgendi 
Amanda Elkins 

RoseMary Elmalh 
Natalie Elrod 
Paityn Emro 
Natasha English 
Alexa Enriquez Sosa 
Zachary Ericksen 
Elysia Escobedo 
Miranda Escobedo 

Juan Estrada 
Joshua Eubanks 
Martin Ewing 
Karlie Faberbock 
Jacob Farner 
Logan Feldman 
Riley Fieldhouse 
Britney Fijut 

Hannah Fionda 
Kathryn Fiorio 
Jessica Flores 
Joshua Flores 
Sebastian Flores 
Matthew Florida 
Mia Flory 
Autumn Flynn 



190 

































Zion Fondren 
Ricardo Fonseca 
Tyler Forajter 
Paul Forjan 
Mark Formella 
Dylan Foster 
Connor Fox 
Morgan Foy 

Michael Frassinone 
Madison Frederick 
Marty Freeborn 
Brianna Frenden 
Angelo Frigo 
Nicoli Fushi 
Alize Futrell 
Angel Futrell 

Dino Gagliano 
Samantha Gallas 
James Ganser 
Dayanne Gaona 
Brian Garcia 
Vesna Gasic 
Aaron Gatlin 
Madison Gawlinski 

Erik Geile 
Kole Geiser 
Taylor Gel la 
Gavin Gescheidler 
Emily Gibson 
Taylor Gibson 
Taylor Gleason 
Alyssa Glinski 

Tiffany Glinski 
Jenna Golfis 
Mackenzie Goncher 
Valeria Gonzalez 
Jack Good 
Tyler Good 
Emily Gora 
Tyler Gorczynski 

Andrew Gordon 
Taylor Gordon 
Thomas Gorski 
Justin Graciano 
Lindsey Graham 
Giana Grahovac 
Justin Graves 
Dominick Grgic 

Samuel Grimier 
ZJ Grino 
Claire Gronek 
Elly Gross 
Hannah Gross 
Morgan Grudzien 
Jaclyn Gruver 
Quentin Grzesik 

Joseph Guarino 
Amanda Guerrero 
Jake Guglielmo 
George Gundelach 
Tyler Gut 
Diego Guzman 
Kaitlyn Hahney 
Alyssa Hammond 

Eric Hampton 
Kassandra Hansen 
Michael Harmon 
Katelyn Hasley 
Bryce Hatfield 
Blair Haugh 
Blake Hawthorne 
Andrew Hegan 


ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 191 

























































































Kaylee Hegyi 
Andrew Hermanek 
Alex Hernandez 
Aylin Hernandez 
Gisselle Hernandez 
Kiersten Hess 
Raymond Hilbrich 
Hannah Hill 

Maxwell Hill 
Chase Hinchman 
Joseph Hintz 
Kaylee Hirchak 
Mateo Hitchcock 
Nathan Hjertquist 
Colby Hoffman 
Conner Hoffman 

Haley Holbrook 
David Holechko 
Briana Holley 
Michael Hollingsworth-Madsen 
Zachary Holmes 
Jacob Hoover 
Hannah Hopkins 
Kaela Horan 

Elexi Horvath 
Lucas Hough 
Brittney Howell 
Megan Hraban 
Noah Hrebenyak 
Zh’ane Hubbard 
Faith Huenecke 
Brandon Hupp 

Brandon Hurtt 
Brandon Hussey 
Emma Hutchings 
Malik Ibrahim 
Marissa Ippolito 
Joshua Irving 
Jomei Ishii 
David Isom 

Gabriel Ivezic 
Daniel Jacobo 
Brian Jacobs 
Mercedes Jacques 
Joseph Jakubowicz 
Murell James 
Nicholas Janich 
Carley Jansky 

Samantha Janusz 
Kristina Jasnic 
Nicholas Jessup 
Karyme Jimenez 
Dallon Jones 
Ian Jones 
Matthew Jordan 
Philip Jurek 

Alexis Kaczmarzewski 
Nicole Kalinowski 
Valerie Kalmar 
Nicole Kaminsky 
Lauren Kamykowski 
Joseph Kane 
Theodoras Karras 
Andrew Kasper 

Jaskiran Kaur 
Joel Kazmierski 
Bailey Kearschner 
Chad Keleman 
Bryan Kelly 
Tyler Kerrick 
Jessica Kiefor 
Claire Kijewski 



192 




























































♦ 'te-.iAJj'V 


Lake Central 


Hailey Kitchell 
Taylor Klemoff 
Joshua Klocek 
Kyle Kloppenburg 
Ashley Knerler 
Zacharry Kolisz 
Kailey Korczykowski 
Raymond Kosinski 

Paige Kotecki 
Maja Kovacevic 
Isabella Kowalczyk 
Nicole Kowalewicz 
Tyler Krachenfels 
Brendan Kraska 
Madalyn Kruszewski 
Trevor Kubiak 

Kyle Kujawa 
Alicia Kulik 
Jonathon LaBelle 
Mackenzie Lacheta 
Lauren Ladowski 
Danielle LaGreco 
Megan Lamont 
Ryan Langland 

Dylan LaRock 
Kendall Larson 
Luke Larson 
Alexis Lawley 
Kelly Lawson 
Elijah Lea 
Angela Leber 
Jasmine Ledet 

David Lee 
Niyelle Lee 
Kelly Undholm 
Johnathon Lindsay 
Kyle Litwicki 
Xinyu Liu 
Andrae Lockett 
Jackson Long 


ooming down a race track at 85 mph is not the average 
high school student’s idea of an after-school activity. For 
Katelyn Rusiniak (9), drag racing is a big focus in her life. 
Q: How did you get started drag racing? 

A: My dad used to race a lot, and we used to go to big events. There 
they had displays of little kids there with their dragsters, so I asked my 
dad if I could get into it, and we did. 

Q: What is your first memory of drag racing? 

A: I remember [the first time my dad ever took me out] to [US 41 Dragway], 
and it’s kind of a lower-class race track. The first time ever I was really 
scared, so I didn’t really hit the gas that hard. I remember I was so excited. 


Q: What about drag racing do you find fun? 

A: Well, [drag racing] involves a lot of science and math. It’s competi¬ 
tion, and I’m a big competitor. And it’s also a challenge to me. Even if 
you’re really good at drag racing you don’t always win because there’s 
a lot of luck in it, too. So I’m always up for a challenge, and I’m really 
mechanical, so I enjoy that. 


Q: Can you tell us about your car? 

A: It’s purple; it’s called the Purple People Eater. The body is a wedge 
shape and the engine is in the back and there are two big tires, which we 
call slicks and they don’t have any treads on them. It goes seven seconds 
in the eighth mile or 85 mph. It has a lawn mower engine with a clutch. 


STORY BY: ELIZABETH BUSTAMANTE AND ADRIANNA PORTELA, 
submitted photo. 



ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 193 




































Angel Lopez 
Carling Louden 
Cameron Lowe 
Daniel Lowery 
Jada Lubotina 
Brent Lucka 
Lucas Lucka 
Monica Luna 

Sebastian Luna 
Taylor Lush 
Delayna Macak 
Tyler Mack 
Joshua Macki 
William Maddy 
Estela Madrigal 
Jakub Makowski 

Vincent Malan 
Emily Mannino 
Samantha Mantoan 
Ayanna Manyweather 
Marcos Manzano 
Haley Marcinkovich 
Rigo Marin 
David Marked 

Morgan Markulin 
Kaylee Marovich 
DiShaina Marshall 
Kiyah Marshall 
Kyron Marshall 
Lauren Martello 
Amber Martin 
Jenna Martin 

Kayla Martin 
Carlos Martinez 
Cecilia Martinez 
Julianna Massa 
Mathew Matakovic 
Camille Matasovsky 
Cheyenne Mathas 
Ryan Mathews 

Madilynn Mathison 
Andrew Matthews 
Caitlin Mavity 
Morgyn McAllister 
Maya McCants 
Thomas McClain 
Noah McClellan 
Jackson McCleskey 

Gavin McCoy 
Patrick McDonald 
Daryn McElroy 
Karly McKinney 
Megan McLaughlin 
Joshua Melgoza 
Eric Mender 
Jesus Meraz 

Austin Meredith 
Abigail Meseberg 
Cameron Meyers 
Gray Michael 
Selena Michko 
Hannah Mickelson 
Alexis Miestowski 
Marina Mikhail 

Mercedies Mikler 
Michael Mikler 
Faith Mikolajczyk 
Melanie Milbrath 
Dylan Miller 
Samuel Miller 
Timothy Miller 
Mitchell Mills 

































































aving good health is sometimes taken for granted, but 
I for Faith Huenecke (9), it is a blessing. At a young age, 
Huenecke was not the example of ideal health; she was 
diagnosed with cancer. 

Q: When were you diagnosed and what cancer did you have? 

A: When I was four, I was diagnosed with Leukemia. I don’t really remem¬ 
ber much of it, I just know I went to University of Chicago, and I think I 
had chemotherapy and I was finally able to say I was cancer-free when 
I was six, and now I am eight years cancer-free. 


Q: How do you think your family helped you through your treatment? 
A: I think they helped since I was so little, every single time I went to the 
hospital or something, they got me a new toy. So, I think it also encour¬ 
aged me to be like, ‘Yeah I’ll go,’ and they were just always there for me. 
If I ever was upset or anything or I was in pain or something I could go 
to them, and they could help me out and stuff. 


Q: What was the best part of the Bump Out Cancer night? 

A: [I think the best part was] to see all the people that were there to 
support and all the people that just came to say that they are here for 
the people that have cancer or had it. I thought it was really nice that 
they did that, and I think it was a really nice idea to say that you support 
people who had cancer or have it now. 

Q: What do you think is the most important thing for people that have 
cancer to know or keep in mind? 

A: [I would say to] just try to stay positive and think for the best. Just keep 
looking forward like you know you can do it. Just keep telling yourself 
that you can do it, that you’ll get through it. 


STORY BY: BREANNA DOBOS, KRISTINA PLASKETT, AND MEGAN 
HELFERS PHOTO BY: JOSEPH PAVELL 




Marko Milutinovic 
Rachel Miotke 
Kristen Mirabelli 
Lana Miramontes 
Michael Miranda 
Cailee Mitchell 
Lara Mitchell 
Rheena Molina 

Albert Montanez 
Christian Montgomery 
Ja’Lin Montgomery 
Mason Montgomery 
Luke Moran 
Benjamin Morris 
Melanie Mosher 
Alexis Munoz 

Trevor Murphy 
Malak Musleh 
Blake Myers 
Colton Myers 
Kyle Mytnik 
James Naccarato 
Blake Nagy 
Jawad Nammari 

Adrianna Naumoski 
Tatiana Newell 
Michael Nickolaou 
Joelle Niemzyk 
Alexis Nikolovski 
Amanda Noblett 
Dawson Nolan 
Codi Nolen 


ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 195 









































Sarah Noles 
Chase Noorlag 
Damen Nowak 
Megan Nunnery 
Ekenechukwu Nwannunu 
Shannon O’Brien 
Megan O’Donnell 
Michael O’Donnell 

Madison O’Drobinak 
Joseph O’Hara 
Gabrielle O’Keefe 
Madison Oakes 
Larz Oakley 
Colette Oboy 
Jason Okorie 
Nova Olejnik 

Natalie Olenik 
Justin Olesek 
Jeremiah Olesen 
Ryan Oljace 
Jordan Olson 
Kyle Orciuch 
Noah Osearo 
Ian Otic 

Andrew Owczarzak 
Anthony Paganelli 
Maya Palomo 
Megan Paluszak 
Joshua Pama 
Alyssa Panczuk 
Geralynn Panozzo 
William Panozzo 

Gianna Paolilli 
David Paredes 
Vincent Pascale 
Holly Pasko 
Katelyn Pass 
Casey Pederson 
Natalija Peles 
Jessica Pena 



196 




ne aspect of freshman year is adjusting to the differences 
between middle school and high school. Natasha English 
(9), however, had to adjust to a bigger change. 


Q: When did you move from England to the United States? 

A: I moved here when I was seven. 

Q: Was the transition from England to the U.S. hard for you? 

A: Not really because everyone wanted to hear my English accent. 

Q: What instrument do you play? 

A: I play clarinet and saxophone. 

Q: How long have you been playing them? 

A:The clarinet I’ve been playing since fourth grade, and then saxophone, 
I’ve been playing since sixth grade, so that’s another three [or] four years 


Q: Do you do any out of school activities with your music? 

A: I go to the Chicago Merit Music School. You have to audition to get in 
and they have three different bands there. I am in the band that includes 
all the instruments, a clarinet choir, which has 30 clarinets, a clarinet tech¬ 
nique class, which has four clarinets, and I also take a music theory class. 
Q: Do you see yourself playing music as a future career? 

A: I like it a lot, and something in my future will probably be related to 
music. I don’t know if I will make it a career or just a side hobby, but I like 
it and definitely want to stick with it. 


STORY BY: VERONICA DAVIS 
PHOTO BY: SOFIA HAY 













































Alejandro Perez 
Michael Perich 
Emily Peters 
Kory Peterson 
Katerina Petreska 
Joseph Petrungaro 
Everett Peyton 
Andrew Pfeiffer 

James Pickle 
Aliah Pimentel 
Alexa Pinarski 
Lidia Pineda 
Caleb Pisowicz 
Rylee Platusic 
Michael Plaut 
Erin Plenus 

Bryce Plessinger 
Mitchell Polaski 
Lindsey Polito 
Tyler Polled 
Julie Popiela 
Mya Poulos 
Madison Powers 
Ishika Prakash 

Nathan Previs 
Brandon Price 
Thomas Pritchett 
Matthew Protsman 
Adam Pruett 
Jack Quinlan 
Collin Radick 
Madeleine Radowski 

Taylor Rae 
Lordes Raguindin 
Whitney Rains 
Anni Rajput 
Raymond Ramirez 
Naazneen Rana 
Kenneth Randell 
Gabrielle Rangel 

Kendell Ransom 
Nolan Ray 
Alyssa Raymond 
Angel Reed 
Xiomara Regalado 
Isabella Reifinger 
Nicole Reitz 
Adam Reyes 

Jasmine Reyes 
Haley Reynolds 
Courtney Rhomberg 
Trinity Rhyne 
Mitchell Ridder 
Austin Riese 
Brian Ring 
Joel Rivera 

Nikolas Rivera 
Michael Rizzo 
Rachael Robards 
Vanessa Robles 
Joseph Robustelli 
Kevin Rodda 
Diana Rodriguez 
Elizabeth Rodriguez 

Melicah Beatriz Rodriguez 
Cuahutemoc Rodriguez-Lara 
Olivia Rogers 
Preston Rohde-Humphry 
Sioux Romer 
Tara Rosenwinkel 
Ryan Ruberry 
Grace Rudnick 


ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 197 
















































































any students think that learning an insturment is all about 
* learning to read notes and sheet music. While that may 
be true for most, Andrew Kasper (9) learns to play music 
by listening. 

Q: What is learning by ear? 

A: [Learning by ear is] being able to listen to a song and by trial and 
error learning to play what you hear. 


Q: How is this talent unique compared to other musical talents? 

A: Most people think that you have to look at music. I think that this is 
the most effective way simply because you get a better understanding 
of what the song is about. 


Q: How did you discover your talent? 

A: It was around the summer going into 6th grade, and there was a lot 
of stress going on in my life, like parent problems and bad grades, and 
there was no way to really relieve stress, so in a way, I needed something 
to take it out. When sports failed, I realized, ‘Hey, I should give this a try,’ 
and it worked. It wasn’t just a past time for me. It was more an escape 
from reality. 


Q: How do you learn a song? 

A: I would learn a song by listening to it and learning it section by sec¬ 
tion, learning a few minutes at a time. After analyzing, I eventually try 
and put it on a keyboard through trial and error. I mess up a few times 
I will eventually find the right notes. It usually takes me 15 minutes to 
learn a song. 


STORY BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU AND EMMA RITCHIE 
PHOTO BY: ANASTASIA PAPANIKOLAOU 


Diego Ruiz 
Diego Ruiz-Avila 
James Rushing 
Katelyn Rusiniak 
Elizabeth Russell 
Zachary Russo 
Justin Ryan 
Kailey Ryan 

Margaret Sablich 
Hannah Sako 
Jacob Sako 
Noah Salazar 
Lukas Samano 
Jason Sambor 
Jonathan Samsel 
Michael Sanchez 

Brooke Sanders 
Payton Sanders 
Sarah Santana 
Madison Sarkey 
Brianna Sarkisian 
Tabitha Sauls 
Anthony Scanlon 
Justin Scasny 

Bailey Schalk 
Aaron Schassburger 
Jared Schassburger 
John Schelling 
Harrison Schmitt 
Steven Schnurlein 
Drake Schreiber 
John Schuberth 



198 








































Charles Schuler 
Brady Schutt 
Zack Seliger 
Skyler Sell 
Keon Sellers 
Sneha Shathish 
Brandon Shaw 
Nicholas Shell 

Michael Shepherd 
Shebin Shibu 
Tariq Shkokani 
Jacob Shumylo 
Alec Sikora 
Nicolus Sills 
Marisa Skertich 
Savannah Skievaski 

Hayley Skrezyna 
Elizabeth Slager 
Ashley Smith 
Holly Smith 
Meghan Smith 
Olivia Smith 
Robert Smith 
Sydney Smith 

Lauren Smolen 
Alyssa Smyers 
Todd Sobczak 
Alexa Spasevski 
Savanna Spears 
Kaitlyn Spiegel 
Eliana Sprehe 
Emily Spriggs 

Joseph St. John 
Lauren Stearns 
Jacob Stefaniak 
Alyssa Stewart 
Terry Stewart 
Molly Stokes 
McKenna Strayer 
Christopher Stroh 

Nicole Stulgate 
Kyle Stutler 
Debra Sukalo 
Gillian Suroviak 
Nicholas Swanson 
McKenzi Swarthout 
Samantha Szewczyk 
Gina Szymborski 

Mohmmad Taharwah 
Nathaniel Tamez 
Ryan Tancos 
Vivianne Tartareanu 
Sarah Tel las 
Christina Terrazas 
Kyle Terry 
Drew Testa 

Teresa Thomas 
Kylie Thomsen 
Olivia Throckmartin 
Kyle Tobin 
Ashley Todd 
Rebecca Todd 
Camille Tolentino 
BriannaTolle 

Conner Tomasic 
Colm Tomaszewski 
Vanessa Torres 
Shania Townsend 
Kendal Travis 
Jonathan Trichak 
Matthew Trinkle 
Milan Trivunovic 


ONE PEOPLE FRESHMAN 199 
























































































Jacob Trosper 
Kendall Trosper 
Jonathan T sakopoulos 
OliviaTsuetaki 
Ethan Tucker 
Madisen Tucker 
Samantha Tugman 
Steven Tulsiak 

Jared Turngren 
Albab Uddin 
Hannah Urbani 
Clalrese Urchell 
Mary Valente 
Samuel VanDenburgh 
Garret VanDerNoord 
Jacob VanGundy 

Andrew VanMilligan 
MakaylaVanVIeet 
Angel Vargas 
Matthew Vargo 
Shelby Vendl 
Ryan Verhoeve 
Jessica Villegas 
Ethan Vogt 

Abigail Voss 
Ryan Voss 
Alexander Vrbanoff 
Stevan Vuckovic 
Nicole Vusak 
Kyle Wagner 
Tyler Wagner 
Samantha Walker 

Chase Wardian 
Ashley Wasserman 
Seth Weber 
Anna Weir 
Hayley West 
Cameron Westerman 
Savannah White 
Noah Whitney 

Jennifer Wiechart 
Brandon Wilking 
Joshua Williams 
Anastausia Willis 
Cole Willis 
Kristy Willis 
Logan Winder 
Kaylee Wisniewski 

Lauren Wisniewski 
Zachariah Wittenhagen 
Harmony Wojciechowski 
Adam Wolfrum 
Joy Wozniak 
Alan Wright 
Sadie Wright 
Luke Wydrinski 

Truman Yahne 
Colin Yugo 
Alexis Zachary 
Zoe Zachocki 
Hunter Zahorsky 
Caleb Zapata 
George Zapata 
Jazmyn Zapata 



C&OCWTl 


Adam Zatlokowicz 
Sam Zielinski 
Nina Zochalski 
Danieia Zubic 


200 




































































1. Dianne Cometa (10) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 2. Jennifer Crague (10) Photo by: Breanna Dobos 
3. Richard Larson (10) Photo by: Anastasia Papanikolaou 4. Austin Atkins (10) Photo by: JeannineToth 5. 
Jenna Buntin (10) Photo by: Shannon Hearne 6. Hannah Souronis (10) Photo by: Candace Jarzombek 7. Mrs. 
Maureen Yaeger. Art. Jessica Rogers (10) and Anna Hallowell (10) Photo by: Emma DeGroot 8. Joseph Graziano 

(10) Photo by: Jennifer Mohamed 
PAGE BY: JOSEPH PAVELL 


ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 201 














Jenan Abdelhamid 
Lena Abdelqader 
Malak Abudayyeh 
Andrew Ackerman 
Matthew Adams 
Emily Agresta 
Luis Aguilar 
Walter Aleksic 

Bianca Alessia 
Justin Ali 
Alexander Allison 
Kristina Almeida 
Jacob Amft 
Marlene Anaya 
Macey Anderson 
Matthew Andrews 

Patrick Andrews 
Raychel Anoe 
Katlyn Arndt 
Rachel Arnold 
Samantha Arnold 
John Babick 
Brian Bader 
Emily Badger 

Gavin Baisa 
Michael Balcazar 
Aaron Balka 
John Banaag 
Nicholas Bandura 
Evan Bane 
Christopher Baranowski 
Rachel Baranowski 

Zyanya Barnes 
Dakota Barnett 
Sam Barnhart 
Kenneth Barsic 
Hannah Barton 
Urangoo Batchuluun 
Emily Bates 
Morgan Bates 

Jordan Bathurst 
D’Andre’ Beard 
Caleb Beasley 
Brian Beeks 
Donald Bender 
Brittany Benedict 
Aaron Benninghoff 
Cody Benson 

Joshua Benson 
Brian Best 
Abagail Betancourt 
Payal Bhatt 
Jordan Bibbs 
Hannah Biegel 
Jenna Bishop 
Matthew Blair 

Nathan Bland-Brtva 
Eric Blankenship 
Colin Blaze 
Madison Blythe 
Kailey Bodell 
Jordyn Boecker 
Diana Bolanos 
Alexandra Bolivar 

Elijah Bonhama 
Allison Book 
Steven Booth 
Olivia Born 
Jack Bosold 
Anthony Bossi 
Torrence Bradley 
Matthew Brady 



202 


























































any freshmen spend their time memorizing which hallway 
is which and getting accustomed to their new school. 
However, Matthew Litwicki (10) spent part of his freshman 
year becoming accustomed to a new school that wasn’t Lake Cen¬ 
tral, but Indiana University Bloomington, where he was offered a 
scholarship for his baseball skills once he completes high school. 
Q: How long have you been playing baseball and how does it affect 
your life? 

A: I have been playing since I was nine or 10.1 play for Apex Baseball and 
am a pitcher. I’ve been clocked out at 93 [mph]. It doesn’t really interfere 
with my social life too much. I normally condition in the morning and 
then have time after school for friends, family and homework. In season, 
it gets a little more tough because there are around three to four games 
a week. Other than that, it is not too demanding. 

Q: How did Indiana University find out about you and start to contact you? 
A: My team had a tournament in Louisville, and [IU] saw me pitch and 
called me because they were interested. I went down [to Bloomington] 
and they toured me of the campus. 

Q: What was the experience you had while touring IU? 

A: They showed me all of the areas around campus, including the football 
field. I stayed in the dorms. At the end of the tour, they offered me pretty 
close to a full-ride. All I have to do is pay for my dorm the first year. I 
committed at the end of the trip. 

Q: How has this decision affected you? 

A: It was kind of weird accepting this offer because I am only a sopho¬ 
more. They started talking to me when I was a freshman. It is crazy to 
think about the fact that they were interested in me. 

STORY AND PHOTO BY: HANNAH BRYNER 


Noah Brasses 
Emily Bratcher 
Breanna Bray 
Kristofer Brokop 
Manuel Brooks 
Samantha Brosseau 
Brett Brown 
Jack Browne 


Walker Brummett 
Parker Bryant 
Danielle Buckley 
Michelle Buckman 
Rhys Buckmaster 
Cameron Bugg 
Ethan Bukowski 
Alyssa Bulic 

Jenna Buntin 
Tabitha Burrink 
Elizabeth Bustamante 
Alex Caird 
Morgan Calligan 
Kayla Camarillo 
Lily Camilleri 
Christina Camp 

Alyssa Carter 
DeMarco Caruso 
Jessica Cary 
Denise Castaneda 
Aaron Chadd 
Ellie Chandos 
Samantha Chapa 
Jennifer Chavarria 


ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 203 






























Madison Chelbana 
Ruth Chen 
Zachary Chess 
Aisha Choudhry 
Michael Cialdella 
Angela Cistaro 
Morgan Clapman 
Michael Clark 

Taylor Cleeton 
Tyler Cline 
Jillian Cloghessy 
Cesily Coffman 
Dennis Collier 
Sarah Combis 
Dianne Cometa 
Joyce Cometa 

Kayley Cook 
Kobe Cook 
Nicholas Cook 
Stephen Cook 
Tyler Copak 
Jennifer Crague 
Keith Crawford 
John Crawley 

Cayla Cress 
Miya Cruz 
Anthony Crylen 
Alexis Curatolo 
Adam Cymerman 
Brock Cyrek 
Braden Czerwinski 
Ezra Daehn 

Jack Daniels 
Parker Danner 
Ryan Davidson 
David Davis 
Benjamin DeBaggis 
Nina Decker 
Ryan Decker 
Emma DeGroot 



204 



aicie Reed (10) had an opportunity that One Direction super 
yWJP/ fans dream of; she was able to meet the band’s members 
Niall Horan and Louis Tomlinson. Reed has been a fan of 
One Direction since she was in 7th grade, and this unexpected 
event brought her closer to the band. 


Q: How did you receive the opportunity to meet Louis and Niall? 

A: I won a contest back in September I had to go on the Today Show in 
New York to compete against these four girls and answer trivia questions 


and whoever wins gets to go to [Florida] to the opening of [One Direc¬ 
tion’s] new album. 


Q: What was your reaction when you discovered you won the contest? 
A: I didn’t think I was going to win, so we really didn’t expect it. Then, the 
day before we had to go, they called and told us that we were leaving in 
the next 24 hours, and we had to get our stuff ready. 

Q: What did you do when you met Louis and Niall? 

A: They did this thing where they shut down [Universal Studios] and they 
could be at the rides, but you don’t know where they would be. 


Q: Where did you find them? 

A: Niall was inside a candy store; he was dressed as an elf, and he was 
passing out candy at the cash register and right before you went on the 
Harry Potter ride, Louis came out and acted like the person who checks 
your seat belts. 


STORY BY: AMBER STEDT AND SARA LISAC 
PHOTO BY: AMBER STEDT 






































Zachary DeJoris 
Mikenzie Delia 
Elizabeth Delis 
Brendan Demantes 
Jacob Denson 
Douglas DeVries 
Daniel Diaz 
Isabella Diaz 

Rico Diaz 
Ryan Dittmer 
Erin Diviney 
Jacob Dobias 
Ryan Dobkowski 
Rade Dobrijevich 
Daniel Dodig 
Alex Dolata 

Enrique Dominguez 
Lacey Doyle 
Nemanja Drezga 
Dylan Drlich 
Joshua Drosos 
Marcus Drzewiecki 
Phoebe Duke 
Joshua Dulski 

Ljiljana Duvnjak 
Jeffrey Dykstra 
Nate Edvardsen 
Megan Eierman 
Grant Eisenhut 
Bradley Elder 
Jacob Engels 
Keontae Engram 

Emily Erickson 
Ethan Erickson 
Makayla Erickson 
Matthew Ernst 
Sara Erwin 
Ramez Eskandar 
Ferris Esposito 
Kylie Extin 

Reilly Fagan 
Serene Fakhoury 
Nicole Farag 
Lauren Farmer 
Zachary Farmer 
Michael Faso 
Hunter Fedora 
Kylie Fehrman 

Mark Ferguson 
Jacob Ferrell 
Jacob Fiorio 
Ryan Fischer 
Kaitlyn Fisher 
Kyra Fitzgerald 
Angel Flores 
DeVonte Flowers 

Ian Flynn 
Ryan Fowler 
Tyler Frank 
Kylee Freckelton 
Kyle Freel 
Rachel Frieling 
Anthony Frolik-Ramirez 
Rachel Front 

Christopher Fundich 
Rachel Furmanek 
Guiseppe Fushi 
Zachary Futch 
Cameron Gabouer 
Ljubomir Gacevic 
Samantha Gagliardi 
Olivia Ganser 


ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 205 
























































CALEB BEASLEY 



aleb Beasley (10) is not an average sophomore. Beasley 
\ m 9§) struck a job opportunity when he stepped foot inside 
Lakeshore Public Media and the production manager 
offered him a callback. Knowing only how to hold a microphone, 
Beasley was thrown in front of the camera to cover the Crown 
Point vs. Lake Central football game. 

Q: Do you have your own TV show? 

A: No, [Lakeshore Public Media] has this TV show called “Pro Football 
Report” that airs during the fall on Thursday and Friday nights. Friday, 
they go live. Thursday is a prerecorded show. So I don’t have my own TV 
show, I’m just the star of a TV show. 

Q: Where did your interest in being on TV come from? 

A: When I was younger, my grandmother used to watch “MeetThe Press” 
and all these political shows and the cool music in the background would 
just attract me to the show, so I would always watch it. Then I watched 
tapes from Sept. 11, 2001, with the terror attacks and how the people 
relied on them for information. It just gave me a feeling and I got kind of 
addicted to it. 

Q: Do you plan on making a career out of this? 

A: Yeah, definitely. I want to be a news anchor or a late night talk show 
host. It could be called, “Nightly News with Caleb Beasley” or “TheTonight 
Show with Caleb Beasley.” 

Q: What is your favorite part about being on TV? 

A: The adrenaline that you get before going on live TV is the coolest thing 
ever. Once the director says, ‘Stand by. Five, four, three, two, one.’ Every¬ 
thing goes away. All of the stress in life. All of the anxiety. All of everything 
just goes away. It’s just me and the camera and I’m just telling the story. 
STORY BY: JODIE HODGES AND DARIAN SMITH, submitted photo. 


Anthony Garcia 
Tyler Garrison 
Jenna Garza 
Nicole Geer 
Christopher Genovesi 
Kaitlin George 
Justin Gereg 
Bradley Gerlach 

Alexis Gerstner 
Justin Gerstner 
Jayden Getz 
Jacob Gibson 
Anthony Giles 
Christopher Gillespie 
Charles Gist 
Kaelynn Givens-Coley 

Kennedy Givens-Coley 
Gage Glista 
Brooke Glover 
Cameron Godinez 
Carly Godshalk 
David Golden 
Samuel Goldman 
Christina Gomez 

Isabella Gomez 
Kara Gonnella 
Kayla Gonnella 
Antonio Gonzalez 
Gina Gonzalez 
Jacob Gorman 
Elena Gorney 
Samantha Gorton 



206 












































Neal Govani 
Rachel Graan 
Brianna Graf 
Joseph Graziano 
Alexis Griffin 
Nathan Grimmer 
Lucas Grkinich 
Lauren Gronek 

Leah Gross 
Jordan Gruthusen 
Joseph Grzybek 
Erica Guevara 
Ryan Guilfoyle 
Jacob Gurney 
Adam Gustas 
Jade Gutierrez 

Keith Gutierrez 
Dominic Guttillo 
Nyia Guy 
Crystal Guzman 
Marco Haddad 
Camryn Halfeldt 
Anna Hallowell 
Brandon Hamby 

Kara Hamilton 
Hope Hamner 
Kayla Hans 
Zachary Hansen 
Madison Hardy 
Nicholas Harris 
Haley Harvey 
Mary Hauter 

Sofia Hay 
Debra Hayes 
Thomas Hayes 
Jessica Hearne 
Hannah Hecht 
Kristen Hecht 
Megan Heflin 
Sarah Hermanek 

Brandon Hernandez 
Donna Hernandez 
Nataly Hernandez 
Kristyn Herrera 
Joseph Hess 
Hannah Hestermann 
Alexandra Hickey 
Abigail Hiestand 

Kallie Higgins 
Mohammed Hijaz 
Abigail Hines 
Samantha Hmurovich 
Tyler Hoevker Hoff 
Hannah Hoff 
Jacqueline Hoffman 
Kyle Holman 

Jack Hopkins 
Raven Horneman 
Jessica Howell 
Austin Huber 
Darius Hughes 
Matthew Hughes 
Sarah Hunsley 
Drake Hunt 

Owen Hunt 
Samuel Hupp 
Isaiah Huppenthal 
Kiana Ibarra 
Alexandra Idalski 
Kalie Ingram 
Jennifer Iragana 
Jacob Irvin 


ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 207 





















































Dalia Isa 
Abigail Ispas 
Austin Ivin 
Tristin Jackowski 
Kennedy Jackson 
Nathan Jackson 
Nathaniel Jackson 
Morgan Janik 

Elaine Januchowski 
Candace Jarzombek 
Andrea Jimenez 
Maria Jimenez 
Jessica Jinkerson 
Michael Johnson 
Robert Johnson 
Natalye Johnston 

Elise Jones 
Marcus Jones 
Kelly Joy 
Madeline Jurek 
Jacob Jurkovic 
Marc Kanosky 
Noah Katalinic 
Quinn Kaurich 

Grace Kawalec 
Alex Kaye 
Ellie Keith 
Devon Kelley 
Joelle Kelley 
Alexis Kelly 
Olivia Kelly 
Ryan Kilinski 

Jared King 
Maxwell King 
Brandee Kinney 
Megan Kirby 
Joshua Kisela 
John Kish 
Alyssa Klapkowski 
Perry Klee 

Collin Knaley 
Vera Kohut 
Nikko Kolintzas 
Anthony Konopka 
Michael Kopack 
Frances Kornelik 
Marisa Kostecki 
Dara Kovacevic 

Rachel Kozel 
Stefan Krajisnik 
Ashley Kralik 
Nicholas Kritikos 
Steven Kruk 
William Kruzan 
Andrew Kurzeja 
Christine Kutka 

Jesse Kwiecinski 
Peter Ladowski 
Maura Lake 
Jeannie Lam 
Jason Lamont 
Cameron Lane 
Austin Langwinski 
Brooke Lanting 

Carl William Laput 
Brianna LaRock 
Richard Larson 
Rachel Laughlin 
Mark Layne 
Natalia Lazic 
Loan Le 
Solomon Lea 



208 















































































Evan Leatherman 
Ryan Leatherman 
Charles Lee 
Madeline Lenting 
Peyton Lessentine 
Kyle LeVan 
Ashley Linares 
Tia Lingvay-Guardiola 

Jason Lionberg 
Ryan Lionberg 
Emily Lisac 
Nathan Little 
Ian Littrell 
Matthew Litwicki 
Dasia Lockett 
Lenoire’ Lockett 

Bradley Loden 
Madelyn Long 
Alexis Lopez 
Alicia Lopez 
Amanda Lopez 
Sean Gregory Lopez 
Katrina Lozanoski 
Nicholas Lucas 

Hanna Lutz 
Hung Ly 
Mark Lydick 
Jordan Lykowski 
Carl Lyza 
Dylan MacLagan 
Justin MacNeill 
Caitlyn Magdziak 

Madison Magdziarz 
Nadia Magnabosco 
Lucas Mago 
Jonathon Makowski 
Faith Maldonado 
Reetam Mander 
Anthony Mangan 
Isabelle Marino 


igh school is a busy time for students. Mohammed Hijaz 
(l||) (10) participates in a soccer club with 18-year-olds to add 
to the stress. 

Q: How long have you been playing soccer? 

A: I’ve been playing soccer since fifth grade and I’ve started going 
into higher competitive teams throughout the years until I came to Lake 
Central two years ago. 


Q: Is there a difference playing with older team members? 

A: When I am playing with kids my age I feel more relaxed because I 
know they are probably going through the same stuff I am going through. 
But when I play with older kids, it forces me to step up my game so I can 
prove to them [that] I deserve to be on the team. 


U: What is it like to play on F.C. Revolution with seniors? 

A: When I’m playing alongside older people it raises the bar of skill I need 
to be at. I always need to improving so I can keep up with them and one 
day be who the younger kids on the team look up to. 

Q: Do you have advice for anyone struggling with sports or academics? 
A: Make sure that you still have time to give yourself a rest. Being in 
sports and high academic classes gets a college’s attention but if you 
are too busy [to the point] where your academics fall behind it would be 
better to reduce your schedule to make sure your grades do not go down. 


STORY BY: SARAH BREDAR, JOVANA DODEVSKA AND JESSICA 
MCCULLOUGH 

PHOTO BY: JILLIAN WILSCHKE 



ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 209 
















































Abby Markowski 
Denisse Marrufo 
Jacob Marshall 
Samantha Marshall 
Hope Martens 
Skylar Martens 
Anahi Martinez 
Karina Martinez 

Miles Mathis 
Maxim Maximtsev 
Jacob Maynard 
Michelle Maynard 
Keith Maynie 
Rachael Mazon 
Teagan McCormack 
Conner McCoy 

Darby McGrath 
David McKinney 
Gunnar McKinney 
Nicholas McManimen 
Anthony Mejia 
Maxwell Meseberg 
Noah Meyer 
Andrea Michael 

Samuel Michniewicz 
Andrijana Mihajlovic 
Hunter Mihalic 
Samantha Mikrut 
Cory Mikuly 
Nicole Milaszewski 
Emma Millard 
Bianca Miranda 

Matthew Mireles 
Adam Miskus 
Haroon Mohiuddin 
Jessica Montella 
Benjamin Moredich 
Brett Morris 
Darby Morris 
Tory Morris 

William Morris 
Linda Morton 
Liana Motel 
Shannon Mulvihill 
Joseph Munsie 
Matthew Murphy 
Marisa Nadon 
Autumn Napiwocki 

Marcus Naranjo 
Isaac Nash 
Anthony Navarro 
Joseph Nelson 
Andreas Nicolaou 
Ethan Niewiadomski 
Benjamin Nisle 
Madelyn Nohos 

Cassidy Nordyke 
Daniel Nowak 
Justin Nowak 
Rilee O’Day 
Kevin O’Donnell 
Stephanie O’Drobinak 
Nkem O’Gonuwe 
Kristal Ochoa 

Aaron Ooms 
Samuel Opacic 
Kaitlyn Opperman 
Kelly Orze 
Bailey Oski 
Jeffrey Osmulski 
Olivia Oster 
Harley Padin 



210 















































































ancing can usually range from Ballet, Jazz, Hip-hop to 
I Contemporary, but Payal Bhatt (10) has found a whole new 
outlet to express herself. Her dancing is intertwined with 
her culture; it is Bollywood dance. 

Q: How long have you danced and who does it with you? 

A: I do Indian dancing, Bollywood dancing, and I’ve been doing it since I 
was in fifth grade. Before it used to be taught, but now we just do it with 
our own group, and we choreograph it by ourselves too. [I dance with] 
this high school group. There’s this group called Hum, and in Hum there 
are different groups. You can form different groups and do dances with 
them. It’s kind of like you can just do it with your friends, and there’s a 
lot of freedom to it. 

Q: Why do you like Indian dancing? 

A: [I like dancing] because it’s fun, and you can get to know your culture 
better, and you can do it with your friends. It’s really fun, and it’s just 
something different. 

Q: When and where do you perform? 

A: We perform for Diwali, which is one of our biggest holidays and is 
usually in November. And there’s also the Hum Night which high schoolers 
are all invited to and that’s in May. We perform at IACC, it’s called the 
Indian American Culture Center, and it’s in Merrillville. 

Q: What do you wear for your performances? 

A: We wear traditional Indian outfits, and it kind of depends on the type 
of dance you’re doing. If you’re doing Garba, you wear the very tradi¬ 
tional skirt and everything, and then if you’re doing more of a modern 
[performance] then you would wear a different type of dress but it’s kind 
of like pants, and a top, but it’s a different kind. 

STORY BY: BREANNA DOBOS, KRISTINA PLASKETT 
AND MEGAN HELFERS, Submitted photo 




Erik Palm 
Tabitha Pappas 
Alex Paredes 
Myranda Parker 
Cameron Parkinson 
Falyn Parnell 

Corbyn Parnell-Humphrey 
Derek Pass 

Maxwell Pattison 
Kyle Paul 
Antonio Pavloski 
Jered Pawlak 
Madison Payne 
Monet Payne 
Halle Pederson 
Michael Pena 

Paige Pennavaria 
Benjamin Perez 
Michael Perez 
Thalia Perez 
Hannah Peters 
Francesca Pezzuto 
Matthew Pharazyn 
Hailey Phelps 

Daniel Picioski 
Tyler Pilackas 
Anna Pinkus 
Julian Pinon 
Annabella Piunti 
Brandon Piunti 
Alexis Pivovarnik 
Daniel Ponce 


SCAN PAGE FOR VIDEO ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 211 



















































Brandon Porras 
Adrianna Portela 
Rebecca Poulter 
Madeline Price 
Luke Prince 
Andrew Pruitt 
Abdul-Rahim Qader 
Sarah Qader 

Maxwell Quandt 
Anahi Quezada 
Jacob Quijas 
Ryan Raeck 
Colin Rafalski 
Joshua Ramirez 
Inna Maraine Ramos 
Sara Ramos 

Victoria Ramos 
Nerville Rance-Cox 
Halas Randell 
Alyssa Ranieri 
Ayanna Ransom 
Hunter Rattray-Elizondo 
Justin Ratulowski 
Jasmin Ray 

Anthony Rea 
John Reato 
Logan Rechlicz 
Alexander Reed 
Jaicie Reed 
Tyler Reel 
Mamie Reising 
Ruby Reising 

Kellie Repasi 
Lucas Rhone 
Autumn Richards 
Gunnar Richardson 
Adrian Rinconeno 
Nathan Risse 
Justin Ritter 
Jessica Rivera 



212 




oyce Cometa (10) is not the average doodler. Cometa 
practices art every day for herself and for contests, like the 
one for Indiana Foreign Language Teachers Association. 


Q: How did you get started with drawing? 

A: I don’t really remember ail that much, but I’m sure I started at a young 
age when I wasn’t even living here. I was probably still in the Philippines. 
Usually what I did was I drew spontaneous things. I don’t really draw 
from the reality. 

Q: What is the Indiana Foreign Language Teachers Association poster 
contest? 


A: It was a poster contest in which it promoted to learn a language - 
universal language. It could be any language; it just promotes a person 
to learn a language, so I created a poster for that and expressed many 
things into there. My main idea of the poster was to promote world lan¬ 
guage by exploration of the world. It would be more fun to understand 
people that you meet there while you explore the world. 

Q: What was your design of the poster and what did each part represent? 
A: [The poster is] a giant globe, but I separated [it] into latitude and lon¬ 
gitude. Each square in it has a certain picture of a place, so you’ll see a 
tiny picture of Paris. There’s one of London. There’s one of the pyramids. 
I surrounded the globe with a series of greetings in different writings and 
languages. In 3D block letters, it says ‘Learn a Language,’ and on the 
bottom it says ‘Explore the World.’ 


STORY BY: KAYLA HALLOWELL AND CAMRYN WALLACE, PHOTO BY: 
CAMRYN WALLACE 

































John Rizzo 
Morgan Roach 
Ayanna Robertson 
Jack Rogers 
Jessica Rogers 
Elizabeth Romero 
Jade Rosario 
Rafael Rosario 

Victoria Ross 
Nicholas Rossi 
Randa Ruder 
Taylor Rudnick 
Jennifer Ruiz 
Samantha Rusch 
Samuel Ruzga 
Colton Rydlewski 

Cora Sakai 
Jonathon Salazar 
Marcela Salazar 
Michael Salazar 
Mohammed Saleh 
Anna Samels 
Raul Sanchez 
Austin Sandoval 

Hannah Sarkey 
Ashley Sarsfield 
Thomas Sarsfield 
Kylie Sauls 
Ashley Scanlon 
Isabelle Scarnavack 
Brooke Scartozzi 
Gavin Schalk 

Nicholas Schallmo 
Allison Schuch 
Dylan Schwader 
Cara Scott 
Emily Scott 
Abigail Sebahar 
Madison Seehausen 
Kaitlyn Seitz 

Ashley Sencaj 
Megan Serratore 
Michael Shanks 
Hanan Shatat 
Naseem Shatat 
Logan Shaw 
Zeeshan Sheikh 
Kelly Shelton 

Donovan Shields 
Michael Sinchar 
Emily Sixtos 
Brandon Slater 
Amanda Slavich 
Anthony Smierciak 
Jazzmyne Smiley 
Norell Smith 

Shannon Smyth 
Cody Snoreck 
Jacob Snyder 
Audrey Sobolewski 
Courtney Solis 
Hannah Souronis 
Kimberly Spindler 
Sarah Spivak 

Caitlyn Squire 
Jasmine Stachelski 
Sydney Stanek 
Zachary Stanek 
Dylan Steliga 
Joseph Stevens 
Desiree Stoces 
Jenna Stockman 


ONE PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 213 















































































t 


I 


EZ 


IDOL 


0N14 




r 



sabella Gomez (10) was inspired by her teacher in the 
(first grade to sing, act and perform. She has sung and 
performed for her school choirs since the fifth grade. In 
the summer of 2014, she decided to take a trip to Tennessee to 
audition for “American Idol.” 


Q: What made you go and try out for American Idol? 

A: I can’t really see myself doing anything else besides something with 
performing. I figured even if I didn’t make it, it was just a good experience 


for me and if I did make it, even to at least the Hollywood Week, then I 
could get my name out there. 


Q: Can you summarize the process of your audition day? 

A,: I went online and registered and then I brought my information and 
papers they told me to have to the audition. I went there to wait in line 
at 6 a.m. People in line got wristbands depending on if they were audi¬ 
tioning or with someone who was auditioning. I was then handed song 
lyrics to learn for the commercials. Then from the line I walked to a patio 
area with other contestants to wait to get into the stadium. When you 
walked in, there were five tables set up with curtains separating each one. 
Producers were sitting behind the tables and called me and four others 
down by our numbers. We each sang for them for about 30 seconds, 
they then had only one person, maybe none, stay back. 


