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Among the many 

STANLEY TOOLS 

for Woodworkers made by this Company are : 

“BAILEY” PLANES TRY AND MITRE SQUARES 
“BED ROCK” PLANES CARPENTER’S STEEL SQUARES 
BOXWOOD RULES BEVELS 

CARPENTER’S CHISELS 
GAUGES 
HAMMERS 
DOWELING TOOLS 
SCREW DRIVERS 
SPOKE SHAVES 
IRON AND WOOD LEVELS 
STANLEY FOUR-SQUARE HOUSEHOLD TOOLS 


“ZIG ZAG” RULES 
BIT BRACES 
BREAST DRILLS 
HAND DRILLS 
MITRE BOXES 
SAW SETS 
VISES 


For complete list of Tools 
send for Catalogues No. 34 


This organization also manufactures a full line of 
Wrought Steel Hardware, Butts and Hinges, Storm Sash 
and Screen Hardware, Box Strapping, Shelf Brackets, 
Cold Rolled Steel, Wrought Steel Specialties, etc. 

Catalogues illustrating the various lines will also 
be sent to those interested. 


STANLEY 

NEW BRITAIN, CON N..U.S.A. 

TMl STANLEY WORKS - THE STANLEY RULE «. LEVEL PLANT 
NEW YORK • CMICAOO • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES • SEATTLE 



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STANLEY 

“PISTOL GRIP” ADJUSTABLE SAW SET No. 42 



This Saw Set embodies several unique and im¬ 
portant features not heretofore seen in tools of this 
description. 

The shape of the Body and Handle enables the 
user to operate the tool with great ease and with 
the least possible exertion, and the saw is held firmly 
against the gauge while the tooth is being set. 

It can be readily adjusted by means of the 
knurled thumb screw to give a greater or less set to 
the teeth of the saw, according as the saw is to be 
used for coarse or fine work. As the anvil or part 
against which the plunger works is graduated, the 
same adjustment can be easily obtained for dupli¬ 
cate work. 

The tool is so designed that the saw teeth are 
in plain view which enables the user to quickly 
adjust the tool to the tooth to be set. 

The plunger and anvil are made of tool steel— 
hardened and tempered. All parts are carefully 

machined and are interchangeable. 

The tool is given a fine black finish. 











DIRECTIONS FOR SHARPENING A SAW 


Use No. 42 Saw Set for ordinary Cross Cut and Rip Saw 

Read the following directions and examine the illustrations carefully. If possible examine a new saw 
to see how the teeth look before going to work. 

There are several distinct operations necessary for setting and filing saws. 


JOINTING 

This operation is necessary only when the teeth 
of the saw are uneven. 


If your saw looks like this This is the way your saw* should 
it needs jointing. look after it has been jointed. 

If not uneven this operation and the one known 
as “Shaping” can be omitted. You then start in on 
“Setting”, (explained below). Place the saw in a 
clamp with the handle to the right. Lay a mill file 
lengthwise on the teeth. File lightly back and forth 
until the teeth are all even; that is, the file touches 
each tooth. 


SHAPING 


N\N\ 



When viewed from the end and 
side. This is how the teeth of 
your Cross Cut Saw should look 
when you finish filing. 





When viewed from side and end. 
This is how your Rip Saw should 
look, when you finish filing. 


A/WWWWi 


This is the way your saw should 
look after shaping. 

Necessary only after saw has been jointed. This 
is to give all teeth correct shape, that is, have all 
gullets same depth, have front and back of teeth 
proper shape. To do this place the file (a taper 
file) down in the gullet and file across the saw at 
the right angles to the blade, (file at no other angle). 
If the teeth are of different sizes, file most on the 
ones having largest flat tops, until you reach the 
center of the flat top. Then file in the next gullet 
until the flat top becomes a point. Don’t try to bevel 
the teeth at this operation. 



Absolutely necessary after “Shaping” but not 
necessary every time your saw needs slight sharp¬ 
ening. “Setting” is springing over the upper part of 
the tooth only, one to the right the other to the 
left so as to make it cut a kerf a little bit wider than 
the saw, to give it clearance .1/100 of an inch is 
enough for ordinary work. If more than the upper 
half of the tooth is sprung or set, you may crimp the 
blade or break the tooth. 


The size of the file to be used should be deter¬ 
mined by the number of points the saw has to the 
inch. 


To find the number of points to the inch, measure 
1 inch from a given tooth and count the number of 
points. There will be one more point than there are 
complete teeth. 

5 pt. Cross Cut Saw use 6<' regular taper file. 

6, 7, 8&9 “ “ .4 

10 & 11. “ “ .5 V 2 " slim 

4%. 5,5% & 6 “ “ “ “ “ 4%'' regular “ “ 


Cross Cut Saws. Place the saw in a clamp with 
the handle to the right. Flatten the top of teeth 
slightly as in jointing, for a guide. Stand to the left 
of the saw. Place the file in the gullet of the first 
tooth directly across the blade, then swing the file 
handle to the left 45 degrees. Be sure the file fits 
down in the gullet and that the file is level, don’t 
tip it. Pile on the push stroke until you cut away 
one-half of the flat top you made as a guide. You 
have now filed one-half of the tooth that is to the 
left and one-half of the tooth that is to the right at 
the same time. Skip the next gullet, and repeat the 
same operation as in the first gullet you filed. Con¬ 
tinue until you reach the handle. 

Then turn your saw around so that the handle 
is to the left. Place file down in gullet nearest you. 
This is the first gullet that hasn’t been filed. Swing 
handle of the file to the right 45 degrees and file 
until the flat part of teeth is removed. Skip the next 
gullet and repeat this operation until you reach 
handle. 


Now place the saw on a board and run a flat 
file over the side lightly once on each side. This is 
to have the set uniform and remove any burrs. 

Rip Saws are filed identically the same way ex¬ 
cept that instead of filing at 45 degrees you file 
straight across or at right angles to the blade.