Q: Would you ever consider going back even though you didn’t make it? 
A: Yeah, well if it was a closer audition, probably cause they have bus 
audtions where it’s an audition for the producers. But I audtioned for “The 
Voice” in Chicago too, and I’d do that again. 


STORY BY: TABITHA PAPPAS, EMMA DEGROOT, AND ASHLEY 
KRALIK, submitted photo. 


Rachel Streck 
Dawson Stroud 
Nina Strubing 
Sameh Subuh 
Sarah Sukalo 
Makayla Sullivan 
Marko Suvocesmakovic 
Karli Swanson 

Radiant Sykes 
Brett Szabo 
Alexa Szatkowski 
Joseph Szydlo 
Paige Szymczak 
NaserTaharwah 
Jorge Tapia 
Lauren Tatina 

Erin Taylor 
Joshua Taylor 
Michael Taylor 
AleksandarTepsic 
Meghan Teumer 
Isabelle Thomas 
Emily Thompson 
Kaitlyn Thompson 

EvaThrockmartin 
Joseph Tigges 
GiannoulaTjortjis 
Maya Tobin 
Jesus Torres 
Melissa Torres 
Micheal Townsend 
Anh Tran 



214 










































































ONE 


Andrew Trinidad 
Sandra T sakopoulos 
Mia Tucker 
AshleeTurnbough 
Zeeshan Uddin 
Benjamin Uram 
Kaitlyn Vander Laan 
Sydney Vandersteeg 

Noah VanderZanden 
Jacob VanDeursen 
Lauren Van Drunen 
Joseph VanVuren 
NemanjaVasic 
AndrianaVasquez 
Rosalinda Velasquez 
Nathaly Velazquez 

Victoria Venturelli 
Katherine Veronesi 
Everardo Vicente 
MajaVidovic 
John Michael Villanueva 
Michael Villarreal 
Kollin Vos 
SperoVrehas 

Kayla Vujisic 
Anna Wachowski 
Matthew Waddell 
Kate Walker 
Camryn Wallace 
James Waller 
Maegan Walton 
Kaylynn Ward 

Alexys Watkins 
Derrick Watkins 
Seth Wayner 
Emily Weber-Brokke 
Nara Welcher 
Noah Wells 
Ryan West 
Ciana White 

Jacob Widowfield 
Jake Wiggins 
Alexis Wilkes 
Victoria Wilkes 
Cailee Wilkinson 
Arttenaej Williams 
Mhejhana Williams 
Tyler Winiecki 

Michael Winker 
Jaime Winquist 
Windy Witt 
Jessica Wojton 
Alyssa Woods 
Jennifer Wright 
EsamYacoub 
Christopher Young 

Jacob Zabrecky 
Jacob Zak 
Helana Zakher 
Ana Zanza 
Veronica Zappa 
Violett Zappa 
Jacob Zasada 
Ryan Zega 


PEOPLE SOPHOMORE 215 


























































1. Brett Balicki (11) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 2. Trevor Williams (11) Photoi>y: Ashley 
Kralik 3 Allison Onest (11) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 4. Breanna Zeller (11) Photo by: 
Samantha Bernardy 5. Rachel Inglese (11) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 6. Griffin Taylor 
(11) Photo by: Madeline Conley 7. Nichole Heusmann Photo by:Tabitha Pappas 8. Cole 
Easterday (11) Photo by: Gianna Mills PAGE BY: JENNA CRAWFORD 


216 




























Allissa Aardema 
Nathan Aaron 
Michael Abramowicz 
Madelyn Ackerman 
Alexandra Adams 
Sarthak Aggarwal 
Ona Ahmed 
Mia Ainscough 

Alexandra Alcantara 
Brandon Alder 
Andrew Alexander 
Samuel Almaguer 
Jasmin Alvarado 
Jennifer Alvarez 
Leah Alvarez 
Kelsey Andersen 

Ellery Anderson 
Samantha Anderson 
Nina Angus 
Miranda Anuszkiewicz 
Nathan Aponte 
Marianne Apuyod 
Isaac Araujo 
Miranda Armstrong 

Joshua Arreola 
Renn Arvanitis 
Hannah Aulinskis 
Francisco Ayala 
Elizabeth Ayersman 
Ammar Azzam 
Summer Bakker 
Brett Balicki 

Max Barnhart 
Sydnee Barrins 
Nicolas Barron 
Megan Barry 
Kendall Bartochowski 
Natasa Beader 
Ryan Beckwith 
Anthony Bednarek 

Jacqlene Beemsterboer 
Matthew Beemsterboer 
Kaitlin Behrens 
Hailey Bell 
Rachel Bell 
Samantha Bell 
Matthew Bellar 
Elizabeth Beilis 

Desiree Benavides 
Dutch Benedict 
Randy Benko 
Ryan Bereda 
Elise Bereolos 
Bianca Bernal 
Samantha Bernardy 
Zha’rece Bertollini 

Madison Berumen 
George Beshara 
Alexander Bielawski 
Isaiah Billot 
Emily Birkmann 
Alec Bisone 
Sierra Black 
Austin Blake 

Alyssa Blevins 
Ashley Bloom 
Jadon Bloom 
Stephen Bodine 
Jessica Bodnar 
Gavyn Boeckstiegel 
Jenna Boiler-Smith 
Meghann Borowski 

ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 217 








































































Jacob Boshears 
Hannah Bougher 
Nathan Boyle 
Kaitlin Brack 
Cory Brackett 
Sarah Bredar 
Madison Breford 
Neal Broad 

Melanie Brokke 
Craig Bronson 
Elysse Brown 
Jakob Brown 
Katrina Brownewell 
Jordan Buckmaster 
Jaquon Burns 
Emily Burvan 

Brittany Busby 
Neal Buss 
Annette Caban 
Rebecca Cain 
Alexa Campbell 
Abby Cappello 
Ksenija Capshaw 
Paige Carter 

Sabrina Castillo 
Paul Centanni 
Matthew Chapski 
Allison Chavez 
Jocelynn Cheesebourough 
Austin Chekaluk 
Savreet Chhokar 
Savannah Childress 

Jay Chopra 
Hangene Chung 
Jamey Church 
Trevor Cieslak 
Alexandra Clark 
Anthony Clark 
Samuel Clark 
Elise Classen 

Alexander Cody 
Amber Cole 
Erini Collaros 
Casey Conner 
Hunter Conner 
Morgan Conner 
James Cook 
Michael Couture 

Kendall Cowling 
Jenna Crawford 
Hannah Crilley 
Reyna Crothers 
Cynthia Cruz 
Katelynn Culbertson 
Jonathan Culver 
Brandon Cure 

Jessica Czajkowski 
Patrick Dahl 
Walter Dahlkamp 
Nathan Daliege 
Elizabeth Daly 
John Damarjian 
Blake Dancer 
Tara Dangerfield 

Gabriella Danko 
Ethan Darter 
Alyssa Davids 
Cj Deckinga 
Tara DeGrauwe 
Jaime Del Real 
Salvador Del Real 
Dana DeLaurentis 



KvJtwa* 


218 





































































hile most students buy their clothes, shoes and gifts from 
retail stores, Melanie Sanchez (11) spends her free time 
making them herself. Sanchez takes on projects ranging 
from painting phone cases to sewing fabric onto Nike Roshe Run 
shoes, making the items one of a kind. After growing up around 
art, Sanchez plans on continuing her interest in art and possibly 

S ursuing a career in the field. 

is Where did your interest in art come from? 

A: [It] probably [came from] my mom’s side. I have always been doing it as a 
kid. Everyone knew that I was going to be artistic growing up. It was a thing 
in my family. 

Q: What projects or crafts do you do? 

A: I’ve customized shoes and painted on them. I’ve just painted and done 
sketches. I’ve done henna tattoos on the side. I would paint on shirts. I have 
even painted on my ukulele. I’ve painted on phone cases, socks, just weird 
things. I’ll buy stuff from the thrift store and paint on it or cut it up and turn it 
into something that is more new. 

Q: Why do you craft? 

A: I feel like when you have certain pieces that no one else has, like the shoes 
that I made myself, no one else is going to have those, and it makes you unique. 
I usually give my friends shoes for their birthdays, and it’s something that no 
one else has and it makes them feel special. 

Q: Do you plan on pursuing art in the future? 

A: Definitely; I plan on going to the Art Institute of Chicago and go further 
with that. I’m not sure what I’m going to do. I’m looking into fashion mer¬ 
chandising. 

STORY BY: SARA LISAC AND EMILY LISAC 
PHOTO BY: EMILY LISAC 


Jackson DeLisle 
Julia DelSangro 
Alexander DelValle 
Kyle DeMichael 
Cosmo Demir 
Tyler Dernulc 
Cecelia Desiderio 
Vivian Diaz 


Sean Diehl 
Frank Dijak 
Renee DiNino 
Emma DiPasquo 
Sarah Diviney 
Breanna Dobos 
Jovana Dodevska 
Elijah Doggett 

Trevor Doogan 
Anthony Doreski 
John Dosen 
Marissa Douglas 
Cassidi Doyle 
Lauren Druzbicki 
Eric Duffey 
Eamonn Duffy 

Taylor Duffy 
Gino Duggan 
Brittany Dunbar 
Chandler Duncanson 
Andrew Dunn 
Evelyn Duran 
Michelle Duran 
Anthony Dye 

ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 219 








































Jacqueline Eader 
Cole Easterday 
Patrick Echlin 
Dijon Edwards 
Meaghan Ehlert 
Joseph Ehlin 
Andrew Elkins 
Luke Elliott 

Noah Elliott 
Jocalyn Ellison 
Eva Elmalh 
Margaret Elton 
MacKenzie Emerson 
Morgan Ericksen 
Jocelyn Estrella 
Mackenzie Evers 

Donovan Ewing 
Kai Fair 
Nathan Fallon 
Sydney Farmer 
Courtney Fastabend 
Skylar Feldman 
Andrew Fernandez 
Ryan Fife 

Samuel Fioretti 
Alec Fiorio 
Emily Fiorio 
Clifford Fitch 
Nicholas Flahive 
Alejandro Flores 
Hector Flores 
Sydney Flores-Cuadrado 

Stephanie Foster 
Francis Fredrickson 
Katherine Freeman 
Rylee Friel 
Emma Frye 
Samantha Fuscaldo 
Megan Gabe 
Danielle Gaines 

Alexis Gallegos 
Amaris Gallegos 
Jacob Galvan 
Antoneia Galvin 
Jordan Garcia 
Marc Garcia 
Marina Garcia 
Nicholas Garcia 

Victoria Gard 
Ethan Gardenhire 
Victoria Gardenhire 
David Garibaldi 
Matthew Garton 
Casey Garvey 
Ivano Garza 
Alexia Geenen 

Michael Gella 
Lindsey Gercken 
Benjamin Geyer 
Russell Gibbs 
Ian Gifford 
Jeanine Gilbert 
Alec Glinski 
Umang Godhani 

Clayton Goldman 
Alexandra Gomez 
Julissa Gomez 
Gabriella Goncher 
Laurel Gonsiorowski 
Kaitlyn Gonzalez 
Nicholas Good 
Jeremy Goodale 



220 

































































Megan Gora 
Harrison Gordon 
Michael Gosnell 
James Gotch 
Amie Goulet 
Brandon Grabarek 
Michael Grahovac 
Lauren Granskog 

Jarod Green-Moore 
Sean Griffin 
Rachel Gross 
Julia Gruver 
Brett Guffey 
Niklas Gustafson 
Caroline Haddad 
Kimberly Haddad 

Brandon Haddon 
Kimberly Hainsworth 
Edward Halbe 
Sydney Halfeldt 
Brandi Hall 
Krystian Hameen 
Adam Hanchar 
Emily Hansen 

Nicholas Hansen 
Talia Harman 
Sean Harper 
Thomas Harrington 
Joseph Haskins 
Clayton Hatfield 
Patrick Haugh 
Kara Hawkins 

Kamren Heady 
Joseph Hearne 
Shannon Hearne 
Daniel Heinrikson 
Megan Heifers 
Micheal Hemmerling 
Amber Hemphill 
Gabriel Henderson 

Crystal Hernandez 
Michelle Hernandez 
Kayla Hestermann 
Sarah Heuberger 
Nichole Heusmann 
James Hickey 
Tristan Hiduke 
Duaa Hijaz 

Jenna Hinchman 
Jace Hirosky 
Madeline Hirschfield 
Jodie Hodges 
Michael Hoff 
Andrew Hoffman 
Desirae Hoffman 
Morgan Horgash 

Michael Horvath 
Zhanae Howard 
Autumn Huber 
Jorge Huicochea 
Kevin Huicochea 
Marcellus Hunt 
Zachary Hupp 
Kristina llic 

SreysarIng 
Rachel Inglese 
Matthew Irving 
Gina Irwin 
Marvin Ishii 
Ahmad Ismail 
Anes Issa 
Sarah Issa 

ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 221 

















































































any students take part in the musicals at school. Madison 
Breford (11) goes beyond the Lake Central stage to per¬ 
form in other choirs, musicals and get special recognition. 
Q: Is there a big difference between Lake Central Theatre Company and 
other community theaters? 

A: [There is] not a huge difference. It’s just that there are different age 
ranges in community theater, and once the cast is set, people aren’t 
necessarily competitive [about being better in their parts] any more. It’s 
all love. You get that with LCTC too, but it takes a bit more time for the 
competitive spirit to wear off. 

Q: Do you have a favorite moment from playing Dorothy? 

A: It sounds cliche, but singing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” every 
night [was my favorite moment.] I also enjoyed the goodbye scene where 
Dorothy clicks her heels. That was an iconic scene and I was beyond honored 
to perform it. 

Q: Can you explain the award you won? 

A: The [Northwest Indiana Excellence in Theatre Foundation] awards 
are presented at an annual gala, and there are people called viewers 
who watch all of the shows going on in the community. They also look 
for people who they think stand out and two years ago, I was in a show 
at Crown Point Community Theater called “You’re A Good Man Charlie 
Brown” and I played Sally. I got nominated for Best Featured Actress in 
a musical. I didn’t win, but it was still really cool to have been nominated 
out of a bunch of adults, and I was only fifteen. I got nominated for the 
NIETF for Best Principal Actress in a Musical [for Dorothy, too.] I didn’t 
win, but it was still crazy to have been nominated two years in a row. 

STORY BY: CATHRYN CEARING AND EMMA DIPASQUO, submitted 
photo. 


Christian Ivezic 
Brittany Jacinto 
Taylor Jackson 
Ashley Jadernak 
Casey Jamrock 
Sabrina Janosz 
Jessica Jarach 
Ronald Jessen 

Leonardo Jimenez 
Jayla Jones 
Raphael Jones 
Jessica Joy 
Matthew Jumonville 
Sydney Jureczko 
James Juscik 
Kelsey Kallen 

McKayla Karagias 
Rayyan Karim 
Adam Karr 
Emily Kassie 
Peter Katsiris 
Roger Kaufman 
Veronica Kazmierski 
Amber Keichinger 

Abigail Keith 
Erica Keleman 
Madison Kelly 
Ryan Kenny 
Collin Keylor 
Brianna Khoury 
Jacob Kiefor 
Casondra Kilburn 



222 




































Eva Kimberly 
Madison King 
Michael King 
Benjamin Klebs 
Jacob Kleimola 
Natalia Klekotko 
Alyssa Klootwyk 
Anthony Kludka 

Kyle Koehler 
Kameron Konopasek 
Jacob Koontz 
Matthew Korneck 
Samuel Koster 
Mikala Kotecki 
Timothy Koutropoulos 
Emma Kowalik 

Tyler Kramer-Stephens 
Courtney Kreykes 
Michael Krga 

Jasmine Kroninger-Mackey 
Joshua Krout 
Matthew Kruszewski 
Julia Kruzan 
Logan Kulinski 

Ty Kullmann 
Alexandra Kurivial 
Natalia Kuzbiel 
Phillip Ladd 
Brandon LaGreco 
Sagar Lalla 
Samantha Lane 
Mary Langdon 

Taylor Langwinski 
Jack Larson 
Alexia Laurisch 
Aaron Lawson 
Adam Lechowicz 
James Lee 
Kaitlynn Lemus 
Cody Leonhardt 

Jessica Lewandowski 
Hannah Leyba 
Sarah Livingston 
Gerardo Llano 
Anthony Lloyd 
Heather Loeffler 
Sara Logan 
Jessica Lopez 

Leslie Lopez 
Luzila Lopez 
Mia Lopez 
JaVonte Loving 
Michael Lucas 
Brian Ludke 
Nicholas Luecke 
Milos Lukic 

Lauren Lutes 
Jerald Lyda 
Cameron Macak 
Tyler Maciejewski 
James Macis 
Katherine Maddy 
Trevor Magiera 
Walkere Mago 

Clare Majchrowicz 
Monserrate Maldonado 
John Mamelson 
Jacob Mantel 
Anthony Mantoan 
Martha Mapes 
Morgan Marchi 
Samantha Marino 


ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 223 






































































Abigail Marra 
Rachel Martens 
Cody Martin 
Justice Martin 
Kyle Massa 
Morgan Massei 
Tyler Mathas 
Kayla Mathews 

Timothy Matthews 
Randall Maxie 
Paul Maywald 
Larissa McBride 
Noelle McBride 
Michael McClelland 
Samantha McCormick 
Samantha McCuaig 

Jessica McCullough 
Jayna McDermott 
Aaron McDonald 
Samuel McFarland 
James Mclntire 
Emmanda McKenzie 
Victoria McKenzie 
Solange Medeiros 

Joe Mekhael 
Anthony Meneghetti 
Dominic Meneghetti 
Ashley Merath 
Grace Mercado 
Sean Meyer 
Steven Meyer 
Corey Meyers 

Matthew Mickelson 
Olivia Middleton 
Emily Miklusak 
Aleksandra Miladinovic 
Michael Miller 
Brianna Mills 
Gianna Mills 
Victoria Mink 

Pablo Miranda 
Daniel Mishevich 
Megan Misirly 
Amanda Mitcheltree 
Benjamin Moore 
Haley Moore 
Kennedy Moore 
Alexander Morgan 

Brittany Mori 
Maria Moricz 
Cassandra Morris 
Joseph Morsovillo 
Serena Morton 
Devin Moseley 
Christian Mota 
Brandon Mueller 

Samer Musleh 
David Nathansen 
Nathan Neal 
Timothy Nebel 
Brandon Neff 
Emma Nelson 
Robert Nevarez 
Kara Newell 

Cassidy Niewiadomski 
Logan Nippert 
Kayla Norris-Center 
Ciera Novak 
Elizabeth Nunez 
Nwamaka Nwannunu 
Nickolas Nykiel 
Samuel O’Connor-Thompson 


224 






















































































Monique Ochoa 
Joseph Okwara 
Adeola Oladeinde 
Joshua Olesen 
Monica Oljace 
Rylee Ollearis 
Morgan Olson 
Allison Onest 

Lauren Oparah 
Alexis Orseske 
Antonio Ortiz 
Oscar Ortiz 
Bernardo Oseguera 
Kalie Ostapchuk 
Nicholas Pachowicz 
Miguel Palacios 

Zachary Palaggi 
Katie Palmer 
Michael Palomo 
Tyler Paluszak 
Brianna Panici 
Anastasia Papanikolaou 
Tristan Pappas 
Riley Parks 

Sydney Pasternak 
Nathan Pasyk 
Breanna Patrick 
Daniel Paulauski 
Joseph Pavell 
Payton Pawelski 
Ashley Payne 
Emma Pellegrini 

Bailey Perez 
Manuel Perez 
Nicholas Perez 
KC Perry 

Brandon Peterson 
Nicole Peterson 
Logan Pettenger 
Jenna Pfeiffer 



ack Larson (11) has gone skydiving around five times in the 
' past two years. He dives with groups of people, sometimes 
in tandem, where a rope is attached to everybody. 

Q: Why did you decide to start skydiving? 

A: I already was a scuba diver, so I thought, ‘if I’m doing it underwater, 
why not do it in the sky?’ On the spur of the moment, I was kind of like, 
‘Are there any skydiving places around?’ There was something going on 
at the Lansing Airport. 


Q: How do you know when to pull your parachute in order to land? 

A: [Knowing when to pull the parachute] depends on a couple things. In 
cases of heavy wind, if you’re out there jumping and an updraft picks up, 
they usually tell you a height to pull it at. You don’t want to pull it near the 
ground because when you pull the parachute, it jerks you up because the 
wind is catching. 


Q: Were you afraid to jump out of the plane the first time you skydived? 
A: [When it was time for me to jump] I had that one thing where rationality 
kicks in, and you start seeing people filing out of the plane, and your first 
thought is, ‘Wait, I’m jumping out of this?’ So it wasn’t really a fear, it was 
more of an uncertainty. It’s that worst-case scenario going through your 
head, but eventually you walk up and put your hand on the plane wing. On 
the count of three, if you don’t jump, they’ll push you. I jumped. 



STORY BY: EMILY BADGER AND ELENA GORNEY 
PHOTO BY: EMILY BADGER 



ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 225 

























Kymberly Pierce 
Lucious Pilate 
Sienna Pinskey 
Tristan Pintor 
Adare Pitchford 
Kristina Plaskett 
Paige Plaut 
Hailee Poe 

Nicholas Pokropinski 
Daria Pomiotlo 
Amber Poortenga 
Sara Potkonjak 
Takoda Potts 
Joshua Prather 
Nathan Pratl 
Hannah Pratt 

Nicholas Presta 
Maggie Previs 
Justin Price 
David Prince 
Cameron Prisby 
Tyler Pritchett 
Derek Pruett 
Nathan Puch 

Jeremy Putnam 
Sarianne Pyzik 
Colleen Quinn 
Lexis Quiroz 
Lauren Rademacher 
Katarina Radoja 
Kayla Radtke 
Maxmilian Radziejeski 

Ali Raja 
Angie Ramirez 
Bryant Ramos 
Khiyah Ransom 
Eric Rasmussen 
Antonio Ratliff 
Gage Ray 
Tanner Rechlicz 

Xochitl Regalado 
Alexis Reichart 
Raquel Rembert 
Emily Res 
Emily Rey 
Matthew Reyes 
Reanna Reyes 
Cole Reynolds 

Dallas Richards 
Michael Ridder 
Krysta Rietveld 
Emma Ritchie 
Edgar Rivera 
Jesus Rivera 
Livan Rivera 
Samantha Robinson 

Kay lee Rodell 
Eliasart Rodriguez 
Migdalia Rodriguez 
Tyler Rodriguez 
Brianna Roethler 
Lawrence Rogers 
Shea Rogers 
Dylan Rouhselang 

Vinayak Roy 
Antonietta Ruffolo 
Haley Rugis 
Ryan Ruthrauff 
Joseph Ryder 
Matthew Sabatino 
Daniel Sadural 
Cristian Sahagun 



226 
























































Kady Salapatas 
Cassie Salgado 
Brendan Salus 
Nikolas Sambor 
Alberto Sanchez 
Jennifer Sanchez 
Melanie Sanchez 
Opal Sanchez 

Stephanie Sanders 
Anthony Santiago 
Eric Santiago 
Matthew Sarkisian 
Gillian Saternus 
Alyssa Scanlon 
Julia Schassburger 
Kylee Scheidt 

Nicholas Schmitt 
Chelsey Schmock 
Troy Schneider 
Jennifer Schnurlein 
Dakota Schreiber 
Jeccika Scialabba 
Aaron Scott 
Connor Scott 

Noah Sebenste 
Edwin Seehausen 
Emily Segovia 
Frank Sek 
Brandon Serba 
Niji Shah 
Mariam Shatat 
Haylee Sherlund 

Spencer Shipman 
Justin Shock 
Malek Shuaibi 
Nicholas Sikora 
Mariam Silman 
Haley Skinta 
Damon Sklivas 
Kristina Skvarek 



ften people strive to go beyond what is expected of them, 
and what they personally expect from themselves. Sean 
Meyer (11) is that type of person, especially after he joined 
SLYCE, or the South Shore Leadership Youth for Community En- 

S agement program. 

1: What is the South Shore Leadership Youth for Community Engage¬ 
ment Program? 


A: At SLYCE, there [are] about 50 kids from 25 high schools across 
the region. We listened to different influential speakers, visited different 
towns and we were all assigned a service project that took five months 


to complete. 

Q: Since the club is focused on leadership skills, how has it helped you 
to take charge in your own life? 


A: I learned many different skills that I can apply to everday life, to help 
[myself and my peers] in both social and educational situations. 

Q: As a junior, how has SLYCE helped you better prepare for your future 
after high school? 


A: SLYCE has helped me network with many influential businessmen 
and women from across the region. I’m also able to apply these [new] 
skills to college applications and job interviews. SLYCE was a great op¬ 
portunity and it helped me realize that there are so many opportunities 
to help [develop] one’s leadership skills. 


STORY BY: SARAH BREDAR AND JOVANA DODEVSKA 
PHOTO BY: HANNAH BRYNER 


ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 227 























































Riley Siegers 
Elise Smith 
Robin Smith 
Skyler Smith 
Tyler Smith 
Christopher Smolen 
Gino Solis 
Logan Sommer 

Toni Soria 
Brooke Sotelo 
Chelsie Spiegel 
Romel Spight 
Stephanie Spigolon 
Haley Spindler 
Conrad Spizewski 
Victoria Springman 

Danielle Sprouse 
Brittany St. Germain 
Joshua Stancik 
Anja Stanic 
Stefan Stankovic 
Alyssa Staszewski 
Amber Stedt 
Melanie Stepanovic 

Joshua Sterne 
Milan Stojanovic 
Erin Stovall 
Emma Strohacker 
Colin Studer 
Hannah Studer 
Malik Suleiman 
Steven Sweeney 

Jason Swetlik 
Brian Sytsma 
Randy Tadros 
AndriaTalavera 
Jacob Tano 
Matthew Tao 
Austin Taylor 
Brittany Taylor 




ristan Pappas (11) has the unique talent of being able to 
HI) solve a Rubik’s cube in a short amount of time. He began 
by solving the standard three by three, then advanced to a 
five by five. He can also solve the final steps of a standard Rubik’s 
cube with a blindfold on. 

Q: When did you start learning how to solve a Rubik’s cube? 

A: I started doing this eighth grade year. [I looked things up] at first, 
then I started memorizing the patterns. Pretty much after that, it was just 
repeating the same thing over and over and getting faster and faster at it. 


Q: What’s the secret to solving a Rubik’s cube? 

A: [The way to solve it is] called algorithms.They’re a sequence of move¬ 
ments to get to the next step in the sequence. It’s like a giant equation. 


Q: What is your record time and what are your goals? 

A: [My goal] is to get a faster time. A three by three is a standard Rubik’s 
cube and I can get that done in a minute twenty. I can do it no problem. 
I got a five by five last year for Christmas. I haven’t totally learned how to 
do that one yet. I can only get a few sides. 


Q: How do your friends view your talent? 

A: My friends think it’s kind of weird because nobody can really do that. 
It’s something that you can just do in a crowd of people. I’ve taught other 
people how to do it before. I taught Alex Morgan (11) and my one friend 
who lives in Austria how to do it. It’s just something cool to be able to do. 


STORY BY: GIANNA MILLS, MICHAEL CLARK AND JENNA CRAWFORD 
PHOTO BY: JENNA CRAWFORD 


228 
































































Griffin Taylor 
Matthew Taylor 
Joule Tazbir 
Jonathan Teumer 
George Theodore 
Samuel Thomas 
AlyssaTieri 
ChristinaTipman 

AlyssaTodd 
Michael Toler 
Samantha Torres 
JeannineToth 
Noah Tracy 
Allison Tragnitz 
Aidan Trevino 
Celeste Trevino 

Emily Trichak 
Anthony Tugman 
Bryan Tunis 
Zachary Turnbough 
Richard Tuttle 
Alexandria Tyler 
VersilisTyson 
Tori Ulloa 

Haley Urbani 
Danielle Usak 
Hilary VanderVelde 
Nicole Vanek 
Rachel VanGundy 
Marina Vasquez 
Jerimiah Velazquez 
Dustin Venditti 

Nicole Verdeyen 
Anthony Verduzco 
KelsieVerhoeve 
BriannaVidaurri 
JelenaVranic 
Milica Vranic 
Nikola Vuckovic 
Gwendolyn Wachowski 

Alyssa Wagner 
Donald Wagner 
Brandon Walton 
Trey Wardian 
George Wascher 
David Watkins 
Geena Wauchop 
Justin Weinand 

Emma Weissbeck 
Griffin Welch 
Brian West 
Merrick Westerfield 
Malik Whitaker 
Jeremy White 
Tyler White 
Sabrina Wiater 

Cory Widing 
Anthony Williams 
Jayzhonna Williams 
Trevor Williams 
Trevor Williams 
Edwin Wilson 
Veronica Wing 
Thomas Winker 

Rheanne Wippo 
Spencer Wise 
Brianna Wisniewski 
Jake Wisniewski 
Jessica Wisniewski 
Stephanie Witkowski 
Jacob Witry 
Michael Wojcik 


ONE PEOPLE JUNIOR 229 






































































Kenneth Wolfrum 
William Wyatt 
Matthew Wydrinski 
Lauren Yacono 
KhalidYacoub 
Rachel Yorek 
Madeline Young 
Daniel Zahorsky 

Christopher Zaikos 
Cynthia Zatlokowicz 
Chris Zeheralis 
Breanna Zeller 
Autumn Zendzian 
Christopher Zielinski 
Olivia Zlatic 
Julia Zlotkowski 




ime management can be a challenging concept, espe¬ 
cially in high school. However, Alyssa Scanlon (11) pulls 
off participating in several different extracurricular activi¬ 
ties, while balancing AP and Honors homework. 

Q: How many different activities are you involved in, including during 
school and out of school? 

A: I’m in Dollars for Scholars. Academic Letterwinners, Young Life, Ad¬ 
vance, and I tutor after school. 


Q: How many students do you tutor? 

A: Just one student out of school, but I am in Peer Tutoring, and I am 
directly responsible for about eight freshmen. 

Q: How do you handle playing soccer, attending youth group, tutoring 
the students, managing AP classes and baby-sitting? 


A: I always have about an hour and a half before I start tutoring to get 
some homework done. Soccer is only for two seasons, and during the 
season, I have two practices a week plus games to worry about. I’m 
only in two AP classes, so the work load isn’t horrible as long as I can 
get some of it done at school, and as long as I can get the kids I baby-sit 
to bed at a reasonable time, I can get my homework done. 


Q: Do you have any tips for those who have trouble managing school- 
work, clubs and sports? Which category should be their number one 
priority and which should be last? 


A: Put your schoolwork first, that should be your number one priority 
and clubs and sports come later. If you can’t decide whether to put 
clubs or sports second, I recommend choosing which one would help 
you in the future. 


STORY BY: SARAH BREDAR JOVANA DODEVSKA 
PHOTO BY: SARAH BREDAR 



230 






























1. Colin Chenoweth (12) Photo by: James Lafakis 2.Teigen Breshock (12) Photo by: Sofia Hay 3. 
Christopher Tarnowski (12) Photo by: Madeline Conley 4. Student Section Photo by: JeanmneToth 5. 
Lindsay Kusbel (12) Photo by: Camryn Wallace 6. Krista Vos (12) Photo by: Sara Lisac 7. Kiera Schultz 
(12) and Ali Raja (12) Photo by: Sofia Hay 8. Alyssa Born (12) Photo by: Madeline Hirschfield 

PAGE BY: MADELINE HIRSCHFIELD 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 231 
















Andrea Abramowicz 
Demitra Adams 
Eric Ainsley 
Olivia Alexander 
Aaron Ali 
Monica Almeida 


Gabrielle Aloia 
Guadalupe Alvarado 
Hannah Anderson 
Carolyn Andrews 
Gabriella Angellotti 
Matthew Applegate 


Nicholas Applegate 
Anthony Arenas 
Christian Arenas 
Charles Badillo 
Emily Baginski 
Alex Baker 


Sarah Banasiak 
Joshua Barajas 
Teresa Baranowski 
Taylor Barchi 
Megan Barenie 
Logan Barnes 


Derek Barnett 
Nicholas Barrera 
Gabrielle Barrett 
Jocelyn Bathurst 
Nicole Batres 
Alison Beck 


Taylor BeDuhn 
Zachary Beemsterboer 
Lauren Behrens 
Joshua Bell 
Robert Belzeski 
Sarah Benedict 


Cheyenne Benko 
Jared Benson 
Myiah Bermingham 
Nikolas Beushausen 
Brandon Bianco 
Nicholas Biegel 



232 






















































































Emily Birlson 
Holly Blair 
Brandon Blanchard 
Austin Bodell 
Victor Bolivar 
Alyssa Born 


Samantha Born 
Ana Boulas 
Nicole Boulazeris 
Nathan Bowdish 
Grant Bradtke 
Ashley Brandner 


Nicholas Brandner 
Kevin Brandt 
Teigen Breshock 
James Broad 
Lindsey Brooker 
Devonte Brooks 


ome students never get the chance to see anything outside 
of Northwest Indiana. Luis Cortez (12), however, was not 
only able to spend his summer studying outside of the 
region, but outside of the country. 

Q: How long were you in Spain, and what was it for? 

A: I was there for seven weeks. It was through IUHPFL, which is a high 
school study abroad program through IU. They have program sites in 
Spain, France, Germany, Chile, Mexico and China. 

Q: What made you choose to study in Spain? 

A: I just felt that there was more history, more places to see [and] it’s safer 
and [there is] the opportunity to learn the most there. I’ve also always 
wanted to go to Europe. 

Q: What was your favorite part about the trip? 

A: Probably living with my host family. There were about 30 other kids 
that went to the same city that I did. Each of us had our own family. I had 
a mom and a dad and a six-year-old brother. 

Q: What did you do during the trip? 

A: During the week, we had school. We took culture, literature, commu¬ 
nication and grammar. On the weekends we traveled around the rest of 
Spain. We went to Granada, Cordoba, Toledo and Madrid. Any free time 
we had we would hang out with our families or with the group friends. 
Q: If you had the chance to do something like this again, would you? 
A: Yeah, of course. I hope to study abroad again in Spain in college. 

Q: How did you get involved with this program? What do you have to do 
to be able to participate? 


M: I heard about it from my Spanish teacher. You must have three years 
of a foreign language to be eligible. If you pass, you are invited to take a 
placement test. If you pass that, you fill out an application. After my app 
got accepted, I got called in for an interview that was half in Spanish, 
half in English. A week after, I was acccepted into the program and had 
to attend an orientation at IU in May to meet everyone. 



STORY BY: ERIN DOSEN, submitted photo. 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 233 


















































Sara Brooks 
Kayla Broussard 
Kevin Brown 
Kelly Browne 
Hannah Bryner 
Ariana Bulett 


Matthew Burgess 
Maria Bushey 
Emily Bustamante 
Brian Butler 
Alyssa Camarillo 
Alyssa Cardinal 


Courtney Carlson 
Frank Cary 
Brianna Cassidy 
Maritza Castaneda 
Jonathan Casto 
Cathryn Cearing 


Guadalupe Cervantes 
Joseph Chatel 
Colin Chenoweth 
Lorenzo Childs 
Alexandria Christensen 
Christine Chung 


Joseph Cinko 
Marissa Clark-Debutch 
Emily Classen 
Hannah Classen 
Adam Cobban 
Sarah Colby 


Madeline Conley 
Samantha Copeland 
Reese Coros 
Justin Cortez 
Luis Cortez 
Cassidy Coyle 


Ryan Dahlkamp 
Concetta Dalsanto 
Jack DalSanto 
Laura Danesean 
Alexandria Davids 
Veronica Davis 



234 


























































































# ollin Gillespie (12) has lived his whole life with epilepsy. 
He was diagnosed at a three years old, and when he was 
a freshman, he had to give up the thing he loved most: 
football. 

Q: How did you find out you were diagnosed with epilepsy? 

A: It started when I was six months old. I had a seizure and couldn’t stop 
shaking. I kept having them, and then [my family] took me to the doctor. 
They found out that at the age of three I had epilepsy. They did a bunch 
of tests and found a scar that couldn’t be cured. My freshman year, I had 
10 tests to find out that I had a tear in my brain, and surgery was the only 
way to fix it. I went to see the surgeon, and he gave me only a week to 
prepare, and then he did surgery. 

Q: What were some obstacles, and how did you face them? 

A: I wanted to play football, but they told me I couldn’t anymore. At first 
it was hard, but my brother had knee surgery and couldn’t play either, so 
he helped me. Faith was a big part of getting through it. I was told there 
were better things than football, and I just went on. 

Q: How long did you play football before high school? 

A: I played 10 years for Tri-Town. 

Q: How do you feel overcoming this has helped you? 

A: [Overcoming being told I can’t play] has helped me become a better 
man. 


Q: Do you do anything with the football team now even though you 
can’t play on it? 

A: I have helped out since sophmore year. I helped out with [Coach Brett 
St. Germain] with whatever he needed to be done, kind of like a manager. 


STORY BY: TABITHA PAPPAS, EMMA DEGROOT AND ASHLEY KRALIK, 
submitted photo. 




Haley Decker 
Margaret Delis 
Ryan Delis 
Taylor Devine 
Stephen Diamantos 
Jorey Dimopoulos 


Sarah Dingman 
Gina DiNino 
Andrew Dittrich 
Matthew Djordjevich 
Jillian Doan 
Chase Doescher 


Taylor Doetterl 
Alisha Donovan 
Kristina Donovan 
Jeffrey Dorsch 
Erin Dosen 
Brianna Dougherty 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 235 





















































Autumn Dransoff 
Jacob Dunn 
Joshua Dunn 
Taylor Eagle 
Hayley Edgcomb 
Courtni Edmonds 


Jennifer Einterz 
Danielle Ellis 
Taylor Ellis 
Brady Extin 
Delaney Fagan 
Kaitlyn Fassoth 


Ashley Ferguson 
Meridith Fionda 
Ryan Fisher 
Katelyn Flanagan 
Michael Flores 
Nicole Flores 


Sean Flynn 
Emma Ford 
Dominic Foushi 
Justin Fox 
Nicolas Frassinone 
Zachery Fredrickson 



236 



t three o’clock in the morning on Oct. 14, Nathan Bowdish 
(12) was woken up by his mother, not any smoke detectors, 
with the news that their house was on fire. 

Q: During this whole situation, what was the scariest part? 

A: I walked around to the back of the house and I [thought], If I had 
woken up in the middle of a blazing room, that would have been the 
most terrifying thing. But, my most terrifying experience [was] hearing 
the curtains fall. You hear a crash, then that’s another curtain falling. You 
can see the flames coming up and eating up the curtain and it crashes. 
Q: Who helped you through this situation? 

A: Our neighbors were so helpful. I woke them up after mom was calling 
[911]. Our neighbors brought out coats and shoes. Our neighbors were 
so generous. That same day we called some friends. They had a guest 
bedroom, the mother and daughter were away so we each had our own 
room. I had my room, my sister had her room and then my parents had 
their own room. We didn’t even have to struggle with fighting over space. 
Q: How severe was the damage? 

A: They got the fire out, but by then it had almost wiped out the sunroom, 
the kitchen was nearly destroyed and the living room had severe damage. 
Everything else was smoke damage. We had a cat, but I’ll be honest, 
I would much rather have my sister be okay than my cat. A cat can be 
replaced my sister can’t. 


STORY BY: BREANNA DOBOS, KRISTINA PLASKETT, AND MEGAN 
HELFERS, submitted photo. 


































































Gabrielle Frigo 
Morgan Gallas 
Marcus Garcia 
Hailey Garlich 
Jacob Garza 
Ashley Gayton 


Kevin Geiser 
Nicholas Gellinger 
Michelle Gergets 
Nicholas Gerlach 
Jacklyn Gerling 
Jessica Gerling 


Alessandra Giannetta 
Timothy Giazzon 
Hannah Giese 
Isabella Giovane 
Meghan Godinez 
Haley Golec 


Ethan Gomez 
Gabrielle Gomez 
Eric Gonsiorowski 
Brian Gonzalez 
Melia Gonzalez 
Adam Gorman 


Emil Govani 
Katlynn Grace 
Marissa Grantham 
Alyssa Graves 
Jacob Graziani 
Deni Grgic 


Sarah Grimier 
Hallie Grimmer 
Nicholas Grimmer 
Tyler Gruthusen 
Nicole Guillermo 
Kara Guinn 


Jacob Guizar 
Melanie Gurney 
Gina Gutierrez 
Benjamin Guzek 
Kayla Hallowell 
Tarah Hamby 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 237 




























































































hrough her church, Emily Birlson (12) had the opportunity 
to volunteer on a mission trip for the first time. She and 
about 25 others spent a week in the Dominican Republic, 
where they worked at an orphanage and helped rebuild the com¬ 
munity around it. After Christmas, Birlson will return to the same 
area to reconnect with the children she fell in love with during the 
week she was away. 

Q: What did you do while you were in the Dominican Republic? 

A: We stayed at an orphanage and we volunteered there and played 
with the kids. [We] helped build different buildings around the orphanage. 
Then we went out into the community, and we helped build a house there 
because it was all rundown. It was [a] super, super poor [area]. 

Q: What was that experience like for you? 

A: It was like nothing else. It wasn’t anything I expected. I knew I was 
[going to] see poverty, but I guess I didn’t realize how bad it really is until 
[I was] actually there. 

Q: How has it influenced who you are today? 

A: I don’t take anything for granted, like the fact that I live in St. John and 
have a nice house and my parents have jobs. It makes you really realize 
and be thankful for what you have. 

Q: What was your favorite part about the trip? 

A: I loved playing with the kids because they don’t have parents. They just 
have each other. All they really want is to be loved and to hold your hand. 

I fell in love with this little boy, and he would hold my hand wherever we 
went. He was only like seven. Leaving him was really hard because I got 
onto the bus, and we said goodbye. Then I hear my name being called, 
and he’s out there with his hand reaching for me to touch it. 

STORY BY: CASSIDY NIEWIADOMSKI, submitted photo. 


Omar Hamed 
Kayla Harris 
Rebecca Hasley 
Kyle Hayes 
Alexandra Hecht 
Alexis Hernandez 


Tyler Hires 
Jason Holechko 
Joseph Holman 
Connor Homans 
Christian Huber 
Ethan Hunt 


Emma Hupp 
Andrea Hynek 
Kawthar Issa 
Ty Jacobson 
Taylor Jagiella 
Jacob Jakubowicz 



238 














































Cayla Jansky 
Joseph Jansky 
Thomas Januchowski 
Rachel Jensen 
Tiffany Jessup 
Juliet Johnson 


Jacob Johnston 
Marisa Jones 
Cameron Jung 
Kristen Kaiser 
Eric Kaminsky 
Jacob Kamykowski 


Angelina Kapetanov 
Annabel Karberg 
Navneet Kaur 
Taryn Keels 
Hannah Keith 
Emma Keleman 


Jorie Kelley 
Brendan Kelly 
Morgan Kelly 
Cheyanne Kessler 
Christopher Keylor 
Ariel Khalil 


Gurleen Khatra 
Nicholas Kiepura 
Kyle Kil 
Arthur Kimber 
Joshua Kirby 
Samuel Kirmani 


Jessica Knerler 
Elaine Knizek 
April Koepke 
Connor Konieczka 
Andrea Kowalewicz 
Kaitlyn Krachenfels 


Cole Krakowiak 
Sarah Krasek 
Thaddeus Kraska 
Megan Krol 
Elizabeth Krysinski 
Michaela Krysinski 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 239 






























































































Jack Kuehner 
Lindsay Kusbel 
Jessica Ladowski 
James Lafakis 
Logan Lambert 
Alyssa Langwinski 


Ariel Lara 
Ronald Lee 
Austin Lessentine 
Laura LeVander 
Jennifer Lindholm 
Sara Lisac 


Gianni Lockhart 
Johan Londono 
Brandon Long 
Chrissa Lopez 
Isabel Lopez 
Yunuen Lopez 


Chase Lowden 
Aaron Ludwig 
Ryan Lulich 
Alejandro Luna 
Jesus Luna 
Monica Luna 


Sara Lunsford 
Samira Lyons _ 
Nicole Maciolek 
Taylor Mack 
Adam Madouros 
Krista Magurany 


Jeremy Maluchnik 
Carmela Marciano 
Jacob Marcinek 
Alyssa Marcinkovich 
llija Marinkovic 
Kurtis Markiewicz 


Lauren Markulin 
Brett Marovich 
Brianna Martin 
Ian Martin 
Alexis Martinez 
Sarah Martinez 












































































































Noelle Matasovsky 
Daniel Matchain 
Samuel Matchain 
Kyle Mathews 
Charles Matlon 
Jacob Mavity 


Gloria Maxwell 
James Mays 
Nicholas Mazon 
Ryan McCallister 
Aidan McCambridge 
Celine McCormack 


Kyleigh McCoy 
Lainautica McCoy 
Mariah McGee 
Ian McGrath 
Marlee McGrath 
Riley McGrath 


Taylor McKeller 
Miranda McNeiley 
Marisa Mendoza 
Alejandra Meraz 
Jose Merced 
Jaren Mercer 



essica Nelson (12) has been living a healthy lifestyle since 
I the end of her sophomore year. Nelson exercises rigorously 
and is constantly trying to improve herself. 

Q: What is the most difficult aspect of living a healthy lifestyle? 

A: [The hardest aspect is] the comparing part.You’re in the gym and you 
see people that look better than you, and you’re constantly comparing 
yourself no matter what. There is always going to be someone better 
than you. It all comes down to your mindset, and you have to overcome 
those thoughts. 

Q: What are your ultimate goals? 

A: In the future, I would like to compete either in body-building or power- 
lifting. I would just like to compete and not even more for the fact of 
winning. I mean, it would be nice to win, but more for the fact of feeling 
the accomplishment of getting that far. 


Q: Do you have any words of advice for those who want to start working 
out and living a fit lifestyle? 

A: Don’t be afraid to lift; that is the biggest thing, especially for girls. 
They’re terrified to lift. They think it’s going to make them manly, but it 
won't. Just lifting a little bit of weight is not going to make you big. Don't 
go to extremes with your eating. It restricts you from life and from family. 
Learn to enjoy it. Don’t work out because you hate your body, work out 
because you love your body and want to make it better. 


STORY BY AND PHOTO BY: HANNAH SONNER 



ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 241 









































































Summer Merriman 
Marc Mertsching 
Cassidy Michau 
Bailey Micka 
Benjamin Migliorati 
Carlie Mikuly 


Nikola Mileusnic 
Noah Miller 
Ashley Millette 
Sarah Milzarek 
Jennifer Mohamed 
Alexis Morales 


Mateo Morales 
Danielle Morang 
George Morris 
Makayla Morris 
Hailey Mueller 
Dana Mularski 


Mario Munoz 
Alexis Murphy 
Nicholas Murphy 
Jacob Navarra 
Erin Navarro 
Jessica Nelson 


Blake Newell 
Brooke Neyhart 
Mitchell Nickolaou 
Alexander Nisle 
Michael Norcutt 
Aspyn Novak 


Mara Nunez 
Ugonna Nwannunu 
Ashley Nylen 
Gage O’Connor 
Amanda O’Drobinak 
Quinn O’Keefe 


Ashley O’Malley 
Michael Opperman 
Chelsea Oprea 
Anthony Osorio 
Ryan Palkon 
Mathew Palm 



242 


























































































yan Jones (12) spent the past year playing for the Lincoln 
Stars in the USHL junior hockey league. This summer, he 
has been invited to the Chicago Blackhawks Combine on 
June 8th-10th. 

Q: When did you start playing hockey and what inspired you to play? 
A: I started playing hockey when I was 6 years old. My brothers were 
the main reason I started playing the sport. I would always watch them 
play and began to fall in love with the game. 

Q: What do you like most about playing hockey? 

A: The thing I like most about playing hockey is winning. It is the great¬ 
est feeling knowing you did whatever it took to make sure your team 
won. Also everyone on the team is happy so it’s always agood time in 
the locker room. 

Q: What position do you play and what does your position do? 

A: I play defensemen and the main objective for me is to do anything in 
my power to keep the opposing team from scoring. It’s a tough task, but 
you become better and it gets easier the more you work at it. 

Q: How has your highschool hockey experience been like and what 
sacfrices did you have to make to continue your journey to the Leauge? 
A: My high school experience has been a wild one. I was at Lake Central 
as a Freshman and a Sophmore. Junior year I moved down to Fishers, 
Indiana to play for a team I knew would be able to help my pursue my 
career even further. My senior year, I moved to Lincoln Nebraska to play 
in the best junior league in the United States. I knew in my heart I couldn’t 
pass up this opportunity, so I pursued it. It has been a crazy experience 
so far living with different families that at first were complete strangers 
to me. I would never go back and do anything differently because these 
have honestly been the best years of my life. 


Anthony Panozzo 
Quinn Paprocki 
David Park 
Piotr Parol 
Nicholas Pass 
Damian Patitsas 


Joseph Paulas 
David Paulauski 
Kelly Paulson 
Robert Pawlak 
Samuel Payne 
Nicole Pelc 


Brandon Peoples 
Abigail Peppin 
Christopher Perez 
Rachael Peterson 
Austen Phelps 
Anessa Pinon 


PEOPLE SENIOR 243 





RYAN JONES 


STORY BY: NATHAN ZAJAC, submitted photo. 














































Ashlyn Plants 
Tyler Platusic 
Kevin Plenus 
Andrew Pluskis 
Austin Polak 
Joellyn Polaski 


Raymond Pollalis 
Taryn Polled 
Tiffany Polyak 
Jennifer Popiela 
Madelyn Potucek 
Nicholas Poulos 


Breanna Powers 
Ryan Powers 
McKaya Pozzi 
Austin Praski 
Antonio Presta 
Alayna Prisby 


Tabitha Prowse 
Dillon Pryszcz 
Michael Pryszcz 
Brittany Rabatine 
Samuel Radjenovich 
Christi Raichle 




ith all of the stress that comes with being a senior, Kassie 
'XjLjr) Woodworth (12) finds solace in her artwork. Woodworth 
has been interested in art since she could hold a pencil, 
and she plans on continuing her work in her future. 

Q: How did you first become interested in art? 

A: Ever since I was little, my mom always kind of did art. (She did] not 
really draw, but she was always creative. I was always creative, and I 
learned about the AP program. I was suggested, kind of nominated, to 
do it so I got into that. 

Q: Do you plan on pursuing art in the future? What brought you to this 
conclusion? 


A: I plan on double-majoring at IUPUI in art and forensic science because 
I’m not going to be a starving artist. I’m not going to do just art. I wanted 
to do something else, and I took the [Forensic Science] class here last 
year, and I was really interested in that. 

Q: What type of projects are you interested outside of the classroom? 
A: I actually just did this project with burning a canvas and stitching it 
back together. Out of school, I kind of experiment with things and not 
only just paintings. I do a lot in my sketchbook. I cut layers and layers of 
the sketchbook to where, when you close the sketchbook and you open 
the first page, it’s a picture but everything’s cut out. 


STORY AND PHOTO BY: NOELLE MCBRIDE 

244 


























































Andres Ramirez 
Benjamin Rangel 
Helena Raptis 
Asia Reed 
Hannah Reed 
Maxwell Rees 


Brooke Renner 
Zachary Retske 
Daniel Revoir 
Kyle Rhein 
Ashley Richards 
Kylie Richardson 


Krysta Rietveld 
Dino Rinaldi 
Andrew Ring 
Amanda Roberts 
David Robinson 
Daniel Rodda 


Raina Rolak 
Jordan Rosenwinkel 
Casey Ruberry 
Jacob Rubick 
Gina Rubino 
Richard Rucinski 


Tess Ruzga 
Ryan Ryba 
Morgan Sabatini 
Carlos Salas 
Ricardo Salgado 
Daniel Sanchez 


Lucas Sanchez 
Melissa Sancya 
Tyler Satkowski 
Amy Sayger 
Leah Scartozzi 
Jeffery Schafer 


Abigail Scherer 
Hannah Scherer 
Sydney Scherzinger 
Sarah Scheub 
Andrew Schmied 
Chelsey Schmock 


ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 245 





























































































lenty of people at Lake Central believe that they have 
I “heart.” Jacob Graziani (12), however, brings a whole new 
meaning to the phrase. When he was young, he had sur- 

8 ery to implant a pacemaker into his heart. 

1: How old were you when you had the surgery? 


A: I was six. Water triggered [the issue) for me, like swimming in cold 
water. I had Long Q.T., which is a type of irregular heart rhythm, so caused 
by the water, it would trigger the irregular heart rhythm. 

Q: What kinds of symptoms do you remember having? 

A: At the time I didn’t know [I was having symptoms at all.] I was just a kid 
playing in the water. I would just start seeing lights and would pass out. I 
wouldn’t even notice [I was having problems.) I would wake up after the 
fact like nothing even happened [while] my parents would be freaking out. 
Q: How does having a pacemaker affect you now? 

A: Some of the things are that magnets trigger it. I can’t be around 
strong magnets or weak magnets. You’re not supposed to hold a phone 
near it, or like when you go into stores and they have the beepers, you’re 
not supposed to stand near those. When I go through customs [at the 
airport,] I can’t go through the metal detector. I have to get the pat-down. 
Q: Do you think there are any misconceptions about having heart surgery 
or having a pacemaker? 

A: Some people think that [pacemakers] are for older people or like people 
who are close to death, which I mean I was [before I got it.] I mean, I’m 
pretty far from that now. I’m not going to a retirement home anytime soon. 


STORY AND PHOTO BY: CATHRYN CEARING 


Joseph Schneider 
Madison Schroeder 
Collin Schuler 
Kiera Schultz 
Nicholas Schulz 
Ryan Schulz 


Brandon Scott 
Jeffery Scott 
Jessica Sellers 
Kaitlin Sheets 
Sherry Shibu 
Kylie Shoemake 


Morgan Shoemaker 
Scott Sieved 
Jazmyn Sills 
Shane Smelser 
Courtney Smith 
Darian Smith 



246 














































Sarah Smith 
Samuel Sobun 
Lindsey Solan 
Dhruv Solanki 
Joshua Soliday 
Nicolas Solis 


Hannah Sonner 
Danielle Soucie 
Sarah Sowinski 
Jackson Spanburg 
Melissa Spanier 
Alexander Sparling 


Nina Spata 
Ashleigh Sprehe 
Brian St. John 
Emily Stafford 
Elizabeth Stefaniak 
Stephanie Stefano 


Alyssa Stepney 
Jacob Stewart 
Jessica Stewart 
Lauren Stockman 
Brandilyn Stockton-Fres 
Elnora Stroud 


Francesca Stuchlak 
Bryan Studniarz 
Chrystian Studzinski 
Joseph Stulgate 
Emily Stutler 
LeAnn Stutler 


Luke Sutherland 
Jessica Swatosh 
Brian Sweeney 
Jeremy Swetlik 
Elizabeth Swets 
Tiffany Tao 


Christopher Tarnowski 
Jacob Taylor 
Nicholas Taylor 
Andrew Tellas 
Nikola Tepsic 
Andrea Terrazas 


PEOPLE SENIOR 247 








































































































Joseph Testa 
Michael Tiller 
Nicholas Tocci 
Erin Todd 
Daniel Torres 
Kaleb Toweson 


Raygen Travis 
TaShara Travis 
SaraTrembczynski 
Hannah Triveline 
Sarah Triveline 
Branden Truver 


Kazimierz Trybunia 
Andrew VanDenburgh 
Bryan Vanderlee 
AllysonVanek 
Jesse Veloz 
Evan Vend I 


EmalieVernengo 
Jacob Vervlied 
Surya Vezhavendan 
KyleVIcek 
Krista Vos 
Andrew Voss 


Jessica Vrbanoff 
Michaela Vuckovic 
Emma Waddell 
Emily Wagenaar 
Alayna Wallace 
Gabrielle Wallington 


Kathryn Walsh 
Andi Wartman 
Michelle Weber 
Schyler Weiss 
Joshua Weissbeck 
Ryan Wells 


Erin West 
Kyle West 
Collin Westerman 
Nicholas Widlowski 
Ryan Wiebe 
Joseph Wiechart 



248 
























































































Etura Williams 
Samuel Willis 
Sandra Willoughby 
Rachel Willy 
Jillian Wilschke 
Jamiere Wilson 


Jarea Wilson 
Lauryn Winarski 
Amber Winborn 
Karl Wing 
Elayne Wisniewski 
Anthony Wojcik 


Jennifer Wojcik 
Ryan Wojcik 
Kassie Woodworth 
Carrie Young 
Megan Zajac 
Nathan Zajac 


Eustina Zakher 
Vincent Zamora 
Amanda Zendzian 
Tara Zlotkowski 
Mia Zubeck 
Candace Zummak 


tudents have many opportunities to help them decide 
IwSy what they want to pursue in college. Brianna Martin (12) 
participates in Exploratory Teaching at Homan Elementrary 
School. 

Q: What made you choose to participate in exploratory teaching? 

A: I was undecided in my major for college and my counselor, Ms. 
[Melissa] St. Clair, told me that she thought I was really good with kids 
and thought teaching would be a good option for me so she recom¬ 
mended this program. 

Q: Do you enjoy your time during exploratory teaching? 

A: I love it. There is definitely many different personalities for being in 
kindergarten. You would think it is easy, but there actually is more to it 
than just playing games all day. There is a lot of learning for myself from 
kids and teaching them as well. 

Q: What’s the best part about being a part of this program? 

A: My favorite thing is that I get to spend my whole day with the kids. 
Whatever I do with college and the rest of my life, I would like to be sur¬ 
rounded by kids. It might just be because I consider myself a big kid. 

Q: Now that you have had this experience, do you plan to pursue teach¬ 
ing in college? 

A: As much as I like it here I would say that I am still undecided just 
because there are a lot of things that I want to have my options open for. 
Education was my second option after applying undecided everywhere. 

STORY AND PHOTO BY: HANNAH GIESE 



ONE PEOPLE SENIOR 249 






































































AUSTIN PRASKI 

MARIA BUSHEY 

Thank you for 

We are very 

proud of you and 
C Jr.-j Tj your accomplish- 

^ ments! 

Love you more 
y each day! 

” Dad, Mom and 

Trenton 

^ Congratulations 
to our wonderful 

daughter. We are 

so proud of you. 

work hard, follow 

you to the moon 
■ and back. 

Mom and Dad 

KYLIE SHOEMAKE 

BRADY EXTIN 

Dream big and 
don’t let anything 
hold you back! 

You have an 
exciting future 
-\j^ ahead of you! 

We are so proud 
of you and all 

V° ur accom¬ 
plishments! 

Good luck at 

1 am SO P roud of 
™ you, Brady! You 
■ amaze me every 
/ ! day! Remember 
f S ! t0 alwa Y s give 

; 

1 1 you will 

\ ■ JL 111 go far m Ihe. 

f||H Love you' 

Love. 

^ H Mom 

Valpo! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad and 
Hannah 




RYAN BERTOSSI 


Ryan, you are and have 
become an amazing 
person, as demonstrated 
through your perseverance, 
compassion, dedication 
and independence. We 
have no doubt that your 
journey through IUB will 
exceed your dreams and 
expectations. We are over 
the top proud of you! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 
Sorry about the dog 



Our beautiful daughter 
Taylor, 

we cannot be more proud 
of you. You have had 
a plan for your life and 
never faltered. As you 
continue your journey 
through college (GO 
PURDUE) just know that 
we will always and forever 
be here to support you. 
Stay the strong princess 
you are. 

Love always, Mom, Dad 
and Nicole 


TAYLOR DOETTERL 


FRANCESCA STUCHLAK 


JACOB STEWART 


JACOB GARZA 



Francesca, your father and 
I are very proud of you. Your 
smile and ability to make us 
laugh is a blessing. You have 
worked hard and now you 
have to take your next big 
step. There will always be 
obstacles, road blocks and 
detours in your way. It is how 
you handle those situations 
that makes you the person 
you will become. Never give 
up fighting for what you 
believe in. We both love you 
very much and want the best 
for you. 

Love Mom and Dad 



Miss this little 
guy, but are SO 
proud of who YOU 
have become. 
Congratulations 
on this milestone 
in your life. Follow 
your dreams! 

Love you, 

Mom, Dad, 

Alyssa and Oreo 


Proud of you 

^ A; 

Love 

k.B - MM Mom 


ANTHONY AND 
CHRISTIAN ARENAS 

To my first born, 
my double bundle 
of Joy. We are 
proud of all you 
have achieved. 
Follow your 
dreams toward 
accomplishing the 
goals you have set. 
May God continue 
to bless you and 
direct your path. 

We love you dearly, 
Mom and Dad 


ALYSSA CARDINAL 

You have 
truely been 
a blessing 
in my life. I 
am proud of 
you everyday. 
Love, Mom. 

I am very 
proud of 
you. Looking 
forward to 
your future 
achievements. 
Love, Dad. 




250 
















MADISON SCHROEDER 

Madison, 

It’s hard to believe you 
are graduating high 
school... when it feels 
like just yesterday we 
were bringing you home 
from the hospital. We are 
so proud of the young 
woman you’ve become 
and can’t wait to see 
what the next chapter in 
your life will bring. The 
moment you entered the 
world was the moment 
we began to realize our 
role here, for although 
we may hold many 
titles, none trump that of 
“parent.” Thank you for 
the great ride Madison, 
you are truly an incredi¬ 
ble person who is bound 
for further greatness... We thank God for you everyday. 




Kyle, 

Wow senior year. You 
have grown up right 
before our eyes from a 
wild, crazy little boy to 
the most caring, funny, 
loving man. Follow your 
dreams and reach for 
the stars. We love you 
to the moon and back. 
Love Always, 

Mom, Al, Kayla and 
Kaitlyn 


KYLE MATHEWS 




You’ll always be our cool, 
blue-eyed baby girl! We’re 
very proud of all your hard 
work and we know you’ll 
be a great success at 
Ball State! Your future’s 
so bright, you gotta wear 
shades! Keep smiling, 
enjoy the ride and don’t 
forget to pack your sippy 
cup! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Corinne, and 
Max (Woof!) 


JULIAN WILSCHKE 


TIFFANY POLYAK 




Brittany, it seems like 
yesterday that we were 
blessed with you. You 
have a kind and gener¬ 
ous heart. You have a 
bright future ahead of 
you. Keep your sense of 
wonder and never forget 
who you are. Stay true 
to your heart. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 


BRITTANY RABATINE 



Kelly, 

How quickly our beauti¬ 
ful has baby grown to be 
such an amazing young 
woman. We truly admire 
your focus and drive in 
all you do, and know you 
can do anything you set 
your mind to. Always 
know how much we love 
you and are so proud 
of you. Above all, stay 
happy and be true to 
yourself. 

Love, Mom and Dad 


BABY ADS 251 






























KATELYN 

FLANAGAN 



Katelyn, I am 
so very proud 
of you. You 
are a beautiful 
young woman 
and have 
accomplished 
so much, yet 
so much more 
awaits! I love 
you. Mom 


Congratulations Christi! We 
could not be more proud of the 
beautiful young woman you 
have become. As you begin the 
next chapter of your life, remem¬ 
ber the sky is the limit! Always 
follow your heart and reach for 
the stars! We love you beyond 
words. Love, Mom and Dad 


KAYLA HILL 



Isn’t she lovely? 
The world is 
yours to con¬ 
quer! Our baby 
girl! 

Love you, 

Mom and Dad 


We are so proud of the beautiful young woman 
you have become. Your achievements continue 
to amaze us. We wish you an abundance of love, 
happiness and success in whatever the future 
holds. Continue to reach for the stars! 

Love, 

Dad, Mom, Lauren and Mia 


GINA DININO 




You are an amazing young 
man who has made us so 
proud in many ways. 

Your energy, free spirit and 
sense of humor make you 
a special person and a 
wonderful son and brother. 
Stay true to your faith, do 
your best. Success and 
happiness will be your 
reward. 

We love you very much! 
Mom, Dad and Luke 


CHRISTI RAICHLE 


QUINN PAPROCKI 


MEGAN KROL 

Megan, it wasn’t too long ago 
you were excited to start school 
and now you are graduating. We 
are so proud of you always giving 
100% in academics and athlet¬ 
ics. We have thoroughly enjoyed 
watching you all these years as 
you have excelled in whatever you 
put your mind to. As you move 
forward into the next phase of 
your life, always be confident and 
determined and you will achieve 
great success and happiness. We 
wish you the best of life, Meg, and 
love you with all our hearts. 

Mom and Dad 




MORGAN 

SHOEMAKER 

Morgan, 

We wish you 
the best of 
luck as you say 
goodbye to LC 
and hello to 
IU... Enjoy every 
memorable 
moment! With 
love and pride, 
Mom, Dad & Bri 


RAYMOND 

POLLALIS 

Raymond, 

I ,u 

lilMS'S' * : , llflI - OIJ> ; 1 rear' - 

SKhT 1! We are are 

WLj JB H prc 

■r Love. Mo" 

and 




Joseph, we’re so very proud of the young man you 
have become and everything that you have accom¬ 
plished in your four years at Lake Central. Good 
Luck in college even though WE KNOW you will be successful in whatever 
you do. 

Love you Forever... Mom, Dad, Andrew, Carley and Bella. 


JOSEPH JANSKY 


252 


















DEVONTE BROOKS 




MARITZA 

CASTANEDA 


We are so proud of 
the smart young lady 
you have become. 

You always strive for 
perfection in all you do. 
We have no doubt that 
you’ll be successful in 
whatever you choose 
to pursue. Enjoy your 
college experience 
and create your own 
special memories! We 
Love YOU! 

Mom and Dad 



Congratulations. A 
good attitude and 
positive thinking will 
help you achieve 
your future goals. 
Continue working 
hard and success 
will find you. May 
your graduation 
from school be 
the beginning of a 
bright future. 

Love, 

Mom and Manuel 



EMILY BUSTAMANTE 



Emily, we are so proud 
to call you our daugh¬ 
ter. You have amazed 
us over the last 17 
years and continue to 
amaze us every day 
with your confidence, 
strength and deter¬ 
mination. You truly 
are a beautiful person 
inside and out. We look 
forward to watching 
your success at IU and 
everything thereafter. 
Love, Mom, Dad and 
the kids 


Hannah, it has been an 
absolute joy to watch 
you grow into such a 
sweet and caring young 
lady. You have a bright 
future ahead of you, so 
do what you love and 
follow your dreams. 
Remember, time passes 
quickly, so live life to the 
fullest, be smart and 
enjoy each moment. We 
are so proud of you and 
love you so much! 

Mom, Dad and Rachel 




Jennifer, 

We were so excited to 
welcome our baby girl 
into our lives 18 years 
ago. It seems like only 
yesterday we carried 
you around while 
waiting tables at our 
restaurant. Now you 
are an independent young woman about to start a new adventure. 

We are so proud of all your hard work and your dedication to school. 
We know you will do just as well in college and beyond. Remember to 
take the time to enjoy your youth and have fun while you pursue your 
goals. Chuc con thanh cong va hanh phuc. Congratulations from your 
family! 



ERIN DOSEN 


Our Erin! How time 
has flown!! We can’t 
say enough about how 
much you’ve grown 
these past four years 
or how much we’re 
going to miss you. 
Never be scared to 
take a leap of faith and 
follow your heart. You 
deserve all the world 
has to offer! Mom, Dad 
and Ryan 



BABY ADS 253 




















EST. 



where sport never stops 

3PARTADOME 


,■«©> 


1953 


STOP^SHQP 

J71cat t7la*kmt 


11333 West 95th Street 
Saint John, Indiana 46373 


League and Rentals 

soccer, baseball, softball, 
lacross and more 

info@spartadome.com 

www.spartadome.com 


/t&iaCute 

For A Healthier you! 

Or. CW Um A Sum 


JILLBECK *1 




DR. CORLIN STEIN 

DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTICS 


Fast Pain Relief for Acute 
and Chronic Pain 
Short Term Treatment Plans 
Most Insurance Accepted 


www.jillbeck.net 

\\ r uw.facebook.com/jillbeckl86 • @jillbeckl8 


Voice: 219-365-4777 Fax: 219-365-0267 

9161 Wicker Avenue 
PO Box 298 St. John, IN 46373-0298 



PU NTILLO & CRA NE 

ORTHODONTICS • PC 

Dr. Anthony Puntillo • Dr. Christopher Crane • Dr. Kenneth Hyde 

• Crown Point 

• Schererville 

• Merrillville 
Valparaiso 

Call to schedule a 
complimentary orthodontic 
consultation today. 

219.662.2264 • 219.462.3537 

























1515 Route 41 Schererville, IN 
(219) 865-8990 

WE CATER! 


Stracd & (/an T(d's dsion is to />e recognized as t/ie deadiny 
fia// service food store, adcuays exceeding costomr s 
expectations today*, and into t/te n&M tniddenniam. 


ADS 255 







DELANEY FAGAN 



Delaney, We 
are all so proud 
of you as you 
finish this 
chapter in your 
life! So many 
wonderful new 
things await 
you! You are 
going to do 
amazing things! 


MATTHEW 

DJORDJEVICH 

Matthew 
(Peanut), We are 
so proud of you! 
You have grown 
into such a 
wonderful young 
man. Make all 
of your dreams 
come true. 

Love You, 

Dad and Mom 




Meeshe, the world became 
a better place the moment 
you were born...And since 
then, you’ve made each day 
better than the last. You’ve 
brought so much joy into 
our lives and we can never 
express how proud we are 
and how much we love you. 
Mom and Dad 


MICHELLE WEBER 


BREANNA 

POWERS 


LINDSEY SOLAN 


Congratulations 
Breanna! We are 
so proud of the 
smart, beautiful 
and loving young 
lady you have 
become. You 
have had music 
in your heart from 
the very begin¬ 
ning, and we 
have enjoyed every one of your perfor¬ 
mances. Always follow your dreams! 

We love you, 

Mom and Dad 




Linny, 

Do not go 
where the path 
may lead you, 
go instead 
where there is 
no path 
and leave a 
trail... 

All our Love, 
Mom and Dad 



ASPYN NOVAK 


J 



Congratulations Aspyn! We 
could not be more proud of 
the young woman you’ve 
become. You are such a 
beautiful person inside and 
out. Continue to work hard, 
believe in yourself and 
follow your dreams! We 
are all so excited for your 
future at the University of 
Dayton! We love you! 


ALAYNA WALLACE 




Alayna, 

Keep your face always toward the sun¬ 
shine—and shadows will fall behind you. 
—Walt Whitman 

What an incredible journey these 18 years 
have been! We are proud of you for your 
many accomplishments but mostly for the 
beautiful, smart, caring young woman you 
have grown up to be. Now you are poised 
to begin your next chapter at IU, where so 
many excellent adventures and life-chang¬ 
ing experiences await you. May God bless 
you with sunny days and the courage to 
believe in yourself and live abundantly. We 
love you so much! 

Mom, Dad and Cami 


AUTUMN 

DRANSOFF 



As you head out 
on your next big 
adventure, may 
your future con¬ 
tinue to be bright, 
and may your life 
continue to be full 
of loving friends. 
We are so proud 
of you. Good luck 
and God bless in 
the future. 

Love Mom, Dad 
and Ashlynne 


KAYLA HARRIS 



So proud of the 
young woman 
you have 
become. May 
all your dreams 
come true, 
and even the 
ones you didn’t 
dream. Aim hig' 
never give up!! 
Love, Mom & 
Morgan 


KAITLYN FASSOTH 



Kaitlyn, we are 
so proud of all 
you’ve 

accomplished! 
We know you’ll 
be AWESOME at 
everything you 
do and we LOVE 
YOU LOTS!!!!! 
Good luck, Kait- 
ster!!!!!!!! -Dad, 
Mom, Alyssa 


JUSTIN & LUIS 
CORTEZ 



Justin & Louie, 
we are so 
proud of you. 
We love you! 
Mom and Dad 


256 
























JOSEPH HOLMAN 

Joey- 

How quickly the 
last 18 years have 
gone by. From the 
moment of your 
birth, life has often 
been challenging, 
but you have per¬ 
severed and made 
this day a reality. 
Congratulations on 
your graduation! 
Enjoy this happy 
time in your life. 

You have grown 
into an amazing 
young man! We 
are so proud of you 
and look forward 
as the next chapter 
in your life unfolds. 
We will always be 
here for you. Aim 
high and follow 
your dreams! 

Love Mom and Dad 





Where have the years 
gone? You are quite 
the young lady. Stay 
focused in college 
and keep up the good 
work. I’m proud of you 
Love, Dad 


ELIZABETH STEFANIAK 



My dear Lexi, we are so 
proud of the wonder¬ 
ful young lady you are 
today! You are so dedi¬ 
cated and hardworking 
in all you do! Keep up 
the good work, and 
you will succeed in all 
you do! 

Love Dad, Mom, Ashley 
and Alleigh 


ALEXIS HERNANDEZ 


JOREY DIM0P0UL0S 



Jorey, 

You are a wonder¬ 
ful son! We’re 
so proud of the 
intelligent, hard¬ 
working, loving 
and handsome 
young man you’ve 
become. From a 
shy little boy to a 
fierce competitor... 
from your academic 
success to being 
a great athlete, 
you have always 
exceeded our 
expectations. You 
have the biggest 
heart of anyone 
we know. As long 
as you remain that 
way, great things 


will happen! We know that anything you set your mind to, you will suc¬ 
ceed. Good luck at college “J.” Thank you for all the wonderful memo¬ 
ries. We will always be proud of you! 

Love you, Mom, Dad and Jenna 



Congratulation Sianek! 

Before you were born 
we dreamed about who 
you would become. 

You have turned out 
even better than our 
greatest dreams! 

We love you very much! 
Mom & Dad 


CHRYSTIAN STUDZINSKI 




Words cannot express 
the joy that you have 
brought to my life and 
the lives of so many 
others. Alexis, I am so 
proud of you and the 
young lady that you 
are becoming. I am 
so excited to see what 
other amazing things 
you will accomplish! 


ALEXIS MARTINEZ 


BABY ADS 257 




















VICTOR 

BOLIVAR 

Victor, I just 
want to say 
thank you for 
tickling my soul 
and filling my 
heart with love. 
You’re the first 
best thing that’s 
happened to 
me. You’re my 
SUN! 


SAMUEL WILLIS 

Sam, con- 
L gratulations. 
ft' We know you’ll 
P make better 
choices and 
* choose the right 
\ path. You have 
a chance for a 
' * great future. 

We love you, 
j Mom, Tom, Zoe 
and Kylie 




mjL * * 




Elayne, you are an amazing 
young lady and we are so 
PROUD to say you’re our 
daughter! You’ve already 
achieved things most 
people will never do in a 
lifetime, and we look for¬ 
ward to the next chapter in 
your life. We love you more 
than you’ll ever know! 

Mom and Dad 


ELAYNE WISNIEWSKI 


ZACHARY CAROLYN 

RETSKE ANDREWS 



We’re proud 
of the caring, 
funny and 
loving young 
man you have 
become. Good 
luck with every¬ 
thing you do. 
We love you. 
Mom, Alan, 
Allison, Alyssa 
and Katherine 



You got turnt 
before it was 
cool. So very 
proud of you! 
Love you very 
much. 



JAREA WILSON 



We are very proud of the 
determination and commit¬ 
ment you’ve put into suc¬ 
cessfully graduating high 
school. Love Mom and Dad. 
“Trust in the Lord with all 
your heart and lean not on 
your own understamding: in 
all your ways acknowledge 
Him, and He will make your 
paths straight.” Proverbs 
3.5-6 


YUNUEN LOPEZ 


KRISTEN KAISER 

The years go by 
so quickly. My 
beautiful little 
girl is all grown 
up and on her 
way out into the 
world. 

I love you always, 
Mom 



August 19, 1997, is the day you 
changed my life. You entered this 
world and made me a mommy. You 
are such a gifted, talented, smart, 
caring and funny young lady. I 
remember this chubby face as if it 
were yesterday. 

Love, Mom and Dad 


LAINAUTICA 

MCCOY 



You go, girl. I’m 
extremely prouc 
of you. You can 
be anything 
you want. Just 
have faith. I love 
you with every 
breath in me. 
You go, girl. 
Love, Mommy 



Kurtis- I thank God I’m 
your mom. It’s been great 
watching you grow up - 
from a baby going out to 
breakfast with Meme and 
I, to seeing you fly over 
the bar in pole vaulting. As 
always - have fun, be safe, 
do your best!! 

Love- Mom, Dad, Ericka, 
Alyssa and Jake 


KURTIS MARKIEWICZ 


MCKAYA POZZI 

Can’t wait to 
see what’s on 
the horizon for 
you. The world 
is yours. Enjoy 
it! Love you 
McKaya Callie 
Pozzi. 

Mom, Dad and 
Niko 



NICOLE BATRES 



dreams come true. 
Love, Mom and Dad 


Nicole, it has 
been amazing 
watching you 
grow from a sh» 
little girl into a 
very compassio 
ate and deter¬ 
mined young 
lady. We are ver 
proud of you an 
hope all your 


258 

















CHASE OWCZARZAK 


HANNAH BRYNER 



Hannah, WOW. Last year you were a sophomore, and now you are putting 
on the cap and gown! It seems like it was just yesterday God blessed us 
with you. We are so proud of you!! We love your energy, your enthusiasm, 
your creativity and your sense of humor. You add so much flare and joy 
to our family. We know you will do remarkable things in life. Remember 
when life gets crazy to take one thing at a time and BREATHE! We love you 
dearly...Look out world, here comes our beautiful Hannah! 

Love, Mom and Dad 



TYLER PLATUSIC 



Tyler, we are so proud 
of you! We could not 
have asked for a better 
son than you! You have 
such a caring heart and 
amazing personality! 
Have no regrets in life. 
Stay true to yourself and 
you will go far! 

We love you. 

Mom and Dad 


Cathryn, we are so 
proud of the beautiful 
and intelligent young 
woman you have 
become. College will be 
such an exciting time 
for you, but we will miss 
you so much! Reach for 
the stars, darling Cat. 
they are all within your 
reach! 

Love you always, 

Mom and Dad 


BABY ADS 259 






















Decor Tile 

10319 Wicker Avenue 
St. John In. 46373 
Ceramic Floor and Wall Tile, 
Marble, Hardwood 
Flooring, Vinyl, and Carpeting 



(fiiverdale 


BODY 

SHOP 


3344 Hart Street Dyer, Ind. 

219-322-4448 
Mon-Thurs. 11 a.m.-l 0 p.m. 
Fri-Sat 11a.m.- 11p.m. 
Sun. 12 p.m.-IOp.m. 
ww.beggarspizza.com 


In 

for over 270 
dog years 


SENIOR SESSIONS | FAMILY PORTRAITS | WEDDINGS | 

RACHEL GIESE 

DESIGN & PHOTO 



WWW.RACHELGIESE.COM 



Great Lakes Orthopedics 
& Sports Medicine, P.C. 

Arthroscopy • Sports Medicine 
General Orthopedics • Physical Theraphy 


260 


Keith R. Pitchford, DO 

Board Cetified Sports 
Fellowship Trained 

Timothy B. Williams, PA-C 

Board Cetified 
Physician Assistant 


1129 Merrillville Rd 
Crown Point, IN 46307 

219.661.8661 
Fax: 219.661.8111 


Work Conditioning • Podiatry 

Dr. Natasha Mandula 
New Podiatrist 

Welcoming New Patients 


Nick Fenn, PT 

MBA, CSCS 

Jeffery S. Straton, MD 

Board Cetified Sports 
Fellowship Trained 

Jennifer L. Bayer, MD 

Sports Fellowship Trained 


9615 Kellman Street 
St. John, IN 46373 

219.365.0220 
Fax: 219.365.0226 





1020 E. Commerical Ave 
Lowell, IN 46356 

219.696.6353 
Fax: 219.696.6368 


lorthopedics.com 


















JJ 


JL 


Patrick J. McGrath 

Manager, Contractor Sales 
773.418.5720 Cell 


BLACK INDUSTRIAL 

CONTRACTOR. SAFETY 
and MRO SUPPLIES 



3600 Calumet Avenue 
Hammond, IN 46320 
Phone: 219.932.8665 
Fax: 219.932.8660 

p.mcgrath@blackindustrial.com 


W x • £ 

ig. Waxing. Facial, 
ing, Henna Tattoos 
|lash Extensions 


ST. JOHN MALL 
9167 Wicker Ave, #2 
St. John IN 46373 
219-365-3155 

Threadnbrow(&mail. com 



0/f/ = “'r 

^'llc 

LAUNDROMAT 




BSsa 


CALIBER 

HOME LOANS 

Cindy Jansky - nmls #525361 

Sales Manager 

1624 E. Summit I Crown Point. IN 46307 
0 219.440.0905 C 219.741.7048 F 855.854.8052 
cindy.jansky@caliberhomeloans.com 
www.caliberhomeloans.com/ciansky_ 


(219) 865-3510 / 1233 SHEFFIELD AVE 

www .chipsandsalsadyer.com 



BENEDICT 

BREAKFAST & LUNCH 


1103 Joliet Street 
Dyer In, 46311 

"WHY LIMIT BRUNCH TO ONLY SUNDAYS* 





Forest Ridge 

^ / Family Dentistry 


JOHN J SCHMANSKI, D.D.S. 

7303 FOREST RIDGE DR. 
SCHERERVILLE IN 46375 

OFFICE | (219) 756-2345 
FAX | (219) 756-3772 

FORESTRIDGEDENTISTRY.COM 


ADS 261 























KRISTEN KAISER 


ANDRES RAMIREZ 




Our beautiful “Granddaugh¬ 
ter” Kristen, there are not 
enough words to tell you how 
very special you are to us 
and how very proud we are 
of all you have accomplished. 
When you were born the pride 
we felt embraced our hearts 
with more love than you can 
imagine. Through the years 
you have brought so much 
love, fun, and happiness to all of our 
lives that it is unimaginable to think 
that you are no longer that spunky 
little girl in grade school, but yet a 
young lady getting ready to embark 
on her futurwork around it. They say 
beautiful girl. 

Love, Grandma & Grandpa 



God had 
blessed us 
with a won¬ 
derful son/ 
brother like 
you. You ha\ 
given us so 
many rea¬ 
sons to be 
proud of the 
young man 
that you hav 
become 
Take pride 

how far you have come, and have 
faith in how for you will go. It’s har 
to believe that you will be off start 
ing your new journey in college. 
Best of luck in all your studies. Ya 
are good to people, always stay 
that way. Congratulations on all 
your achievements, you’ve earnec 
them! We will forever and always 
be there for you. We love you mor< 
than you can possibly ever know. 
Love, Mom & Dad & Suzy 

















ERIN NAVARRO 



My favorite redhead, 

You have been a surprise and 
wonder since the day you were 
born. I think back to my sweet, 
curly-haired baby girl and see 
you now as the amazing, young 
woman you have become. I can 
only feel how blessed I am to 
have you as my daughter. You 
carry with you so many of Dad’s traits: his compassion, kindness and 
unconventional outlook of life. The strength and determination to make 
your own path, to lead and not follow, will bring you the success you 
desire. I love you and am so proud to be your mom! 



Tara, 

You have been our pride 
and joy since you were 
born. There has never been 
a dull moment with you, 
and you have been a source 
of excitement in our lives 
since the day we brought 
you home. Now we could 
not be any more proud of 
the beautiful young lady you 
have become. You know 
your Mom & Dad will always be here for you. We wish you the absolute best in 
college. 

Love you baby girl ~ Mom, Dad & Julia 



TARA ZLOTKOWSKI 


Congratulations Jake! 
We are so proud of 
you and your suc¬ 
cess in high school. 
We cannot wait to see 
what your future holds 
but have no doubt you 
will accomplish great 
things. 

We love you! 

Dad, Mom and Mitch¬ 
ell. 

JACOB JOHNSTON 




CONGRATULATIONS 
SARAH! We are so proud 
of you and can’t wait to see 
what you accomplish in this 
next stage of your life. You 
have grown up to be such 
a beautiful, loving, talented 
young woman. Believe you 
can do anything you set 
your mind to and never give 
up on your dreams. We are 
here to love and support 



Congratulations Madeline! Your 
family is so very proud of the 
poised, confident and successful 
young woman you’ve become. As 
you take this next step on life’s 
journey, know you possess every 
quality and ability necessary to 
achieve any goal you set. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 


you every step of the way. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Sam, Sawyer, Simon, Scott, Summer, Sullivan and Sheri 


MADELINE CONLEY 


SARAH GRIMLER 


Dearest Gurleen, 

We will always see you as 
the little girl who could not 
put together “it is snow¬ 
ing” into words. You have 
become such a creative, 
beautiful young lady. We 
wish you all the best in life. 
Always listen to your heart, 
try your best, and follow 
your dreams. We will always 
support you. You are truly a 
blessing who brought happiness into our world. Words cannot express how 
much we love you. Congratulations! 

With lots of love, 

Dad, Mom and Ami 


Liz, 

We are so proud of 
you and everything you 
have accomplished! 
Best of luck on all your 
future endeavors. You 
have a bright future 
ahead of you and we 
will always be there to 
support you through it. 
Love Dad. Mom and 
Ashley 

ELIZABETH SWETS 




GURLEEN KHATRA 


BABY ADS 263 













DANIELLE 

MORANG 



be our baby girl! 
Love, Mom and Dad 


GRANT 

BRADTKE 



NICHOLAS 

KIEPURA 


Our time at 
Lake Central 
is finished! It 
seems it went 
by fastest with 
you! You have 
made us both 
so proud with 
all you have 
accomplished! 
You will always 



_ Nick, words 

5 cannot express the 
> joy you bring to 
Ty* 7 our lives. You have 
"1 made parenting a 
* breeze. We cannot 
be more proud of 
the incredible and 
caring person you 
have become. 

Love you, 


Mom, Dad, Zak and Reggie 



JAMES LAFAKIS 


NIKOLAS 

BEUSHAUSEN 


Congratula¬ 
tions, you made 
it!! Wishing you 
the best of luck 
in college and 
a wonderful 
journey as you 
move through 
life. 

Love, Mom, 

Dad and Trevor 



Nikolas, We are 
so proud of you 
and love you 
beyond words. You 
have the whole 
world ahead of 
you. Remember 
your attitude 
determines your 
altitude. We love 
you forever, mom 
and dad 



6INA RUBINO 


Jimmy- 

Congratulations as you 
graduate! It has been a 
sincere pleasure watching 
you grow into the wonderful 
young man that you have 
become. We wish you all 
of the best as you begin 
the next exciting chapter of 
your life in college. 

Love, Mom and Dad 


Gina, 

We are so proud of the 
lovely young woman you 
have become. You have 
given us so much joy 
throughout these years, 
and we are so proud 
of everything you have 
accomplished. Enjoy this 
next phase of your life. We 
know you will be success¬ 
ful! 

Mom and Dad 





Noelle, 

Congratulations, we are so proud of you! We can’t 
believe that your high school years are almost over, and 
you are moving on to college. It seems as if you were so 
young and little just yesterday. Our house is going to be 
very quiet soon, and we will be missing you. We admire 
your hard work, dedication and desire to learn new things 
even if the going is rough. Your ability to look for the 
positive side of things will serve you well. Remember to 
always smile, laugh at the silly things and question the 
unbelievable. Words can’t capture how excited we are for 
you to venture out into the world and begin to make your 
mark. We are looking forward to seeing what the future 
has to offer you. We are your biggest cheerleaders! We 
love you so very much!! 

Love, 

Dad, Mom and Camille 

Oh, we almost forgot to remind you: Make good choices! 1 


264 
























TARAH HAMBY 



Tarah, 

You have made us very 
proud over the past 18 years! 
We recognized your ambition 
early on... You started talking 
at 6 months...Then started 
walking (or running) at eight 
months. We always knew 
you’d be focused and goal- 
oriented. As you embark on 
this next chapter of your life, 
we know you’ll tackle it with 
the same fervent passion. 

We wish you happiness in all 
that you do. 

Love, Mom and Dad 




ASHLEY O'MALLEY 



ERIC VARGAS 


NICOLE PELC 



Wherever your journey leads, 

May you make good choices, 

Be kind, fair and compassionate. 
May you be respectful, humble 
and grateful, 

Offer patience, kindness and 
empathy to others. 

Be persistent. Make a difference. 

It is our hope that you find peace, 
happiness and love. 

And at the end of your journey, 
may you have no regrets. 

You truly are one of a kind. A 
blessing. A gift. 

We are proud to call you daughter. 
We love you. <3 
Mom & Dad 



MARGARET DELIS 



Ashley, we are so 
blessed to have you 
in our lives. You bring 
joy, laughter and pride 
to us. We admire your 
drive and competitive 
nature on and off the 
court. You have worked 
so hard, and we are so 
proud of you. May all 
your dreams come true 
because you deserve 
success and happiness. 
Love always, Mom and 
Dad. 


You are the best son 
any mother can wish for, 
from never having been 
late to school and only 
missing two days since 
grade school to being 
there after all my chemo 
treatments! I can only 
hope your life after high 
school is as amazing 
as you. 

Love you, Mom and 
Dad! 


Maggie, 

We are so proud of you. 
You have grown up to be 
such a beautiful young 
lady. Your smile lights up 
the room, and you have 
a big heart. Follow your 
dreams, and you will go 
far. We love you! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Tyler, Laura, 
Sean and Colton 


Gabby, 

We have been lucky 
enough to watch you 
grow into a beautiful 
young woman. You are 
such an important part of 
our lives. We are incred¬ 
ibly proud to be your 
parents. Our wish for you 
is happiness throughout 
your lifetime. 

We love you more! 


Mom, Dad and Nanny 

GABRIELLE GOMEZ 


BABY ADS 265 






















Tcxta'ic 



f 

3± 




Where Art and Beauty Unite.. 


219.924.4656 


Little Bear Traders 

Native American 
Jewelry & More 

9213 Wicker Avenue 
St. John, Indiana 


A AC. 
ORTHODONTICS 

John Lisac, D.D.S. 

Carolyn Gardiner, D.D.S. 


ft 


www.texturepointesalon.com 219 - 365-0719 



k 'Ids, First Pediatrics 

OlA. 30 


Pediatrics § Pediatric 
ervdccrc/tclc^y 
Board Certified Pediatrics 


*+ 21J-322-g534 

www.DT*vcd4 lelds.coiv. 

1160Joliet ,St., Suite 103, Dyer fN 

rae'Ni Charv0-Strorwarv, MD, 

FAAP * 

parui pattoale, md, faap 
Na^cy J. Aibrl0ht, MD, FAAP 
Kervarv 62iw, MD, FAAP 


Accessory Closet 

Jewelry, hair extensions, designer 
inspired sunglasses, purses, and more! 
“Lowest Prices in the Industry!” 


Phone: 219-365-7944 
916 Wicker Avenue 
St. John, IN 46373 
St. John Mall Behind 
Subway next to 
Centier Bank 
Hours: 

Tues-Sat: 10-6 
Sun: 12-4 
Closed Monday 




Congratulations; 
Class of 2015 1 

The Lafakis 
Family 

Congratulations and Continued Success! 
Center for 

Foot & Ankle 
Care 


David F. Ray. D.P.M. 

Patrick P. Frencl. DP M 

966 West US Highway 30 
Schererville, IN 46375-1551 
219 322 8854 

Providing Advanced, Comprehnsive Foot & Ankle Care 


8165 Calumet Avenue 
Munster, IN 46321 
(219)836-0888 

312 E U.S. 30 
Schererville, IN 46375 
(219)322-8008 

2262 Morthland Drive (U.S. 30) 
Valparaiso, IN 46383 

AW Scan (219)531-0544 

Association of 
. Orthodontists 

invisalign* 

Visit us on the web at: 

nwM.aucorthodontics. com 


Find us on 

Facebook 


Hats off to you, 
Graduates! 


Wrf: 



IROiW CUSTATO 


f 





Our special congratulations to the graduating class 
You’ve done well already, and we’re here to support 
you as you go further still. We’re glad to have been 
a part of your high school years and part of yout 
hometown. We salute you. 

Culver’s of Schererville 

980 W. Lincoln Hiolnvav 219,322.2266 ^ 


266 
























INVITE St'iocktVanTil TO YOUR NEXT PARTY! 


food market 


Satisfying Homestyle Cooking 
starting at $6.99 a person! 



rv 



Deluxe 
Party Platters 

STARTING AT $22.99 

Select from our mouthwatering appetizers 
prepared fresh to order! Your guests will be 
delighted with the wide array of tasty indulgences! 
f Strack & Van Til appetizer platters are the perfect 
oeginning for any occasion... formal or informal. 

Call Us or Stop In- 
Well Help You Plan Your Party! 


www.svtcatenng.com 


*Min. 25 people. Price varies with service level requested 
Please call one of our catering consultants for more information. 


Voted #1 Caterer in The Region! 



ADS 267 















NICHOLAS 

BARRERA 

Nick, 

I am so proud of 
the young man 
that you are. 
Always think big 
and follow your 
dreams. Make 
your mark on the 
world! 

My love always, 
Mom 


JOCELYN 

BATHURST 

Jocelyn, 

I am so proud of 
you and what you 
have accom¬ 
plished in the last 
18 years! Best 
of luck at Fox 
College and your 
future! 

Love, 

Mom, Jessica, 
and Jordan 





It is unbelievable to think 
that you are graduating. 
You’ve become an intel¬ 
ligent and loving daughter. 
As you graduate, we just 
want you to know how 
proud you have made us. 
We know you will continue 
to grow as you head on to 
college. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Michael 
and Zack 


ANDREA ABRAMOWICZ 


ERIC KAMINSKY 

You are a 
remarkable 
young man with 
a bright future. 
Congratula¬ 
tions on all your 
accomplish¬ 
ments. Enjoy 
the journey and 
don’t lose sight 
of your dreams. 



MELISSA SPANIER 



We have 
watched you 
grow from an 
adorable baby 
to a beautiful 
young woman. 
We are so 
proud of you. 
We love you 
very much! 
Love, Mom, 



Joey, 

We are so proud of the 
wonderful young man you 
have become. We know 
you will excel in college 
as you did in high school 
and are looking forward to 
the great things you will 
accomplish in the future! 
Love, 

Mom, Dad &Tony 



Love, 

Mom, Dad and Jessica 


Dad, Matt, Amanda 


JOSEPH SCHNEIDER 


HAILEY MUELLER 



Congratulations Hailey! 

We are extremely proud of 
the beautiful, intelligent and 
determined young woman 
you have grown to become. 
Whatever your future holds, 
we know you will be suc¬ 
cessful. Believe in yourself, 
follow your dreams, and 
enjoy all that life has to offer. 
May your life be filled with 
much love, happiness, and 
success! 

We love you more than you 
know and will always be 
your biggest fans! 

Keep up the drive and dedi¬ 
cation in college... follow 
your dreams!!! 

Love you to the moon, 

Mom and Dad 



NICHOLAS BIEGEL 



KRISTA MAGURANY 


Nicholas, Our Amazing, 
Remarkable Son, 

As you start your new 
journey in life, we want 
you to know that our love 
will forever be by your 
side. You’re the pride, joy, 
and memory maker in our 
lives. You’re loving, giving, 
forgiving, and priceless 
with your heart of gold. 
We love you! 

Mom and Dad 


Krista, 

Wow, the moment is 
finally here and we 
couldn’t be more proud 
of you! You are truly 
the biggest blessing in 
our lives. Remember 
to always stay true to 
yourself and the rest is 
in God’s hands. We love 
you to the moon! Stay 
golden! 

Love always, your family 


268 






















BRIANNA MARTIN 





Bri, 

Congratulations on finishing this 
chapter in your life! We are so 
proud of you. You are a bright, 
compassionate young lady, and 
we have no doubt that you will 
accomplish great things. May 
your dreams be big and your 
worries be small. 

We Love You! 

Mom, Jerry and Marley 



JACK KUEHNER 



Love, Mom, Dad and Nicole 



Jack, 

Seems like yesterday we were signing 
you up for pre-school. Now we’re cel¬ 
ebrating your high school graduation. We 
are very proud of the young man you’ve 
become. 

As you travel this rocky road, follow your 
heart. Never be afraid to make a mistake 
because even the best fall down some¬ 
times. Love, Laugh, Live. See the good in 
others as well as in yourself. Work hard. 
Shoot for the moon. Spread your wings 
and fly. This is our wish for you. 

Never forget we’ve got your back and 
that you have our love and support. 




Good Luck Brooke. We 
are all proud of you. You 
are going to do great 
things!!! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Eric and 
Blake 


BROOKE NEYHART 


"Some people want it 
to happen, some wish it 
would happen, 
others make it happen.” 
-Michael Jordan 
Nick, 

We are so proud of the 
young man that you 
have become. Always 
remain that kind, loyal, 
compassionate and 
honest person that we 
are blessed to know 
and love. We are confident that whatever you want in life, YOU WILL make 
happen. Congratulations! 

All our love. 

Dad, Mom and Mya 

NICHOLAS POULOS 



The transition from 
schoolgirl to young 
adult is both exciting 
and frightening. I know 
you can’t wait to spread 
your wings and fly and 
sweetheart — you 
will soar! Laura, you 
possess intelligence, 
creativity, ambition and 
compassion. You own 
the ability to create a 
spectacular life for yourself. Keep believing in that and know you have a 
loving family who will always be there to support you. 

Love you, Mom and Regina 



LAURA LEVANDER 



ibly proud of you and look forward to watching you 
dreams! 


Congratulations! It has 
been an honor to watch 
you grow into the 
beautiful young woman 
you are today. Your hard 
work and dedication 
are beyond impressive. 
Continue to strive for 
the very best. May your 
future have as much 
joy as you have given 
us. We are so incred- 
reach your goals and 


ANDREA KOWALEWICZ 


BABY ADS 269 

























MARISSA GRANTHAM 






Marissa, we are 
so proud of you! 

You have learned 
a good balance 
between working 
hard, playing hard 
and studying hard. 
Keep it up and that 
law degree will be 
yours. Remember, 
while the world truly 
does revolve around 
you right now, you 
must always think 
of others first and 
consider the con¬ 
sequences of your 
decisions. Choose 
your words carefully 
and stand up for 
what you believe in. 
Be a leader, not a 
follower. We all love 
you and are always 
here for you. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Brittany, 
Jackie, Jeff and 
baby Michael 



JOSEPH CINKO 



RONALD LEE 


Joey, this time has really 
gone by like the blink of 
an eye. Little did we know 
that our little bundle of joy 
would turn into an AMAZ¬ 
ING grown man so quickly. 
We are blessed to have 
such an intelligent, strong- 
willed, witty and charming 
son. 

With Love, 

Mom and Dad 


Dear Ronny, 

We are so very proud of 
the young man you have 
grown to be. You warm our 
hearts with your beautiful 
smile. You are adventurous 
and fun-loving and rarely 
give us a dull moment in 
your life! Smile and be 
happy! 

Love and hugs, 

Mom and Dad 


TIMOTHY GIAZZON 



Timothy, you 
have grown 
from a toddler 
taking your 
first steps and 
saying your first 
words to a pre¬ 
schooler writing 
your first words 
and making 
new friends 
to a teen¬ 
ager that has 
accomplished 
so much. You 
are not only 
a talented 
musician but 
an outstanding 
scholar, and we 
are proud of all 
your accom¬ 
plishments. We 
wish you the 
best in your 
future and love 
you always. 


RICARDO ELIZABETH 

SALGADO STEFAN IAK 



Ricky 

Congrats! We 
love you! We are 
so proud of you! 
You achieved an 
important step 
in your life. We 
will support you 
toward your suc¬ 
cess. 

Mom, Dad, 
Sandra, Michelle 


Congratu¬ 
lations, 
Bethie- 
Boo! I’m 
so proud of 
all you’ve 
accom¬ 
plished thus 
far. You’re a very intelligent, fun-loving 
person. It’s been a joy to watch you 
grow into such a beautiful, young 
woman. I know you will be successful 
in whatever path you choose in life. I 
love you! 

Mom 




We could not be more proud 
of the fine young man you 
have become. You have so 
much to offer the world. 

We know that whatever you 
set your mind to, you will 
accomplish. We have been 
and will always be your big¬ 
gest fans. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Corey and 
Cameron 


May all your dreams come true. 
Love, 

Mom, Dad & Anthony 


COLLIN WESTERMAN 


270 






























LORENZO CHILDS 

Davon, We are so 
proud of the won¬ 
derful young man 
you have become! 
What a blessing 
you have been to 
our lives and the 
missing puzzle 
piece to complete 
our family. We 
love you more 
than anything and 
know that you will 
continue to find 
your way and be 
successful in all 
that you do! 

With love to the 
moon and back, 
Uncle Jeff, Aunt 
Gena, Malaysia 
and Lailah 

Jeremiah 29:11 
- For I know the 

plans I have for you declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and 
not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. 




MORGAN KELLY 


We are so very proud of you! 
Eighteen years ago we were 
blessed with our second 
beautiful daughter! We can’t 
believe how fast time has 
gone by. You have grown into 
a beautiful, sweet fashionista! 
As you enter the next stage of 
your life we hope you always 
stay true to yourself and keep 
up all your hard work! 

Morgan Taylor, follow your 
dreams...Sky is the limit! 

Love, 

Dad, Mom, Shauna and 
Madison 



Nicholas — Cannot believe that you are graduat¬ 
ing high school already. Didn’t Dad and I just bring 
you home? We want to take this opportunity to 
let you know just how proud we are of you, not 
only academic-wise but as a whole person. You 
have exceeded our expectations of who you would 
become and we couldn’t be prouder. Also, just 
wanted to thank you for letting us be your parents. 
This ride has been a blast and looking forward to the 
future. Remember you can achieve anything you put 
your mind to and always reach for the stars. 

Love you always, Dad and Mom. 


NICHOLAS TAYLOR 


MELIA GONZALEZ 





Dad and I are so proud of 
you! God has truly blessed 
us. You are an amazing 
daughter and sister with 
such strong values, leader¬ 
ship, compassion, intel¬ 
ligence and generosity. The 
bond you have with your 
brother is so special and 
rare. Always keep that. We 
love hearing you laugh and 
acting so silly, dancing and 
making beautiful choreog¬ 
raphy, coming home from 
the gym and making us 
always feel your muscles, 
lol. You take so much pride 
in the things you do. Melia 
you have an energy that 
everyone gravitates too. 
People love you and enjoy 
your company. You make 
people laugh. I believe that your future is so bright and no matter what, 
you are going to be a very successful person. Always believe in yourself 
and never give up. “We can do all things through Christ who strengthens 
us.” Dad, Antonio and I will always and forever be here for you. We love 
you so much. We are looking forward to sharing the next chapter of your 
•ife with you. Our reward as parents is looking at you! 

W.L.Y.M.T.H. 

Love Dad, Mom and Antonio xoxoxoxoxo 



TAYLOR JAGIELLA 



HANNAH ANDERSON 


Taylor, 

You are a wonderful 
daughter! It has been a 
privilege watching you 
grow from a baby into 
the loving, beautiful 
young lady that you 
are today. You make us 
proud every day. We 
look forward to all the 
great things you are 
going to accomplish in 
college and beyond. 
Enjoy it all! We wish you 
a lifetime of love, faith, 
happiness and success! 
Love Mom, Dad and 
Trey xo 


Hannah, 

We are so proud of 
the person you have 
become. As you move 
in on life’s journey, 
remember these things. 
Follow God. Experience 
Nature. Listen as much 
as you speak. Relax. 
Laugh often. Work hard. 
Believe in yourself. Set 
goals. LOVE with all 
your heart. Take risks. 
Embrace your crazy. 
Love, Your family 


BABY ADS 271 



















ampered Chef 

Lori Sonner 
Independent Director 
Consultant #109696 
219-865-3168 
LLSonne@hotmail.com 
ww.pamperedchef.biz/ Sonner 

Mention this ad and get a FREE GIFT! 




LANDSCAPE SERVICES 

^ * 
ik ^ 

Dominic Zuccarelli 

Landscape Designer 

Office: (219)374.9900 
Cell: (219) 613.4908 


ST. 

4 . 



0/ US TODAY 
TJ. BOYIi 

REAL ESTATE. INC 

219 - 922-2300 

10249 INDIANAPOLIS BlVD. 
HIGHUND. IN 40322 



7140 Broadway 
Merrillville, IN 46410 
(219)769-7471 

8926 Indianapolis Blvd. 
Highland, IN 46322 
(219)923-6446 

7966 Wicker Ave. 

St. John, IN 46373 
(219)365-8159 

www.dunhilltuxedos.com 



Specialty Breakfast & Lunch 
Catering • Delivery 
Fresh Squeezed OJ • Yogurt Smoothies 
Gluten Free Selection 
Free WiFi 

Merrillville, IN 219-736-0100 Dyer, IN 219-865-3200 

www.jellypancakehouse.com 

























V/ A AKECENTRAL 

■online news 

■ * t « 

Advertise on Lake Central News! 1 

llr UMUML ML!! u 

If $ T To H N IN 0 1 A N A 


rt «*■*» mmmmmn mimi ictv coer wcnotM.vt 




^mlraiy 


STUDENT LIFE 


Jim Miskovich 

Agent 

6629 West US Highway 30, PO Box 1 
Schererville, IN 46375-0001 
Bus 219 322 2727 
www.jimmiskovich.com 


The greatest compliment you can give is a referral. 




estate Farm 


Andorra 


Banquets & Catering 


1112 RT. 41 

SCHERERVILLE, INDIANA 46375 

219.865.1230 


ADS 273 

























Nathan and Megan, 

Dad and I miss the little ones you were and are very proud of 
the young adults you have become. Going through the pictures 
helped us remember all of the great moments as you were grow¬ 
ing up. Praying for you both for all of the very best in your future 
as you graduate from high school and enter a new chapter in your 
lives. 

Lots of Love, 

Mom and Dad 


NATHAN AND MEGAN ZAJAC 



This picture reflects how 
dad and I feel about you 
growing up so fast. It’s 
time to let you begin 
your adult life and blos¬ 
som even more! You will 
continue to do your best 
in everything you do... you 
always have and always 
will! We adore and cherish 
you! 



We are extremely proud of 
the young men you have 
become. 

Stay true to yourself and 
continue to be men of char¬ 
acter and honor. 

I love you forever. I’ll like you 
for always as long as I’m 
living and even in heaven my 
babies you’ll be. 

Love Dad, 

Mom & Bianca 


VERONICA DAVIS 


DANIEL AND SAMUEL MATCHAIN 



It seems like just yesterday you were 
graduating from preschool and here you 
are already a senior. As you continue to 
write your life’s story, always remember to 
believe, achieve, and challenge yourself; 
but most importantly continue to stay true 
to who you are. And your story contin¬ 
ues... 

Love you forever, 

Mom, Dad, Brad 


NICHOLAS GERLACH 


KYLIE 

RICHARDSON 


BLAKE NEWELL 



We are so 
proud of all 
your accom¬ 
plishments and 
of the young 
woman you 
have become. 
You are our 
blessing. Wel¬ 
come to the 
next chapter. 



Blake, Take 
pride in how far 
you’ve come 
Have faith in 
how far you car 
go. But don’t 
forget to enjoy 
the journey - M 
Josephson. 
Love, 

Mom, Dad, & 
Tatiana 


Love, 

Dad and Stepmom (Mom) 


274 
















LINDSAY KUSBEL 



Lindsay, 

We are proud of you 
and all you have 
accomplished in your 
tenure here at LC! You 
have achieved both 
academically and ath¬ 
letically, and we could 
not be happier. You 
have grown into a beau¬ 
tiful, thoughtful, and 
loving young woman. 

We are so excited for 
you and your future! We 
are truly grateful for the 
big sister you have been 
to Mackenzie. Thank 
you for all your hard 
work and we wish you 
health and happiness as 
you begin your future. 
Always pursue your 
dreams and never fear, 
cause your lifeguard 
walks on water. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, and 
Mackenzie 



RAINA ROLAK 



IAN MARTIN 


LOGAN LAMBERT 



Logan, 

You’ve 
matured into 
an amazing 
young man. 
You’re kind, 
thoughtful, 
wise and 
strong, with a 
quiet deter¬ 
mination. You 
are admired by 
your friends, 
your teachers, and others because of 
your consistent effort to do your best and 
achieve for yourself while showing humility 
and enthusiasm for the success of others. 
And you certainly have achieved, admirably, 
both academically and athletically during 
your years at LC - and you don’t need an 
award to prove it! Keep God first and move 
confidently into the next chapter of your 
life because you wrote your high school 
chapter so successfully. Congratulations, 
we love you, and we’re so proud to be your 
parents! 

Love, 

Dad & Mom 




all of your future endeavors. 
We love you very much! 
Mom & Dad 


JENNIFER WOJCIK 



remain the dynamic, level headed young lady that 
Love Always, Mom, Dad, and Kelly 


Raina, 

The best kid a parent 
could ever ask for! It 
has been a joy to watch 
you grow into a beauti¬ 
ful, smart, young lady! 
We are incredibly proud 
of you! God has amaz¬ 
ing plans for you and 
you will do great! Have 
fun in college! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 


You’ll leave high school 
with great memories, and 
meaning many things to 
many people. You’re a man 
of “Pure” heart and great 
character who knows WHO 
blessed you with your tal¬ 
ents. We are very proud of 
you. Pray hard, play hard, 
and spread your joy! 

Love, 

Dad, Mom, and London 


Jennifer, 

It is amazing how fast 
time goes by. It seems 
like it was just yesterday 
that you were in pre¬ 
school. You have grown 
into such a beautiful 
young lady. We are so 
proud of your accom¬ 
plishments and many 
talents. We wish you all 
the best in college and 


Jenny, 

Time has flown by so 
quickly over the years! 
We have enjoyed 
“cheering” you on at 
every event! You have 
made us extremely 
proud of your many 
accomplishments—in 
cheerleading and aca¬ 
demics alike! Always 
believe in yourself and 
you have evolved into. 


JENNIFER LINDHOLM 


BABY ADS 275 

























ST.JOHN.INDIANA 


r LIFE SPORTS CLU8S ENTERTAINMENT GALLERIES LCTV CONSTRUCTION UPDATES 



Stay Connected! 

www.lakecentralnews.com 

Follow us on Twitter 
@LCHSNews 
and 

Instag ram 
@lakecentralnews 


TWO LOCATIONS 

1259 JOLIET ST. DYER, IN 46311 • 219-865-3854 
600 E. US 30 MERRILLVILLE, IN 46410 • 219-769-4466 
















FOR THE LOVE OF YEARBOOK. 

CONGRATULATIONS, LAKE CENTRAL QUIVER STAFF! 

I’m so happy to be part of your yearbook team! You tell amazing stories and make 
beautiful books for your school. Herff Jones provides resources, inspiration and support 
to help you do your job. When it comes to meeting yearbook goals, together we can. 

BETTY SAMPLES 
.fL Representing Herff Jones 

F '9 BSAMPLES@HERFFJONES.COM 
_ YEARBOOKBETTY@GMAIL.COM 






















ELNORA STROUD 



Congratula¬ 
tions, Ellie! 

You have 
grown up to 
be an amazing 
young woman 
and have such 
a promising 
future! We are 
so proud of 
you! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 


CONNOR 

KONIECZKA 

Connor, we’re 
very proud of 
you and what 
you’ve accom¬ 
plished as you 
end your high 
school journey 
and begin 
college. Stay 
true to who you 
are! Love, Mom 
and Dad 



BRANDON NICHOLAS 

BLANCHARD WIDLOWSKI 



Brandon, 
we’re very 
proud of 
you and 
what you’ve 
accom¬ 
plished in 
high school. 
We wish you 
all the best 
as you begin 
life’s journey! 
Love, 

Mom & Dad 


Congratula¬ 
tions, Nick! 
We’re so proud 
of our little 
miracle. 
Remember 
that with hard 
work and 
determina¬ 
tion, you 
can achieve 
anything. We wish you love, laughter 
and success. 

Love, Mom & Dad 



MICHAEL TILLER 



Michael, Congratulations! 

It is unbelievable that we 
have already reached this 
important milestone in your 
life. Words can’t describe how 
proud we are of you. 

Watching you grow into a 
wonderful young man has 
been amazing. You are smart, 
talented and have a huge 
heart. We have enjoyed all 
your activities like youth group, band and of course baseball. As 
you start your journey into college, may God continue to watch over 
you and guide you. Continue to work hard and stay focused as you 
accomplish your goals. We will always be here for you and we love 
you very much! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 



KYLE WEST 


JOELLYN POLASKI 




Kyle, your mother and I are 
so proud of the young man 
you have become. I still 
remember frantically driv¬ 
ing to the hospital the day 
you were born as clear as 
yesterday. There are just so 
many incredible memories to 
cherish from your childhood. 
Good luck in your years in 
college. I am certain you will 
do well. We look forward to 
seeing what lies ahead in 
your future. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Josie, you are simply amaz¬ 
ing, and you make us proud 
every single day. You are the 
hardest-working person we 
know, and yet your accom¬ 
plishments thus far are only 
the tip of the iceberg. Your 
gorgeous smile and sense of 
humor light up a room, and 
we will all miss you terribly 
when you go off to college 
(yes, even Mitch!) We are 
really and truly blessed to 
have you for a daughter. 

Love always, 

Mom and Dad 



278 



























RYAN EMERY 



Ryan, it seems like yesterday 
you were starting your first 
day of school and putting on 
your first pair of skates...and 
now in a blink you are gradu¬ 
ating and finished your varsity 
high school hockey career. 
Words can’t express how 
proud we are of you and all 
that you have accomplished. 
You are an amazing young 
man and we are so excited 
for you as you move on to 
Purdue, and we can’t wait to 
see what your next accom¬ 
plishments will be! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Marissa... 

Indy, Tommy, Chip 






BRYAN VANDERLEE 


HANNAH SONNER 



Hannah Ruby, your birth in July of 1996 brought 
us so much joy and happiness. You were a beauti¬ 
ful, happy baby that loved to giggle and smile. 
There were some things you didn’t like though, 
like Mommy leaving the house to run errands, or 
being left with a babysitter (not good.) You loved 
going to Bakers Square with Dad to have chicken 
nuggets and Dino-Tots. You showed early creativ¬ 
ity by endlessly drawing stick-figure families and 
creating your own “recipes.” You developed an impish little smile in pre¬ 
school that will never be forgotten. Your eyes lit up with joy when you 
got your puppy and we let you name her. None of us will ever forget, 

“I want to name her Donut.” Now, you’re a fierce, Ninja-like shopper 
with Mom and a great fan of Butler Basketball with Dad. You became 
strong-willed, yet endearingly shy. Over the past four years your con¬ 
fidence has grown, your talents and leadership skills have blossomed 
and you’ve displayed great resolve while being a good citizen. You’ve 
excelled in the classroom and are ready to take that to an even higher 
level. We are so proud to be your parents. We hope we’ve been great 
parents to you. Can’t wait to see what impact you will have on the next, 
even larger, stage. We love you so much, Mom and Dad 




CHELSEY SCHMOCK 



Vi 

ASHLEY GAYTON 


Ryan, 

You have always made us 
proud and amazed us with 
your scholastic achieve¬ 
ments. The hard work, 
determination and motiva¬ 
tion you put towards all you 
do is inspiring! We are truly 
blessed and we’ll always be 
here with support and love. 
"Go ill” 

All our love, 

Mom, Dad and Reid 


You have become this 
extraordinary young man 
that has truly blessed 
our lives. We are so 
proud of the person you 
have become and your 
accomplishments, both 
academically and on the 
baseball field. Dream 
big, work hard and 
ENJOY THE JOURNEY! 
Love. Mom and Meghan 


Chelsey, You have grown 
into an intelligent, beau¬ 
tiful and compassionate 
young woman. Academi¬ 
cally, you have exceeded 
every expectation. It is 
impossible to put into 
words how much respect 
we have for you and how 
proud we are to be your 
parents. We will love you 
forever. 

Mom & Dad 


Ashley, we are so 
blessed to have you 
in our lives. You bring 
joy, laughter and pride 
to us. We admire your 
drive and competi¬ 
tive nature on and off 
the court. You have 
worked so hard, and 
we are so proud of you. 
May all your dreams 
come true because 
you deserve success 
and happiness. Love 
always, 

Mom and Dad. 


BABY ADS 279 


























VARSITY FOOTBALL 



Front row: Brett Morris, Joshua Drosos, Jose Merced, Kyle Mathews, Michael Pena, Nathan Pasyk, Jacob Dulski, Quinn Paprocki, Logan Lambert, Daniel Diaz, 
Michael Kopack, Keith Gutierrez Row 2: Paul Centanni, Radiant Sykes, Brandon Scott, John Villanueva, Jerimiah Velazquez, Quinn Kaurich, Jakob Brown, 
Nicholas Lucas, Michael Norcutt, Tyler Dernulc, Derrick Watkins, Luke Sutherland, Jillian Doan, Robert Pawlak Row 3: Lucious Pilate, Khalid Yacoub, Gage 
Glista. Anthony Garcia, Christopher Gillespie, Joshua Bensen, Aaron Benninghoff, Jackson Long, Kyle Paul, Walker Brummett, Dylan Schwader, Aaron Chadd. 
Andrew VanDenburgh Row 4: Hunter Rattray-Elizondo, Joseph Szydlo, Jaquon Burns, Victor Bolivar, Tyler Platusic, Joseph Schneider, Nicolas Solis, Dakota 
Barnett, Jacob Johnston, Kobe Cook, Kenneth Singleton, Antwan Davis, Samuel Kirmani, Eric Ainsley, Gino Solis, Charles Sykes, Matthew Kruszewski Row 
5: Jacob Irvin, Joshua Soliday , Damon Sklivas, Kyle Freel. Timothy Matthews. Michael Taylor, Anthony Lloyd, Matthew Djordjevich, Andrew Pruitt, Alexander 
DelValle. Austin Chekaluk, Christopher Fundich, Sam Barnhart, Isaiah Huppenthal, Michael King, Derek Pass Row 6: Matthew Ernst, Daniel Heinrikson, Austin 
Atkins, Austin Kunis, Michael Dahlkamp, Walter Dahlkamp, Joshua Prather, Anthony Williams, Ethan Darter, Ryan Bereda, Collin Knaley, Ammar Azzam, Christo¬ 
pher Genovesi. Tyler Frank, Cody Schultz, Colin Studer, Ryan Decker Back row: Madison Kelly, Jennifer Ruiz, Brianna Roethler, Coach Scott Winters, Coach Pat 
Hilyard, Coach Nicholas Johnson, Coach Tom Halterman, Jeff St. Germain, Coach Brett St. Germain, Coach Joe Lauerman, Mark Hidalgo, Collin Gillespie, Head 
Athletic Trainer Chris Hall, Assistant Athletic Trainer Lydia Morgan, Maegan Walton, Megan Kirby 


MUNSTER 

24-21 L 

CHESTERTON 

6-0 W 

EC CENTRAL 

49-13 W 

MERRILLVILLE 

28-7 W 

PORTAGE 

14-6 W 

VALPARAISO 

28-7 W 

CROWN POINT 

27-13 W 

LAFAYETTE JEFF 41-6 W 

LAPORTE 

20-13 W 

MERRILLVILLE 

21-7 L 

MICHIGAN CITY 

35-29 W 




VARSITY BOYS SOCCER 


280 



ANDREAN 

3-0 W 

CROWN POINT 

1-0 L 

SOUTH BEND 

1-0 L 

HIGHLAND 

1-0 L 

MICHIGAN CITY 

2-0 W 

PORTAGE 

0-0 T 

SOUTH OLDHAND 

1-1 T 

HENRY CLAY 

3-1 L 

GREEN WOOD 

1-0 W 

LAPORTE 

1-0 w 


CHESTERTON 

1-1 

MUNSTER 

2-0 L 

VALPARAISO 

2-1 W 

BROWNSBURG 

4-2 L 

EVANSVILLE NORTH 

1-0 W 

MERRILLVILLE 

3-0 W 

HIGHLAND 

1-0 W 

GRIFFITH 

4-0 W 

MUNSTER 

1-0 L 


Front Row: Jorge Trujillo, Diego Ruiz-Avila, 
Bernardo Oseguera, Nikko Kolintzas, Joshua 
Ramirez, Christopher Baranowski, Eric San¬ 
tiago, Michael Bikos, Jason Lionberg 
Second Row: Michael McClelland, Enrique 
Dominguez, Joshua Dulski, Nathan Puch, 
Miguel Palacios, Daniel Picioski, Jacob Galva 
NaserTaharwah, Juan Zambrano 
Back Row: Nikola Vuckovic, Anthony Doreski. 
Samuel Willis, Chandler Duncanson, Nikola 
Tepsic, Clayton Goldman, Michael Flores, Kyle 
Kil, Benjamin Klebs 

























FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



Front row: Rigo Marin, Martin Ewing, Tyler Wagner, Eric Mender, William Panozzo, Thomas McClain, Luis Degollado Row 2: Alejandro Perez, Joshua Wil¬ 
liams, Jon Beilfuss, Ryan Ruberry, Ryan Oljace, Michael Hollingsworth-Madsen, Michael Shepherd, Brandon Price, Mark Formella, Everett Peyton Row 3: 
Nicholas Blevins, Murell James, Mitchell Mills, Edward Davies, Brenden Cooper, Cole Willis, Bryan Kelly, Dakota-Travor Bettis, Brenden Cooper, Anthony 
Carter, Evan Dudy Row 4: Ryan Voss, Gavin Cantu, David Markert, Casey Pederson, Garrett Clark, Chase Hinchman, Jack Drosset. Andrew Owczarzak, 
Brian Brackins, Nathan Hjertquist, Trevor Murphy Back row: Coach Jeff Sherman, Coach Brian Tomson, Coach Scott Freckelton 


MUNSTER 21-8 L 

KANKAKEE VALLEY 29-14 W 
PORTAGE 31-8 L 

CROWN POINT 33-0 L 


LAPORTE 39-7 W 

MICHIGAN CITY 33-20 W 
CHESTERTON 38-8 L 
MERRILLVILLE 32-18 W 


JV BOYS SOCCER 


Front Row: Diego Ruiz-Avila, Nicholas Shell, 
Mohammed Hijaz, Cuahutemoc Rodriguez- 
Lara, Jack Quinlan 

Second Row: Jacob Galvan, Michael Zubeck, 
Damian Navarro, Justin MacNeill, Alexander 
Reed, Bernardo Oseguera, Juan Zambrano 
Back Row: Noah Osearo, James Egnatz, 
Colton Myers, Chandler Duncanson, Nikola 
Vuckovic, Miguel Palacios, Daniel Picioski 



CROWN POINT 

W 

CHESTERTON 

W 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 

VALPARAISO 

W 

PORTAGE 

w 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 

LAPORTE 

w 




SPORTS INDEX 281 



















VARSITY/JV GIRLS SOCCER 



Front row: Teresa Baranowski (12), Cara Scott (10), Madison Sarkey (9), 
Cailee Wilkinson (10), Morgan Clapman (10), Lauren Bulf (9), Madeline Jurek 

(10) , Kathryn Fiorio (9), Kristina Jasnic (9), Kiersten Hess (9) 

Middle row: Coach Mary Dunlap, Sara Notes (9), Meghan Teumer (10), 
Alexis Munoz (9),Tarah Hamby (12), Clare Majchrowicz (11), Gillian Suroviak 
(9), Ashley Scanlon (10), Alexia Laurisch (11), Hannah Triveline (12), Sarah 
Triveline (12), Emilie Dunne (9), Darby McGrath (10), Sienna Pinskey (11) 
Back row: Coach Shawn Thomas, Brianna Dougherty (12), Alexia Geenen 

(11) , Abigail Peppin (12), Madison Berumen (11), Emily Blink (9), Sydney 
Dragos (9), Jillian Doan (12), Lindsay Kusbel (12), Abigail Meseberg (9), Jes¬ 
sica Hearne (10), Rachel Inglese (11),Tabitha Burrink (10), Alisha Donovan 

(12) , Rebecca Todd (9), Coach Alexandra Graves 


CROWN POINT 

W 2-1 

GRIFFITH 

W 8-0 

NORTHWOOD 

W 4-0 

LAPORTE 

W 8-0 

NORTHRIDGE 

W 5-0 

CHESTERTON 

L 2-3 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 11-0 

CONCORD 

LI-3 

HIGHLAND 

W 4-0 

VALPARAISO 

W 3-0 

PORTAGE 

W 2-0 

PENN STATE 

L 2-6 

MUNSTER 

T 1-1 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 2-1 

ANDREAN 

W 2-0 




GIRLS GOLF 



Front row: Alexis Miestowski (9), Christina Terrazas (9) Back row: 
Allison Onest (11), Kylie Shoemake (12), Megan Serratore (10), Kaitlyn 
Thompson (10), Julia Beggs (12), Kaitlin George (11), Stephanie Sand¬ 
ers (12), Brooke Scartozzi (10), Coach Christopher Rossiano 


LAFAYETTE JEF- W 174-184 
FERSON DUAL 
CHESTERTON L 182-174 

MICHGAN CITY W 151-227 
CROWN POINT W 168-186 
MERRILLVILLE W 156-253 
VALPARAIS O W 165-176 
LAPORTE W 159-213 

PORTAGE W 148-173 

LAFAYETTE JEF- 1st Place 
FERSON INVITE 
LC INVITE 1st Place 


MCCUTCHEON 

1 st Place 

INVITE 


CROWN POINT 

1 st Place 

INVITE 


KANKAKEE VAL¬ 

1st Place 

LEY 


DAC INVITE 

2nd Place 

IHSAA SECTION¬ 

1 st Place 

AL 


IHSAA REGIONAL 

1 st Place 

IHSAA STATE 

7th Place 


BOYS TENNIS 



Front row: Keith Crawford (10), Jacob Navarra (12), Nicholas Mazon 
(12), Mathew Matakovic (9), Steven Tulsiak (9), Chase Owczarzak 
(12), Douglas DeVries (9) Back row: Coach Joshua Wiersba, Marko 
Milutinovic (9), Richard Larson (10), John Mamelson (11), KollinVos 
(10), Michael Hemmerling (11), Raymond Pollalis (12), Coach Ralph 


Holden 

WHEELER 

W 3-2 

LAPORTE 

L 0-5 

MUNSTER 

L 0-5 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 5-0 

HIGHLAND 

W 3-2 

MERRILLVILLE 

LI-4 

CROWN POINT 

L 1-4 

MACY INVITE 

4th Place 

PORTAGE 

W 4-1 

LAFAYETTE 

8th Place 

CHESTERTON 

L 1-41 

INVITE 

• 

LOWELL 

W 3-2 

DELTA INVITE 

4th Place 

VALPARAISO 

L 0-5 




282 





















VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 


Front row: Mackenzie Evers (11), Rylee Ollearis (11), Rachel Gross (11), 
Alyssa Born (12) Middle row: Alyssa Stepney (12), Julia Zlotkowski (11), 
Stephanie Spigolon (11), Brianna Mills (11) Back row: Coach Tina Tinberg, 
Samantha Anderson (11), Victoria Gardenhire (11), Jacqueline Eader (11), 
Alexandria Davids (12), Julia Kruzan (11), Coach Bill Gray 


CHESTERTON W 22-25, PORTAGE 

18-25, 25-23, 

20-25, 15-9, W 
25-15, 25-14, 

25-23 MICHIGAN CITY 

CROWN POINT W 25-22, 

20-25, 25-14, 

25-15, W VALPARAISO 

22-25, 25-16, 

25-22, 26-24 

MERRILLVILLE W 25-15, 25-8, LAPORTE 
25-14 


W 25-10, 
25-17, 25-17, 
W 25-10, 
25-10, 25-13 
W 25-22, 
25-12, 19-25, 
25-13 
L 23-25, 
25-19, 16-25, 
18-25 
W 25-21, 
25-17, 25-18 



JV VOLLEYBALL 


Front row: Caitlyn Magdziak (10), Mia DiNino (9), Olivia Oster (10) Middle 
row: Nicole Milaszewski (10), Andrijana Mihajlovic (10), Rachel Furmanek 
(10), Frances Kornelik (10) Back row: Kelly Orze (10), Natasa Beader (11), 
Linda Morton (10), Kaylee Marovich (9), Jenna Garza (10), Coach Jennifer 

Fandl 


CHESTERTON 
CROWN POINT 


PORTAGE 
MICHIGAN CITY 


W 25-7, 25-18, LAPORTE W 25-19, 25-24, 
W 25-9, 25-17 W 25-14, 17-25, 

L 21-25, 25-21. 15-11 

6-15, W 25-12, VALPARAISO W 25-22, 
25-19 23-25, 15-10, W 

W 25-14, 25-10, 25-17, 25-16 

W 25-16, 25-18 MERRILLVILLE W 25-4, 25-8, 
W 25-13, 25-20, W 25-9, 25-12 

25-22, 25-9 



FRESHMAN VOLLEYBALL 


front row: Lauren Stearns (9), Faith Huenecke (9), Kaitlyn Dross (9) 
Middle Row: Olivia Rogers (9), Courtney Rhomberg (9), Meghan Smith 
(9), Rebecca Ashby (9) Back row: Madilynn Mathison (9), Rachael 
Robards (9), Nicole Dubish (9), Lana Miramontes (9), Jessie Balka (9), 
Coach Jamie Rodgers 


CROWN POINT 
PORTAGE 


MICHIGAN 

CITY 


W 25-19, W 
25-13, 25-14 
W 25-17, 

25-24,W 25-16, 
25-15, W 
25-15, 23-25, 
15-11 
W 25-20, 

24- 25, 15-9, W 

25- 4, 25-7 


CHESTERTON W 25-23, 
25-16, W 
25-12, 25-10 
VALPARAISO W 25-21, 
25-24, L 23-25, 
25-12, 8-15 
LAPORTE W 25-17, 25-24, 
W 25-10, 25-21 



SPORTS INDEX 283 
































BOYS CROSS COONTRY 



Front row: Anthony Smierciak (10), Cosmo Demir (11), Kameron Konopasek (11), Cole Easterday (11), Gavin Baisa (10), Joseph St. John (9), Zachary Erick- 
sen (9) Middle Row: Matthew Garton (11), Nathan Previs (9), Casey Garvey (11), Zachary Hupp (11), Cole Reynolds (11), Tyler Kramer-Stephens (11), Joseph 
Copeland (9), Brandon Long (12), Mitchell Polaski (9) Back row: Head Coach Jeff Rhody, Aaron Balka (10), Ryan West (10), Brian St. John (12), Jacob 
Koontz (11), Justin Price (11), Steven Sweeney (11), Michael Lucas (11),Takoda Potts (11), Matthew Blair (10), Ryan Lionberg (10) 


RUDY SKORUPA 

2nd 

HARRISON 

7th 

LOWELL 

3rd 

NEW PRAIRIE 

2nd 

CULVER 

9th 

DAC 

3rd 


SECTIONALS 

2nd 

REGIONALS 

3rd 

SEMI-STATE 

5th 

STATE 

14th 


JV CHEER 



Front row: Jasmine Stachelski (10), Emily Mannino (9), Morgan 
Grudzien (9), Ashley Sarsfield (10), Emily Scott (10), Hayley Curran 
(9) Middle row: Lauren Tatina (10), Madeline Price (10), Hope Mar¬ 
tens (10), Skylar Martens (10), Zh’ane Hubbard (9), Alexis Morris (9). 
Alyssa Klapkowsk (10), Jenna Golf is (9) Back row: Skyler Sell (9), 
Taylor Dwyer (9), Darby Morris (10). Samantha Janusz (9), Madison 
Powers (9), Kristy Willis (9), Kayli Cinko (9), Lindsey Graham (9), 
Samantha Mikrut (10) 


PURDUE “GET ON TRACK” 1 st 

BISHOP DWENGER INVITE 1 st 

INDIANA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS 4th 

LINCOLN-WAY NORTH POLE INVITE 1st 

MIDWEST CHEERFEST 1st 

LAKE ZURICH INVITE 1st 











GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY 



Front row: Sydney Vandersteeg (10), Joule Tazbir (11), Nicole Farag (10), Jasmine Reyes (9),Teresa Thomas (9), Jeannie Lam (10), Sarah Hunsley (10), Melanie 
Milbrath (9) Middle Row: Rachel Albright (9), Nova Olejnik (9), Ellie Keith (10), Melissa Spanier (12), Elizabeth Ayersman (11), Autumn Huber (11), Emily 
Bustamante (12), Sara Ramos (10) Back row: Coach Karen Arehart, Jennifer Crague (10), Hannah Keith (12), Joellyn Polaski (12), Dana Mularski (12), Maritza 
Castaneda (12), Kelly Shelton (10), Megan Zajac (12), Loan Le (10), Sara Erwin (10), Coach Ann Downey 


RUDY SKORUPA 

2nd 

HARRISON 

4th 

LOWELL 

1st 

NEW PRAIRIE 

3rd 

CULVER 

10th 

DAC 

2nd 


SECTIONALS 

1st 

REGIONALS 

1st 

SEMI-STATE 

2nd 

STATE 

13th 


VARSITY CHEER 


Front row: Taylor Devine (12), KarlieVanHouten (12), Jennifer 
Lindholm (12) Middle Row: Makayla Sullivan (10), Kayla Camarillo 

(10) , Abby Cappello (11), Molly Stokes (9), Kennedy Moore (11), 
Brooke Glover (10) Back row: Megan Hraban (9), Brittany Jacinto 

(11) , Jayna McDermott (11), Olivia Middleton (11), Kelly Lindholm 
(9), Alexandra Gomez (11) 


PURDUE “GET ON TRACK” 1 St 

BISHOP DWENGER INVITE 1st 

INDIANA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS 2nd 

LINCOLN-WAY NORTH POLE INVITE 1st 

MIDWEST CHEERFEST 1st 

LAKE ZURICH INVITE 1st 

CHEER SPORT NATIONALS 2nd 



SPORTS INDEX 285 



















VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 



Front row: Megan Krol (12), Gina Rubino (12), Ashley O’Malley (12), Rachel 
Bell (11), Emily Miklusak (11), Tara Zlotkowski (11), Faith Maldonado (10), 
Jayla Harvey (12) Back row: Nicholas Rossi (10), Coach Andy Gurnak. 
Lauren Ladowski (9), Kylie Fehrman (10), Lindsay Kusbel (12), Coach Marc 
Urban, Victoria Gard (11), AlyssaTodd (11), Coach Brianne Rubesha, Lind¬ 
sey Polito (9) 


CHESTERTON 

W 

79-50 

MERRILLVILLE 

w 

55-41 

MICHIGAN CITY 

w 

78-36 

CROWN POINT 

vv 

54-37 

LAPORTE 

w 

59-45 

PORTAGE 

w 

58-42 

VALPARAISO 

w 

55-45 


JV GIRLS BASKETBALL 



Front row: Crystal Guzman (10), Faith Maldonado (10), Cheyenne 
Mathas (9), Kylee Freckelton (10), Kylie Extin (10), Makayla Erickson (10) 
Back row: Hannah Sarkey (10), Rachael Robards (9), Coach Brianne 
Rubesha, Lauren Smolen (9), Lauren Ladowski (9) 


CHESTERTON 

W 

42-35 

MICHIGAN CITY 

w 

64-13 

CROWN POINT 

w 

41-21 

MERRILLVILLE 

w 

48-11 

VALPARAISO 

w 

45-31 

PORTAGE 

w 

34-22 


FRESHMAN GIRLS BASKETBALL 



Front row: Jessica Villegas (9), Carley Jansky (9), Ashley Todd (9), 
Gabrielle O’Keefe (9). Alexis Miestowski (9), Sarah Tellas (9), Alaysha 
Earving (9), Alexis Zachary (9) Back row: Coach Karen Arehart, 
Anna Weir (9), Jenna Bunner (9), Madisen Tucker (9), Nina Zochalski 
(9), Courtney Carlson (9), Samantha Walker (9), Kacey Cummins (9), 
Coach Scott Freckelton 


CROWN POINT 

W 49-12 

LAPORTE 

L 25-16 

PORTAGE 

W 30-14 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 32-9 

CHESTERTON 

L 33-25 

PORTAGE 

W 47-29 

VALPARAISO 

W 46-12 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 36-14 

CROWN POINT 

W 46-11 

LAPORTE 

W 25-16 

VALPARAISO 

W 36-25 

CHESTERTON 

W 35-34 


286 

























Front row: Sean Griffin (11), Amir Ransom (12), Marcellus Hunt (11), Coach 
Andrew Locke, Coach Dave Milausnic, Coach Eric Speer, Eric Ainsley (12), 
Joseph Bannister (12), Gage Ray (11) Back row: Skyler Smith (11), Nate 
Edvardsen (10), Norell Smith (10), Frank Dijak (10), Ethan Darter (11), Ian 
Martin (12), Ryan Bereda (11), Austin Atkins (10), Joseph Graziano (10) 


LAPORTE 

W 52-48 

PORTAGE 

W 61-56 

VALPARAISO 

L 59-50 

CHESTERTON 

L 56-53 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 48-46 

MICHIGAN CITY 

L 56-26 

CROWN POINT 

L 71-46 


VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL 


Front row: Ryan Davidson (10), Bradley Gerlach (10), Marcellus Hunt (11), 
Coach Andrew Locke, Coach Dave Milausnic, Coach Eric Speer, Eric Ains¬ 
ley (12), Joseph Graziano (10), Brandon Serba (11) Back row: Jack Browne 
(10), Nate Edvardsen (10), Norell Smith (10), Guiseppe Fushi (10), Austin 
Atkins (10), Nicholas Bandura (10), Antonio Pavloski (10) 


CHESTERTON 

L 39-37 

VALPARAISO 

L 53-50 

CROWN POINT 

W 48-29 

MERRILLVILLE 

L 38-36 

PORTAGE 

W 72-44 

CROWN POINT 

W 45-44 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 51-27 



VALPARAISO 

W 33-30 




JV BOYS BASKETBALL 


Front row: Truman Yahne (9), Joseph Hintz (9), Raymond Hilbrich (9), 
Jack Good (9), ConnerTomasic (9), Jack Curtin (9), Ryan Ruberry (9), 
Justin Graves (9), Erik Geile (9) Back row: Coach Brian Tomson, Keon 
Sellers (9), Caleb Pisowicz (9), Justin Graciano (9), Nicoli Fushi (9), Adam 
Reyes (9), Justin Olesek (9), Garret VanDerNoord (9), Westen Black (9), 

Coach Brett Summers 


CROWN POINT 

W 40-32 

CHESTERTON 

L 38-37 

PORTAGE 

L 25-23 

VALPARAISO 

W 40-24 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 36-30 

LAPORTE 

W 48-46 

MERRILLVILLE 

L 35-30 

CROWN POINT 

W 53-35 

CHESTERTON 

W 47-44 

MICHIGAN CITY 

L 45-43 

PORTAGE 

W 47-24 

MERRILLVILLE 

L 34-33 



CROWN POINT 

W 39-28 



VALPARAISO 

W 41-32 


FRESHMAN BOYS BASKETBALL 


SPORTS INDEX 287 





























VARSITY WRESTLING 



Front row: Anthony Osorio (12), Antonio Presta (12), Nicholas Taylor 
(12), Tristan Pappas (11), Tyler Pilackas (10) Middle row: Joseph Szydlo 
(10), Kodie Christenson (12), Luke Sutherland (12), Tristan Pintor (11), 
Jacob Stewart (12), Quinn Kaurich (10) Back row: Coach Ryan Alb, 
Walker Brummett (10), Romel Spight (11), Brett Brown (10), Jacob 
Kleimola (11), Russel Gibbs (11), Austin Langwinski (10), Branden 
Truver (12), Coach LukeTriveline 


I MICHIGAN CITY 

W 57-18 

DAC 

4th 

! VALPARAISO 

W 33-31 

HARVEST CLASSIC 

4th 

CHESTERTON 

W 38-37 

SUPER DUALS 

5-0 

CROWN POINT 

L 55-14 

COUNTY TOURNAMENT 

2nd 

MERRILLVILLE 

L 42-27 

CHICAGO SECTIONAL 

2nd 

■ PORTAGE 

L 66-9 

CALUMET REGIONAL 

5th 

I LAPORTE 

W 48-27 

MERILLVILLE SEMI-STATE 6th 



STATE 

44th 


JV WRESTLING 



Front row: Everardo Vicente (10), Joshua Taylor (10), Brett Morris 
(10), Andreas Nicolaou (10), Nickolas Nykiel (11), Thomas McClain 
(9), Antonio Gonzalez (10), Thomas Pritchett (9) Middle row: Coach 
Ryan Alb, Anthony Konopka (10), Logan Rechlicz (10), Nicolus Sills 
(9), Cody Martin (11), Francisco Ayala (11), Michael Sanchez (9), 
Cory Mikuly (10), Jacob Gurney (10), Coach LukeTriveline Back 
row: Austin Taylor (11), Maxwell King (10), Michael Mikler (9), Charles 
Hayes (11), Christopher Genovesi (10), John Rizzo (10), Matthew 
Taylor (11), Ryan Lionberg (10), Jason Lionberg (10) 

CROWN POINT W 

DUAL MEET RECORD 6-4 
DAC RECORD 3-4 


BOYS SWIMMING & DIVING 



Front row: Gavin Baisa (10), James Ganser (9), Jacob Brazzale (9), 
Ryan Kilinski (10), Drake Hunt (10), Michael Sinchar (10), Michael 
Perich (9), Stevan Vuckovic (9) Second row: Zachary DeJoris (10), 
Cameron Westerman (9), Marcus Naranjo (10), Ivano Garza (11), Troy 
Schneider (11), Christian Cavanaugh (9), Aaron Schassburger (9), 
Christopher Keylor (12) Third row: Tyler Forajter (9), Bartlomiej Cias 

(9) , Alexander Morgan (11), Jamiere Wilson (12), Nathan Jackson (10), 
Brian Garcia (9), Kyle Massa (11), Matthew Applegate (12), Alexander 
Bielawski (11), Colby Hoffman (9) Back row: Coach Jeff Kilinski, Tyler 
Childress (9), Logan Nippert (11), Brandon Walton (11), Coach Tommy 
Slivka, Connor Homans (12), Joshua Barajas (12), Micheal Townsend 

(10) , Coach Dale Ramsey 


VALPARAISO 

W 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 

MUNSTER RELAYS 

2nd 

CHESTERTON 

L 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 

CROWN POINT 

W 

PENN 

L 

MUNSTER 

L 

LAPORTE 

W 

PORTAGE 

W 

HIGHLAND 

W 

SECTIONALS 

2nd 

HIGHLAND INVITE 

2nd 

STATE 

20th 


288 












































Front row: Hannah Leyba (11), Stephanie Stefano (12), Ashley Castillo (9), 
Ashley Knerler (9), Chantal Almazan (9), Tatiana Newell (9), Jordan Rosenwin- 
kel (12), Gabriella Goncher (11), Megan Earl (9) Second row: Rachel Graan 

(10), Sarah Diviney (11), Kallie Higgins (10), Mary Valente (9), Hailey Garlich 
(12), Maura Lake (10), Jennifer Wright (10), Rachel Albright (9), Angel Futrell 
(9), Alejandra Meraz (12), Destini Briggs (9) Third row: Julianna Massa (9), 
Tori Ulloa (11), Savanna Spears (9), Kaitlyn Krachenfels (12), Kaylee Hegyi (9), 
Faith Cooper (9), Gianna Paolilli (9), Marina Vasquez (11), Sara Erwin (10), Erin 
Plenus (9) Back row: Margaret Elton (11), Paityn Emro (9), Camryn Halfeldt 
(10), Coach Emily Tobias, Coach Tommy Slivka, Coach Todd Smolinski, 
Coach Stephen Schindler, Coach Abby Homans, Victoria Springman (11), 

Ana Zanza (10), Hanna Anthony (9) 


PORTAGE W 

VALPARAISO W109-77 
HIGHLAND W133-22 
MERRILLVILLE W148-36 
PENN L107-78 

LAPORTE W121-62 

MICHIGAN CITY W 127-58 


HIGHLAND INVITE 3rd 

CHESTERTON L133-53 

CROWN POINT L 

MUNSTER L 110.5-75.5 

DAC 3rd 

SECTIONALS 3rd 

STATE 30th 


GIRLS SWIMMING & DIVING 



GYMNASTICS 


Front row: Maya Tobin (10), Madison O’Drobinak (9), Megan Gora (11), 
Morgan Markulin (9), Lauren Markulin (12) Back row: Manager Elise Smith 

(11), Coach Myra Lolkema, Andi Wartman (12), Lauren Druzbicki (11), 
Lauren Davidson (9), Coach Lydia Morgan 


VALPARAISO 

L 

LOWELL 

W 

PORTAGE 

L 

CHESTERTON 

L 

MERRILLVILLE 

L 

HOBART 

W 

VALPARAISO 

L 

LAPORTE 

W 

CROWN POINT 

L 

DAC 

L 

MICHIGAN CITY 

L 

SECTIONALS 

L 



VARSITY CENTRALETTES 


Front row: AllysonVanek (12), MichaelaVuckovic (12), Amanda Roberts 

(12), Emma Hupp (12) Middle row: Megan Heifers (11), Alyssa Carter 
(10), Reyna Crothers (11), Nicole Vanek (11), Emma Strohacker (11) Back 
row: Kristina Plaskett (11), Gina Irwin (11), Madeline Andrews (9), Sydney 
Stanek (10), Jessica Lewandowski (11), Abby Markowski (10) 


MILWAUKEE HIP HOP 

1st 

HOMESTEAD JAZZ 

1st 

MILWAUKEE JAZZ 

1st 

LCDI HIP HOP 

8713 

Marion hip hop 

2nd 

LCDI JAZZ 

91.53 

MARION JAZZ 

1st 

REGIONALS HIP HOP 

1st 

kahler hip hop 

1st 

REGIONALS JAZZ 

1st 

kahler jazz 

1st 

NATIONALS HIP HOP 

7th 

CHICAGOLAND HIP HOP 

1st 

NATIONALS JAZZ 

1st 

CHICAGOLAND JAZZ 

1st 

STATE HIP HOP 

1st 

CLARK HIP HOP 

1st 

STATE JAZZ 

1st 

CLARK JAZZ 

1st 





SPORTS INDEX 289 































FRESHMAN BASEBALL 



Front row: Martin Ewing (9), Justin Graves (9), Nicholas Janich (9), Jakob 
Chatel (9), Hunter Zahorsky (9). Middle Row: Douglas Visnack (9), Ray¬ 
mond Hilbrich (9), Ryan Ruberry (9), Payton Sanders (9), Nicholas Swansor 
(9), Jared Schassburger (9). Back Row: Coach Matt Skura, Logan Carver 
(9), Conner Hoffman (9), Kyle Litwicki (9), ConnerTomasic (9), Jeffrey David: 
(9), Coach Brian McNamara 


HIGHLAND 

W 12-2 

CHESTERTON 

W 16-3 

HIGHLAND 

W 15-0 

LOCKPORT 

W 14-4 

CROWN POINT 

L 6-5 

CROWN POINT 

W 3-1 

PORTAGE 

W 11-1 

PORTAGE 

W 6-0 

VALPARAISO 

L 8-5 



HOBART 

W 4-2 



MUNSTER 

W 11-0 



LOWELL 

W 19-0 




JV BASEBALL 



Front row: Coach Anthony Olund, Christopher Fundich (10), Nicholas 
Bandura (10), Jason Lamont (10), Kyle Freel (10), Sam Barnhart (10), 
Coach Mark Escobedo, Middle row: Bradley Loden (10), Maxwell Pat- 
tison (10), Hunter Mihalic (10), Colton Rydlewski (10). Back row: Noah 
Wells (10), Tyler Winiecki (10), Marcus Drzewiecki (10), Jack Bosold (10), 
Dennis Collier (10) 


BISHOP NOLL 

W 18-0 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 23-0 

MORTON 

W 14-3 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 14-2 

MORTON 

W 14-3 

LAPORTE 

W 9-2 

MUNSTER 

W 9-3 

CHESTERTON 

W 6-0 

HIGHLAND 

W 4-2 

WHITING 

W 10-0 

FENWICK 

L 2-5 

LOCKPORT 

L 6-7 

FENWICK 

W 16-5 

CROWN POINT 

L 3-7 

CROWN POINT 

W 9-6 

PORTAGE 

W 11-1 

PORTAGE 

W 15-3 



HANOVER 

W 14-1 



VALPARAISO 

W 11-1 




VARSITY BASEBALL 



Front row: Christian Mota (11), Jarrett Lopez (10), Steven Meyer 
(11), Ian Gifford (11), James Mays (12), Middle row: Zachary 
Turnbough (11), Jake Wisniewski (11), Jack Kuehner (12), Joseph 
Graziano (10), Bryan Vanderlee (12), Ryan Ruthrauff (11) Back row: 
Coach Jeff Myzack, Colin Studer (11), Benjamin Nisle (10), Ethan 
Darter (11), Coach Jeff Sandor, Tyler Frank (10), Alexander Nisle (12), 
Matthew Litwicki (10), Coach Brett Summers 


BISHOP NOLL 

W 5-0 

LAWRENCE CENTRAL 

W 6-4 

DEKALB 

W 11-0 

LAWRENCE CENTRAL W 12-1 

DEKALB 

W 12-1 

LA PORTE 

L 5-4 

ILLIANA CHRISTIAN L 3-2 

PORTAGE 

W 9-0 

MUNSTER 

W 17-7 

SECTIONALS 

W 5-3 

CROWN POINT 

L 2-0 

SECTIONALS 

W 3-1 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 12-1 

SECTIONALS 

L 6-1 

VALPARASIO 

L 9-6 



MICHIGAN CITY 

W 9-0 




290 





















Front row: Sarah Santana (9), Sydney Dinan (9), Alyssa Ranieri (10), Gina 
Szymborski (9), Amanda Noblett (9), Jessica Kiefor (9), Cheyenne Mathas 
(9), Olivia Smith (9), Back row: Coach Melissa Magdos, Rylee Platusic (9), 
Kristen Hecht (10), Hayley Skrezyna (9), Alexa Pinarski (9), Morgan Dines 
(9), Madisen Tucker (9), Selena Michko (9), Coach Rachel Weaver 


CHESTERTON 

W 22-25, 

PORTAGE 

W 25-10, 


18-25, 25-23, 


25-17, 25-17, 


20-25, 15-9, W 


W 25-10, 


25-15, 25-14, 


25-10, 25-13 


25-23 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 25-22, 

CROWN POINT 

W 25-22, 


25-12, 19-25, 


20-25, 25-14, 


25-13 


25-15, W 

VALPARAISO 

L 23-25, 


22-25, 25-16, 


25-19, 16-25, 


25-22, 26-24 


18-25 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 25-15, 25-8, 

LAPORTE 

W 25-21, 


25-14 


25-17, 25-18 



VARSITY SOFTBALL 



Front row: Reanna Reyes (11), Ciera Novak (11), Sarah Banasiak (12), Julia 
Schassburger (11), Jayna McDermott (11), Crystal Guzman (10), Paige 
Carter (11), Aspyn Novak (12) Back row: Sydney Scherzinger (12), Ashley 
Nylen (12), Natalye Johnston (10), Alexandra Hickey (10), Annabel Karberg 
(12), Madison Blythe (10), Emily Thompson (10), Haylee Sherlund (11), 
Coach Jeff Sherman 


MUNSTER 

T 5-5 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 10-0 

PENN 

L 5-3 

PENN 

W 5-2 

HIGHLAND 

W 9-0 

LAPORTE 

W 5-0 

KIMBERLY (WIS.) 

W 11-5 

CHESTERTON 

W 5-0 

LOWELL 

W 9-0 

CROWN POINT 

W 9-0 

CHESTERTON 

W 10-0 

PORTAGE 

W 5-0 

ELWOOD 

W 5-1 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 16-1 

MADISON GRANT 

W 5-0 

SECTIONALS 

1st 

FRANKLIN CENTRAL 

L 10-5 

REGIONALS 

W 2-1 

INDIANAPOLIS 

W 16-13 

SEMISTATE 

W 4-3 

MCCUTCHEON 

W 16-5 

SEMISTATE 

W 7-2 

VALPARAISO 

W 8-3 

STATE 

L 6-2, 2nd 


BOYS GOLF 


Left to right: Tyler Good (9), Benjamin Uram (10), Jordan Lykowski (10), 
Andrew Hegan (9), Anthony Bossi (10), Ryan Wells (12), Coach Christo¬ 
pher Rossiano, Ryan Dahlkamp (12), Tyler Copak (10), Jack Good (9), Alex 
Kaye (10), Nicholas Good (11), Reid Dahlkamp (9) 


HARRISON 

2ND PLACE/332 LA PORTE 

170 

INVITE 


LEBANON 

12TH/340 

triangular- 

151 

ULEN INVITA¬ 


munster/ 


TIONAL 


highland 

7TH/324 

CHESTERTON/ 

154 

don dicken 


MERRILLVILLE 


CLASSIC 


SECTIONALS 

2nd 



REGIONALS 

7th 



SPORTS INDEX 291 









BOYS TRACK & FIELD 



Front row: Joshua Pama (9), Noah Whitney (9), Tyler Dernulc (11), Cole Easterday (11), Nathan Previs (9), Mitchell Polaski (9), Antonio Ortiz (11), Zachary 
Hupp (11), Casey Garvey (11), Maxwell Hill (9), Michael Pena (10), Ryan Fife (11), Keith Crawford (10), Kameron Konopasek (11), Jordan Bibbs (10) Second 
Row: Dakota-Travor Bettis (9), Gavin Gescheidler (9), George Zapata (9), Samer Musleh (11), Jared Benson (12), Noah McClellan (9), Nicholas Lucas (10), 
Aaron Balka (10), Anthony Giles (11), Joshua Benson (10), Noah Tracy (11), Nicholas Mazon (12),Takoda Potts (11), Noah Anderson (9), Michael McClellan (11) 
Third Row: Chase Owczarzak (12), Nathan Jackson (10), Shane Smelser (12), Kyron Marshall (9), Ryan West (10), Gavin Cantu (9), Michael Lucas (10), John 
Dosen (11), Collin Keylor (11), Jacob Boshears (11), Matthew Blair (10), Ethan Tucker (9), Ethan Gomez (12), Charles Sykes (12), Adam Lechowicz (11) Back 
row: Coach Garrett Gray, Head Coach Jeff Rhody, Tyler Kramer-Stephens (11), Joseph Copeland (9), Timothy Matthews (11), Walter Dahlkamp (11), Samuel 
Matchain (12), Michael Horvath (11), Jacob Koontz (11), Anthony Williams (12), Brian St. John (12), Clayton Goldman (11), Daniel Matchain (12), Antonio Pav- 
loski (10), Michael Dahlkamp (9), Joseph Schneider (12), Kurtis Markiewicz (12), Coach Paul Volk, Coach Derell Tinner 


CROWN POINT 

L 63-60 

LC INVITE 

1st 

MUNSTER AND 

2nd 

PORTAGE 


CROWN POINT 

W 71-61 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 69-63 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 73-50 

CHESTERTON 

W 69-63 


LAPORTE 

Tie 

VALPARAISO 

W 69-63 

PORTAGE 

L 76-56 

DAC OUTDOOR 

3rd 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 


SECTIONALS 

2nd 

REGIONALS 

5th 

STATE 

8th 


GIRLS TRACK & FIELD 



VALPARAISO 

W 85-47 

LA SALLE LEG¬ 

1st 

PORTAGE 

W 96-36 

ENDS CLASSIC 


CHESTERTON 

W 89-43 

LAKE MICHIGAN 

2nd 

LAPORTE 

W 100-32 

INVITE 

1st 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 106-17 

CONFERENCE 

1st 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 91-41 

SECTIONALS 

1st 

CROWN POINT 

W 89-43 

REGIONALS 

1st 

LA SALLE 

1st 

STATE 

43rd 


Front row: Jessica Gerling (12), Megan Zajac (12), Emily Busta¬ 
mante (12), Melanie Stepanovic (11), Kylee Freckelton (10), Sarah 
Heuberger (11), Autumn Huber (11), Kendal Travis (9), Loan Le 

(10) , Sarah Hunsley (10), Teresa Thomas (9), Alaysha Earving (9), 
Samantha Dittrich (9), Olivia Barnes (9), Sydney Vandersteeg (10), 
Brooke Glover (10) Middle row: Jocelynn Cheesebourough (11), 
Rachel Miotke (9), Savanna Spears (9), Kelly Shelton (10), Abigail 
Hines (10), Laura Schoonmaker (12), Morgan Olson (11), Renee 
DiNino (11), Sarah Scheub (12), Emily Blink (9), Nicole Verdeyen 

(11) , Etura Williams (12), Victoria McKenzie (11), Jennifer Crague 
(10), Sydnee Barrins (11), Zh’ane Hubbard (9), Sarah Spivak (10), 
Katelyn Rusiniak (9), Jazmyn Zapata (9), Zhanae Howard (11), 

Emma Weissbeck (11) Back row: Sarah Martinez (12), Sara Ramos 
(10), Samantha Bell (11), Alexandria Tyler (11), Melanie Gurney 

(12) , Kimberly Haddad (11), Jaclyn Gruver (9), Clairese Urchell (9), 
Mackenzie Goncher (9), Kelly Joy (10), Melissa Spanier (12), Holly 
Blair (12), Nova Olejnik (9), Kelly Lindholm (9), Ksenija Capshaw (11), 
Alexxa Sutton-Schifo (12), Daniela Zubic (9), Morgyn McAllister (9), 
Jasmine Reyes (9), Morgan Clapman (10) 


292 




































VARSITY/JV GIRLS TENNIS 



Front row: Tatiana Newell (9), Lauren Gronek (10), Navneet Kaur (12), Emily Gora (9), Claire Gronek (9), Hope Martens (10), Skylar Martens (10), Katrina 
Lozanoski (10), Rachel Eder (9) Middle Row: Anastausia Willis (9), Hannah Hill (9), Sydney Batinick (9), JeannineToth (11), Kristina Tinsley (10), Holly F*asko 
(9), Kaitlin George (10), Anna Wachowski (10) Back row: Coach Katelin Ellis, Elayne Wisniewski (12), Michelle Buckman (10), Amber Stedt (11), Colette Oboy 
(9), Colleen Quinn (11), Amanda Guerrero (9), Emily Birlson (12), Coach Bryan Szalonek 


MORTON 

W 

5-0 

GRIFFITH 

W 

5-0 

LOWELL 

w 

5-0 

EAST CHICAGO 

w 

5-0 

HANOVER 

w 

5-0 

HIGHLAND 

w 

5-0 

HOBART 

w 

4-1 

WHITING 

w 

5-0 


VALPARAISO 

W 3-2 

PORTAGE 

L 3-2 

MUNSTER 

W 3-2 

CHESTERTON 

W 5-0 

CROWN POINT 

L 4-1 

MERRILLVILLE 

W 5-0 

MICHIGAN CITY 

W 3-2 

LAPORTE 

L 2-3 

SECTIONALS 

L 2-3 


JV CENTRALETTES 


Front row: Stephanie Foster (11), Autumn Napiwocki (10), Alexa 
Szatkowski (10), Alexis Curatolo (10), Laurel Gonsiorowski (11), Kelsie 
Verhoeve (11) Middle Row: Marisa Skertich (9), Elly Gross (9), Corinne 
Blastick (9), Elexi Horvath (9), Paige Kotecki (9), Macey Anderson (10) 
Back row: Tara Rosenwinkel (9), Carling Louden (9), Hannah Urbani (9), 
Hailey Benko (9), Lauren Wisniewski (9), Hannah Mickelson (9) 


MILWAUKEE 

1st 

MUNSTER 

1st 

MARION 

1st 

CLARK 

1st 

KAHLER 

1st 

LCDI 

1st 

CHICAGO 

1st Hip-Hop, 

REGIONALS 

1st 


2nd Jazz 

STATE 

1st 



SPORTS INDEX 293 

















Front row: Sarah Dingman (12), Andrew Dittrich (12), Joseph Kane (9), Carlie 
Mikuly (12), Shelby Vendl (9) Middle row: Chrystian Studzinski (12), Jonathon 
LaBelle (9), Nathan Bowdish (12), Justin Fox (12) Back row: Michael Nicko- 

laou (11), Joseph Paulas (12) 


Front row: Austin Kunis (12), Raymond Pollalis (12) Second row: Sneha 
Shathish (9), Madelyn Ackerman (11), Guadalupe Cervantes (12), Haroon 
Mohiuddin (10), Sarah Hermanek (10), Madison Payne (10), Anna Hallowell 

(10), Tiffany Tao (12), Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (12) Third row: Neal Govani 
(10), Faiq Quadeer (12), Robert Belzeski (12), Samantha McCuaig (11), Rachel 
Kozel (10), Mohammed Hijaz (10), Albab Uddin (9), Michael Shanks (10), 
Rachel Arnold (10) Fourth row: Jay Chopra (11), Jacob Jakubowicz (12), 
Gavin Schalk (10), Surya Vezhavendan (12), Sarthak Aggarwal (11), Joseph 
Jakubowicz (9), ChristopherTarnowski (12) Back row: Micheal Hemmerling 

(11), Nicholas Applegate (12), Alan Wright (9), George Gundelach (9) 


NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Front row: Hannah Classen (12), Robert Belzeski (12), Danielle Morang 

(12), Megan Barenie (12), Emily Birlson (12), Kristen Kaiser (12) Second 
row: Andres Ramirez (12), James Lafakis (12), Madeline Conley (12), Alayna 
Wallace (12), Christopher Keylor (12) Third row: Jessica Vrbanoff (12). Dana 
Mularski (12), Gurleen Khatra (12), Maritza Castaneda (12) Back row: Ryan 

Wiebe (12), Nicholas Kiepura (12) 


NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Front row: Amanda Roberts (12), Jennifer Mohamed (12), Sinai Valdez 
(12), Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (12), Aspyn Novak (12), Alexis Morales (12) 

Second row: Alison Beck (12),Yunuen Lopez (12), Kayla Hallowell (12), 

Hannah Sonner (12), Ugonna Nwannunu (11) Third row: Taylor Doetterl (12), 

Alexis Martinez (12), Abigail Peppin (12), Tiffany Polyak (12) Back row: Nicho¬ 
las Brandner (12), Alex Baker (12), Courtney Smith (12), Emily Classen (12), 

Andrea Kowalewicz (12) 


294 




TABLETOP CLUB 



SCIENCE OLYMPIAD 















ANIME CLUB 



Front row: Emily Barnes (9), Ashlyn Plants (12), Kimberly Hainsworth (11), Tara Danger- 
field (11), Carlie Mikuly (12) Second row: Alyssa Smyers (9), Andrew Dittrich (12), Lauren 
Rademacher (11), Brittany Rabatine (12), Bailey Kearschner (9) Third row: Justin Fox (12), 
Richard Tuttle (11), Jonathon LaBelle (9), Isaac Araujo (11), Jessica Czajkowski (11) Back 
row: Michael Nickolaou (9), Noah Miller (12), Chrystian Studzinski (12), Jacob Mavity (12) 


FRENCH CLUB 



Front row: Mary Hauter (10), Sarah Diviney (11), Duaa Hijaz (11), Kristina llic (11) Middle 
row: Mariam Silman (11), Breanna Zeller (11), Eva Elmalh (11) Back row: Sarah Bredar 
(11), Jovana Dodevska (11), Madelyn Ackerman (11), Leslie Lopez (11) 


ACADEMIC SUPER BOWL 



Front row: Etura Williams (12), Guadalupe Cervantes (12), Eric Gonsiorowski (12), Roger 
Kaufman (11), Vinayak Roy (11) Middle row: Mathew Matakovic (9), Laura LeVander (12), 
Ryan McCallister (12) Back row: Austin Bodell (12). Brandon Grabarek (11) 


QUILL AND SCROLL 



Front row: Madeline Hirschfield (11), Hannah Sonner (12), Jennifer Mohamed (12), 
Anastasia Papanikolaou (11) Middle row: Madeline Conley (12), Alayna Wallace (12), 
James Lafakis (12), Cathryn Cearing (12), Cassidy Niewiadomski (12) Back row: Ms. 
Carrie Wadycki, Mrs. Sarah Verpooten 


BEST BUDDIES 



Front row: Zachariah Wittenhagen (9), Cameron Jung (12), Alec Bisone (12), Taylor Barchi 
(12), Carl William Laput (10), Sara Logan (11), Olivia Zlatic (11), Tristin Jackowski (10), 
Nicholas Rossi (10) Second row: Christian Huber (12), Zachary Chess (10), Jack Rogers 
(10), Elizabeth Beilis (11), Michelle Gergets (12), Kyle Kujawa (9), Krysta Rietveld (12), Renn 
Arvanitis (11), David Watkins (11) Third row: Brandon Porras (10), Rachel Gross (11), Pablo 
Miranda (11), Austin Huber (10), Matthew Protsman (9) Back row: Haley Reynolds (9), 
Kaitlyn Fassoth (12), Robert Burney (9), Jacob Kleimola (11), Elijah Doggett (11), Jacob 
Taylor (12), Lucas Phillips (12) 


SPORTS INDEX 295 


















WIND ENSEMBLE 


Front row: Carmela Marciano (12), Demitra Adams (12), Joseph Jansky 
(12), Alexandra Hecht (12), Jennifer Chavarria (10), Kelly Browne (12), Madi¬ 
son Payne (10), Christine Chung (12), Haley Skinta (11), Andrea Terrazas 
(12) Second row: Mateo Morales (12), Ethan Hunt (12), Nicholas Sanfratello 
(12), Matthew Beemsterboer (11), Ana Boulas (12), Madelyn Potucek (12), 
Celine McCormack (12), Courtney Smith (12), Sarah Benedict (12), Jen¬ 
nifer Wojcik (12), Marlee McGrath (12) Third row: Andrew Ackerman (10), 
Stephen Diamantos (12), Ryan Leatherman (10), Jesse Veloz (12), Sean 
Flynn (12), Christian Ivezic (11), Jered Pawlak (10), Christopher Tarnowski 
(12), Adam Cobban (12), Maxwell Rees (12), Dana DeLaurentis (11) Back 
row: Alexander Sparling (12), Benjamin Cash (12), Timothy Giazzon (12), 
Marc Mertsching (12), Shea Rogers (11), Benjamin Guzek (12), Brian West 
(11), Andres Ramirez (12) Not Pictured: Abigail Keith (11), Bianca Bernal 
(11), Samantha McCuaig (11), Matthew Tao (11), Jesus Rivera (11), Alexandra 
Adams (11), Madelyn Ackerman (11), Nicholas Schulz (12), Nina Angus (11), 
Madison Schroeder (12), Rebecca Cain (11) 


SYMPHONIC BAND 



Front row: Samantha Bednarek (9), Alyssa Panczuk (9), Faith Hue- 
necke (9), Halle Pederson (10), Michael Beshara (9), Dianne Cometa 
(10), Bailey Schalk (9), Mary Kirkland (10) Second row: Anastau- 
sia Willis (9), Jawad Nammari (9), Eric Vargas (12), Noah Salazar 

(9), Andrae Lockett (9), Lauryn Winarski (12), Alexys Watkins (10), 
Patrick McDonald (9), Nathaniel Tamez (9), Madison O’Drobinak (9), 
Alexis Lopez (10) Third row: Angel Lopez (9), Makayla VanVIeet (9), 
Julia Casner (9), Ryan Fowler (10), Christian Brazzale (9), Kristofer 
Brokop (10) Matthew Hughes (10), Clairese Urchell (9), LeAnn Stut- 
ler (12),Teagan McCormack (10), Jenna Bunner (9), Alexis Murphy 
(12) Fourth row: Kaylee Hegyi (9), Jessica Jarach (11), David Davis 

(10), Kyle Stutler (9), RyanTancos (9), Kyle LeVan (10), Anthony 
Mangan (10), Joshua Klocek (9), Andrew Dittrich (12), Zachary 
Chess (10), Alayna Prisby (12), Justin Andrews (9), Chrystian Studz- 
inski (12), Nathan Aponte (11), Brandon Haddon (11), Bryce Pless- 
inger (9), Brian Ring (9), Austin Langwinski (10), David Edmond (9), 

Angel Reed (9), Jasmine Ledet (9) 


JAZZ ENSEMBLE I 



Front row: Neal Buss (11), Erin Todd (12), Anthony Panozzo (12), Griffin 
Taylor (11), Leslie Lopez (11), Celine McCormack (12) Second row: Chris¬ 
topher Tarnowski (12), Benjamin Moore (11), Christian Ivezic (11), Michael 
Johnson (10), Eliasart Rodriguez (11), Robert Pawlak (12), Ethan Hunt (12), 
EvanVendl (12) Third row: Kenneth Wolfrum (11), William Wyatt (11), Shea 
Rogers (11), Nicholas Schulz (12), Mateo Morales (12), Nicholas Perez (11) 
Not Pictured: Clifford Fitch (11), Eamonn Duffy (11), Alexander Sparling 
(12), Kyle West (12) 



Front row: Trevor Williams (11), Joseph Jansky (12), Kylie Thomsen (9), 

Joelle Niemzyk (9), Elysse Brown (11), Ethan Vogt (9), Elizabeth Slager (9), 
Jasmine Reyes (9), Natasha English (9), Madison Payne (10), Maya McCants 
(9), Second row: Samantha Szewczyk (9), Connor Fox (9), Brice Doescher 
(9), Joshua Velazquez (12), Michael Clark (10), Tyler Paluszak (11), Zach¬ 
ary Hansen (10), Michael Shanks (10), LeAnn Stutler (12), Maxwell Hill (9), 
Blair Haugh (9) Third row: Gabriel Ivezic (9), Kenneth Singleton (12), Ethan 
Erickson (10), Matthew Adams (10), Nicholas Kritikos (10), Michael Rizzo (9), 
Chase Wardian (9), Jered Pawlak (10), Robert Pawlak (12), Noah McClellan 
(9), Tyler Kerrick (9) Back row: Nathan Little (10), Kenneth Barsic (10), Ben¬ 
jamin Cash (12), Timothy Giazzon (12), Philip Jurek (9), Casey Pederson (9), 
Alan Wright (9), Matthew Waddell (10), Ryan Leatherman (10) Not Pictured: 
Jessica Rivera (10) 


PERCUSSION 



Front row: Raychel Anoe (10), Niyelle Lee (9), McKenzi Swarthout 
(9), Liana Motel (10), Monica Luna (9). Hannah Peters (10), Kaitlyn 
Seitz (10) Second row: Amber Poortenga (11), Niklas Gustafson 
(11), Gabriel Ivezic (9), Brady Schutt (9), Neal Buss (11), Nadia 
Magnabosco (10), Madelyn Nohos (10) Third row: Noah Whitney 
(9), Griffin Taylor (11), Anthony Panozzo (12), Dawson Stroud (11), 
William Wyatt (11), Alec Book (12), Joshua DeJarlais (9) Last row: 
Kole Geiser (9), Philip Jurek (9), Ian Otic (9), Jacob Boshears (11) 



Front row: Sara Logan (11), Samantha McCormick (11), Hannah 
Hoff (10), Joy Wozniak (9), Gabriella Goncher (11) Second row: 
GiannoulaTjortjis (10), Troy Schneider (11), Nicholas Rossi (10), 
Savannah Childress (11), Isabelle Thomas (10), Amber Hemphill 

(11), Haley Reynolds (9) Third row: Desiree Stoces (10), Ronald 
Jessen (11), Caleb Zapata (9), Joshua DeJarlais (9), Emily Bratcher 
(10). Rachel Arnold (10) Back row: Kaitlynn Lemus (11), Tia Ling- 
vay-Guardiola (10), Justin Cortez (12), David Paredes (9), Brandon 
Bianco (12), Kaitlyn Opperman (10), Tara DeGrauwe (11), George 
Gundelach (9) Not Pictured: Danielle Usak (11), Kayla Vujisic (10) 


296 















Front row: Hilary VanderVelde (11), Eva Kimberly (11), Kara Guinn (12), Ashley 
Gayton (12) Second row: Marissa Grantham (12), Marisa Jones (12), Katlynn Grace 
(12), Samantha Lane (11), Savannah Childress (11) Third row: Emily Baginski (12), 
Nicole Batres (12), Lauren Rademacher (11), Jennifer Alvarez (11) Last row: Ashley 
Ferguson (12), Elizabeth Arnold (12), Breanna Powers (12), Katherine Freeman (11) 
Not Pictured: Concetta DalSanto (12), Danielle Gaines (11) 


SENIOR TREBLE 



Front row: Elnora Stroud (12), Mikenzie Delia (10), Chelsea Barzycki (11), KC Perry 
(11), Jennifer Sanchez (11), Marisa Nadon (10), Danielle Buckley (10) Second row: 
April Koepke (12), Payton Pawelski (11), Mariam Shatat (11), Ashley Jadernak (11), 
Morgan Massei (11), Dasia Lockett (10), Antonietta Ruffolo (11), McKayla Karagias 
(11) Third row: Desiree Stoces (10), Monique Ochoa (11), Vivian Diaz (11), Stepha¬ 
nie O’Drobinak (10), Lauren Yacono (11), Isabella Gomez (10), Hannah Souronis 

(10) , Kellie Repasi (10), Jenna Buntin (10) Last row: Jessica Wisniewski (11), Tia 
Lingvay-Guardiola (10), Alexandra Idalski (10), Kaitlyn Vander Laan (10), Ona Ahmed 

(11) , Christi Raichle (12), Anastasia Rauch (11), LeAnn Stutler (12), Emily Bratcher 
(10), Maegan Walton (10), Anna Samels (10) 


CONCERT BAND 



Front row: Camille Matasovsky (9), Hannah Gross (9), Maya McCants (9), Nicole 
p elc (12), Shelby Vendl (9), Emily Spriggs (9), Samantha Dittrich (9), Alyssa Smyers 
(9). Miya Cruz (10), Jayla Jones (11) Second row: Xochitl Regalado (11), Julissa 
Dsgollado (12), Erica Guevara (10), Celeste Guevara (12), Michael Kulik (9), Colm 
Tomaszewski (9), Sean Harper (11), Joelle Niemzyk (9), Haley Jeneske (10) Third 
r ow: Alize Futrell (9), Megan Gabe (11), Alexis Hernandez (12), Savannah White (9), 
Emmanda McKenzie (11), Christian Banfield (9), Michael Harmon (9), Nikolas Rivera 
(9), Taylor Duffy (11) Fourth row: Trevor Williams (11), Clayton Hatfield (11), Bailey 
Kearschner (9), Michael O’Donnell (9), David Isom (9), Alexis Murphy (12), David 
Golden III (10), Lindsey Buchler (9), Ian Jones (9) Fifth row: David Nelson, Robert 
Belzeski (12), Nickolas Bernal (9), Michael Villarreal (10), Antoneia Galvin (11), Megan 
O’Donnell (9), Rachel Cain (9), Ciana White (10) Sixth row: Hayley West (9), Hannah 
$ako (9), Britney Fijut (9), Mateo Hitchcock (9), Austin Riese (9), Jonathan Samsel 
(9), Elise Classen (11), Hannah Classen (12), Vincent Malan (9) Seventh row: Brian 
Best (10), Noah DiDonato (9), Brice Doescher (9), Benjamin Moore (11), Mathew 
Palm (12), David Lee (9), Christopher Abrinko (9) Back row: Colin Yugo (9), Anthony 
Bednarek (11), JonathanTsakopoulos (9), Carlos Martinez (9), Joseph O’Hara (9), 
Nathan Little (10), Erik Palm (10), Jacob Denson (10), Nathan Augustino (9) 


HAND BELLS I 



Front row: Macey Anderson (10), Hannah Hestermann (10), Katherine 
Veronesi (10), Angie Ramirez (11) Second row: Lisette Barajas (9), Ashley 
Gayton (12), Lauren Tatina (10), Maya Tobin (10), Isabella Kowalczyk (9) 
Third row: Katlynn Grace (12), Danielle Sprouse (11), Katherine Znavor 
(10), Jaime Winquist (10), Jennifer Alvarez (11) Last row: Samantha 
Mikrut (10), Kaitlyn Thompson (10), Madison Magdziarz (10), Madison 
Powers (9), Katherine Freeman (11) Not Pictured: Concetta DalSanto 
(12), Tara DeGrauwe (11), Spencer Wise (11) 


JUNIOR TREBLE 



Front row: Rachel Miotke (9), Karly McKinney (9), Mercedes Jacques 
(9), Maegan Walton (10), Vera Kohut (10), Kristal Ochoa (10), Christina 
Terrazas (9), Amanda Elkins (9) Second row: Caitlin Mavity (9), Lauren 
Kamykowski (9), Hannah Hoff (10), Lidia Pineda (9), Erin Plenus (9), Claire 
Kijewski (9), Ayanna Ransom (10), Tatiana Newell (9) Third row: Autumn 
Flynn (9), Miranda Escobedo (9), Rachel Albright (9), Emily Bratcher (10), 
Jazzmyne Smiley (10), Madison Frederick (9), Lara Mitchell (9), Kaitlin 
Broz (9), Dana Brownewell (9), Maija Nieves (9) Last row: Estela Madri¬ 
gal (9), Kaitlyn Vander Laan (10), Alexis Lawley (9), Samantha Bredar (9), 
Lauren Wisniewski (9), Megan McLaughlin (9), Sneha Shathish (9), Kas- 
sandra Hansen (9), Madison Powers (9), Amanda Aponte (9), Taylor Lush 
(9), Jessica Flores (9) Not Pictured: Amy Denton (9), Jessica Rivera (10) 



Front row: Payton Pawelski (11), Deamontria Robinson (12), Elnora 
Stroud (12), Roger Kaufman (11), Christi Raichle (12), Alayna Prisby (12), 

Hannah Scherer (12), Jennifer Alvarez (11), Megan Seibert (12), Aaron 
Cappello (9), Ashley Jadernak (11) Second row: Breanna Patrick (11), 
Zachary Hansen (10), Lauren Druzbicki (11), Kristina Donovan (12), Spen¬ 
cer Wise (11), Jadon Bloom (11), David Paredes (9), Madison Breford (11), 

Blake Hawthorne (9), Montes Pirtle (12) Third row: Breanna Powers (12), 
Kaitlynn Lemus (11), Chelsea Barzycki (11), Anastasia Rauch (11), Michael 
Krga (11), Christina Tipman (11), Sydney Farmer (11), Lindsey Solan (12), 

Olivia Froelich (10), Toni Cribari (12), Andrew Kasper (9) Last row: LeAnn 
Stutler (12), Elise Bereolos (11), Megan Barry (11),Ty Kullmann (11), Ryan 
Powers (12), Justin Cortez (12) Brett Balicki (11), Parker Danner (10), 
Timothy Bakas (9), Michelle Duran (11), Adam Gustas (10), George Gun- 
delach (9) Not Pictured: Jackson DeLisle (11), Larissa McBride (11) 

INDEX 297 



























Front row: Jackson DeLisle (11), Aaron Cappello (9), Christi Raichle (12), 
Brittany Busby (11), Sarah Hermanek (10), Katherine Veronesi (10), Isabella 
Gomez (10), Stephanie O’Drobinak (10), Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (12) 
Second row: Sarah Colby (12), Madison Frederick (9), Adam Gustas 

(10), Cathryn Cearing (12), Anastasia Rauch (11), Alayna Wallace (12), 
MakaylaVanVIeet (9), Candace Jarzombek (10), Erini Collaros (11) Third 
row: Megan McLaughlin (9), Ronald Lee (12), Amanda Aponte (9), Brett 
Balicki (11), Madeline Conley (12), Brandon Bianco (12), Elise Bereolos 

(11) , Megan Barry (11) Back row: Ryan Wojcik (12), Aidan McCambridge 

(12) , Nicholas Kiepura (12), Alexander Vrbanoff (9), Raquel Rembert (11), 

William Kruzan (10), Nichole Heusmann (11), Parker Danner (10) 



DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS 


Front row: Natasha English (9), Jennifer Mohamed (12), Sinai Valdez (12), 
Emily Mannino (9), Gianna Mills (11), Makayla Sullivan (10), Rachel Eder (9), 
Kayla Broussard (12) Second row: Katrina Lozanoski (10), Nicole Geer (10), 
TaShara Travis (12), Alyssa Scanlon (11), Madeline Hirschfield (11), Niji Shah 
(11), Eustina Zakher (12) Third row: Navneet Kaur (12), Katarina Radoja (11), 
Jiliian Wilschke (12), Gabriella Danko (11), Jasmin Alvarado (11), Jeanine 
Gilbert (11), Duaa Hijaz (11) Third row: Sherry Shibu (12), Ashley Scanlon (10), 

Breanna Zeller (11), Sean Meyer (11) 



Front row: Courtney Smith (12), Samantha Szewczyk (9), Tiffany Polyak (12), 
Amanda Roberts (12), Helana Zakher (10), Taylor Doetterl (12),Guadalupe 
Cervantes (12), Ms. Ashley Kline Second row: Hannah Classen (12), Robert 
Belzeski (12), Brandon Long (12), Joellyn Polaski (12), Megan Barenie (12), 
Katelyn Pass (9), Rachel Streck (10) Third row: Romel Spight (11), Colleen 
Quinn (11), Sarah Bredar (11), Jovana Dodevska (11), Gurleen Khatra (12), 
Etura Williams (12), Maria Moricz (11), Eamonn Duffy (11) Fourth row: Jacob 
Kleimola (11), Jay Chopra (11), Julia Kruzan (11), Kaylee Rodell (11), Nicole 
Vanek (11), Noah Miller (12), Andrea Abramowicz (12) Back row: Ryan Wiebe 

(12), Justin Price (11) 


DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS 


THESPIANS 

Front row: Candace Jarzombek (10), Jackson DeLisle (11), Stephanie 
O’Drobinak (10) Halle Pederson (10), Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (12), Emily 
Badger (10) Second row: Megan Barry (11), Adam Gustas (10), Cathryn 
Cearing (11), Anastasia Rauch (11), Matthew Hughes (10) Third row: 

Ronald Lee (12), Brett Balicki (11), Madeline Conley (12), Craig Bronson 
(11) Back row: Erini Collaros (11), Nicholas Kiepura (12), Raquel Rembert 
(11), Nichole Heusmann (11), Brittany Busby (11) 




298 

































INTERACT 



Front row: Niji Shah (11), Jeccika Scialabba, (11), Rachel Eder (9), Alexis Morales (12) 
Second row: Peyton Lessentine (10), Jeanine Gilbert (11), Duaa Hijaz (11) Third row: 
Shannon Hearne (11), Jovana Dodevska (11), Nicole Peterson (11), Lauryn Winarski (12), 
David Park (12) Third row: Jacob Mavity (12), Ryan Wiebe (12), Nicholas Poulos (12), 
Sarah Bredar (11), Maria Moricz (11) 



Front row: Jaime Winquist (10), Megan Gabe (11), Hannah Peters (10), Tiffany Tao (12), 
Riley McGrath (12) Middle row: Madelyn Ackerman (11), Sherry Shibu (12), Mary Hauter 
(10), Navneet Kaur (12) Back row: Taylor Duffy (11), Samantha McCuaig (11) 



Front row: Michelle Buckman (10), Camryn Wallace (10), Rachel Kozel (10), Brendan Kelly 
(12), Nicholas Biegel (12), Jordan Buckmaster (11) Middle row: Joseph Jakubowicz (9), 
Joseph Grzybek (10), Neal Govani (10), Ethan Hunt (12), Brandon Long (12) Back row: 
Andrew Ring (12), Jay Chopra (11), Jacob Jakubowicz (12), Surya Vezhavendan (12), Sar- 
thak Aggarwal (11) 


SPELL BOWL 



Front row: Raymond Pollalis (12), Rayyan Karim (11), Niji Shah (11), Faiq Quadeer (12) 
Back row: Micheal Hemmerling (11), Nicholas Applegate (12) 



Front row: Heather Loeffler (11), Hannah Miskell (12), Sarah Pramuk (12), Emily Erickson 
(9) Back row: Kassie Woodworth (12), Victoria McKenzie (11), Summer Bakker (11) 


CLUBS INDEX 299 




















Front row: Rachel Gross (11). Madeline Hirschfield (11), Niji 
Shah (11), AndriaTalavera (11). Duaa Hijaz (11) Second row: 
Michael Zubeck (10), Mohammed Hijaz (10), Breanna Zeller (11), 
Sean Meyer (11) Third row: Taylor Doetterl (12), Taylor Rudnick 

(10). Kaylee Rodell (11), Maria Moricz (11), Cassidy Niewiadom- 
ski (11) Fourth row: Brandon Grabarek (11), 
Joseph Grzybek (10) 


STUDENT COUNCIL 



Front row: Bailey Schalk (9), Eva Kimberly (11), Nicole Geer 

(10), Anna Hallowell (10), Gianna Mills (11), Jessica Howell (10), 
Rachel Eder (9), Ruth Chen (10) Second row: Diana Bolanos 

(10) , Alexis Kelly (10), Ishika Prakash (9), Madeline Hirschfield 

(11) , Kayla Hallowell (12), Duaa Hijaz (11), Niji Shah (11) Third 
row: Sean Meyer (11), Eva Elmalh (11), Samantha Tugman (9), 

Emily Segovia (11), Sarah Combis (10), Audrey Sobolewski (10), 
Karli Swanson (10) Fourth row: Maria Moricz (11), Joseph Grzy¬ 
bek (10). Kassie Woodworth (12), Courtney Smith (12). Taylor 
Doetterl (12), Breanna Zeller (11), Jay Chopra (11) Last row: 

Kaylee Rodell (11), Sarah Bredar (11) 


N-TEENS 



FUTURE MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS 


Front row: Eva Elmalh (11), Madeline Hirschfield (11), Niji Shah 

(11), AndriaTalavera (11), Nicole Geer (10), Anna Hallowell (10) 
Middle row: Samantha Torres (11), Maria Moricz (11), Nkem 
O’Gonuwe (10), Breanna Zeller (11), Emily Segovia (11), Rachel 
Gross (11) Back row: Mr. William Keep. Jay Chopra (11), 

Joseph Grzybek (10) 



ACADEMIC LETTER WINNERS 


Front row: Navneet Kaur (12), Niji Shah (11), Duaa Hijaz (11), 
Hannah Sonner (12), Jennifer Mohamed (12), Alexis Morales 

(12) Middle row: Amanda Roberts (12), Mohammed Hijaz (10), 
Madelyn Ackerman (11), Sean Meyer (11), Rachel Gross (11) 
Back row: Taylor Doetterl (12), Sarah Bredar (11), Gurleen Khatra 

(12), Maria Moricz (11), Alayna Wallace (12) Last Row: Brandon 

Grabarek (11), Jay Chopra (11) 



































Front row: Alexis Morales (12), Max Barnhart (11), Grant Bradtke (12), Kayla Hallowell 
(12), Eva Kimberly (11) Middle row: Paul Centanni (11), James Lafakis (12), Caleb Bea¬ 
sley (10), Joey Schneider (12), Madeline Conley (12), Kristina Skvarek (11) Back row: 
Anthony Dye (11), Nathan Zajac (12), Christopher Zielinski (11), Dylan Anderson (12), 
Brandon Long (12) 


SOPHOMORE CLASS CABINET 



Front row: Joseph Grzybek (10), Nicole Geer (10), Ms. Carrie Wadycki, Mrs. Sarah 
Verpooten 


JUNIOR CLASS CABINET 



Front row: Rachel Gross (11), Eva Kimberly (11), Madeline Hirschfield (11), Niji Shah 
(11), Emily Segovia (11), Gianna Mills (11) Middle row: Noelle McBride (11), Breanna 
Zeller (11), Samantha Torres (11), Sean Meyer (11), Eva Elmalh (11) Back row: Maria 
Moricz (11), Jay Chopra (11), Cassidy Niewiadomski (11) 


SENIOR CLASS CABINET 



Front row: Tiffany Polyak (12), Abigail Peppin (12), Ugonna Nwannunu (12), Jennifer 
Mohamed (12), Sinai Valdez (12) Middle row: Megan Barenie (12), Kristen Kaiser (12), 
Morgan Kelly (12), Courtney Smith (12) Back Row: Robert Belzeski (12), Maritza Cas¬ 
taneda (12), Nicholas Kiepura (12), Ashley Richards (12), James Lafakis (12) 



Front row: Sean Meyer (11), Niji Shah (11), Maria Moricz (11), Jay Chopra (11) 


SPORTS INDEX 301 







COLOPHON 


editors and 
advisers 



JENN MOHAMED 
YBK Editor-in-Chief 


SARAH VERPOOTEN CARRIE WADYCKI 

Adviser Adviser 


HANNAH REED 
YBK Design Editor 






Michael Clark 


Lauren 

Davidson 


Annabella 

Piunti 


[Colleen Quinn] 


302 






























LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 


We made it (the yearbook). It has 
been one rough year of hard work, 
but our publications staff produced 
one amazing book this year. I may 
have created the theme extremely 
late and stressed out Wad and VP, 
but once the theme was born, the 
staff began the journey of finishing 
this book. 

Pub has taught me so many les¬ 
sons in the last three years. In math 
or english class, you can sit next 
to the kid you don’t like and not 
have to work with him, but in pub, 
chances are Wad or VP will find a 
way to make everybody work with 
each other at least once. That’s the 
biggest lesson I’ve learned. In the 
real world, not everyone will like 
you, and there won’t always be a 
person there to hold your hand and 
tell you that you can do it. 

To put it simply, Pub is not a 
blow-off class. Amazing products 
are created, and everybody gains 


JENNIFER MOHAMED 

BOOK INFORMATION ybkeic 2014-2015 


Quiver Volume 49. Every Some One. was printed by Herff Jones. 2525 Midpoint Drive, Edwardsville, 

KS 66111, with the assistance of Customer Service Adviser Kristi Templeton. Technical Support Adviser 
Debbie King and Sales Representative Betty Samples. This book has a press run of 1.500, featured on 
100 lb. paper. During early orders at registration, the book cost $50, while end-of-year orders in March 
reached $70. All page layouts were created using Adobe InDesign CS4 and Adobe Photoshop CS4. 

Our staff photographers shot thousands of digital images using Canon Digital 50D, 60D andT3i. Giolas Photography in Merrillville shot all underclass, senior and group photos. All the text in this book is set in Helvetica CE 
55 Roman. Alternate Gothic 2 BT. and HelveticaNeue U 65 Medium. 

Quiver Volume 48 was awarded many Harvey Awards and ranked Superior by the Indiana High School Press Association. 

Quiver Volume 47 was ranked Superior by the Indiana High School Press Association, and a First Class with two marks of distinction from the National Scholastic Press Association, was rated a Hoosier Star and was 
awarded many Harvey Awards through the IHSPA. 


skills and learns more about them¬ 
selves. I’d like to thank all of you 
for putting in the time and effort to 
help create this year’s yearbook. 
Most importantly, I’d like to thank 
Hannah Reed for being an amazing 
design editor. I don’t think I could 
have gotten along with anyone 
else, and the dream team will be 
one to beat. 

My best advice is to remember 
that life is arbitrary, but it’s yours 
for the taking. Some people will be 
difficult to deal with and some will 
be friends that might last a lifetime. 

High school isn’t like a movie at 
all, people don’t always like each 
other, and classmates don’t sing 
together to make a situation better. 
In real life, people will yell at each 
other, cry from frustration, and 
struggle with finding solutions to 
seemingly impossible situations. 
Pub definitely consists of these real 
life situations. 



COLOPHON 303 



















INDEX 

A 

Aardema, Allissa 217 
Aardema, Andrew 42, 151, 187 
Aaron, Nathan 217 
Abbasi, Samantha 187 
Abbassi, Christina 187 
Abdelhamid, Jenan 202 
Abdeljaber, Muaath 187 
Abdelqader, Lena 202 
Abramowicz, Andrea 232, 268, 
298 

Abramowicz, Michael 217 
Abrinko, Christopher 187, 297 
Abudayyeh, Malak 202 
Abughofah.Yousaf 319 
Ackerman, Andrew 202, 296 
Ackerman, Madelyn 173, 178, 
179, 217, 294, 295, 296, 299, 
300 

Adams, Alexandra 81, 142, 

217, 296 

Adams, Demitra 232, 296 
Adams, Logan 187 
Adams, Matthew 202, 296 
Addington, Zachary 152 


Aggarwal, Sarthak 177, 179, 
217, 294, 299 
Agresta, Emily 202 
Aguilar, Luis 202 
Ahmed, Ona 217, 297 
Ainscough, Mia 217 
Ainsley, Eric 136, 139, 141, 
232, 280, 287 
Al-Abed, Bahaa 187 
Alb, Ryan 93,288 
Albright, Rachel 78, 79, 187, 
285, 289, 297 
Alcantara, Alexandra 217 
Alder, Brandon 217 
Aleksic, Walter 147,202 


Alessandri, Jaclyn 19, 182 
Alessia, Bianca 202 
Alexander, Andrew 217 
Alexander, Olivia 232 
Ali, Aaron 232 
Ali, Justin 202 
Allen-Breski, Amanda 182 
Allison, Alexander 202 
Almaguer, Samuel 217 
Almazan, Chantal 35, 187, 289 
Almazan, Natalie 187 
Almeida, Kristina 202 
Almeida, Monica 140, 142, 232 
Aloia, Gabrielle 232 
Altieri, Angelo 187 
Alvarado, Guadalupe 15, 232 
Alvarado, Jasmin 217, 298 
Alvarez, Jennifer 152, 153, 217, 
297 

Alvarez, Leah 217 
Alvarez, Lidia 18 
Amft, Jacob 202 
Amptmeyer, Kolbie 187 
Anaya, Marlene 202 
Andersen, Kelsey 217 
Anderson, Cade 187 
Anderson, Dylan 301 
Anderson, Ellery 217 
Anderson, Hannah 232, 271 
Anderson, Macey 22, 202, 293, 
297 

Anderson, Matthew 187 
Anderson, Noah 187, 292 


Anderson, Pam 182 
Anderson, Samantha 37, 68, 
69, 217, 283 
Andrade, Tea 187 
Andrews, Carolyn 232 
Andrews, Jendryk 187 
Andrews, Justin 187, 296 
Andrews, Madeline 96, 187, 
289 

Andrews, Matthew 202 
Andrews, Patrick 202 
Angellotti, Gabriella 232 
Angotti, Alivia 187 
Angotti, Andrew 42 
Angus, Nina 142, 217, 296 


Anoe, Raychel 202, 296 
Anthony, Hanna 187, 289 
Antonakopoulos, Jessica 187 
Anuszkiewicz, Miranda 127, 
217 

Apalak, Sahin 187 
Aponte, Amanda 187, 297, 298 
Aponte, Nathan 217, 296 
Applegate, Matthew 88, 89, 
232, 288 

Applegate, Nicholas 173, 232, 
294, 299 

Apuyod, Marianne 217 
Araujo, Erika 57, 187 
Araujo, Isaac 217, 295 
Arehart, Karen 182, 285, 286 
Arenas, Anthony 232 
Arenas, Christian 232, 250 
Arevalo, Christina 187 
Armstrong, Miranda 217 
Arndt, Katlyn 202 
Arnold, Elizabeth 297 
Arnold, Rachel 202, 294, 296 
Arnold, Samantha 202 
Arreola, Joshua 217 
Artman, Adam 187 
Arvanitis, Renn 168, 217, 295 
Ashby, Rebecca 187, 283 
Ashby, Spencer 187 
Atkins, Austin 84, 201,280, 
287 

Augustino, Nathan 187, 297 
Augustino, Nicholas 187 
Aulinskis, Hannah 26, 217 
Avelar, Timothy 187 
Ayala, Francisco 217, 288 
Ayersman, Elizabeth 73, 93, 
217, 285 

Azzam, Ammar 217, 280 
Azzam, Haya 187 

B 

Babick, John 202 
Back, Ryan Decker 280 
Bacso, Don 143,182 
Bacso, Nicholas 187 
Bader, Brian 202 
Badger, Emily 24, 148, 149, 

186, 202, 225, 298, 302 
Badillo, Bianca 187 
Badillo, Charles 232 
Bafia, Joe 182 

Baginski, Emily 12, 232, 297 
Bais, Jackson 187 
Baisa, Gavin 24, 88, 89, 202, 
284, 288 

Bakas,Timothy 30,150,151, 

187, 297 

Baker, Alex 131,232,294 
Bakker, Summer 217, 299 
Balazs, Hunter 187 
Balcazar, Blake 187 
Balcazar, Michael 202 


Balicki, Brett 42, 142, 146, 147, 
216, 217, 297, 298 
Balka, Aaron 202, 284, 292 
Balka, Jessie 187, 283 
Banaag, John 202 
Banasiak, Sarah 118, 141,232, 
291,319 

Bandura, Michael 187 
Bandura, Nicholas 30,121, 
202, 287 290 
Bane, Evan 202 
Banfield, Christian 187, 297 
Bankroff, Laurel 24, 25, 185 
Bannister, Joseph 84, 85, 287, 
319 

Bannon.Tim 182 
Barajas, Joshua 88, 89, 136, 
232, 288, 319 

Barajas, Lisette 31,187,297 
Baranowski, Christopher 63, 
202, 280 

Baranowski, George 182 
Baranowski, Rachel 202 
Baranowski, Teresa 64,232, 
282 

Barchi,Taylor 170,232,295 
Barenie, Megan 56, 128, 141, 
144, 177,232, 294, 298, 301, 
319 

Barnes, Emily 178, 187, 295 
Barnes, Logan 232 
Barnes, Olivia 44, 156, 186, 
187 292 

Barnes, Zyanya 202 
Barnett, Dakota 202, 280 
Barnett, Derek 232 
Barnett, Emma 134, 187 
Barnhart, Max 130, 217, 301 
Barnhart, Sam 121, 163, 202, 
280, 290 

Barnoski, Kyle 187 
Barrera, Nicholas 232 
Barrett, Gabrielle 232 
Barrins, Sydnee 217, 292 
Barron, Nicolas 217 
Barry, Megan 148, 174, 217, 
297,298 ~ 

Barsic, Kenneth 202, 296 
Bartochowski, Kendall 49, 156 
217 

Bartolomeo, Tony 185 
Barton, Hannah 202 
Barton, Morgan 187 
Barzycki, Chelsea 297 
Basem, Benjamin 187 
Basile, Gavin 319 
Batchuluun, Urangoo 202 
Bates, Emily 202 
Bates, Morgan 202 
Bathurst, Jocelyn 30, 232 
Bathurst, Jordan 202 
Batinick, Sydney 57, 187, 293 
Batres, Nicole 232, 258, 297 
Beader, Natasa 44, 217, 283 
Beard, D’Andre’ 202 


Christopher Tarnowski (12) Photo by: Madeline Conley 



304 




Beasley, Caleb 202, 206, 301 
Becich, Kelsey 127,171,183 
Beck, Alison 232, 294 
Beck, Ed 185 
Beckwith, Ryan 217 
Bednarek, Anthony 217, 297 
Bednarek, Samantha 187, 296 
BeDuhn, Taylor 232 
Beeks, Brian 202 
Beemsterboer, Jacqlene 217 
Beemsterboer, Matthew 217, 
296 

Beemsterboer, Michael 187 
Beemsterboer, Zachary 232 
Beggs, Julia 75, 282 
Beggs, Mark 75 
Begley, Sean 24, 28, 29, 142, 
185 

Behrens, Kaitlin 85, 217 
Behrens, Lauren 32, 232 
Beilfuss, Jon 187, 281 
Bell, Hailey 217 
Bell, Joshua 143,232 
Bell, Rachel 86, 87, 217, 286 
Bell, Samantha 217,292 
Bellar, Matthew 217 
Bellar, Michael 187 
Beilis, Elizabeth 217, 295 
Belzeski, Robert 81,171,173, 
232, 294, 297, 298, 301 
Benavides, Desiree 217 
Bender, Donald 202 
Benedict, Brittany 202 
Benedict, Dutch 217 
Benedict, Sarah 164, 232, 296 
Benko, Cheyenne 232 
Benko, Hailey 187, 293 
Benko, Randy 217 
Benninghoff, Aaron 202, 280 
Bensen, Joshua 280 
Benson, Cody 202 
Benson, Jared 113,232,292 
Benson, Joshua 202, 292 
Bereda, Ryan 84, 85, 217, 280, 
287 - 

Bereolos, Elise 47, 142, 149, 
150, 168, 217, 297 298 
Berg, Samuel 187 
Bermingham, Myiah 232 
Bernal, Bianca 217, 296 
Bernal, Nickolas 187, 297 
Bernardy, Samantha 17, 65, 77, 
216,217 

Bertollini, Zha’rece 217 
Bertossi, Ryan 139, 250 
Berumen, Madison 217, 282 
Beshara, George 217 
Beshara, Michael 164, 187, 296 
Best, Brian 202,297 
Betancourt, Abagail 180, 202 
Betten, Haley 187 
Bettis, Dakota-Travor 187, 281, 
292 

Beushausen, Nikolas 232 
Bhatt, Payal 175, 202, 211 


Bianco, Brandon 149, 232, 

296,298 

Bibbs, Jordan 202, 292 
Biegel, Hannah 202 
Biegel, Nicholas 232, 268, 299, 
314 

Bielawski, Alexander 217, 288 
Bikos, Michael 77, 186, 187, 

280 

Billot, Isaiah 217 
Birkmann, Emily 217 
Birlson, Emily 108, 138, 233, 
238, 293, 294 
Bishop, Jenna 202 
Bisone, Alec 217, 295 
Black, Sierra 217 
Black, Westen 187, 287 
Blair, Holly 114, 115, 233, 292, 
319 

Blair, Matthew 112, 202, 284, 
292 

Blake, Austin 217 
Blanchard, Brandon 233 
Bland-Brtva, Nathan 202 
Blankenship, Eric 202 
Blastick, Corinne 187, 293 
Blaze, Colin 202 
Blaze, Ian 187 
Blevins, Alyssa 217 
Blevins, Nicholas 44, 187, 281 
Blink, Emily 78, 187, 282, 292 
Bloom, Ashley 217 
Bloom, Jadon 217, 297 
Blythe, Madison 118, 202, 291 
Bodell, Austin 233, 295 
Bodell, Kailey 202 
Bodine, Stephen 217 
Bodnar, Jessica 217 
Boecker, Jordyn 202 
Boeckstiegel, Gavyn 217 
Boeckstiegel, Sophia 187 
Bogie, Ryan 187 
Bohlin, Hannah 105, 187 
Bolanos, Diana 202, 300 
Bolivar, Alexandra 202 
Bolivar, Victor 233, 280 
Boiler-Smith, Jenna 33, 217 
Bolton, Breann 158 
Bonhama, Elijah 202 
Book, Alec 296 
Book, Allison 202 
Booth, Steven 41,202 
Born, Alyssa 68, 69, 106, 141, 
143, 231,233, 283, 319 
Born, Olivia 202 
Born, Samantha 233 
Borowski, Meghann 217 
Boshears, Jacob 218, 292, 296 
Bosold, Jack 202, 290 
Bossi, Anthony 110, 202, 291 
Botkin, Josef 187 
Bouck, Laney 187 
Bougher, Hannah 57, 218 
Boulas, Ana 81,233, 296 
Boulazeris, Nicole 233 


Boutcher, Jason 187 
Bovard, Beverly 183 
Bowdish, Nathan 177, 233, 

236,294 

Bowman, Karen 185 
Boyle, Nathan 218 
Brack, Kaitlin 93, 218 
Brackett, Cory 218 
Brackins, Brian 188, 281 
Bradich, Michael 188 
Bradley, Torrence 202 
Bradtke, Grant 233, 301,303 
Brady, Matthew 202 
Brandner, Ashley 233 
Brandner, Nicholas 163, 233, 
294 

Brandt, Kevin 233 
Brann, Mia 188 
Brannock, Dennis 158 
Brassea, Noah 203 
Bratcher, Emily 203, 296, 297 
Bray, Breanna 203 
Brazzale, Christian 188, 296 
Brazzale, Jacob 188, 288 
Bredar, Samantha 36, 146, 148, 
188, 297 

Bredar, Sarah 53, 61, 112,147, 
179, 209, 218, 230, 295, 298, 
299, 300, 302 

Breford, Madison 52, 149, 218, 
222, 297 

Brennan, Jasmine 188 
Breshock, Teigen 140,231,233 
Breshock, Timothy 54, 188 
Briggs, Destini 188, 289 
Broad, James 233 
Broad, Neal 124, 218, 314 
Brokke, Melanie 218 
Brokop, Kristofer 203, 296 
Bronecke, Ryan 188 
Bronson, Craig 9, 17, 33, 218, 
298 

Brooker, Lindsey 142, 233 
Brooks, Devonte 107, 233, 253, 
319 

Brooks, Manuel 163, 203 
Brooks, Sara 234 
Brosseau, Samantha 203 
Broussard, Kayla 234, 298 
Brown, Brett 92, 93, 203, 288 
Brown, Elysse 218, 296 
Brown, Hanna 188 
Brown, Jakob 101,218, 280 
Brown, Kevin 234 
Browne, Jack 203, 287 
Browne, Kelly 234, 296 
Brownewell, Dana 188, 297 
Brownewell, Katrina 218 
Broz, Kaitlin 188, 297 
Brumm, Lori 52, 182, 183 
Brummett, Walker 101, 163, 

203, 280, 288 
Bryant, Parker 203 
Bryner, Hannah 6, 128, 129, 

179, 203, 227, 234, 259, 302 


Buchler, Lindsey 188, 297 
Buckley, Danielle 203, 297 
Buckman, Michelle 134, 179, 
203, 293, 299 

Buckmaster, Jordan 218, 299 
Buckmaster, Rhys 203 
Budlove, Terri 163 
Bugg, Cameron 203 
Bukowski, Ethan 203 
Bulett, Ariana 176,234 
Bulf, Lauren 188, 282 
Bulic, Alyssa 203 
Bunner, Jenna 188,286,296 
Buntin, Jenna 133, 153, 201, 
203, 297 

Burgess, Matthew 134, 234, 
319 

Burney, Robert 188, 295 
Burns, Jaquon 218, 280 
Burrink,Tabitha 156,203,282 
Burvan, Emily 41,218 
Busby, Brittany 138, 148, 168, 
218,298 

Bushey, Maria 234, 250 
Bushong, Eric 183 
Buss, Neal 58, 218, 296 
Bustamante, Elizabeth 14, 74, 
109, 203, 302 

Bustamante, Emily 234, 253, 
285, 292 

Butler, Brian 234 

c 

Caban, Annette 218 
Caduco, Maruel 188 
Cain, Rachel 188, 297 
Cain, Rebecca 218, 296 
Caird, Alex 203 
Caird, Tyler 188 
Calderone, Kevin 15, 160 
Calligan, Morgan 203 
Camarillo, Alyssa 141,234 
Camarillo, Kayla 94, 203, 285 
Camilleri, Lily 203 
Camp, Christina 203 
Campbell, Alexa 218 
Campbell, Breeanna 188 
Cano, Joseph 188 
Cantrell, Sydney 188 
Cantu, Gavin 188, 281,292 
Capestany, Nicole 188 
Cappello, Aaron 5, 148, 188, 
190, 297, 298 

Cappello, Abby 94, 107, 218, 

285 

Capps, Audrey 188 
Capshaw, Ksenija 115, 218, 
292 

Cardinal, Alyssa 234, 250 
Carlson, Courtney 188, 234, 

286 

Carper, Matthew 188 
Carstensen, Darry 183 


INDEX 305 








Carter, Alyssa 203, 289 
Carter, Anthony 24,188, 281 
Carter, Paige 22, 118, 218, 291 
Caruso, DeMarco 203 
Carver, Logan 120, 188, 290 
Cary, Frank 234 
Cary, Jessica 203 
Cash, Benjamin 296 
Casner, Julia 188, 296 
Cassidy, Brianna 234 
Castaneda, Denise 17, 203 
Castaneda, Maritza 72, 73, 
234,285, 294, 301 
Castaneda, Sarah 182 
Castillo, Ashley 188,289 
Castillo, Sabrina 218 
Casto, Jonathan 234 
Cavanaugh, Christian 188, 288 
Cavazos, Kayla 188 
Cearing, Cathryn 5, 42, 234, 
246, 259, 295, 298, 302 
Centanni, Paul 48, 51, 76, 101, 
218, 280, 301,303 
Cervantes, Guadalupe 234, 
294,295, 298 
Cetnar, Ryan 188 
Chadd, Aaron 101,203,280 
Chandler, Taylor 188 
Chandos, Ellie 203 
Chapa, Samantha 203 
Chapski, Matthew 218 
Chatel, Jakob 188,290 
Chatel, Joseph 234 
Chavarria, Jennifer 203, 296 
Chavez, Alicia 188 
Chavez, Allison 218 
Chavez, Caroline 188 
Chavez, Victoria 40, 189 
Cheesebourough, Jocelynn 12, 
173,218,292 ' 

Chekaluk, Austin 19, 60, 61, 
160, 218, 280 
Chelbana, Madison 204 
Chelbana, Paige 319 
Chen, Ruth 19, 36, 56, 57, 78, 
87 115, 160, 204, 300, 302 
Chenoweth, Colin 107, 135, 
231,234, 319 
Chess, Ashley 31,189 
Chess, Zachary 204, 295, 296 
Chhokar, Savreet 218 
Childress, Savannah 218, 296, 
297 

Childress, Tyler 189,288 
Childs, Lorenzo 234, 271 
Chmielewski, Mark 189 
Chopra, Jay 23, 57, 173, 218, 
294, 298, 299, 300, 301 
Choudhry, Aisha 204 
Christensen, Alexandria 234 
Christensen, Michael 189 
Christenson, Kodie 92, 93, 288 
Chung, Christine 234, 296 
Chung, Hangene 218 
Church, Jamey 218 
Churilla, Erica 185 

306 


Cialdella, Michael 204 
Ciarrocchi, Hope 189 
Ciarrocchi, Lydia 189 
Cias, Bartlomiej 189, 288 
Cieslak, Trevor 218 
Cinko, Joseph 234, 270 
Cinko, Kayli 189, 284 
Cistaro, Angela 204 
Clapman, Morgan 31,122, 
204,282, 292 
Clark, Alexandra 218 
Clark, Anthony 218 
Clark, Garrett 189, 281 
Clark, Josh 12, 183 
Clark, Kathryn 183 
Clark, Michael 21,122,123, 
204, 296, 302 
Clark, Samuel 218 
Clark, Tom 3, 174, 183 
Clark-Debutch, Marissa 234 
Classen, Elise 18, 218, 297 
Classen, Emily 234, 294 
Classen, Hannah 234, 294, 
297 298 

Cleeton, Taylor 204 
Cline, Tyler 204 
Cloghessy, Jillian 50, 204 
Clyde, Brianna 189 
Cobban, Adam 234, 296 
Cody, Alexander 218 
Coffman, Cesily 204 
Colby, Sarah 147, 148, 150, 
151,234, 298 
Cole, Amber 218 
Coll, Michael 189 
Collaros, Erini 147, 218, 298 
Collier, Dennis 204, 290 
Combis, Dawn 45, 183 
Combis, Sarah 36, 204, 300 
Cometa, Dianne 17, 36, 201, 
204,296 

Cometa, Joyce 173, 204, 212 
Companik, Jennifer 189 
Companik, Maeve 189 
Conley, Madeline 80, 174, 186, 
216, 231,234, 263, 294, 295, 
298, 301, 302 
Conner, Casey 218 
Conner, Hunter 218 
Conner, Meghan 189 
Conner, Morgan 218 
Contreras, Mariah 115, 189 
Cook, James 218 
Cook, Jessica 189 
Cook, Kayley 204 
Cook, Kobe 163, 204, 280 
Cook, Nicholas 204 
Cook, Stephen 204 
Cooley, Stephanie 104, 105 
Cooper, Brenden 189, 281 
Cooper, Faith 186, 189, 289 
Copak, Tyler 110,204,291 
Copeland, Joseph 71,189, 
284, 292 

Copeland, Samantha 13, 20, 
128, 234 


Coras, Reese 39, 234 
Cortez, Justin 156, 234, 296, 
297 

Cortez, Luis 233, 234 
Couture, Michael 218 
Covelli, Louis 189 
Cowling, Kendall 218 
Cox, Dylan 189 
Coyle, Cassidy 234 
Crague, Jennifer 72, 73, 201, 
204, 285, 292 

Crawford, Jenna 65, 125, 218, 
228,302 

Crawford, Keith 66, 67, 77, 204, 
282,292 

Crawford, Mason 150, 189 
Crawley, John 204 
Cress, Cayla 80, 82, 204 
Cribari.Toni 26,297 
Crilley, Hannah 218 
Crothers, Reyna 97, 218, 289 
Cruz, Cynthia 218 
Cruz, Miya 204, 297 
Crylen, Anthony 204 
Cucuz, Danka 189 
Culbertson, Katelynn 218 
Culver, Jonathan 218 
Cummins, Kacey 189, 286 
Curatolo, Alexis 204, 293 
Cure, Brandon 218 
Curran, Hayley 189, 284 
Curtin, Jack 189, 287 
Cymerman, Adam 204 
Cyrek, Brock 204 
Czajkowski, Jessica 218, 295 
Czerniawski, Kailie 189 
Czernoch, Tyler 189 
Czerwinski, Braden 204 

D 

Dado, Nathaniel 29 
Daehn, Ezra 204 
Dahl, Patrick 218 
Dahlkamp, Jillian 37, 189 
Dahlkamp, Michael 113, 189, 
280, 292 

Dahlkamp, Reid 110, 189, 291 
Dahlkamp, Ryan 34,110,111, 
234, 279, 291 

Dahlkamp, Walter 218, 280, 

292 

Daliege, Nathan 218 
DalSanto, Concetta 234, 297 
DalSanto, Jack 234 
Daly, Elizabeth 17, 218 
Damarjian, John 21,218 
Dancer, Blake 218 
Danesean, Laura 234 
Dangerfield, Tara 218,295 
Daniels, Jack 204 
Daniels, Jessica 189 
Danko, Gabriella 218, 298 
Danner, Parker 127, 142, 146, 
148, 204, 297, 298 


Darter, Ethan 218, 280, 287, 
290 

Davids, Alexandria 68, 69, 234 
283 

Davids, Alyssa 218 
Davids, Jeffrey 189, 290 
Davidson, Lauren 189, 289 
Davidson, Ryan 100, 204, 287 
Davies, Edward 189, 281 
Davis, Antwan 60, 101,280, 
319 

Davis, David 204, 296 
Davis, Robert 189 
Davis, Veronica 12,111,135, 
137, 196, 234, 274, 302 
DeBaggis, Benjamin 158, 204 
Decker, Haley 235 
Decker, Nina 204 
Decker, Ryan 204 
Deckinga, Cj 218 
Degollado, Julissa 297 
Degollado, Luis 189, 281 
DeGrauwe, Tara 218,296,297 
DeGroot, Emma 35,42,101, 
102, 136, 137, 157 175, 201,204, 
214,302 

DeJarlais, Joshua 189, 296 
DeJoris, Zachary 100, 205, 288 
Del Real, Jaime 218 
Del Real, Salvador 218 
Del Rio, Guadalupe 189 
DeLaurentis, Dana 218, 296 
Delia, Mikenzie 205, 297 
Delis, Elizabeth 31, 205 
Delis, Margaret 235, 265 
Delis, Ryan 14, 235 
DeLisle, Jackson 147, 149, 219, 
297, 298 

DelSangro, Julia 219 
DelValle, Alexander 219, 280 
Demantes, Brendan 18, 205 
DeMichael, Kyle 219 
Demir, Cosmo 219, 284 
Denson, Jacob 50,205,297 
Denton, Amy 189, 297 
Denton, Brynn 25, 27, 30, 44, 
128 

Dernulc, Tyler 219,280,292 
Desiderio, Ariana 31,189 
Desiderio, Cecelia 18, 219 
Devine, Taylor 235, 285 
DeVries, Douglas 67, 76, 77, 
205, 282 

DeVries, John 182 
Diamantos, Stephen 235, 296 
Diaz, Daniel 205, 280 
Diaz, Isabella 22, 205 
Diaz, Nathanial 189 
Diaz, Rico 205 
Diaz, Vivian 219,297 
DiDonato, Noah 189, 297 
Diehl, Sean 219 
Dijak, Frank 106, 219, 287 
Dimopoulos, Jorey 117, 141, 
162, 235, 257, 319 
Dinan, Sydney 189, 291 



Dines, Morgan 35, 189, 291 
Dingman, Sarah 27, 235, 294 
DiNino, Gina 128, 141,235, 

252 

DiNino, Mia 189, 283 
DiNino, Renee 115, 219, 292 
DiPasquo, Emma 16, 45, 176, 
219 

Dittmer, Ryan 205 

Dittrich, Andrew 140, 235, 294, 

295, 296 

Dittrich, Samantha 189, 292, 
297 

Diviney, Erin 15, 205 
Diviney, Sarah 89, 219, 289, 
295 

Djordjevich, Elyssa 189 
Djordjevich, Matthew 235, 280 
Djuric, Petar 189 
Doan, Jillian 1,5, 60, 65, 235, 
280, 282, 319 
Dobias, Jacob 22, 205 
Dobias, Nicholas 189 
Dobkowski, Ryan 205 
Dobos, Amanda 189 
Dobos, Breanna 62,195,201, 
211,219, 236 
Dobrijevich, Rade 205 
Dodevska, Jovana 16, 46, 53, 
122, 164, 190, 219, 295, 298, 
299, 302 

Dodig, Daniel 205 

Doescher, Brice 110, 189, 296, 

297 

Doescher, Chase 41,49,235 
Doetterl, Taylor 235,250,294, 
298, 300 

Doggett, Elijah 219, 295 
Dolata, Alex 205 
Dolores-Ramirez, Servando 
189 

Dominguez, Enrique 63, 205, 
280 

Dominguez, Marco 47, 162 
Donohue, Sara 189 
Donovan, Alisha 64, 65, 134, 
235, 282, 319 

Donovan, Kristina 235, 297 
Doogan, Collin 189 
Doogan, Trevor 219 
Doreski, Anthony 63, 219, 280 
Dorsch, Jeffrey 235 
Dosen, Erin 29, 84, 85, 113, 

131, 141, 154, 233, 235, 253, 

302 

Dosen, John 16, 17, 219, 292 
Dougherty, Brianna 64, 65, 

235, 282 

Douglas, Marissa 219 
Downey, Ann 73, 183, 285 
Downs, Jillian 189 
Doyle, Cassidi 219 
Doyle, Lacey 205 
Doyle, Nicholas 189 
Dragos, Sydney 64, 189, 282 
Dransoff, Ashlynne 189 


Dransoff, Autumn 82, 236 
Drezga, Nemanja 205 
Drlich, Devin 189 
Drlich, Dylan 205 
Drosos, Joshua 76, 205, 280 
Dross, Kaitlyn 189, 283 
Drosset, Jack 189, 281 
Druzbicki, Lauren 98, 102, 126, 
219, 289, 297 

Drzewiecki, Marcus 205, 290 

Dubish, Nicole 189, 283 

Dudy, Evan 189, 281 

Duerst, Dawn 183 

Duffey, Eric 219 

Duffy, Eamonn 219, 296, 298 

Duffy, Taylor 173,219,297,299 

Duggan, Gino 219 

Duke, Phoebe 205 

Dulski, Jacob 107, 134, 280, 

319 

Dulski, Joshua 63, 205, 280 
Dunbar, Brittany 3, 219 
Duncanson, Chandler 219, 

280, 281 

Dunlap, Mary 282 
Dunn, Andrew 219 
Dunn,Jacob 52,236 
Dunn,Joshua 236 
Dunn, Ryan 189 
Dunne, Emilie 154, 189, 282 
Duran, Evelyn 219 
Duran, Michelle 219, 297 
Duszynski, William 71, 189 
Duvnjak, Ljiljana 205 
Dwyer, Taylor 189,284 
Dye, Anthony 219, 301,303 
Dykstra, Jeffrey 205 

E 

Eader, Jacqueline 69, 104, 220, 
283 

Eagle, Nathan 189 
Eagle, Taylor 236 
Earl, Megan 189, 289 
Earving, Alaysha 189, 286, 292 
Easterday, Cole 70, 71,216, 
220,284,292, 320 
Echlin, Patrick 220 
Eder, Rachel 190, 293, 298, 
299, 300 

Edgcomb, Hayley 35, 236 
Edmond, David 190, 296 
Edmonds, Courtni 236 
Edvardsen, Nate 162, 205, 287 
Edwards, Dijon 220 
Edwards, Latashyana 190 
Egnatz, James 190, 281 
Ehlert, Meaghan 168, 220 
Ehlin, Joseph 220 
Eickleberry, Elena 32, 140 
Eid, Ayah 190 
Eierman, Megan 205 
Einterz, Jennifer 134, 160, 236 
Eisenhut, Grant 205 


Elder, Bradley 205 

Elea, Brandon 190 

Elgendi, Demiana 190 

Elkins, Amanda 190, 297 

Elkins, Andrew 220 

Elliott, Luke 220 

Elliott, Noah 220 

Ellis, Danielle 236 

Ellis, Katelin 14, 29, 109, 183, 

293 

Ellis, Taylor 236,319 
Ellison, Jocalyn 220 
Elmalh, Eva 126, 177, 220, 295, 
300, 301 

Elmalh, RoseMary 190 
Elrod, Natalie 190 
Elton, Margaret 91,220, 289 
Emerson, MacKenzie 220 
Emro, Paityn 190, 289 
Engel, Christopher 18, 183 
Engels, Jacob 205 
English, Natasha 190, 196, 

296, 298 

Engram, Keontae 205 
Ericksen, Morgan 220 
Ericksen, Zachary 190, 284 
Erickson, Emily 205, 299 
Erickson, Ethan 205, 296 
Erickson, Makayla 205, 286 
Ernst, Matthew 205, 280 
Erwin, Sara 37, 79, 90, 205, 
285, 289 

Escobedo, Elysia 190 
Escobedo, Mark 290 
Escobedo, Miranda 190, 297 
Eskandar, Ramez 205 
Esposito, Ferris 205 
Estrada, Juan 190 
Estrella, Jocelyn 220 
Eubanks, Joshua 190 
Evers, Mackenzie 37, 69, 220, 
283 

Ewing, Donovan 220 
Ewing, Martin 120, 190, 281, 
290 

Extin, Brady 236, 250 
Extin, Kylie 205,286 

F 

Faberbock, Karlie 190 
Fagan, Delaney 236, 256 
Fagan, Reilly 205 
Fair, Kai 220 

Fakhoury, Serene 127, 205 
Fallon, Nathan 220 
Fandl, Jennifer 31, 183, 283 
Farag, Nicole 205, 285 
Farmer, Lauren 205 
Farmer, Sydney 220, 297 
Farmer, Zachary 205 
Farner, Jacob 190 
Faso, Michael 205 
Fassoth, Kaitlyn 236, 256, 295 
Fastabend, Courtney 220 


Fedora, Hunter 205 
Fehrman, Kylie 86, 205, 286 
Feldman, Logan 190 
Feldman, Skylar 220 
Ferguson, Ashley 236, 297 
Ferguson, Mark 205 
Fernandez, Andrew 220 
Ferrell, Jacob 205 
Fieldhouse, Riley 190 
Fife, Ryan 162,220,292 
Fijut, Britney 190, 297 
Fionda, Hannah 190 
Fionda, Meridith 236 
Fioretti, Samuel 220 
Fiorio, Alec 220 
Fiorio, Emily 220 
Fiorio, Jacob 205 
Fiorio, Kathryn 190, 282 
Fischer, Ryan 205 
Fisher, Kaitlyn 205 
Fisher, Ryan 236 
Fitch, Clifford 220,296 
Fitzgerald, Kyra 157, 205 
Flahive, Nicholas 220 
Flanagan, Katelyn 81,83,142, 
236 

Flores, Alejandro 220 



Flores, Angel 205 
Flores, Hector 220 
Flores, Jessica 65, 190, 297 
Flores, Joshua 190 
Flores, Michael 62, 63, 130, 
141,143, 236, 280 
Flores, Nicole 236 
Flores, Sebastian 190 
Flores-Cuadrado, Sydney 220 
Florida, Matthew 190 
Flory, Mia 190 
Flowers, DeVonte 205 
Flynn, Autumn 190, 297 
Flynn, Ian 205 
Flynn, Sean 236, 296 
Fondren, Zion 191 
Fonseca, Ricardo 191 
Forajter, Tyler 191,288 
Ford, Emma 236 
Forjan, Paul 191 
Formella, Mark 191,281 
Foster, Dylan 147, 191 


INDEX 307 








Foster, Stephanie 220, 293 
Foushi, Dominic 12, 236 
Fowler, Ryan 205, 296 
Fox, Connor 24,191,296 
Fox, Joe 17, 20, 183, 185 
Fox, Justin 236, 294, 295, 319 
Foy, Morgan 191 
Frank, Tyler 120, 205, 280, 290 
Frassinone, Michael 191 
Frassinone, Nicolas 140, 236 
Freckelton, Kylee 114, 115, 123, 
162,205, 286, 292 
Freckelton, Scott 183, 281,286 
Frederick, Madison 148, 150, 
191, 297, 298 

Fredrickson, Francis 44, 220 
Fredrickson, Zachery 236 
Freeborn, Marty 191 
Freel, Kyle 76, 120, 205, 280, 
290 

Freeman, Katherine 18, 22, 54, 
220, 297 

Freeman, Kim 183 
Freeman, Martin 54, 185 
Frenden, Brianna 156, 191 
Friel, Rylee 43, 137, 220 
Frieling, Rachel 162, 174, 205 
Frigo, Angelo 30, 191 
Frigo, Gabrielle 170, 178, 237 
Froelich, Olivia 297 
Frolik-Ramirez, Anthony 205 
Front, Rachel 35, 205 
Frye, Emma 53, 220 
Fundich, Christopher 76, 120, 
205,280, 290 

Furmanek, Rachel 205, 283 
Fuscaldo, Samantha 220 
Fushi, Guiseppe 205, 287 
Fushi, Nicoli 191,287 
Futch, Zachary 35, 205 
Futrell, Alize 191,297 
Futrell, Angel 191,289 

G 

Gabe, Megan 173, 220, 297, 
299 

Gabouer, Cameron 105, 205 



308 


Gacevic, Ljubomir 205 
Gagliano, Dino 191 
Gagliardi, Samantha 205 
Gaines, Danielle 220, 297 
Gallas, Morgan 237 
Gallas, Samantha 191 
Gallegos, Alexis 220 
Gallegos, Amaris 220 
Gallegos, Paulina 17 
Galvan, Jacob 77 , 220, 280, 
281 

Galvin, Antoneia 220, 297 
Gandolfi, Al 182 
Ganser, James 191,288 
Ganser, Olivia 205 
Gaona, Dayanne 191 
Garcia, Anthony 206, 280 
Garcia, Brian 191,288 
Garcia, Jordan 220 
Garcia, Marc 164, 220 
Garcia, Marcus 237, 319 
Garcia, Marina 220 
Garcia, Nicholas 16, 220 
Gard, Victoria 52,87,220,286 
Gardenhire, Ethan 220 
Gardenhire, Victoria 37 68, 
220, 283 
Gardner, Val 183 
Garibaldi, David 220 
Garlich, Hailey 34, 90, 91,237 
289 

Garrison, Tyler 206 
Garton, Matthew 220, 284 
Garvey, Casey 48,71,220, 
284, 292 

Garza, Ivano 220, 288 
Garza, Jacob 237, 250 
Garza, Jenna 79, 206, 283 
Gasic.Vesna 191 
Gatlin, Aaron 191 
Gawlinski, Madison 191 
Gayton, Ashley 237 279, 297 
Geenen, Alexia 40, 220, 282 
Geer, Nicole 19, 171, 175, 206, 
298, 300, 301 
Geile, Erik 191,287 
Geiser, Kevin 237 
Geiser, Kole 191,296 
Gella, Michael 220 
Gella, Taylor 191 
Gellinger, Nicholas 237 
Genovesi, Christopher 206, 
280, 288 

George, Kaitlin 206, 282, 293 
Gercken, Lindsey 167, 220 
Gereg, Justin 206 
Gergets, Michelle 237, 295 
Gerlach, Bradley 206, 287 
Gerlach, Nicholas 237, 274 
Gerling, Jacklyn 237 
Gerling, Jessica 237, 292 
Gerstner, Alexis 206 
Gerstner, Justin 206 
Gescheidler, Gavin 191,292 
Getz, Jayden 206 
Geyer, Benjamin 220 


Giannetta, Alessandra 237 
Giazzon, Timothy 161,237, 

270, 296, 319 

Gibbs, Russell 92, 107, 220, 
288 

Gibson, Emily 191 
Gibson,Jacob 159, 206 
Gibson, Taylor 191 
Giese, Hannah 10, 45, 52, 53, 
71, 72, 107, 141,237, 249, 253, 
302 

Gifford, Ian 116,117,220,290, 
317 

Gilbert, Jeanine 126, 127, 171, 
220, 298, 299 
Giles, Anthony 206, 292 
Gillespie, Christopher 206, 280 
Gillespie, Collin 235, 280 
Giovane, Isabella 237 
Gist, Charles 206 
Givens-Coley, Kaelynn 206 
Givens-Coley, Kennedy 206 
Gleason, Taylor 191 
Glinski, Alec 159,220 
Glinski, Alyssa 191 
Glinski, Tiffany 191 
Glista, Gage 206, 280 
Glover, Brooke 94, 102, 115, 
206, 285, 292 
Godhani, Umang 220 
Godinez, Cameron 206 
Godinez, Meghan 43, 237 
Godshalk, Carly 206 
Golden, David 206, 297 
Goldman, Clayton 21, 113, 

220, 280, 292, 320 
Goldman, Samuel 206 
Golec, Haley 237 
Golfis, Jenna 191,284 
Gomez, Alexandra 94, 95, 137, 
220,285 

Gomez, Christina 107, 206 
Gomez, Ethan 113, 138, 144, 
237 292 

Gomez, Gabrielle 107, 237, 265, 
319 

Gomez, Isabella 50, 133, 148, 
206, 214, 297, 298 
Gomez, Julissa 220 
Goncher, Gabriella 144, 220, 
289,296 

Goncher, Mackenzie 191, 292 
Gonnella, Kara 206 
Gonnella, Kayla 206 
Gonsiorowski, Eric 237, 295 
Gonsiorowski, Laurel 41,131, 
220, 293 

Gonzalez, Antonio 100, 206, 
288 

Gonzalez, Brian 237 
Gonzalez, Gina 206 
Gonzalez, Kaitlyn 220 
Gonzalez, Melia 43, 237, 271 
Gonzalez, Valeria 191 
Good, Jack 111,191,287,291 
Good, Nicholas 110,220,291 


Good, Tyler 110,191,291 
Goodale, Jeremy 41,220 
Gora, Emily 191,293 
Gora, Megan 98, 221,289 
Gorczynski, Tyler 191 
Gordon, Andrew 191 
Gordon, Harrison 221 
Gordon, Taylor 191 
Gorman, Adam 237 
Gorman, Jacob 25, 206 
Gorney, Elena 25,51,119,144, 
149, 206, 302 
Gorski, Thomas 191 
Gorton, Samantha 206 
Gosnell, Michael 221 
Gotch, James 221 
Goulet, Amie 170, 221 
Govani, Emil 12, 140, 237 
Govani, Neal 179, 207, 294, 

299 

Graan, Rachel 207, 289 
Grabarek, Brandon 221,295, 

300 

Grace, Katlynn 237, 297 
Graciano, Justin 100, 191,287 
Graf, Brianna 207 
Graham, Lindsey 191,284 
Grahovac, Giana 191 
Grahovac, Michael 221 
Granskog, Lauren 23, 45, 124, 
161,221 

Grantham, Marissa 237, 270, 
297 

Graves, Alexandra 282 
Graves, Alyssa 177, 237 
Graves, Eric 46, 47, 64 
Graves, Justin 100, 191,287, 
290 

Gray, Bill 283 
Gray, Garrett 160,161,292 
Gray, Rachel 3, 183 
Graziani, Jacob 128, 237, 246, 
319 

Graziano, Joseph 85, 116, 117, 
201,207 287, 290 
Green-Moore, Jarod 221 
Grgic, Deni 237 
Grgic, Dominick 191 
Griffin, Alexis 25, 207 
Griffin, Sean 221,287 
Grimier, Samuel 191 
Grimier, Sarah 141,237, 263 
Grimmer, Hallie 237 
Grimmer, Nathan 207 
Grimmer, Nicholas 237 
Grino, ZJ 191 
Grkinich, Lucas 207 
Gromala, Rebecca 182 
Gronek, Claire 15, 109, 191, 
293 

Gronek, Lauren 15, 109, 122, 
207 293 

Gross, Elly 24,191,293 
Gross, Hannah 191,297 
Gross, Leah 207 
Gross, Rachel 22,23,69,221, 





283, 295, 300, 301 
Grudzien, Morgan 191,284 
Gruthusen, Jordan 207 
Gruthusen, Tyler 237 
Gruver, Jaclyn 191,292 
Gruver, Julia 22, 221 
Grzesik, Quentin 191 
Grzybek, Joseph 15,160, 207, 
299, 300, 301 
Guarino, Joseph 191 
Guerrero, Amanda 191,293 
Guevara, Celeste 297 
Guevara, Erica 207, 297 
Guffey, Brett 163, 221 
Guglielmo, Jake 191 
Guilfoyle, Ryan 207 
Guillermo, Nicole 150, 237 
Guinn, Kara 176, 237, 297 
Guizar, Jacob 237 
Gundelach, George 191,294, 
296, 297 

Gurnak, Andy 183, 286 
Gurney, Jacob 207, 288 
Gurney, Melanie 237, 292 
Gustafson, Niklas 221,296 
Gustas, Adam 42, 56, 142, 151, 
207, 297, 298 
Gut, Tyler 191 
Gutierrez, Gina 55, 237 
Gutierrez, Jade 207 
Gutierrez, Keith 207, 280 
Guttillo, Dominic 207 
Guy, Nyia 35, 207 
Guzek, Benjamin 12, 237, 296 
Guzman, Crystal 118, 207, 286, 
291 

Guzman, Diego 191 

H 

Haddad, Caroline 22, 221 
Haddad, Kimberly 221,292 
Haddad, Marco 207 
Haddon, Brandon 33, 221, 296 
Hahney, Kaitlyn 191 
Hainsworth, Kimberly 178, 221, 
295 

Halbe, Edward 23, 156, 221 
Halfeldt, Camryn 207,289 
Halfeldt, Sydney 34, 138, 221 
Hall, Brandi 221 
Hall, Chris 280 
Hallowell, Anna 42,171,175, 

201.207.294, 300 
Hallowell, Kayla 14, 99, 130, 

131.171.237.294, 300, 301 
Halterman.Tom 280 
Hamby, Brandon 207 
Hamby, Tarah 64, 237, 265, 282 
Hamed, Omar 238 
Hameen, Krystian 221 
Hamilton, Kara 207 
Hammond, Alyssa 191 
Hamner, Hope 207 


Hampton, Eric 191 
Hanchar, Adam 221 
Hans, Kayla 207 
Hansen, Emily 221 
Hansen, Kassandra 151,191, 
297 

Hansen, Nicholas 158, 221 
Hansen, Zachary 5, 24, 142, 
148, 152, 174, 207, 296, 297 
Hardy, Madison 207 
Harman, Talia 221 
Harmon, Chris 43, 183 
Harmon, Michael 191, 297 
Harnish, David 160, 183 
Harnish, Roberta 43, 183 
Harper, Sean 50, 80, 221,297 
Harrington, Thomas 221 
Harris, Kayla 32, 238, 256 
Harris, Nicholas 207 
Harvey, Haley 207 
Harvey, Jayla 86, 286 
Haskins, Joseph 221 
Hasley, Katelyn 191 
Hasley, Rebecca 238 
Hatfield, Bryce 191 
Hatfield, Clayton 221,297 
Haugh, Blair 191,296 
Haugh, Patrick 221 
Hauter, Mary 207,295,299 
Hawkins, Kara 221 
Hawthorne, Blake 191,297 
Hay, Sofia 3.12, 13, 76, 79, 84, 
86, 138, 139, 170, 186, 196, 207, 
231,302 

Hayes, Charles 288 
Hayes, Debra 207 
Hayes, Kyle 1,128,238 
Hayes, Thomas 207 
Heady, Kamren 221 
Hearne, Jessica 31,207, 282 
Hearne, Joseph 221 
Hearne, Shannon 1,53, 83, 

118, 119, 136, 137 152, 153, 160, 
174, 175, 201,221,299, 302 
Hecht, Alexandra 238, 296 
Hecht, Hannah 207 
Hecht, Kristen 122,127,171, 
207 291 

Heflin, Megan 104, 105, 207 
Hegan, Andrew 111, 191,291 
Hegyi, Kaylee 192, 289, 296 
Heinrikson, Daniel 221,280 
Heifers, Megan 97, 156, 186, 
221,289 

Hemmerling, Micheal 66, 67, 
126, 221,282, 294, 299 
Hemphill, Amber 221,296 
Henderson, Gabriel 221 
Hentush, Thomas 34 
Hermanek, Andrew 192 
Hermanek, Sarah 149,161, 

173, 207, 294, 298 
Hernandez, Alex 192 
Hernandez, Alexis 238, 257, 

297 


Hernandez, Aylin 192 
Hernandez, Brandon 207 
Hernandez, Crystal 221 
Hernandez, Donna 207 
Hernandez, Gisselle 192 
Hernandez, Michelle 221 
Hernandez, Nataly 207 
Herrera, Kristyn 207 
Hess, Joseph 207 
Hess, Kiersten 192, 282 
Hestermann, Hannah 207, 297 
Hestermann, Kayla 221 
Heuberger, Sarah 114, 221,292 
Heusmann, Nichole 125, 149, 
150,174, 216, 221,298 
Hickey, Alexandra 102, 119, 

207, 291 

Hickey, James 221 
Hickey, Marie 104, 105 
Hidalgo, Mark 280 
Hiduke, Tristan 158,221 
Hiestand, Abigail 36, 207 
Higgins, Kallie 90, 207, 289 
Hijaz, Duaa 174, 175, 221,295, 
298, 299, 300 

Hijaz, Mohammed 105, 126, 
207, 209, 281,294, 300 
Hilbrich, Raymond 192, 287, 

290 

Hill, Hannah 123, 192, 293 
Hill, Kayla 252 

Hill, Maxwell 113, 192, 292, 296 
Hilyard, Pat 280 
Hilyard, Scott 183 
Hinchman, Chase 192, 281 
Hinchman, Jenna 221 
Hines, Abigail 22, 207, 292, 302 
Hintz, Joseph 192, 287 
Hirchak, Kaylee 192 
Hires, Tyler 124,238 
Hirosky, Jace 221 
Hirschfield, Madeline 57, 68, 69, 
92, 93, 120, 137, 166, 221,231, 
295, 298, 300, 301,302 
Hitchcock, Mateo 192, 297 
Hjertquist, Nathan 192, 281 
Hmurovich, Samantha 207 
Hobbs, Sandy 133, 152, 153 
Hodges, Jodie 17, 48, 221,302 
Hoevker Hoff, Tyler 207 
Hoff, Hannah 207,296,297 
Hoff, Michael 221 
Hoffman, Andrew 221 
Hoffman, Colby 89,101,192, 
288 

Hoffman, Conner 192, 290 
Hoffman, Cynthia 171, 183 
Hoffman, Desirae 221 
Hoffman, Jacqueline 107, 207, 
302 

Holbrook, Haley 192 
Holden, Jackie 43 
Holden, Ralph 167, 183, 282 
Holechko, David 192 
Holechko, Jason 238 


Holley, Briana 192 
Hollingsworth-Madsen, Michael 
192, 281 

Holman, Joseph 238, 257 
Holman, Kyle 179, 207 
Holmes, Zachary 192 
Homans, Abigail 46, 47, 289 
Homans, Connor 238, 288 
Hoover, Jacob 192 
Hopkins, Hannah 192 
Hopkins, Jack 207 
Horan, Kaela 192 
Horgash, Morgan 221 
Horneman, Raven 207 
Horvath, Elexi 192, 293 
Horvath, Michael 112, 221,292 
Hough, Lucas 192 
Howard, Zhanae 115,221,292 
Howell, Brittney 192 
Howell, Jessica 207, 300 
Hraban, Megan 192, 285 
Hrebenyak, Noah 192 
Hubbard, Zh’ane 192, 284, 292 
Huber, Austin 207, 295 
Huber, Autumn 221,285, 292 
Huber, Christian 170, 171,238, 
295 

Huenecke, Faith 57, 78, 192, 
195, 283, 296 
Hughes, Darius 207 
Hughes, Matthew 149, 207, 

296, 298 

Huicochea, Jorge 221 
Huicochea, Kevin 221 
Hunsley, Sarah 72, 73, 207, 

285,292 

Hunt, Drake 207, 288 
Hunt, Ethan 238,296,299 
Hunt, Marcellus 221, 287 
Hunt, Owen 207 
Hupp, Brandon 192 
Hupp, Emma 46, 97, 135, 138, 
238, 289, 303, 319 
Hupp, Samuel 207 
Hupp, Zachary 48,70,221, 

284, 292 

Huppenthal, Isaiah 207, 280 
Hurley, Cyndi 43 
Hurtt, Brandon 192 
Hussey, Brandon 192 
Hutchings, Emma 24, 192 
Hynek, Andrea 238 

I 

Ibarra, Kiana 207 

Ibrahim, Malik 192 

Idalski, Alexandra 207, 297 

llic, Kristina 221,295 

Ing, Sreysar 221 

Inglese, Rachel 216, 221,282, 

308 

Ingram, Kalie 207 
Ippolito, Marissa 192 


INDEX 309 



Iragana, Jennifer 207 
Irvin, Jacob 207, 280 
Irving, Joshua 192 
Irving, Matthew 221 
Irwin, Gina 96, 221,289 
Isa, Dalia 208 
Ishii, Jomei 192 
Ishii, Marvin 221 
Ismail, Ahmad 221 
Isom, David 192, 297 
Ispas, Abigail 208 
Issa, Anes 221 
Issa, Kawthar 238 
Issa, Sarah 221 
Ivezic, Christian 222, 296 
Ivezic, Gabriel 192, 296 
Ivin, Austin 208 
Iwema, Leslie 165 
Iwema.Todd 144 

J 

Jacinto, Brittany 94, 222, 285 
Jackowski, Robert 183 
Jackowski, Tristin 208, 295 
Jackson, Kennedy 208 
Jackson, Nathan 208, 288, 292 
Jackson, Nathaniel 208 
Jackson, Taylor 36, 222 
Jacobo, Daniel 192 
Jacobs, Brian 192 
Jacobson, Ty 238 
Jacques, Mercedes 192, 297 
Jadernak, Ashley 222, 297 
Jagiella, Taylor 238,271 
Jakubowicz, Jacob 12, 238, 
294, 299 

Jakubowicz, Joseph 192, 294, 
299 

James, Murell 192, 281 
James, Rob 182 
Jamrock, Casey 222 
Janich, Nicholas 32, 192, 290 
Janik, Morgan 208 
Janosz, Sabrina 222 
Jansky, Carley 103, 192, 286 
Jansky, Cayla 239 
Jansky, Joseph 239, 252, 296 
Januchowski, Elaine 15, 208 
Januchowski, Thomas 239 
Janusz, Samantha 192, 284 
Jarach, Jessica 46, 153, 222, 
296 

Jarzombek, Candace 149,150, 
171, 178, 201,208, 298, 302 
Jasnic, Kristina 192, 282 
Jeneske, Haley 297 
Jensen, Rachel 137, 239 
Jessen, Ronald 222, 296 
Jessup, Nicholas 192 
Jessup, Tiffany 140,239 
Jimenez, Andrea 29, 208 
Jimenez, Karyme 192 
Jimenez, Leonardo 222 
Jimenez, Maria 208 

310 


Jinkerson, Jessica 208 
Johnson, Juliet 143, 239 
Johnson, Michael 208, 296 
Johnson, Nicholas 280 
Johnson, Robert 208 
Johnston, Jacob 60, 135, 239, 
263, 280 

Johnston, Natalye 208, 291 
Jones, Dallon 192 
Jones, Elise 136, 208 
Jones, Ian 192, 297 
Jones, Jayla 222, 297 
Jones, Marcus 208 
Jones, Marisa 239, 297 
Jones, Raphael 222 
Jordan, Matthew 192 
Joy, Jessica 222 
Joy, Kelly 37,208,292 
Jumonville, Matthew 222 
Jung, Cameron 239, 295 
Jureczko, Sydney 222 
Jurek, Madeline 164, 208, 282 
Jurek, Philip 49, 192, 296 
Jurkovic, Jacob 208 
Juscik, James 222 

K 

Kaczmarzewski, Alexis 192 
Kaiser, Kristen 32, 106, 107, 
166, 239, 258, 262, 294, 301 
Kalinowski, Nicole 192 
Kallen, Kelsey 222 
Kalmar, Valerie 192 
Kaminsky, Eric 239, 268 
Kaminsky, Nicole 192 
Kamykowski, Jacob 239 
Kamykowski, Lauren 192, 297 
Kane, Joseph 35, 192, 294 
Kania, Rob 183 
Kanosky, Marc 208 
Kapetanov, Angelina 239 
Karagias, McKayla 222, 297 
Karberg, Annabel 239, 291 
Karim, Rayyan 222, 299 
Karr, Adam 222 
Karras, Theodoras 42, 148, 
149, 150, 186, 192 
Kasper, Andrew 192, 198, 297 
Kassie, Emily 222 
Katalinic, Noah 150, 208 
Katsiris, Peter 222 
Kaufman, Roger 222, 295, 297 
Kaur, Jaskiran 192 
Kaur, Navneet 12, 47, 108, 109, 
239, 293, 298, 299, 300, 307 
Kaurich, Quinn 208, 280, 288 
Kawalec, Grace 208 
Kaye, Alex 22,111,208,291 
Kazmierski, Joel 192 
Kazmierski, Veronica 222 
Kearschner, Bailey 192, 295, 
297 

Keels, Taryn 239 
Keep, William 300 


Keichinger, Amber 222 
Keith, Abigail 81,222, 296 
Keith, Ellie 208, 285 
Keith, Hannah 34,46,141, 
239,285 

Keleman, Chad 192 
Keleman, Emma 239 
Keleman, Erica 21,222 
Kelley, Devon 137, 156, 208 
Kelley, Joelle 208 
Kelley, Jorie 140, 239 
Kelly, Alexis 37, 208, 300 
Kelly, Brendan 51,136,142, 
179, 239, 299 
Kelly, Bryan 192, 281 
Kelly, Madison 222, 280 
Kelly, Morgan 141,239, 271, 
301 

Kelly, Olivia 208 
Kenny, Ryan 222 
Kerrick, Tyler 192,296 
Kessler, Cheyanne 239 
Keylor, Christopher 239, 288, 
294 

Keylor, Collin 27, 222, 292 
Khalil, Ariel 239 
Kharchaf, Adam 26 
Khatra, Gurleen 12, 177, 239, 
263, 294, 298, 300 
Khoury, Brianna 222 
Kiefor, Jacob 170,222 
Kiefor, Jessica 103, 123, 192, 
291 

Kiepura, Nicholas 135, 142, 
143, 146, 147, 175, 239, 294, 
298, 301 

Kijewski, Claire 192, 297 
Kil, Kyle 62,63,141,239,280 
Kilburn, Casondra 222 
Kilinski, Jeff 288 
Kilinski, Ryan 14, 208, 288 
Kimber, Arthur 239, 303 
Kimberly, Eva 141,171,172, 
223, 297, 300, 301,303 
King, Jared 208 
King, Madison 223 
King, Maxwell 208, 288 
King, Michael 223, 280 
Kinney, Brandee 157, 208 
Kirby, Joshua 49, 239 
Kirby, Megan 208, 280 
Kirkland, Mary 296 
Kirmani, Samuel 141,239, 280 
Kisela, Joshua 208 
Kish, John 29,208 
Kitchell, Hailey 193 
Klapkowski, Alyssa 208, 284 
Klebs, Benjamin 62, 63, 223, 
280 

Klee, Perry 208 
Kleimola, Jacob 92, 93, 154, 
223, 288, 295, 298 
Klekotko, Natalia 223 
Klemoff, Taylor 193 
Kline, Ashley 176, 177 
Klocek, Joshua 193, 296 


Klootwyk, Alyssa 223 
Kloppenburg, Kyle 193 
Kludka, Anthony 223 
Knaley, Collin 208, 280 
Knerler, Ashley 57, 193, 289 
Knerler, Jessica 239 
Knizek, Elaine 239 
Knox, Kennedy 127 
Koehler, Kyle 223 
Koepke, April 141,239,297 
Kohut, Vera 208,297 
Kolintzas, Nikko 63, 208, 280 
Kolisz, Zacharry 193 
Konieczka, Connor 239 
Konopasek, Kameron 70, 223, 
284, 292 

Konopka, Anthony 208, 288 
Koontz, Jacob 48, 223, 284, 
292 

Kopack, Michael 208, 280 
Korczykowski, Kailey 193 
Koricanac, Julie 183 
Korneck, Matthew 178, 223 
Kornelik, Frances 25, 78, 208. 
283 

Kosinski, Raymond 193 
Kostecki, Marisa 208 
Koster, Samuel 223 
Kotecki, Mikala 51,223 
Kotecki, Paige 96, 193, 293 
Koutropoulos, Timothy 223 
Kovacevic, Dara 208 
Kovacevic, Maja 193 
Kowalczyk, Isabella 151,193, 
297 

Kowalewicz, Andrea 82, 126, 
239, 269, 294 

Kowalewicz, Nicole 81,82, 83, 
193 

Kowalik, Emma 223 
Kozel, Rachel 16, 17, 19, 56, 
172, 208, 294, 299 
Krachenfels, Kaitlyn 90, 91, 
239,289 

Krachenfels, Tyler 177,193 
Krajisnik, Stefan 36, 208 
Krakowiak, Cole 239 
Kralik, Ashley 78,121,173, 
208, 216, 302 

Kramer-Stephens, Tyler 113, 
223,284, 292 
Krasek, Sarah 239 
Kraska, Brendan 193 
Kraska, Thaddeus 239 
Kreykes, Courtney 152, 223, 
302 

Krga, Michael 223, 297 
Kritikos, Nicholas 208, 296 
Krol, Megan 239, 252, 286 
Krolak, Brandi 183 
Kroninger-Mackey, Jasmine 
223 

Kroon, Taylor 144 

Kraut, Joshua 42, 139, 175, 

223 

Kruk, Steven 208 




Kruszewski, Madalyn 150,151, 
193 

Kruszewski, Matthew 223, 280 
Kruzan, Julia 69, 162, 223, 283, 
298 

Kruzan, William 164, 208, 298 
Krysinski, Elizabeth 239 
Krysinski, Michaela 128, 239 
Kubiak, Trevor 193 
Kuehner, Jack 116, 117, 177 
240, 269, 290 
Kuhlenschmidt, Claire 44 
Kujawa, Kyle 193,295 
Kulik, Alicia 193 
Kulik, Michael 297 
Kulinski, Logan 223 
Kullmann, Ty 159,223,297 
Kunis, Austin 173, 280, 294 
Kurivial, Alexandra 49, 223 
Kurzeja, Andrew 208 
Kusbel, Lindsay 64,87,231, 
240, 275, 282, 286 
Kutka, Christine 208 
Kuzbiel, Natalia 223 
Kwiecinski, Jesse 208 

L 

LaBelle, Jonathon 193, 294, 

295 

Lacheta, Mackenzie 193 
Ladd, Phillip 223 
Ladowski, Jessica 15, 131, 240 
Ladowski, Lauren 86, 102, 193, 
286 

Ladowski, Peter 208 
Lafakis, James 75, 84, 85, 86, 
95, 97, 98, 99, 102, 108, 109, 

113, 114, 117, 122, 123, 135, 231, 
240, 243, 264, 294, 295, 301, 
302, 303, 319 
LaGreco, Brandon 223 
LaGreco, Danielle 193 
Lake, Maura 208, 289 
Lale, Cynthia 43, 183 
Lalla, Sagar 223 


Lam, Jeannie 208, 285 
Lambert, Logan 60, 240, 275, 
280, 323 

Lamont, Jason 208, 290 
Lamont, Megan 193 
Lane, Cameron 208 
Lane, Samantha 16, 223, 297 
Langdon, Mary 168, 223 
Langland, Ryan 193 
Langwinski, Alyssa 240 
Langwinski, Austin 208, 288, 
296 

Langwinski, Taylor 223 
Lanting, Brooke 127,171,208 
LaPato, Jessica 183 
Laput, Carl William 208, 295 
Lara, Ariel 240 
LaRock, Brianna 208 
LaRock, Dylan 193 
Larson, Jack 160, 165, 223, 
225 

Larson, Kendall 193 
Larson, Luke 193 
Larson, Richard 66, 67, 201, 
208, 282 

Laskey, Rita 183 
Lauerman, Joe 280 
Laughlin, Rachel 208 
Laurisch, Alexia 223, 282 
Lawley, Alexis 150, 193, 297 
Lawson, Aaron 223 
Lawson, Kelly 193 
Layne, Mark 208 
Lazic, Natalia 208 
Le, Loan 17,208,285,292 
Lea, Elijah 105, 193 
Lea, Solomon 208 
Leatherman, Evan 19, 209 
Leatherman, Ryan 209, 296 
Leber, Angela 193 
Lechowicz, Adam 125, 223, 
292 

Ledet, Jasmine 193, 296 
Ledyard, Bill 52, 53, 182 
Lee, Charles 209 
Lee, David 193, 297 
Lee, James 45, 223, 314 


Lee, Niyelle 193, 296 

Lee, Ronald 139, 148, 240, 270, 

298 

Lemus, Kaitlynn 223, 296, 297 
Lenting, Madeline 209 
Leonhardt, Cody 223 
Lessentine, Austin 240 
Lessentine, Peyton 209, 299 
Lessentine, Sandy 182 
Letter, Scarlet 80, 81,82 
LeVan, Kyle 209,296 
LeVander, Laura 240, 269, 295 
Lewandowski, Jessica 223, 289 
Leyba, Hannah 90, 223, 289 
Linares, Ashley 209 
Lindholm, Jennifer 240, 275, 
285 

Lindholm, Kelly 193, 285, 292 
Lindsay, Johnathon 193 
Lingvay-Guardiola, Tia 209, 

296, 297 

Lionberg, Jason 76, 209, 280, 
288 

Lionberg, Ryan 209, 284, 288 
Lisac, Emily 118,209,219,302 
Lisac, Sara 82, 144, 167, 174, 
231,240, 302 

Little, Nathan 209, 296, 297 
Littrell, Ian 125, 209 
Litwicki, Kyle 193, 290 
Litwicki, Matthew 116, 203, 

209,290 
Liu, Xinyu 193 
Livingston, Sarah 223 
Llano, Gerardo 223 
Lloyd, Anthony 223, 280 
Locke, Andrew 183, 287 
Lockett, Andrae 193, 296 
Lockett, Dasia 25, 209, 297 
Lockett, Lenoire’ 209 
Lockhart, Gianni 240 
Loden, Bradley 120, 209, 290 
Loden,Joan 94,125, 170, 183 
Loeffler, Heather 223, 299 
Logan, Sara 223, 295, 296 
Lolkema, Myra 45, 289, 303 
Londono, Johan 240 
Long, Brandon 240, 284, 298, 
299, 301,303 
Long, Jackson 193, 280 
Long, Madelyn 36, 209 
Lopez, Alexis 209, 296 
Lopez, Alicia 209 
Lopez, Amanda 209 
Lopez, Angel 194, 296 
Lopez, Chrissa 240 
Lopez, Isabel 240 
Lopez, Jarrett 290 
Lopez, Jessica 223 
Lopez, Leslie 223, 295, 296 
Lopez, Luzila 54, 223 
Lopez, Mia 223 
Lopez, Sean Gregory 101,209 
Lopez, Yunuen 240,258,294 
Louden, Carling 194, 293 
Loving, JaVonte 223 


Lowden, Chase 14, 125, 240 
Lowe, Cameron 194 
Lowery, Daniel 194 
Lozanoski, Katrina 32, 108, 

109, 209, 293, 298 

Lubotina, Jada 194 

Lucas, Michael 70,71,76,112, 

120,223,284, 292 

Lucas, Nicholas 60, 113, 209, 

280, 292 

Lucka, Brent 194 
Lucka, Lucas 25, 194 
Ludke, Brian 105, 223 
Ludwig, Aaron 44, 104, 128, 
240 

Luecke, Nicholas 223 

Lukic, Milos 223 

Lulich, Ryan 240 

Luna, Alejandro 240 

Luna, Jesus 240 

Luna, Monica 194, 240, 296 

Luna, Sebastian 194 

Lunsford, Sara 240 

Lush, Taylor 194,297 

Lutes, Lauren 30, 223 

Lutz, Hanna 209 

Ly, Hung 209 

Lyda, Jerald 125, 163, 223 

Lydick, Mark 209 

Lykowski, Jordan 110, 111, 209, 

291 

Lyons, Samira 240 
Lyza, Carl 209 



Macak, Cameron 223 
Macak, Delayna 156, 194 
Maciejewski, Tyler 223 
Maciolek, Nicole 240 
Macis, James 223 
Mack, Taylor 142,240 
Mack, Tyler 194 
Macki, Joshua 194 
MacLagan, Dylan 209 
MacNeill, Justin 209, 281 
Maddy, Katherine 223 
Maddy, William 194 
Madouros, Adam 240 
Madrigal, Estela 194, 297 
Magdos, Melissa 122, 291 
Magdziak, Caitlyn 209, 283 
Magdziarz, Madison 148, 157, 
209,297 

Magiera, Trevor 223 
Magnabosco, Nadia 35, 209, 
296 

Mago, Lucas 209 
Mago, Walkere 223 
Magurany, Krista 240, 268 
Majchrowicz, Clare 55, 64, 104, 
223,282 

Makowski, Jakub 194 
Makowski, Jonathon 209 
Malan, Vincent 194,297 


INDEX 311 








Malchow, Janice 182 
Maldonado, Faith 86, 209, 286 
Maldonado, Monserrate 223 
Maluchnik, Jeremy 240 
Mamelson, John 66, 223, 282 
Mander, Reetam 19, 164, 177, 
209 

Mangan, Anthony 209, 296 
Mannino, Emily 194, 284, 298 
Mantel, Jacob 106, 223 
Mantoan, Anthony 223, 314 
Mantoan, Samantha 194 
Manyweather, Ayanna 194 
Manzano, Marcos 194 
Mapes, Martha 48, 49, 223 
Marchi, Morgan 223 
Marciano, Carmela 240, 296 
Marcinek, Jacob 141,240 
Marcinkovich, Alyssa 240 
Marcinkovich, Haley 194 
Marin, Rigo 194, 281 
Marinkovic, llija 47, 240 
Marino, Isabelle 209 
Marino, Samantha 134, 174, 
223 

Marked, David 134, 194, 281 
Markiewicz, Kurtis 113, 240, 
258,292 

Markowski, Abby 97, 210, 289 
Markulin, Lauren 98, 99, 141, 
240, 289, 319 

Markulin, Morgan 98, 99, 102, 
194, 289 

Marovich, Brett 85, 107, 240 
Marovich, Kaylee 194, 283 
Marra, Abigail 224 
Marrufo, Denisse 210 
Marshall, DiShaina 194 
Marshall, Howard 182 
Marshall, Jacob 210 
Marshall, Kiyah 194 
Marshall, Kyron 194, 292 
Marshall, Samantha 210 
Martello, Lauren 194 
Martens, Hope 123, 210, 284, 
293 

Martens, Rachel 224 
Martens, Skylar 123, 210, 284, 
293 

Martin, Amber 194 
Martin, Brianna 240, 249, 269 
Martin, Cody 224,288,311 
Martin, Ian 84, 85, 240, 275, 
287 

Martin, Jenna 194 
Martin, Justice 224 
Martin, Kayla 194 
Martin, Mary Joan 172, 173 
Martinez, Alexis 138,139, 240, 
257, 294 

Martinez, Anahi 210 
Martinez, Carlos 194, 297 
Martinez, Cecilia 194 
Martinez, Karina 210 
Martinez, Sarah 240, 292 
Martino, Kylie 32 

312 


Massa, Julianna 90, 194, 289 
Massa, Kyle 27, 48, 88, 125, 
224, 288 

Massei, Morgan 224, 297 
Matakovic, Mathew 77, 194, 
282,295 

Matasovsky, Camille 194, 297 
Matasovsky, Noelle 27, 43, 177, 
241,264 

Matchain, Daniel 120,241, 

274, 292 

Matchain, Samuel 121,241, 
274, 292 

Mathas, Cheyenne 123, 194, 
286, 291 

Mathas, Tyler 224 
Mathews, Kayla 224 
Mathews, Kyle 241,251,280 
Mathews, Ryan 30, 194 
Mathis, Miles 210 
Mathison, Madilynn 194, 283 
Matlon, Charles 241 
Matthews, Andrew 194 
Matthews, Timothy 34, 138, 
224, 280, 292 
Mavity, Caitlin 194, 297 
Mavity, Jacob 167, 178, 241, 
295,299 

Maxie, Randall 224 
Maximtsev, Maxim 26, 210 
Maxwell, Gloria 241 
May, Robin 170, 185 
Maynard, Jacob 210 
Maynard, Michelle 210 
Maynie, Keith 210 
Mays, James 116, 134, 241, 
290,319 

Maywald, Paul 224 
Mazon, Nicholas 166, 241, 

282, 292 

Mazon, Rachael 210 
McAllister, Morgyn 54, 194, 

292 

McBride, Larissa 153, 224, 297 
McBride, Noelle 54, 67, 81,83, 
224, 244, 301,302 
McCall, Cody 167 
McCallister, Doug 183 
McCallister, Ryan 241, 295 
McCambridge, Aidan 35,128, 
241,298 

McCants, Maya 194, 296, 297 
McClain, Thomas 101,194, 

281,288 

McClellan, Noah 194, 292, 296 
McClelland, Michael 63, 224, 
280, 292 

McCleskey, Jackson 194 
McCormack, Celine 241,296 
McCormack, Teagan 210,296 
McCormick, Samantha 224, 
296 

McCoy, Conner 16, 210 
McCoy, Gavin 194 
McCoy, Kyleigh 241 
McCoy, Lainautica 241 


McCuaig, Samantha 36, 80, 
224,294,296, 299 
McCullough, Jessica 25, 31, 
52, 53, 137, 177, 180, 224 
McDermott, Jayna 118,119, 
154,224,285, 291 
McDonald, Aaron 41,224 
McDonald, Patrick 194, 296 
McElroy, Daryn 194 
McFarland, Samuel 224 
McGee, Mariah 241 
McGrath, Darby 35, 210, 282 
McGrath, Ian 20, 241 
McGrath, Marlee 241,296 
McGrath, Riley 241,299 
Mclntire, James 131, 159, 224 
McKeller, Taylor 30, 241 
McKenzie, Emmanda 224, 297 
McKenzie, Victoria 114, 125, 
224,292, 299 
McKinney, David 210 
McKinney, Gunnar 210 
McKinney, Karly 194, 297 
McLaughlin, Megan 149, 194, 
297, 298 

McManimen, Nicholas 210 
McNamara, Brian 43, 290 
McNeiley, Miranda 241 
Medeiros, Solange 224 
Mejia, Anthony 210 
Mekhael, Joe 224 
Melgoza, Joshua 194 
Mender, Eric 13, 76, 194, 281 
Mendoza, Marisa 32, 128, 135, 
163, 241,319 
Meneghetti, Anthony 224 
Meneghetti, Dominic 224 
Merath, Ashley 224 
Meraz, Alejandra 175, 241,289 
Meraz, Jesus 194 
Mercado, Grace 224 
Merced, Jose 241,280 
Mercer, Jaren 241,319 
Meredith, Austin 194 
Merriman, Summer 26, 43, 

142, 242 

Mertsching, Marc 161,242, 

296 

Meseberg, Abigail 64, 194, 282 
Meseberg, Maxwell 210 
Meyer, Noah 210 
Meyer, Sean 43, 125, 137, 224, 
227, 298, 300, 301 
Meyer, Steven 116, 224, 290 
Meyers, Cameron 194 
Meyers, Corey 224 
Michael, Andrea 210 
Michael, Gray 194 
Michau, Cassidy 49, 242 
Michko, Selena 194, 291 
Michniewicz, Samuel 210 
Micka, Bailey 242 
Mickelson, Hannah 194, 293 
Mickelson, Matthew 224 
Middleton, Olivia 17, 94, 95, 
224,285 


Miestowski, Alexis 74, 75, 103, 
194,282, 286 
Migliorati, Benjamin 242 
Mihajlovic, Andrijana 78, 210, 
283 

Mihalic, Hunter 210, 290 
Mikhail, Marina 43, 194 
Mikler, Mercedies 194 
Mikler, Michael 194, 288 
Miklusak, Emily 86, 224, 286 
Mikolajczyk, Faith 194 
Mikrut, Samantha 210, 284, 
297 

Mikuly, Carlie 178, 242, 294, 
295 

Mikuly, Cory 210, 288 
Miladinovic, Aleksandra 224 
Milaszewski, Nicole 56, 105, 
210, 283 

Milausnic, Dave 85, 183, 287 
Milbrath, Melanie 194, 285 
Mileusnic, Nikola 242 
Millard, Emma 210 
Miller, Dylan 194 
Miller, Michael 46, 224 
Miller, Noah 178, 242, 295, 298 
Miller, Samuel 194 
Miller, Timothy 194 
Millette, Ashley 242 
Mills, Brianna 68, 102, 103, 
224, 283 

Mills, Gianna 20,21,70,71, 

76, 100, 216, 224, 228, 298, 
300, 301,302 
Mills, Mitchell 194, 281 
Mills, Stacey 38, 39, 185 
Milutinovic, Marko 66, 67, 195, 
282 

Milzarek, Sarah 129, 242 
Mink, Victoria 224 
Miotke, Rachel 195, 292, 297 
Mirabelli, Kristen 195 
Miramontes, Lana 195, 283 
Miranda, Bianca 210 
Miranda, Michael 195 
Miranda, Pablo 224, 295 
Mireles, Matthew 16, 210 
Mishevich, Daniel 224 
Misirly, Megan 51,224 
Miskell, Hannah 299 
Miskus, Adam 210 
Mitchell, Cailee 35, 195 
Mitchell, Lara 157, 195, 297 
Mitcheltree, Amanda 125, 224 
Mockovak, Chris 156, 183 
Mohamed, Jennifer 1,3, 5,10, 
60, 63, 71, 73, 79, 95, 97, 101, 
102, 106, 107, 114, 115, 118, 141. 
188, 201,242, 253, 294, 295, 
298, 300, 301,319 
Mohiuddin, Haroon 210, 294 
Molina, Rheena 195 
Montanez, Albert 195 
Montella, Jessica 210 
Montgomery, Christian 195 
Montgomery, Ja’Lin 195 



Montgomery, Mason 195 
Moore, Benjamin 224, 296, 297 
Moore, Haley 224 
Moore, Kennedy 94, 224, 285 
Moore, Richard 185 
Moorhouse, Jack 172, 183 
Morales, Alexis 142, 143, 242, 
294, 299, 300, 301,303 
Morales, Mateo 81, 152, 242, 
296 

Moran, Luke 195 

Morang, Danielle 106, 242, 294, 

319 

Moredich, Benjamin 210 
Moreno, Lisa 14, 16, 183 
Morgan, Alexander 88, 224, 

228, 288 

Morgan, Lydia 280, 289 
Mori, Brittany 38, 40, 41,224 
Moricz, Maria 126, 179, 224, 
298, 299, 300, 301 
Morris, Alexis 284 
Morris, Benjamin 195 
Morris, Brett 16, 76,100, 210, 
280, 288 

Morris, Cassandra 224 
Morris, Darby 210, 284 
Morris, George 242 
Morris, Makayla 51,242 
Morris, Tory 210 
Morris, William 210 
Morsovillo, Joseph 224 
Morton, Linda 78, 210, 283 
Morton, Serena 164, 224 
Moseley, Devin 224 
Mosher, Melanie 195 
Mota, Christian 116,224,290 
Motel, Liana 210, 296 
Mueller, Brandon 224 
Mueller, Hailey 242, 268 
Mularski, Dana 242, 285, 294 
Mulvihill, Shannon 210 
Munoz, Alexis 195, 282 
Munoz, Dyanna 174 
Munoz, Mario 242 
Munsie, Joseph 210 
Munster, Beating 122 
Murphy, Alexis 242, 296, 297 
Murphy, Matthew 210 
Murphy, Nicholas 242 
Murphy, Trevor 195,281 
Musleh, Malak 195 
Musleh, Samer 224, 292 
Myers, Blake 195 
Myers, Colton 195,281 
Mytnik, Kyle 195 
Myzack, Jeff 290 

N 

Naccarato, James 195 
Nadon, Marisa 210, 297 
Nagy, Blake 195 
Nammari, Jawad 195, 296 
Nammari, Reem 319 


Napiwocki, Autumn 210, 293 
Naranjo, Marcus 210, 288 
Nash, Isaac 29, 210 
Nathansen, David 224 
Naumoski, Adrianna 195 
Navarra, Jacob 57, 242, 282 
Navarro, Anthony 210 
Navarro, Damian 281 
Navarro, Erin 242, 263 
Neal, Nathan 224 
Nebel, Timothy 224 
Neff, Brandon 224 
Nelson, Dave 152, 297 
Nelson, David 183 
Nelson, Emma 224 
Nelson, Jessica 241,242, 319 
Nelson, Joseph 210 
Neth, Pam 42, 43, 149, 150, 

183 

Nevarez, Robert 224 
Newell, Blake 242, 274 
Newell, Kara 14, 224 
Newell, Tatiana 195,289,293, 
297 

Neyhart, Brooke 242, 269 
Nickolaou, Michael 195, 294, 
295 

Nickolaou, Mitchell 175, 242 
Nicolaou, Andreas 210, 288 
Niemzyk, Joelle 80, 195, 296, 
297 

Nieves, Maija 297 
Niewiadomski, Cassidy 60, 86, 
117, 224, 238, 295, 300, 301,302 
Niewiadomski, Ethan 210 
Nikolovski, Alexis 57, 195 
Nippert, Logan 224, 288 
Nisle, Alexander 40, 116, 162, 
242, 290, 319 
Nisle, Benjamin 210, 290 
Noblett, Amanda 123, 195, 291 
Nohos, Madelyn 80, 210, 296 
Nolan, Dawson 195 
Nolen, Codi 195 
Noles, Sarah 196,282 
Noorlag, Chase 196 
Norcutt, Michael 242, 280 
Nordyke, Cassidy 210 
Norris-Center, Kayla 224 
Novak, Aspyn 119,242,256, 
291,294,319 

Novak, Ciera 118,224,291 
Novak, Erin 184 
Nowak, Damen 196 
Nowak, Daniel 210 
Nowak, Danielle 125 
Nowak, Justin 210 
Nunez, Elizabeth 224 
Nunez, Mara 242 
Nunnery, Megan 196 
Nwannunu, Ekenechukwu 196 
Nwannunu, Nwamaka 224 
Nwannunu, Ugonna 160, 242, 
294, 301 

Nykiel, Nickolas 224, 288 
Nylen, Ashley 51, 118, 119, 242, 


291, 303 

0 

O’Brien, Shannon 196 
O’Connor, Gage 242 
O’Connor-Thompson, Samuel 
224 

O’Day, Rilee 210 
O’Donnell, Kevin 210 
O’Donnell, Megan 37, 196, 297 
O’Donnell, Michael 196, 297 
O’Drobinak, Amanda 242 
O’Drobinak, Madison 99, 196, 
289, 296 

O’Drobinak, Stephanie 45, 133, 
173, 210, 297, 298, 302 
O’Gonuwe, Nkem 210, 300 
O’Hara, Caryn 14, 16, 184 
O’Hara, Joseph 196, 297 
O’Keefe, Gabrielle 196, 286 
O’Keefe, Quinn 242 
O’Malley, Ashley 86, 242, 265, 
286 

Oakes, Madison 196 
Oakley, Larz 196 
Oboy, Colette 196, 293 
Ochoa, Kristal 210, 297 
Ochoa, Monique 225, 297 
Ohlenkamp, Angela 31, 184 
Ohlenkamp, Richard 184 
Okorie, Jason 196 
Okwara, Joseph 225 
Oladeinde, Adeola 225 
Olejnik, Nova 73, 196, 285, 292 
Olenik, Natalie 196 


Olesek, Justin 196, 287 
Olesen, Jeremiah 196 
Olesen, Joshua 225 
Oljace, Monica 225 
Oljace, Ryan 76, 196, 281 
Ollearis, Rylee 136, 225, 283 
Olson, Jordan 196 
Olson, Morgan 114, 115, 225, 
292 

Olund, Anthony 290 

Onest, Allison 74, 75, 216, 225, 

282 

Ooms, Aaron 210 
Opacic, Samuel 210 
Oparah, Lauren 225 
Opperman, Kaitlyn 126, 210, 
296 

Opperman, Michael 142, 242 
Oprea, Chelsea 242 
Orciuch, Kyle 196 
Orseske, Alexis 18, 225 
Ortiz, Antonio 44, 76, 225, 292 
Ortiz, Oscar 225 
Orze, Kelly 104,210,283 
Osearo, Noah 76, 196, 281 
Oseguera, Bernardo 63, 225, 
280,281 

Oski, Bailey 210 
Osmulski, Jeffrey 210 
Osorio, Anthony 242, 288 
Ostapchuk, Kalie 45, 225 
Oster, Olivia 31,79,103,110, 
117,210, 283, 302 
Otic, Ian 196, 296 
Owczarzak, Andrew 76, 196, 
281 


Owczarzak, Chase 48, 66, 135, 



INDEX 313 











160, 259, 282, 292 

P 

Pachowicz, Nicholas 225 
Padin, Harley 210 
Paganelli, Anthony 196 
Palacios, Miguel 225, 280, 281 
Palaggi, Zachary 225 
Palasz, Ray 184 
Palkon, Ryan 166, 242 
Palm, Erik 211,297 
Palm, Mathew 242, 297 
Palmer, Katie 81,82, 225 
Palomo, Maya 196 
Palomo, Michael 225 
Paluszak, Megan 196 
Paluszak, Tyler 48,225,296 
Pama, Joshua 196, 292 
Panczuk, Alyssa 165, 196, 296 
Panici, Brianna 83, 225 
Panozzo, Anthony 81,243, 296 
Panozzo, Geralynn 196 
Panozzo, William 196, 281 
Paolilli, Gianna 196, 289 
Papanikolaou, Anastasia 39, 

67, 89, 94, 108, 109, 172, 182, 
198, 201,225, 302 
Pappas, Tabitha 76, 90, 211, 
214, 216, 235, 302 
Pappas, Tristan 92,93,225, 
228, 288 

Paprocki, Quinn 101, 106, 141, 
243, 252, 280, 319 
Paredes, Alex 211 
Paredes, David 196, 296, 297 
Park, David 160, 175, 243, 299 
Parker, Myranda 211 
Parkinson, Cameron 211 
Parks, Riley 225 
Parks, Stephanie 46 
Parnell, Falyn 211 
Parnell-Humphrey, Corbyn 211 
Parol, Piotr 141,243 
Pascale, Vincent 196 
Pasko, Holly 196,293 
Pass, Derek 211,280 
Pass, Katelyn 196, 298 


Pass, Nicholas 243 
Pasternak, Sydney 225 
Pasyk, Nathan 163, 225, 280 
Patitsas, Damian 243 
Patrick, Breanna 131,225, 297 
Pattison, Maxwell 211,290 
Paul, Kyle 211,280 
Paulas, Joseph 243, 294 
Paulauski, Daniel 225 
Paulauski, David 243 
Paulson, Kelly 243,251 
Pavell, Joseph 9, 18, 33, 54, 

74, 137, 141, 195, 201,225, 302 
Pavloski, Antonio 211,287, 292 
Pawelski, Payton 131,225, 297 
Pawlak, Jered 161,211,296 
Pawlak, Robert 61,243, 280, 
296 

Payne, Ashley 225 

Payne, Madison 80, 211,294, 

296 

Payne, Monet 211 
Payne, Samuel 243 
Peda, Allison 138,170, 184 
Pederson, Casey 196, 281,296 
Pederson, Halle 51,211,296, 
298 

Pelc, Nicole 40, 243, 265, 297 
Peles, Natalija 196 
Pellegrini, Emma 225 
Pena, Jessica 196 
Pena, Michael 211,280,292 
Pennavaria, Paige 211 
Peoples, Brandon 243 
Peppin, Abigail 64, 141, 177, 
243, 282, 294, 301 
Perez, Alejandro 197, 281 
Perez, Bailey 225 
Perez, Benjamin 211 
Perez, Christopher 243 
Perez, Manuel 225 
Perez, Michael 211 
Perez, Nicholas 225, 296 
Perez, Thalia 211 
Perich, Michael 197, 288 
Perry, KC 225,297 
Peters, Emily 197 
Peters, Hannah 211,296, 299 
Peterson, Brandon 225 


Peterson, Kory 197 
Peterson, Nicole 225, 299 
Peterson, Rachael 243 
Petreska, Katerina 197 
Petrungaro, Joseph 197 
Pettenger, Logan 225 
Peyton, Everett 197, 281 
Pezzuto, Francesca 36, 211 
Pfeiffer, Andrew 197 
Pfeiffer, Jenna 225 
Pharazyn, Matthew 211 
Phelps, Austen 243 
Phelps, Hailey 37,211 
Phillips, Lucas 295 
Photo, Student Section 231 
Picioski, Daniel 62,63,211, 
280,281 

Pickle, James 197 
Pictured, Not 296, 297 
Pierce, Kymberly 226 
Pieters, Adam 29, 184 
Pilackas, Tyler 92,93,211,288 
Pilate, Lucious 226, 280 
Pimentel, Aliah 197 
Pinarski, Alexa 122, 197, 291 
Pineda, Lidia 197, 297 
Pinkus, Anna 168, 211 
Pinon, Anessa 243 
Pinon, Julian 211 
Pinskey, Sienna 226, 282 
Pintor, Tristan 92,226,288 
Pirtle, Montes 243, 297 
Pisowicz, Caleb 197, 287 
Pitchford, Adare 41, 166, 226 
Piunti, Annabella 13, 30, 31, 

58, 100, 103, 110, 111, 127, 156, 
162, 163, 171,211,302 
Piunti, Brandon 211 
Pivovarnik, Alexis 211 
Plants, Ashlyn 244, 295 
Plaskett, Kristina 12, 20, 97, 

160, 167, 195, 211,226, 236, 289 
Platusic, Rylee 103, 123, 197, 

291 

Platusic, Tyler 60,244,259, 

280 

Plaut, Michael 197 
Plaut, Paige 226 
Plenus, Erin 197, 289, 297 
Plenus, Kevin 244 
Plessinger, Bryce 197, 296 
Pluskis, Andrew 244 
Poe, Hailee 226 
Pokropinski, Nicholas 226 
Polak, Austin 244 
Polaski, Joellyn 72, 73, 141, 
244, 278, 285, 298 
Polaski, Mitchell 76, 197, 284, 

292 

Polito, Lindsey 197, 286 
Pollalis, Raymond 15, 66, 67, 
173, 244, 282, 294, 299 
Polled, Taryn 244 
Polled, Tyler 197 
Polyak, Tiffany 36,129,143, 
175, 244, 251,294, 298, 301 


314 


Pomiotlo, Daria 167, 226 
Ponce, Daniel 211 
Poortenga, Amber 226, 296 
Popiela, Jennifer 174, 244 
Popiela, Julie 174, 177, 197 
Porras, Brandon 212, 295 
Portela, Adrianna 130, 212 
Potkonjak, Sara 226 
Potts, Takoda 167,226,284, 
292 

Potucek, Madelyn 244, 296 
Poulos, Mya 197 
Poulos, Nicholas 244, 269, 299 
Poulter, Rebecca 212 
Powers, Breanna 139, 153, 

244, 297 

Powers, Madison 197, 284, 297 
Powers, Ryan 244, 297 
Pozzi, McKaya 144, 244, 258 
Prakash, Ishika 197, 300 
Pramuk, Sarah 26, 299 
Praski, Austin 244, 250 
Prather, Joshua 226, 280 
Pratl, Nathan 226 
Pratt, Hannah 77, 177, 226, 302 
Presta, Antonio 244, 288 
Presta, Nicholas 226 
Previs, Maggie 226 
Previs, Nathan 197, 284, 292 
Price, Brandon 197, 281 
Price, Justin 176, 226, 284, 298 
Price, Madeline 212, 284 
Prince, David 226 
Prince, Luke 212 
Prisby, Alayna 142, 244, 296, 
297 

Prisby, Cameron 226 
Pritchett, Thomas 197, 288 
Pritchett, Tyler 226 
Protsman, Matthew 170, 197, 
295 

Prowse, Tabitha 146,149,244, 
319 

Pruett, Adam 197 
Pruett, Derek 226 
Pruitt, Andrew 104, 212, 280 
Pryszcz, Dillon 244 
Pryszcz, Michael 244 
Puch, Nathan 63, 104, 226, 

280 

Putnam, Jeremy 49, 226 
Pyzik, Sarianne 226 

Q 

Qader, Abdul-Rahim 212 
Qader, Sarah 212 
Quadeer, Faiq 294, 299 
Quandt, Maxwell 212 
Quezada, Anahi 212 
Quijas, Jacob 212 
Quinlan, Jack 54, 76, 77, 197, 
281 

Quinn, Colleen 29, 46, 53, 67, 
76, 147, 226, 293, 298, 302 





Quiroz, Lexis 226 

R 

Rabatine, Brittany 150,151, 

158, 159, 244, 251,295, 302 
Raber, Nicole 146, 147 
Rademacher, Lauren 226, 295, 

297 

Radick, Collin 197 
Radjenovich, Samuel 244 
Radoja, Katarina 34,131,226, 

298 

Radowski, Madeleine 197 
Radtke, Kayla 226 
Radziejeski, Maxmilian 41,226 
Rae, Taylor 35, 197 
Raeck, Ryan 212 
Rafalski, Colin 38, 212 
Raguindin, Lordes 197 
Raichle, Christi 139, 142, 148, 
244, 252, 297, 298 
Rains, Whitney 197 
Rainwater, Jereme 184 
Raja, Ali 170,226,231 
Rajput, Anni 197 
Ramirez, Andres 80, 245, 262, 
294, 296, 319 
Ramirez, Angie 226, 297 
Ramirez, Joshua 212, 280 
Ramirez, Raymond 54, 197 
Ramos, Bryant 226 
Ramos, Inna 12 
Ramos, Inna Maraine 212 
Ramos, Sara 73, 212, 285, 292 
Ramos, Victoria 212 
Ramsey, Dale 288 
Rana, Naazneen 197 
Rance-Cox, Nerville 212 
Randell, Halas 212 
Randell, Kenneth 197 
Rangel, Benjamin 245 
Rangel, Gabrielle 177, 197 
Ranieri, Alyssa 212, 291 
Ransom, Amir 287 
Ransom, Ayanna 212, 297 
Ransom, Kendell 197 
Ransom, Khiyah 226 
Rapin, Gabrielle 184 
Raptis, Helena 245 
Rasmussen, Eric 165, 226 
Ratliff, Antonio 226 
Rattray-Elizondo, Hunter 212, 
280 

Ratulowski, Justin 212 

Rauch, Anastasia 146, 147, 148, 

152, 153, 175, 297, 298 

Ray, Gage 84,85,226,287 

Ray, Jasmin 212 

Ray, Nolan 197 

Raymond, Alyssa 197 

Rea, Anthony 212 

Reato, John 212 

Rechlicz, Logan 212, 288 

Rechlicz, Tanner 226 


Reddy, Sean 163 
Rediger, Gladys 55 
Reed, Alexander 77, 212, 281 
Reed, Angel 197, 296 
Reed, Asia 245 
Reed, Hannah 1,3,5,10,58, 
60, 63, 135, 180, 245, 302 
Reed, Jaicie 204, 212 
Reel, Tyler 212 
Rees, Maxwell 51,56, 57, 80, 
143, 245, 296,313 
Regalado, Xiomara 197 
Regalado, Xochitl 226, 297 
Reichart, Alexis 226 
Reifinger, Isabella 197 
Reising, Mamie 159, 212 
Reising, Ruby 212 
Reitz, Nicole 197 
Rembert, Raquel 37, 45, 149, 
150, 226, 298 
Renner, Brooke 245 
Repasi, Kellie 133, 212, 297 
Res, Emily 226 
Retske, Zachary 245 
Rettig, Melissa 185 
Revoir, Daniel 245 
Rey, Emily 67, 165, 226, 302 
Reyes, Adam 197, 287 
Reyes, Jasmine 197, 285, 292, 
296 

Reyes, Matthew 226 
Reyes, Reanna 226, 291 
Reynolds, Cole 48, 49, 136, 
226, 284 

Reynolds, Haley 197, 295, 296 
Rhein, Kyle 245 
Rhody, Jeff 29,112,113,184, 
284, 292 

Rhomberg, Courtney 197, 283 
Rhone, Lucas 212 
Rhyne, Trinity 31, 197 
Richards, Ashley 245, 301 
Richards, Autumn 212 
Richards, Dallas 226 
Richardson, Gunnar 15, 212 
Richardson, Kylie 245 
Richardson, Terry 184 
Ridder, Michael 226 
Ridder, Mitchell 197 
Riese, Austin 197, 297 
Rietveld, Krysta 226, 245, 295 
Rinaldi, Dino 245 
Rinconeno, Adrian 212 
Ring, Andrew 179, 245, 299 
Ring, Brian 197, 296 
Risse, Nathan 212 
Ritchie, Emma 22, 100, 226, 
302 

Ritter, Justin 212 
Rivera, Edgar 226 
Rivera, Jessica 212, 296, 297 
Rivera, Jesus 226, 296 
Rivera, Joel 197 
Rivera, Livan 226 
Rivera, Nikolas 197, 297 
Rizzo, John 101,213, 288 


Rizzo, Michael 197, 296 
Roach, Morgan 26, 213 
Robards, Rachael 197, 283, 286 
Roberts, Amanda 97, 107, 245, 
289, 294, 298, 300, 319 
Robertson, Ayanna 213 
Robinson, David 245 
Robinson, Deamontria 297 
Robinson, Samantha 226 
Robles, Vanessa 197 
Robustelli, Joseph 197 
Rodda, Daniel 245 
Rodda, Kevin 197 
Rodell, Kaylee 21,226,298, 

300 

Rodgers, Jamie 185, 283 
Rodovich, Andrea 184 
Rodriguez, Diana 197 
Rodriguez, Eliasart 226, 296 
Rodriguez, Elizabeth 197 
Rodriguez, Melicah Beatriz 56, 
197 

Rodriguez, Migdalia 226 
Rodriguez, Tyler 226 
Rodriguez-Lara, Cuahutemoc 
197, 281 

Roethler, Brianna 226, 280 
Rogers, Jack 213, 295 
Rogers, Jessica 42,201,213 
Rogers, Lawrence 226 
Rogers, Olivia 78, 197, 283 
Rogers, Shea 226, 296 
Rohde-Humphry, Preston 197 
Rokita, Amy 184 
Rolak, Raina 245, 275 
Romer, Sioux 197 
Romero, Elizabeth 213 
Rosario, Jade 25, 213 
Rosario, Rafael 213 
Rosenwinkel, Jordan 245, 289 
Rosenwinkel, Tara 13, 197, 293 
Ross, Victoria 213 
Rossi, Nicholas 213, 286, 295, 
296 

Rossiano, Chris 74, 79 
Rossiano, Christopher 110, 111, 
282, 291 

Rouhselang, Dylan 226 
Roy, Vinayak 226, 295 
Ruberry, Casey 245 
Ruberry, Ryan 120, 197, 281, 

287, 290, 318 

Rubesha, Brianne 184, 286 
Rubick, Jacob 245 
Rubino, Gina 86, 87, 245, 264, 
286 

Rucinski, Richard 245 
Ruder, Randa 213 
Rudnick, Grace 197 
Rudnick, Taylor 156,213,300 
Ruffolo, Antonietta 226, 297 
Rugis, Haley 226 
Ruiz, Diego 198 
Ruiz, Jackie 22, 43, 176, 177, 

184 

Ruiz, Jennifer 213, 280 


Ruiz-Avila, Diego 76, 198, 280, 
281 

Rusch, Samantha 213 
Rushing, James 198 
Rusiniak, Katelyn 114, 115, 193, 
198, 292 

Russell, Elizabeth 198 
Russo, Zachary 198 
Ruthrauff, Ryan 117, 226, 290 
Ruzga, Samuel 213 
Ruzga, Tess 57, 245 
Ryan, Justin 198 
Ryan, Kailey 198 
Ryba, Ryan 141,245 
Ryder, Joseph 226 
Rydlewski, Colton 121,213, 

290 

s 

Sabatini, Morgan 245 
Sabatino, Matthew 226 
Sablich, Margaret 188, 198 
Sadural, Daniel 226 
Sahagun, Cristian 226 
Sakai, Cora 213 
Sako, Hannah 198, 297 
Sako, Jacob 198 
Salapatas, Kady 227 
Salas, Carlos 176, 245 
Salazar, Jonathon 213 
Salazar, Marcela 213 
Salazar, Michael 26, 213 
Salazar, Noah 198, 296 
Saleh, Mohammed 213 
Salgado, Cassie 227 
Salgado, Ricardo 245 
Salus, Brendan 227 
Samano, Lukas 198 
Sambor, Jason 198 
Sambor, Nikolas 130, 227 
Samels, Anna 153, 213, 297 
Samsel, Jonathan 198, 297 
Sanchez, Alberto 227 
Sanchez, Daniel 134, 245 
Sanchez, Jennifer 227, 297 
Sanchez, Lucas 245, 319 
Sanchez, Melanie 219, 227 
Sanchez, Michael 198, 288 
Sanchez, Opal 227 
Sanchez, Raul 213 
Sancya, Melissa 245 
Sanders, Brooke 198 
Sanders, Payton 121,198,290 
Sanders, Stephanie 38, 78, 79, 
227, 282 

Sandor, Jeff 116,290 
Sandoval, Austin 213 
Sanfratello, Nicholas 43, 80, 

296 

Santana, Sarah 198, 291 
Santiago, Anthony 227 
Santiago, Eric 77, 227, 280 
Sarkey, Hannah 102, 213, 286 
Sarkey, Madison 79, 198, 282 

INDEX 315 



Sarkisian, Brianna 198 
Sarkisian, Matthew 227 
Sarsfield, Ashley 213, 284 
Sarsfield, Thomas 213 
Saternus, Gillian 227 
Satkowski, Tyler 245 
Satterfield, Nicole 185 
Sauls, Kylie 213 
Sauls, Tabitha 43, 198 
Sayger, Amy 81,83, 245 
Scanlon, Alyssa 227, 230, 298 
Scanlon, Anthony 198 
Scanlon, Ashley 78, 213, 282, 
298 

Scarnavack, Isabelle 213 
Scartozzi, Brooke 74, 75, 213, 
282 

Scartozzi, Leah 245 
Scasny, Justin 198 
Schafer, Jeffery 245 
Schalk, Bailey 198, 296, 300 
Schalk, Gavin 213, 294 
Schallmo, Nicholas 213 
Schassburger, Aaron 198, 288 
Schassburger, Jared 198, 290 
Schassburger, Julia 118,119, 
227, 291 

Scheidt, Kylee 227 
Schelling, John 198 
Scherer, Abigail 245 
Scherer, Hannah 14, 150, 153, 

245, 297 

Scherzinger, Sydney 40, 118, 
141,245, 291,319 
Scheub, Sarah 245, 292 
Schilling, Lisa 184 
Schindler, Stephen 289 
Schmied, Andrew 245 
Schmitt, Harrison 198 
Schmitt, Nicholas 136, 227 
Schmock, Chelsey 32, 227, 
245,279 

Schneider, Joseph 113, 138, 

246, 268, 280, 292, 301,303, 
319 

Schneider, Troy 227,288,296 
Schnurlein, Jennifer 227 
Schnurlein, Steven 198 
Schoonmaker, Laura 102, 292 
Schreiber, Dakota 227 
Schreiber, Drake 198 
Schroeder, Madison 130, 246, 
251, 296 

Schuberth, John 198 
Schuch, Allison 213 
Schuler, Charles 54, 199 
Schuler, Collin 246 
Schultz, Cody 60, 134, 280 
Schultz, Kiera 170,231,246 
Schulz, Nicholas 246, 296 
Schulz, Ryan 246 
Schuster, Andrea 125 
Schutt, Brady 199, 296 
Schuyler, Amanda 184 
Schwader, Dylan 213, 280 


Scialabba, Jeccika 227, 299 
Scott, Aaron 35, 227 
Scott, Brandon 61,113,246, 
280 

Scott, Cara 50, 78, 213, 282 
Scott, Connor 14, 227 
Scott, Emily 213, 284 
Scott, Jeffery 137,246 
Sebahar, Abigail 213 
Sebenste, Noah 227 
Seehausen, Edwin 227 
Seehausen, Madison 213 
Segovia, Emily 13, 126, 127, 
227, 300, 301 
Seibert, Megan 297 
Seitz, Kaitlyn 80, 152, 213, 296 
Sek, Frank 227 
Seliger, Zack 199 
Sell, Skyler 31,199,284 
Sellers, Jessica 125, 135, 246 
Sellers, Keon 199, 287 
Sencaj, Ashley 213 
Serba, Brandon 227, 287 
Serratore, Megan 19, 213, 282 
Shah, Niji 20,175, 227, 298, 
299, 300, 301 

Shanks, Michael 21,213,294, 
296 

Shatat, Hanan 213 
Shatat, Mariam 227, 297 
Shatat, Naseem 16, 213 
Shathish, Sneha 199, 294, 297 
Shaw, Brandon 199 
Shaw, Logan 213 
Sheets, Kaitlin 246 
Sheikh, Zeeshan 213 
Shell, Christopher 177 
Shell, Nicholas 199,281 
Shelton, Kelly 72, 73, 115, 213, 
285,292 

Shepherd, Michael 199, 281 
Sherlund, Haylee 227, 291 
Sherman, Jeff 29, 119, 184, 
281,291 

Shibu, Shebin 199 
Shibu, Sherry 246, 298, 299 
Shields, Donovan 213 
Shipman, Spencer 227 
Shkokani.Tariq 199 
Shock, Justin 227 
Shoemake, Kylie 75, 138, 246, 
250,282 

Shoemaker, Morgan 26, 27, 
129,246 

Shuaibi, Malek 227 
Shumylo, Jacob 199 
Shupryt, Julie 15, 184 
Sidenbender, Brett 3, 16 
Sievert, Scott 246 
Sikora, Alec 199 
Sikora, Nicholas 227 
Sills, Jazmyn 246 
Sills, Nicolus 199,288 
Silman, Mariam 227, 295 
Sinchar, Michael 89, 213, 288 


Singleton, Kenneth 61,280, 

296 

Sivak, Stephanie 170, 184 
Sixtos, Emily 213 
Skertich, Marisa 199, 293 
Skievaski, Savannah 199 
Skinta, Haley 227, 296 
Sklivas, Damon 227, 280 
Skrezyna, Hayley 199, 291 
Skura, Matt 290 
Skvarek, Kristina 227, 301,303 
Slager, Elizabeth 199, 296 
Slater, Brandon 213 
Slavich, Amanda 213 
Siegers, Riley 228 
Slivka, Tommy 288, 289 
Smelser, Shane 246, 292 
Smierciak, Anthony 103, 213, 
284 

Smiley, Jazzmyne 213, 297 

Smith, Ashley 199 

Smith, Courtney 80, 246, 294, 

296, 298, 300, 301 

Smith, Darian 26, 48, 125, 177, 

179, 246, 302 

Smith, Elise 228, 289 

Smith, Holly 199 

Smith, Kendal 128, 172, 173, 

184 

Smith, Meghan 199, 283 
Smith, Norell 84, 100, 213, 287 
Smith, Olivia 103, 199, 291 
Smith, Robert 199 
Smith, Robin 228 
Smith, Sarah 247 
Smith, Skyler 84, 85, 228, 287 
Smith, Sydney 199 
Smith, Tyler 228 
Smolen, Christopher 228 
Smolen, Lauren 199, 286 
Smolinski.Todd 89, 90, 184, 
289 

Smyers, Alyssa 199, 295, 297 
Smyth, Shannon 213 
Snoreck, Cody 213 
Snyder, Jacob 213 
Sobczak,Todd 199 
Sobolewski, Audrey 213, 300 
Sobun, Samuel 247 
Solan, Lindsey 153, 247, 256, 

297 

Solanki, Dhruv 247 
Soliday, Joshua 247, 280 
Solis, Courtney 213 
Solis, Gino 228, 280 
Solis, Nicolas 247, 280 
Sommer, Logan 48, 228 
Sonner, Hannah 33, 60, 76, 89, 
95, 106, 113, 135, 241,247, 279, 
294, 295, 300, 302 
Soria, Toni 228 
Sotelo, Brooke 228 
Soucie, Danielle 247 
Souronis, Hannah 24, 53, 133, 
148, 174, 201,213, 297 


Sowinski, Sarah 247 
Spanburg, Jackson 143, 247 
Spanier, Melissa 72, 73, 115, 
247, 268, 285, 292 
Sparling, Alexander 247, 296 
Spasevski, Alexa 199 
Spata, Nina 247 
Spears, Savanna 123, 199, 
289,292 
Speer, Eric 287 
Spiegel, Chelsie 228 
Spiegel, Kaitlyn 199 
Spight, Romel 92, 93, 228, 
288, 298 

Spigolon, Stephanie 68, 69, 
228,283 

Spindler, Haley 228 
Spindler, Kimberly 213 
Spivak, Sarah 26, 123, 213, 
292 

Spizewski, Conrad 228 
Sprehe, Ashleigh 247 
Sprehe, Eliana 199 
Spriggs, Emily 199, 297 
Springman, Victoria 52,91, 
228, 289 

Sprouse, Danielle 164, 228, 
297 

Squire, Caitlyn 213 
St. Clair, Melissa 185 
St. Germain, Brett 60,61,185, 
235, 280 

St. Germain, Brittany 228 
St. Germain, Jeff 280 
St. John, Brian 70,71,247, 
284, 292 

St. John, Joseph 199, 284 
Stachelski, Jasmine 213, 284 
Stafford, Emily 28, 247 
Stancik, Joshua 228 
Stanek, Sydney 213, 289 
Stanek, Zachary 159, 213 
Stanic, Anja 32, 36, 228 
Stankovic, Stefan 228 
Staszewski, Alyssa 107, 138, 
163,228 

Stearns, Lauren 199, 283 
Stedt, Amber 16, 50, 51, 100, 
204,228, 293, 302 
Stefaniak, Elizabeth 140, 247, 
257, 319 

Stefaniak, Jacob 22, 199 
Stefano, Stephanie 247, 289 
Steliga, Dylan 213 
Stepanovic, Melanie 115, 228. 
292 

Stepney, Alyssa 69, 140, 247, 
283 

Sterne, Joshua 228 
Stevens, Joseph 213 
Stewart, Alyssa 199 
Stewart, Jacob 92, 247, 250, 
288 

Stewart, Jessica 247 
Stewart, Terry 199 





Stoces, Desiree 213, 296, 297 
Stockman, Jenna 213 
Stockman, Lauren 13, 247 
Stockton-Fresso, Brandilyn 
149, 247, 294, 298 
Stojanovic, Milan 228 
Stokes, Molly 94, 95, 199, 285 
Stovall, Erin 228 
Strayer, McKenna 199 
Streck, Rachel 214, 298 
Stroh, Christopher 199 
Strohacker, Emma 96, 228, 289 
Stroud, Dawson 56, 214, 296 
Stroud, Elnora 32, 54, 247, 278, 
297 

Strubing, Nina 127, 214 
Stuchlak, Francesca 247, 250 
Studer, Colin 60, 228, 280, 290 
Studer, Hannah 228 
Studniarz, Bryan 247 
Studzinski, Chrystian 247, 257, 
294, 295, 296 
Stulgate, Joseph 247 
Stulgate, Nicole 199 
Stutler, Emily 247 
Stutler, Kyle 199, 296 
Stutler, LeAnn 153, 247, 296, 

297 

Subuh, Sameh 214 
Sukalo, Debra 199 
Sukalo, Sarah 214 
Suleiman, Malik 101,228 
Sullivan, Makayla 94, 214, 285, 

298 

Summers, Brett 287, 290 
Suroviak, Gillian 199, 282 
Sutherland, Luke 247, 280, 288 
Sutton-Schifo, Alexxa 292 
Suvocesmakovic, Marko 13, 

214 

Swanson, Karli 214, 300 
Swanson, Nicholas 40, 120, 

199, 290 

Swarthout, McKenzi 199, 296 
Swatosh, Jessica 27, 247 
Sweeney, Brian 247 
Sweeney, Steven 76, 228, 284 
Swetlik, Jason 228 
Swetlik, Jeremy 247 
Swets, Elizabeth 247, 263 
Sykes, Charles 112, 280, 292, 
319 

Sykes, Radiant 17, 127, 214, 280 
Sytsma, Brian 228 
Szabo, Brett 214 
Szalonek, Bryan 43, 108, 122, 
184, 293 

Szatkowski, Alexa 214, 293 
Szewciw, Kathy 156, 184 
Szewczyk, Samantha 199, 296, 
298 

Szydlo, Joseph 92, 93, 214, 

280, 288 

Szymborski, Gina 199, 291 
Szymczak, Paige 45, 214 


T 

Tadros, Randy 228 
Taharwah, Mohmmad 199 
Taharwah, Naser 63, 214, 280 
Talavera, Andria 175, 228, 300 
Tallent, Louise 156, 157, 184 
Tamez, Nathaniel 199, 296 
Tancos, Ryan 199, 296 
Tano, Jacob 228 
Tao, Matthew 80, 228, 296 
Tao, Tiffany 56, 143, 173, 247, 
294,299, 319 
Tapia, Jorge 214 
Tarnowski, Christopher 167, 
231,247, 294, 296, 304 
Tartareanu, Vivianne 199 
Tatina, Lauren 214, 284, 297 
Taylor, Austin 228, 288 
Taylor, Brittany 228 
Taylor, Erin 214 
Taylor, Griffin 80, 107, 216, 229, 

296 

Taylor, Jacob 27, 247, 295 
Taylor, Joshua 101,214, 288 
Taylor, Matthew 33, 229, 288 
Taylor, Michael 214, 280 
Taylor, Nicholas 92, 247, 271, 
288 

Tazbir, Joule 72, 144, 229, 285 
Tellas, Andrew 107, 247 
Tellas, Sarah 199, 286 
Tepsic, Aleksandar 214 
Tepsic, Nikola 12,135,141, 

163, 179, 247, 280, 319 
Terrazas, Andrea 247, 296 
Terrazas, Christina 199, 282, 

297 

Terry, Kyle 199 
Testa, Drew 56, 199 
Testa, Joseph 105, 248 
Teumer, Jonathan 229 
Teumer, Meghan 79, 214, 282 
Theodore, George 51,229 
Thomas, Isabelle 214, 296 
Thomas, Rachel 17, 184 
Thomas, Samuel 229 
Thomas, Shawn 282 
Thomas, Teresa 78, 199, 285, 
292 

Thompson, Emily 214, 291 
Thompson, Kaitlyn 78, 214, 

282,297 

Thomsen, Kylie 199, 296 
Throckmartin, Eva 214 
Throckmartin, Olivia 149, 150, 
186, 199 

Tieri, Alyssa 229 
Tigges, Joseph 214 
Tilka, Nancy 165, 184 
Tiller, Michael 248, 278 
Tinberg, Tina 283 
Tinklenberg, Calyn 80, 82 


Tinner, Derell 292 
Tinsley, Kristina 108, 109, 293 
Tipman, Christina 167, 229, 297 
Tjortjis, Giannoula 14, 152, 214, 
296 

Tobias, Emily 289 

Tobias, Robin 3, 28, 182, 185 

Tobin, Kyle 199 

Tobin, Maya 23, 98, 99, 152, 

214,289, 297 

Tocci, Nicholas 157, 248 

Todd, Alyssa 86,229,286 

Todd, Ashley 186, 199, 286 

Todd, Erin 138, 141, 177, 248, 

296 

Todd, Rebecca 13, 199, 282 
Tolentino, Camille 199 
Toler, Michael 229 
Tolle, Brianna 199 
Tomasic, Conner 54, 199, 287, 
290 

Tomaszewski, Colm 199, 297 
Tomson, Brian 14, 184, 281, 

287 

Tonkovich, Jim 184 

Torres, Daniel 248 

Torres, Jesus 214 

Torres, Melissa 214 

Torres, Samantha 229, 300, 301 

Torres, Vanessa 150, 151, 174, 

199 

Toth, Jeannine 79, 80, 90, 91, 

98, 99, 108, 179, 201,229, 231, 
293, 302 

Toweson, Kaleb 129, 248 
Townsend, Micheal 214, 288 


Townsend, Shania 199 
Tracy, Noah 113, 164, 229, 292 
Tragnitz, Allison 229 
Tran, Anh 23, 34, 214 
Travis, Kendal 199, 292 
Travis, Raygen 248 
Travis, TaShara 248,298 
Trembczynski, Sara 156, 248 
Trevino, Aidan 229 
Trevino, Celeste 229 
Trichak, Emily 229 
Trichak, Jonathan 199 
Trinidad, Andrew 215 
Trinkle, Matthew 199 
Triveline, Hannah 64, 65, 141, 
248, 282 

Triveline, Luke 93, 288 
Triveline, Sarah 64, 248, 282 
Trivunovic, Milan 199 
Trosper, Jacob 200 
Trosper, Kendall 200 
Trujillo, Jorge 63, 141,280, 319 
Truver, Branden 93, 248, 288 
Trybunia, Kazimierz 248 
Tsakopoulos, Jonathan 200, 
297 

Tsakopoulos, Sandra 215 
Tsuetaki, Olivia 200 
Tucker, Ethan 200, 292 
Tucker, Madisen 103, 118, 200, 
286, 291 
Tucker, Mia 215 
Tugman, Anthony 26, 229 
Tugman, Samantha 200, 300 
Tulsiak, Steven 76, 200, 282 
Tunis, Bryan 229 


INDEX 317 
















Turnbough, Ashlee 24, 215 
Turnbough, Zachary 53, 229, 
290 

Turngren, Jared 200 
Tuttle, Richard 229, 295 
Tyler, Alexandria 229, 292 
Tyson, Versilis 229 

u 

Uddin, Albab 200,294 
Uddin, Zeeshan 215 
Ulloa.Tori 229,289 
Underwood, Rachel 14, 184 
Uram, Benjamin 111, 215, 291 
Urban, Marc 184, 286 
Urbani, Haley 41,229 
Urbani, Hannah 200, 293 
Urchell, Clairese 123, 200, 292, 
296 

Usak, Danielle 229, 296 

V 

Valdez, Sinai 294, 298, 301 
Valente, Mary 200, 289 
VanDenburgh, Andrew 248, 

280 

VanDenburgh, Samuel 200 
Vander Laan, Kaitlyn 215, 297 
Vanderlee, Bryan 12,116,141, 
162, 248, 279, 290 
VanDerNoord, Garret 200, 287 
Vandersteeg, Sydney 73, 215, 
285, 292 

VanderVelde, Hilary 229, 297 
VanderZanden, Noah 215 
VanDeursen, Jacob 215 
VanDrunen, Lauren 215 
Vanek, Allyson 96, 97, 248, 289 
Vanek, Nicole 96, 229, 289, 

298 

VanGundy, Jacob 200 
VanGundy, Rachel 229 


VanHouten, Karlie 142, 285, 
319 

VanMilligan, Andrew 200 
VanVIeet, Makayla 29, 200, 

296, 298 

VanVuren, Joseph 130, 215 
Vargas, Angel 200 
Vargas, Eric 265, 296 
Vargo, Matthew 200 
Vasic, Nemanja 215 
Vasquez, Andriana 215 
Vasquez, Marina 16,43,52,91 
139, 229, 289 
Velasco, Vivian 156, 184 
Velasquez, Rosalinda 215 
Velazquez, Jerimiah 60, 229, 
280 

Velazquez, Joshua 152, 296 
Velazquez, Nathaly 215 
Veloz, Jesse 248, 296 
Venditti, Dustin 229 
Vendl, Evan 248, 296 
Vendl, Shelby 200, 294, 297 
Venturelli, Victoria 215 
Veracco, Larry 35, 182 
Verdeyen, Nicole 115,229,292 
Verduzco, Anthony 229 
Verhoeve, Kelsie 229, 293 
Verhoeve, Ryan 200 
Vernengo, Emalie 81,82, 248 
Veronesi, Katherine 35, 215, 

297, 298 

Verpooten, Dustin 184 
Verpooten, Sarah 170, 184, 
295, 301,302 
Verraco, Larry 3 
Vervlied, Jacob 248, 319 
Vezhavendan, Surya 248, 294, 
299 

Vicente, Everardo 215, 288 
Vidaurri, Brianna 229 
Vidovic, Maja 215 
Villanueva, John 280 
Villanueva, John Michael 215 
Villarreal, Michael 215, 297 
Villarreal, Stephanie 171, 184 


Villegas, Jessica 200, 286 
Visnack, Douglas 120, 290 
Vlcek, Kyle 177,248 
Vogt, Ethan 200, 296 
Volk, Paul 42, 292 
Vos, Kollin 215, 282 
Vos, Krista 231,248 
Voss, Abigail 200 
Voss, Andrew 166, 248 
Voss, Ryan 76,200,281 
Vranic, Jelena 229 
Vranic, Milica 229 
Vrbanoff, Alexander 150, 200, 
298 

Vrbanoff, Jessica 138, 248, 294 
Vrehas, Spero 178, 215 
Vuckovic, Michaela 97, 248, 

289 

Vuckovic, Nikola 49, 229, 280, 
281 

Vuckovic, Stevan 200, 288 
Vujisic, Kayla 215, 296 
Vusak, Nicole 48, 200 

W 

Wachowski, Anna 109, 122, 
215,293 

Wachowski, Gwendolyn 229 
Waddell, Emma 248 
Waddell, Matthew 215, 296 
Wadycki, Carrie 170, 184, 295, 
301,302 

Wagenaar, Emily 248 
Wagner, Alyssa 57, 229 
Wagner, Donald 229 
Wagner, Kyle 200 
Wagner, Tyler 200,281 
Walker, Kate 215 
Walker, Samantha 103, 200, 
286 

Wallace, Alayna 148, 248, 256, 
294, 295, 298, 300, 302 
Wallace, Camryn 10, 16, 42, 

65, 75, 89, 100, 103, 106, 107, 
121, 139, 146, 175, 186, 201, 

212, 215,216, 231,299 
Waller, James 102,215 
Wallington, Gabrielle 248 
Walsh, Kathryn 248 
Walton, Brandon 45, 89, 229, 
288 

Walton, Maegan 215, 280, 297 
Ward, Kaylynn 34, 38, 135, 

156, 215 

Wardian, Chase 200, 296 
Wardian, Trey 229 
Wartman, Andi 98, 99, 134, 
248, 289 

Wascher, George 229 
Wasserman, Ashley 200 
Watkins, Alexys 215, 296 
Watkins, David 229, 295 
Watkins, Derrick 215, 280 


Wauchop, Geena 229 
Wayner, Seth 215 
Weaver, Rachel 291 
Weber, Michelle 248, 256, 319 
Weber, Seth 200 
Weber-Brokke, Emily 215 
Weinand, Justin 229 
Weir, Anna 103,200,286 
Weiss, Schyler 248 
Weissbeck, Emma 48, 229, 

292 

Weissbeck, Joshua 248 
Welch, Griffin 229 
Welcher, Nara 215 
Wells, Noah 215,290 
Wells, Ryan 111,162,248,291 
West, Brian 14, 229, 296 
West, Erin 248 
West, Hayley 200,297 
West, Kyle 40,154, 248, 278, 
296 

West, Ryan 215, 284, 292 
Westerfield, Merrick 229 
Westerman, Cameron 88, 200, 
288 

Westerman, Collin 248, 270 
Whitaker, Malik 229 
White, Ciana 215,297 
White, Jeremy 229 
White, Savannah 200, 297 
White, Tyler 229 
Whitney, Noah 120, 200, 292, 

296 

Wiater, Sabrina 229 
Widing, Cory 229 
Widlowski, Nicholas 248 
Widowfield, Jacob 215 
Wiebe, Ryan 127, 135, 174,175, 
177, 248, 294, 298, 299 
Wiechart, Jennifer 200 
Wiechart, Joseph 248 
Wiersba, Joshua 282 
Wierzal, Darrell 23, 43, 184 
Wiggins, Jake 215 
Wilkes, Alexis 215 
Wilkes, Victoria 88, 89, 120, 
152,160, 215, 302 
Wilking, Brandon 200 
Wilkins, Amy 184 
Wilkinson, Cailee 163, 215, 282 
Williams, Anthony 229, 280, 
292 

Williams, Arttenaej 215 
Williams, Etura 114, 249, 292, 
295, 298 

Williams, Jayzhonna 229 
Williams, Joshua 200, 281 
Williams, Mhejhana 215 
Williams, Samuel 314 
Williams, Trevor 216,229,296, 

297 

Willis, Anastausia 200, 293, 
296 

Willis, Cole 200,281 
Willis, Kristy 50, 200, 284 



318 







Willis, Samuel 62, 63, 141,249, 
258, 280, 319 
Willoughby, Sandra 249 
Willy, Rachel 249 
Wilschke, Jillian 17, 72, 73, 76, 
77, 97, 135, 167, 186, 209, 249, 
251, 298, 302 
Wilson, Edwin 229 
Wilson, Jamiere 89, 249, 288 
Wilson, Jarea 249, 258 
Winarski, Lauryn 158, 165, 249, 
296, 299 

Winborn, Amber 249 
Winder, Logan 200 
Wing, Karl 249 
Wing, Veronica 229 
Winiecki, Tyler 215,290 
Winker, Michael 215 
Winker, Thomas 229 
Winquist, Jaime 34, 215, 297, 
299 

Winters, Patrick 184 
Winters, Scott 280 
Wippo, Rheanne 229 
Wise, Spencer 35, 152, 229, 

297 

Wisniewski, Brianna 229 
Wisniewski, Elayne 108, 249, 
258, 293 

Wisniewski, Jake 229, 290 
Wisniewski, Jessica 229, 297 
Wisniewski, Kaylee 200 
Wisniewski, Lauren 13, 200, 


293, 297 

Witkowski, Stephanie 229 
Witry, Jacob 229 
Witt, Windy 215 
Wittenhagen, Zachariah 186, 
200, 295 

Wojciechowski, Harmony 200 
Wojcik, Anthony 249 
Wojcik, Jennifer 249, 275, 296 
Wojcik, Michael 229 
Wojcik, Ryan 45, 249, 298 
Wojton, Jessica 42, 79, 126, 
133, 137, 215, 302 
Wolfrum, Adam 200 
Wolfrum, Kenneth 160, 230, 
296 

Wolowicz, Jessica 165 
Woods, Alyssa 215 
Woodworth, Kassie 51, 137, 
244, 249, 299, 300, 319 
Wozniak, Joy 200, 296 
Wright, Alan 200, 294, 296 
Wright, Jennifer 137, 168, 215, 
289 

Wright, Sadie 200 
Wyatt, William 230,296 
Wydrinski, Luke 200 
Wydrinski, Matthew 230 

Y 

Yacono, Lauren 230, 297 


Yacoub, Esam 159, 215 
Yacoub, Khalid 230, 280 
Yaeger, Maureen 26, 42, 174, 
175, 184, 201 
Yahne, Truman 200, 287 
Yorek, Rachel 230 
York, Rhonda 184 
Young, Carrie 249 
Young, Christopher 215 
Young, Madeline 136, 168, 230 
Yugo, Colin 200, 297 

z 

Zabrecky, Jacob 215 
Zachary, Alexis 200, 286 
Zachocki, Zoe 200 
Zahorsky, Daniel 230 
Zahorsky, Hunter 200, 290 
Zaikos, Christopher 230 
Zajac, Megan 72,114,141, 

249, 274, 285, 292 
Zajac, Nathan 60, 113, 137, 

140, 249, 274, 301, 303, 319 
Zak, Jacob 15, 161,215 
Zakher, Eustina 249, 298 
Zakher, Helana 21,164,215, 
298 

Zambrano, Juan 280, 281 
Zamora, Vincent 249 
Zanza, Ana 15, 103, 215, 289 
Zapata, Caleb 200, 296 


Zapata, George 200, 292 
Zapata, Jazmyn 123, 186, 200, 
292 

Zappa, Veronica 215 
Zappa, Violett 215 
Zasada, Jacob 215 
Zatlokowicz, Adam 200 
Zatlokowicz, Cynthia 230 
Zega, Ryan 215 
Zeheralis, Chris 230 
Zeller, Breanna 12, 17, 216, 

230, 295, 298, 300, 301 
Zendzian, Amanda 249 
Zendzian, Autumn 32, 230 
Zentz, Teresa 184 
Zielinski, Christopher 230,301, 
303 

Zielinski, Sam 200 
Ziron, Sydney 215 
Zito, Anthony 215 
Zlatic, Olivia 230, 295 
Zlatic, Sarah 215 
Zlotkowski, Julia 68, 230, 283 
Zlotkowski.Tara 86,249,263, 
286 

Znavor, Katherine 51,215, 297 
Zochalski, Nina 200, 286 
Zubeck, Mia 21,249 
Zubeck, Michael 77, 215, 281, 
300 

Zubic, Daniela 115,200,292 
Zuccolo, Zachary 230 
Zummak, Candace 44,140, 249 


SENIOR AWARDS 


BEST DRESSED 

Jorge Trujillo, Lauren Markulin 

BEST HAIR 

Andres Ramirez, Reem Nammari 

BEST SMILE 

Jacob Vervlied, Jennifer Mohamed 

BEST EYES 

Timothy Giazzon, Michelle Weber 

BEST LAUGH 

James Mays, Alyssa Born 

BEST PERSONALITY 

Nathan Zajac, Megan Barenie 

best car 

Jorey Dimopoulos, Amanda Roberts 

BEST BODY 

Joseph Schneider, Jessica Nelson 

MOST STRESSED OUT 

Jaren Mercer, Jennifer Mohamed 

MOST ATHLETIC 

Charles Sykes, Jillian Doan 

MOST INTELLIGENT 

Tiffany Tao, Yousaf Abughofah 

most artistic 

Jacob Graziani, Kassie Woodworth 

most dramatic 

Matthew Burgess, Marisa Men doza 


MOST GULLIBLE 

Jacob Dulski, Sarah Banasiak 

MOST PHOTOGENIC 

Lucas Sanchez, Taylor Ellis 

BIGGEST FLIRT 

Colin Chenoweth, Aspyn Novak 

BIGGEST REBEL 

Gavin Basile, Paige Chelbana 

BIGGEST KLUTZ 

Antwan Davis, Elizabeth Stefaniak 

WORST DRIVER 

Samuel Willis, Joshua Barajas, Sarah Banasiak 

WORST CASE OF SENIORITY 

Marcus Garcia, Alisha Donovan 

ULTIMATE SUPERFAN 

Devonte Brooks, Danielle Morang 

TEACHER’S PET 

James Lafakis, Holly Blair 

COUPLE THAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN 

Nathan Zajac, KarlieVanHouten 

MOST LIKELY TO GET MARRIED 

Alexander Nisle, Sydney Scherzinger 
CLASS SNOOZER 
Justin Fox, Tabitha Prowse 
CLASS CLOWN 
Quinn Paprocki, Megan Barenie 


BIGGEST AIRHEAD 

Jacob Dulski, Sarah Banasiak 

LIFE OF THE PARTY 

Jacob Dulski, Gabrielle Gomez 

ONE-IN-A-MILLION 

James Lafakis 

MOST LIKELY TO BRIGHTEN YOUR DAY 

Emma Hupp 

MOST LIKELY TO BE PRESIDENT 

James Lafakis 

MOST LIKELY TO BE RICH AND FAMOUS 

Joseph Bannister 

MOST LIKELY TO BE LATE TO GRADUATION 

Nikola Tepsic 

MOST LIKELY TO RETURN TO LC AS A 
TEACHER 

James Lafakis 

MOST LIKELY TO KEEP IT REAL 

James Lafakis 

MOST LIKELY TO DO SOME GOOD OUT 
THERE 

James Lafakis 

MOST LIKELY TO TAKE A SELFIE DURING 
AWARDS 

Taylor Ellis 


INDEX 319 





FINISH IT OFF 

PAGE BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED 

^^ust like that, another school year passes. 

Hundreds of lectures and tests are finished for 
now, and hopefully, everyone took notes over this 
year. For the first time, we started the school year 
in the new academic wing, and everyone probably 
thought they had an idea of how the year would 
pan out. Little did they know that they were wrong. 

The football team won the DAC outright for the first 
time and played a game in the Lucas Oil Stadium. 
The boys soccer team won sectionals while the girls 
team made it to Semi-State. Habitat for Humanity 
and Book Club became two options for students 
to join. Student council held a fundraiser for Riley’s 
Hospital, and the musical was held in the LGI for the 
first time. One morning before school, the seniors 
joined for a tailgate in the faculty parking lot for their 
senior prank, and Frank Cary (12) gave an inspiring 
speech to the students. The boys’ and girls’ track 
teams each sent two relay teams to State, and state 
rings and medals were claimed. 


1. READY TO RUN Clayton Goldman (11) starts off the 4 x 400 relay at Sectionals. 
The relay team ran a 3:16.49, broke the school record and placed first at the State 
Championship this year. Photo by: Sofia Hay 


320 













































YOU CAN GO 
YOUR OWN WAY 

PAGE BY: JENNIFER MOHAMED 

^^very single moment may not be remem- 
5^bered, but at least one will stand out this 
year. The last school bell of the 2014-2015 school 
year may have rang clear, but the future can still 
remain foggy. Some will break off and go one 
way while others will go another, but in the end 
every student will go off in their own direction 
and make their own path. However, we all come 
from the same roots. Three middle schools and 
towns feed into this high school, and it connects 
us in a way that is difficult to describe. Everyone 
in this school has the opportunity to grow as an 
individual. We are every, we are some and we are 
one all at once. 


1. CLOSING TIME Logan Lambert (12) waves to his family while walking across the 
stage. The Star Plaza was filled with friends and family of the senior class. 

Photo by: Olivia Oster (10) 


CLOSING 323 










1. LET IT GO Construction workers take down the Indian Head. The 
Indian head was once on the front of the Field House. Photo by: 
Joseph Pavell 
Page by: Hannah Reed 










































































HERFF JONES 


The paper fiber used 
in this yearbook was 
responsibly sourced.